Register  |   Log In  |  
Sign up to our weekly newsletter    
Search   
Empire Magazine and iPad
Follow Me on Pinterest YouTube Tumblr Viber
Empire
Trending On Empire
The Big 2015 Movie Preview
The 50 Best Films Of 2014
Review Of The Year 2014
Download Ex Machina
Before the DVD release on 8th June
Subscribe To Empire
Sign up now and save 44%
Reviews
STAR RATINGS EXPLAINED
Unmissable 5 Stars
Excellent 4 Stars
Good 3 Stars
Poor 2 Stars
Tragic 1 Star

PACKSHOT
Pokémon X And Y

GAME DETAILS
Released
18 October 2013
Format
Nintendo 3DS
Developer
Nintendo / Game Freak

LATEST GAME REVIEWS
Payday 2: Crimewave Edition
4 Star Empire Rating
Batman: Arkham Knight
5 Star Empire Rating
Yoshi's Wooly World
4 Star Empire Rating
Lego Jurassic World
3 Star Empire Rating
Heroes Of The Storm
4 Star Empire Rating



5 STAR REVIEWS
Batman: Arkham Knight
5 Star Empire Rating
Witcher III: Wild Hunt, The
5 Star Empire Rating
Bloodborne
5 Star Empire Rating
Legend Of Zelda: Majora’s Mask 3D, The
5 Star Empire Rating
Elite: Dangerous
5 Star Empire Rating

Pokémon X And Y


submit to reddit

Pokémon X And Y (2013)
Review
Pokémon is a series that Nintendo could very easily get lazy with. Bang in a few hundred new easily-merchandisable monsters, flash them past impressionable kiddies, then go to sleep on freshly made beds of cash. Some previous entries have done just that – looking at you, Ruby and Sapphire – but for X and Y, we’re very pleased to find there’s been a near-total overhaul, one bringing the series up to date for players young and old.

The most immediate improvement is visual, finally delivering the 3D treatment fans have been begging for for years. Unfortunately, only certain key locations are given the extra eyecandy, but even the more traditional top-down paths benefit from modelled characters rather than sprites. In battle, attack animations are significantly improved, now more likely to reflect what the Pokémon has actually done. This does lead to very occasional lag, but it was never game-breaking.

At its core, the gameplay remains the same, the goal being to catalogue every Pokémon in the land and train them through turn-based combat. Battles most often pit one ‘mon at a time against another, though paired and triple battles aren’t uncommon. Sky Battles force you to fight with flying critters, a newly introduced category no doubt born of awareness that every player carries one in their party simply to use the fast-travel Fly move. That in itself will be a godsend in X/Y, since the Kalos region the game is set in – based on France, with architecture and historical notes to match – is gargantuan. Surprisingly, there isn’t a vast array of brand new Pokémon to catch, with only a meagre 69 introduced.

Instead, Nintendo has focused on what’s going on under the hood, so to speak. Pokémon is a game of numbers, from overall level number and health points, to hidden values determining attack potency or evasion. A new Super Training mode, consisting of mini-games played on the 3DS’ lower touch screen, lets you improve all these base statistics, unlocking the potential to vastly alter each individual Pokémon. For instance, put the effort into raising Pikachu’s speed stat and teach it the move Electro Ball, which powers up in relation to speed, and you’ll end up with an immensely powerful electrical mouse.

Similarly, O-Powers let you temporarily boost your whole party’s stats in certain areas, though these buffs require spending energy before battles, which replenishes over time. The level of customisation that’s now available to tactically minded players is frankly staggering. Another new addition, Mega Evolution seems more spectacle though, allowing certain creatures to briefly evolve beyond their ‘final’ forms. While it brings a power spike, there’s not as much depth to the feature as there could be. Vastly improved online trading and battling systems (accessible at all times from the bottom screen, rather than having to trek to a Pokémon Center in-game) are the icing on the cake for what is easily the finest Pokémon game to date.

It may still look cute and simple but there’s a wealth of content and strategy to be found under its adorable shell.


Reviewed by Matt Kamen

Write Your Review
To write your review please login or register.


CURRENT HIGHLIGHTS
100 Greatest Movie Characters
Week 2 of your all-time favourite heroes and villains

10 Things To Look Out For At Comic-Con
Empire's look ahead to this week's big panels

Mirror Match: 10 Movies Where Your Evil Twin Attacks
A new challenger enters… and it’s YOU (but with bad facial hair)

Please Explain! With Arnold Schwarzenegger...
Plus Emilia Clarke on pranks, smiles and 'The Robot'

Bonfire Of The Vanities: When Personal Projects Go Wrong
15 hubristic horrors that went straight to movie jail

Hollywood Jackanory: Stars Reading Things Out Of Context
From Ian McKellen vs. One Direction to Hugh Jackman vs. baking innuendos

Before And After: How 10 Books Changed On Their Way To Becoming Movies
...And how their authors reacted

Subscribe to Empire magazine
Empire print magazine

Delivered to your door – with exclusive subscriber only covers each month!

Subscribe and save 44%

Subscribe to Empire iPad edition
Empire digital magazine

Exclusive and enhanced content – get instant access via your iPad or Android device

Subscribe and save 44%

Subscribe now and save up to 67%
Print, Digital & Package options available Subscribe today!
Empire's Film Studies 101 Series
Everything you ever wanted to know about filmmaking but were afraid to ask...
The Empire Digital Edition
With exclusive extras, interactive features, trailers and much more! Download now
Home  |  News  |  Blogs  |  Reviews  |  Future Films  |  Features  |  Interviews  |  Images  |  Competitions  |  Forum  |  Digital Edition  |  Podcast  |  Magazine Contact Us  |  Empire FAQ  |  Subscribe To Empire  |  Register
© Bauer Consumer Media Ltd  |  Legal Info  |  Editorial Complaints  |  Privacy Policy  |  Bauer Entertainment Network
Bauer Consumer Media Ltd (company number 01176085 and registered address 1 Lincoln Court, Lincoln Road, Peterborough, England PE1 2RF)