Image for Immortals

King Hyperion (Rourke) seeks to free the godlike Titans and challenge the Greek gods, led by Zeus (Luke Evans). Forbidden from direct interference in human affairs, Zeus hopes that Theseus (Cavill) can save the day.


The 300 comparisons for this ultra-styled, ultra-violent Greek epic are inevitable, but this is more expansive, embracing mythology and abandoning historical fidelity in favour of flights of grotesque fancy. By some distance Tarsem’s most coherent and commercial film to date, the tale of Theseus (an impressively heroic Cavill) fighting an overwhelmingly evil force led by Rourke’s Hyperion to avoid a war in the heavens largely makes sense (unlike, say, The Cell) and the breathtaking costumes and design feel helpful rather than overwhelming (unlike, at times, The Fall). It all looks so beautiful and bizarre that odd moments will stay with you long afterwards, and while the plot feels as though it’s scissored up and patched back together in a few places, it will leave you wanting more, and optimistic about Tarsem’s Snow White.

It won’t do anything to win over those not already partial to Tarsem’s style, but it has more than enough blood, guts and glamour to satisfy – and Cavill looks like a superman.