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Steven Spielberg's The Lost World: Jurassic Park Viewer's Guide

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The Lost World: Jurassic Park isn’t quite as good as the original, but it’s still got plenty of wonderfully Spielbergian moments, as this screenshot-by-screenshot fact-filled viewer’s guide proves…

Steven Spielberg: Director's Collection Blu-ray box set available to order now.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

6.52 Hammond's nephew, Peter Ludlow, is played by Arliss Howard, who also appeared in another 1997 Steven Spielberg production, Amistad.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

8.29 “Thank God for site B.” The author of Jurassic Park didn’t have plans to write a sequel, despite the massive public outcry for more dino-mayhem. He was eventually persuaded to do so when Steven Spielberg himself asked for a follow-up.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

9.36 “You bred them lysine deficient. Shouldn’t they have kicked after seven days without supplemental enzymes?” “But, by God, they’re flourishing! That’s one of a thousand questions I want the team to answer.” Well, that explains that, then.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

11.31 In case you didn’t spot it, there’s that all-important amber-topped walking stick, still getting some love.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

12.00 “So you went from capitalist to naturalist in just four years…” David Attenborough, Richard’s brother, is a naturalist. Bet you didn’t know that. Oh, you did? Right you are.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

15.09 The Lost World’s screenwriter, David Koepp, chose Vince Vaughn’s character name because he liked a Warren Zevon song called ‘Roland the Headless Thompson Gunner’, which features both a Roland and a Van Owen.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

15.49 Vanessa Lee Chester plays Kelly Curtis. Coincidentally, she had a tiny part in The West Wing later on in 2006, which of course Richard Schiff starred in.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

17.05 “I got cut from the team.” Kelly’s gymnastic superpowers have now been foreshadowed. Deal with it.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

18.55 Your five deaths, close up. The name comes from a Indian myth about a brave warrior facing a different execution on each of the five islands: burning, drowning, crushing, hanging and beheading.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

19.07 This barge shot and the few that follow it are some of the few scenes – other than the opening one – that were shot in Hawaii. As you’ll see, much of the rest was done on set, on the lot, or in northern California.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

0.19 This was the first movie to use this new late-‘90s, early-‘00s Universal ident. The most recent one looks like this.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

1.03 Actually Hawaii. Sorry about that. New Zealand was considered at one point, but eventually dismissed for cost reasons.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

3.03 This young girl, Cathy Bowman, is played by Camilla Belle, who grew up to play one of the lead roles in 10,000 BC 11 years later.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

3.36 Mrs. Bowman, with her high-pitched voice and natty hat, is played by Cyndi Strittmatter, who you may have recently seen as Maurine Dunne in Gone Girl.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

3.48 Mr. Bowman, with his Financial Times down for a moment, is played by David Sachs, who you may know as sorcerer Ethan Rayne in Buffy The Vampire Slayer, or, if you’re a real Sachs fan, as the very green insectoid bad guy Roth'h'ar Sarris in Galaxy Quest.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

4.07 This may be the best yawn-based gag in the history of cinema. Take note.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

4.34 Yes, that’s a young Eli Roth – The Bear Jew himself – doing a bit of extra work as a man reading something on a subway train. Here’s Roth himself tweeting about it.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

4.56 This cheeky chappie is played by an actor called Ross Partridge, but he’s worth pointing out because his character is called “Curious Man” in the credits. Okay, maybe he’s not.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

5.34 The butler here is played by Ian Abercrombie, who’s used to playing butlers, as seen in his work on Desperate Housewives (where he plays a butler). He’s probably best known as Mr. Pitt, Elaine’s boss in Seinfeld, who is not a butler, however.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

5.54 All of Hammond’s house was shot in Mayfield Senior School in Pasadena, California, a Catholic all-girls independent school. These scenes were shot during term-time.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

6.16 Look, it’s Ariana Richards as Alexis "Lex" Murphy, Hammond's granddaughter, and Joseph Mazzello as Timothy "Tim" Murphy, Hammond's grandson! Since the Jurassic Park films, Richards has become a professional artist, while Mazzello continues to act, most notably playing Facebook co-founder Dustin Moskovitz in The Social Network.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

20.55 All of these vehicles were specially made by Mercedes-Benz for the production. No, you cannot buy the trailer yourself.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

21.17 We’re now no longer in Hawaii, but in a redwood forest close to Eureka, California. There are no redwoods in or near Costa Rica, but everyone’s hoping you don’t notice that sort of thing.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

22.02 One of the few dinosaurs not seen in the original Jurassic Park, stegosauri were specifically included in the sequel after Steven Spielberg got so many letters from fans begging him to sneak them in somehow. This is that somehow.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

22.54 Spielberg first met with Julianne Moore three years previously, not with The Lost World in mind, but just because he admired her work, first properly noticing her after seeing her in The Fugitive.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

25.00 Video cameras have come a long way, baby.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

25.33 This puppet baby steggie was called Claire, which is a fine name for a fine beast.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

26.33 You can see on the side of the gun that this is a “Lindstradt” – a fictional Swedish arms company that has its origins in the original novels. Again, you can’t buy one.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

28.06 Here, Dr. Sarah Harding explains her theory that T-Rexes are not inherently aggressive, just protective. This mimics the argument made by the film series’ resident dinosaur expert, John Horner, and goes against the argument by Horner’s paleontological rival, Robert Bakker, who says they are predators. The character of Dr. Burke, seen later in the film played by Thomas F. Duffy, is based on Robert Bakker, and genuinely looks a lot like him.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

29.06 If you ever expected the phone to work, you are a damn fool.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

33.06 The first time we meet Pete Postlethwaite’s philosopher hunter Roland Tembo. There was a scene shot where the audience was meant to meet Tembo earlier, but it was removed in favour of introducing him here on the fly. In the deleted scene, Harvey Jason’s Ajay Sidhu is seen trying to persuade Tembo to join the trip. It ends with Tembo punching someone else in the face.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

34.04 There were meant to be pteranodons in this film as part of the ending, but they were cut when the new final act was devised. This shot would have been a foreshadowing of their arrival.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

34.20 The dinos being herded and grabbed here come in four categories – give yourself an Empire point if can spot at least one of the following: Parasaurolophus, Pachycephalosaurus, Gallimimus, Triceratops.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

34.90 Here’s Dr. Burke. Take a look at this picture of his real-life counterpart, Robert Bakker, to play a game of spot the difference.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

34.51 All these lassoos are CGI too, because otherwise… otherwise it would have been impossible.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

35.26 This vehicle was known as “The Snagger” because it snags things. Mainly dinosaurs.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

36.13 The two groups were referred to as “The Hunters” and “The Gatherers”. You can guess which name goes with which group.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

38.15 Tembo’s gun here is a double-barreled rifle chambered in .600 Nitro Express made by B. Searcy & Co., of Boron, California. There were two made, and Spielberg kept one.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

40.39 This was all built on set and looks absolutely amazing.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

48.59 All of the high hide scenes were shot in studio with a blue screen background, because of the length of the dialogue required up there.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

52.06 The T-Rexes in the original film weighed 9000 lbs. In this one, they weighed nine tonnes.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

52.28 The T-Rexes were so heavy that they stayed exactly where they were initially set up on set, and the rest of the production moved around them. The same goes for George Clooney, incidentally.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

55.36 This shot was done with the magic of blue screen and Universal Studio’s parking department allowing production to use the side of their multi-story car park to dangle off a prop half of the trailer. The actual mega-trailer they had made weighed in at 12 tonnes.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

56.12 All of the cracks here magically appear with a very simple trick. The production designers broke some sheets of glass into some pretty / scary shapes, then shot them on camera, flat. With that already done, they just “animated” the reveals of the cracks from the initial centre outwards, with sound effects doing the rest.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

57.18 With days and days of artificial rain hurling down on them, so much time spent hanging from a rope and a lot of stunt work required, all three leads here confessed afterwards that they pretty much hated doing all of this. Then there’s poor Richard Schiff, who gets drenched, then dies.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

1.03.17 Spielberg called this moment the “Make a wish” shot, because he’s one sick puppy.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

1.04.13 Again, imagine the rain-fuelled misery.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

1.08.02 “That chap, I can’t remember his name…” That would be Reinhold Messner, the first man to climb Everest without oxygen, and the first man to ascend all 14 "eight-thousanders" (peaks over 8,000 metres above sea level).

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

1.10.20 This is Carter, Dieter’s (Peter Stormare) only friend. He’s played by Thomas Rosales Jr., who if you didn’t know already, is a legend in his field. As a stunt man, he’s had small speaking roles or notable injuries/deaths in the likes of RoboCop 2, The Crow, Tremors 2: Aftershocks, Universal Soldier, Predator 2, L.A. Confidential, Police Academy 2: Their First Assignment, U.S. Marshals, Deep Impact, The Running Man, The Hunter, Beverly Hills Cop III, Speed and NCIS. Respect him.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

1.12.39 Though many shots in this sequence were CGI-ed, particularly when the “compies” – as they were known, short for Compsognathuses – are moving in a flock formation, this is all Stan Winston Studio puppetry magic.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

1.17.47 Of course there had to be a callback to the ripples in the cup of water. This time, it’s bigger.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

1.18.37 At this point, no-one else is awake. Know this: T-Rexes can be stealthy too.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

1.22.00 Stan Winston and his team were petrified that the mechanical workings of the T-Rex puppets wouldn’t be able to handle the water being poured over them in the waterfall sequence. This is why this entire scene was the very last shot with the puppets, just in case they broke down disastrously (which, thankfully, they didn’t).

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

1.22.18 This is a milk snake, which is not dangerous in the slightest. It looks just like the very venomous coral snake, mind, which explains Dr. Burke’s mistake.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

1.22.29 The story goes that in-house paleontologist Jack Horner asked for the Robert Bakker substitute Dr. Burke to eaten by the T-Rex. Bakker was pleased, saying, "I told you Rex was a predator!"

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

1.22.32 This portable waterfall actually looked like a shower rail with holes in it. Some of the holes were rigged up with fake blood so that at the push of a button, there’s red on everyone.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

1.23.21 This field of tall elephant grass was grown by production guru Michael Lantieri and his team specifically for this scene, with seeds sown the year beforehand. The eight acres were required so that they could be divided into quarters, and shots could be done more than once, as after the grass was flattened, it couldn’t come back up.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

1.23.37 Spielberg called this the “Torpedo Shot” and said that if they couldn’t make it work, they would scrap the whole raptors-in-the-grass sequence. The trick was done by compositing an image of the grass flattened with an image of the grass upright, and digitally erasing one on top of the other, with CGI raptors added in later.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

1.25.31 Originally, this research centre was actually part of a much bigger village, complete with its own Denny’s – the theory being, there’s nowhere on this earth where commercialism won’t rear its ugly head – to fit in a long raptor chase finale but this was scrapped half-way through production in favour of the San Diego ending.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

1.26.10 Vince Vaughn first appeared on Spielberg’s radar after the producers of his break-out movie, Swingers, requested used of the Jaws theme and Spielberg decided to watch the film before approval.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

1.29.56 Bear in mind that to make this shot work, Goldblum had to grab a door, pull it off its hinges, then slam it into his head. With several takes required, and rehearsal on top of that, Goldblum had very bruised noggin by the end of proceedings.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

1.32.39 This is actually a male stunt double doing the super gymnastics.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

1.34.07 In case you weren’t counting, Julianne Moore’s character, Sarah Harding, has landed flat on her back four times – in a row.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

1.34.52 The very final sequence in the original script had two flapping, screeching, highly aggressive pterandons attacking the helicopter.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

1.40.06 This boat sequence was all done with miniatures.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

1.41.11 Quick question: who or what killed all the men on the boat?

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

1.42.43 “NO FRUITS, VEGETABLES OR ANIMALS BEYOND THIS POINT”. Yep, this is a joke, joke fans. You see, the T-Rex is an animal… oh, forget it.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

1.43.05 This shot, like the suburban streets later, was genuinely taken in San Diego.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

1.44.27 If you look closely, you can see that as the T-Rex walks past that basketball hoop, he makes a dribbling motion with one of his arms.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

1.45.08 This kid’s name is Benjamin, and he was played by Colton James, who has since had small roles in the likes of TV’s Supernatural and bigger ones in the likes of TV’s 7th Heaven.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

1.45.29 It’s this image, of a T-Rex drinking from a swimming pool, that Spielberg liked so much, he wanted to do the new ending.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

1.46.14 Spielberg doesn’t play by Roland Emmerich’s the-dog-never-dies rules: here, Fido gets it.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

1.46.21 Benjamin’s mum is played by Katy Boyer, who later crops up in another Spielberg production, Minority Report.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

1.46.21 This stadium is another glorious bit of miniature work from the production team, as is the tiny, tiny car.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

1.48.16 Burger King gets a big plug here on the side of this bus. With all the tie-in deals involved with the film, a lot of shops on this street had their lights turned off, or were covered up.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

1.48.21 Look, Arnold Schwarzenegger’s King Lear is on videocassette! And so is Robin Williams’ latest, Jack And The Beanstalks! Take that, Hook, and, um, Francis Ford Coppola’s Jack, you silly movies, you.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

1.48.24 And in the bottom right, there’s a poster for Tom Hanks’ new movie, Tsunami Sunrise, where he plays some sort of surfer dude.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

1.48.33 This in-your-face Godzilla riff sees one Japanese business man say in his native tongue: "I left Japan to get away from this!”

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

1.48.46 This is David Koepp, the movie’s screenwriter, about to get deaded. His character is called “Unlucky Bastard” in the credits.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

1.50.04 To maintain man-to-dino eyelines throughout the film, contraptions known on set as “Monster sticks” were used: cardboard cut-outs of the dinosaur in question’s head, on a stick, being carried about by a crewmember. There’s no doubt Julianne Moore is looking at one now.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

1.53.05 The new T-Rex puppets had the ability to pick up stuntmen and not hurt them, so there was no way the Big Bad wasn’t going to get a chomp-and-drop.

Jurassic Park: The Lost World

1.56.52 Finally, a pteranodon! Perhaps they’ll have a bigger role in Jurassic Park III…