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Love Crimes Review

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Uncompromising District Attorny Dana, is intrigued by the case against con man David, who poses as a photographer to get women to pose for him before he takes advantage of them. None of his victims are prepared to press charges, so Dana decides to lure him herself, but in doing so begins to question her own sexual desires.

★★★★★

Never have two such obvious front-runners for the Where Are They Now? file been used to such numbing effect as Sean Young and Patrick Bergin are here, with the former as an assistant district attorney who risks body and soul to entrap the latter, a particularly unsavoury sex offender, only to end up becoming as obsessed by him as the rest of his victims.

Bergin — with a performance barely discernible from his handsome-cad-terrorises-woman role in Sleeping With The Enemy — masquerades as a famous photographer and "persuades" his victims to drop considerably more than just their inhibitions for the lens. Young — driven, decidedly more chic than any real cop you're likely to meet, and sexually repressed — takes on the case but is intrigued that while Bergin's subjects come forward to press charges — and here's where it all becomes politically -very dubious — they cannot decide whether they were raped or merely seduced.

Intrigue turns to ire, however, when Bergin gets violent and Young sets off to catch him at his own game. Less cat-and-mouse than tortoise-and-snail, this lurches along from one predictable moment to the next, doubly burdened as it is by two hamfisted leads and the pseudo-documentary hand of self-styled feminist director Borden

Indeed, what may have begun as a vehicle for Lizzie Borden's continuing exploration of a woman's relationship to her own sexuality and, in particular, the crucial question of consent, has become little more than a cheap thrills caper with noticeably fewer thrills than usual.

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