Wild Grass

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When married 50-something Georges (Dussollier) returns a stolen wallet to its rightful owner, the middle-aged Marguerite (Azéma), the pair find their lives quickly become entwined in ways neither expects.


Alain Resnais' 18th feature is one of his most playful and deceptive. The unconventional relationship that develops after potentially sinister bourgeois André Dussollier returns dentist Sabine Azéma’s lost wallet would be intriguing in itself. But, by playing with generic convention and the paraphernalia of screen technique, Resnais transforms it into a dazzling tribute to classical cinema that wryly, poignantly and provocatively revisits such trademark themes as time, space, memory, causality and subjective reality. The denouement is a touch bewildering, but the performances are remarkable, as is Resnais’ unceasing quest to make film an artform.

A typically poignant lifestory illuminated by strong turns from Dussollier and Azéma, Alain Resnais' latest is one to stir the brain as well as the heart.