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Peter Jackson Prop Art: The Older Movies

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Stored in a separate warehouse are props, entire sets, and even specially built creatures for the various local premieres. Most of them gather a little dust.

If you need to borrow a background horse — trotting seemingly — you can use this handy equine mould.

Photo: Louise Hatton

Chaise Longue, basin, chair, braziers, natty statue of nymph pouring water from Elrond’s palatial home. Large, knotted branch behind may come from Fangorn or Skull Island.

Photo: Louise Hatton

A large sculpture of The Gatekeeper, a demonic cherub which at one point was to guard the cemetary in The Frigheners. It was ultimately cut from the film.

Photo: Louise Hatton

Unmistakable one-of-the-nine at full size upon his aerial steed. This was actually constructed for the Wellington premiere of The Return Of The King, and positioned over the Embassy Theatre.

Photo: Louise Hatton

As produced by Peter Jackson, there are two of the township-crushing vehicles from Neill Blomkamp’s sci-fi satire. Including authentic flat tire.

Photo: Louise Hatton

The organ from Meet The Feebles' orchestra pit. It got vomited upon by Harry the Hare, but fortunately has been cleaned up since then.

Photo: Louise Hatton

As utilised for the blood drenched massacre of zombies, hence the rust.

Photo: Louise Hatton

Ornate giant sculptures carved out of volcanic rocks (well, actually polystyrene). Note: mix of ape and human physiognomy to the carvings.

Photo: Louise Hatton

Not looking his magnificent best, it has to be said. Still, as constructed for the Wellington premiere, here is a full sized Kong.

Photo: Louise Hatton

In surprisingly good nick is this fabulous rendering of the young troll dispatched to attack the Fellowship in Moria. He is, in fact, another promotional item, carved for the premiere of The Fellowship Of The Ring.

Photo: Louise Hatton

Created for the New York sequences of King Kong, these delightful Prohibition-era signs. The Embassy logo is an in-joke as Jackson part-owns Wellington’s Embassy Theatre.

Photo: Louise Hatton