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25 Cool Movie Crews You'd Want To Be Part Of

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Even when the world is against them, even when they look at each other and say, "We are all we've got", there are some bands of brothers (and sisters) you can still trust to make it through. However overwhelming the odds or terrifying the opposition, these movie crews, mobs and fellowships always have one another's backs. With the launch of the latest Call of Duty incarnation, Ghosts, we took a look at the very coolest, hardest and funniest squads in film history to profile what makes them tick...

Call of Duty: Ghosts is out on November 5th this year and is available on Xbox One, Xbox 360, PS4, PS3, PC and Wii U.

The Expendables

ABOUT THE CREW
Fun fact: if you measured the biceps of the entire Expendables team and laid the results end-to-end, it would reach halfway around the planet. The insanely tough crew are, onscreen, an elite band of super-competent mercenaries with specialities in martial arts, sniping, demolitions and generally opening cans of whoop-ass. In real life, they're basically every action hero of the last 30 years. Led by Stallone's Barney Ross, they go where other tough guys fear to tread and generally blow everything up when they get there. With two films down and another on its way, these elder statesmen of destruction are only getting more formidable, recruiting the passing likes of Arnold Schwarzenegger's Trench Mauser and Chuck Norris' Booker whenever anything threatens to go un-roundhouse kicked in the head. MOST VALUABLE PLAYER
Dolph Lundgren’s Gunnar Jensen, who brings some occasionally much-needed levity to proceedings as the drug-addled, alcohol-befuddled, betrayal-prone, combat-stressed and generally nuts team sniper. He gets bonus points for poking fun at himself: Lundgren’s own degree in chemical engineering is added to Jensen’s character for laughs. THEIR DEFINING MOMENT
This gunfight aboard a boat, where their victory over their opponents is so assured that leads Ross and Lee Christmas (Jason Statham) take a moment out to bicker over who shoots whom.

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The Avengers

ABOUT THE CREW
An alien god, two assassins, a super-soldier, a genius-billionaire-playboy-philanthropist and a Hulk: how could this possibly go right? And yet The Avengers somehow gelled as a team, partly thanks to the machinations of Nick Fury but largely because they belatedly realised one another's awesomeness in the face of imminent invasion. We could quite happily watch this lot sit around and bicker all day; that they also saddle up to save the Earth is just a bonus. MOST VALUABLE PLAYER
Chris Evans' Captain America, the strong and steady heart of the team. Amid egotists and maladjusts, he's the one who keeps them all focused on the bigger picture and who has enough moral authority to give orders even to Hulk. Respect. THEIR DEFINING MOMENT
It's the entire Battle of New York, a small clip of which you can see below. That's when the team finally puts their differences aside and struts their stuff. Teamwork: it's great - although Hulk may still have some learning to do on that score.

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The Seven Samurai

ABOUT THE CREW
Perhaps the original movie crew, Akira Kurosawa's Seven Samurai are certainly the most influential, spawning a horde of impostors (some of whom are also on this list) and rip-offs ever since. A disparate bunch led by Shimura's grizzled old veteran Shimada, the Seven are recruited by a gang of cowardly villagers who are under threat from a gang of vicious bandits. Despite the fact that many of the villagers hold samurai in open contempt, the samurai fight against overwhelming odds in the name of honour, that prevailing preoccupation of the Japanese during the feudal era. During the longeurs, the samurai are by turns stoic and playful, noble and impetuous (one even falls in love with a peasant girl), but when the arrows start flying, they're a truly awesome sight to behold. MOST VALUABLE PLAYER
Mifune's hot-headed Kikuchiyo, source of many of the movie's most comedic moments and - spoiler! - arguably its most heartbreaking too. THEIR DEFINING MOMENT
As with so many of these movies, the final battle, in which the stakes are high, the group suffers real losses, and yet struggles manfully on.

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The French Resistance (Top Secret!, 1984)

ABOUT THE CREW
Just when you think that Zucker-Abrahams-Zucker's fusion of Elvis movie spoof and World War II flick parody can't get any more insane, the French Resistance turn up around the halfway point. Nothing insane about that in a WWII flick - except this one takes place in East Germany, sometime after the Jimmy Carter presidency. And what a motley and hilarious crew it is that Val Kilmer's devil-hipped hero Nick Rivers encounters, from the smooth, sculpted but strangely effete leader Nigel (Villiers), to Latrine, who makes a habit of turning up sporting seemingly mortal wounds and reams of exposition, to Tagoe's magnificent Chocolate Mousse, a spot-on parody of bad-ass blaxploitation heroes long before Robert Downey Jr. and Tropic Thunder ever got in on the act. MOST VALUABLE PLAYER
Jim Carter's Deja vu, a Frenchman more clueless than Clouseau. From his opening words to Kilmer - "have we not met before?" - he's a one-man case of comedic TNT, enlivening every scene with his doltishness and penchant for surreal non-sequiturs. THEIR DEFINING MOMENT
The Nazi attack on the Resistance's headquarters at the Potato Farm, home of M. Albert Potato. Featuring, in no particular order, a chorus line dance routine, a game of noughts and crosses played with bullets, and the funniest high-five in cinema history, it's a couple of minutes of demented genius.

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Inglourious Basterds

ABOUT THE CREW
Lt. Aldo Raine (Brad Pitt) recruits eight Jewish-American soldiers to drop behind enemy lines, dressed as civilians, to kill Nazis and mutilate their bodies. His plan is to slaughter as many as possible, scalp them (one hundred per person, specifically), and leave the bodies as testament to the treatment that Nazis deserve. It's not a bad plan: it should put the willies up the occupying Germans ahead of D-Day and it has the merit of simplicity. And everyone hates Nazis, so the Basterds can be sure of popular support.
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Staff Sergeant Donny Donowitz, the "Bear Jew", who beats Nazi prisoners to death with a baseball bat in order to get them to divulge, well, the location of more Nazis for him to beat to death. But we're sure he's a delight at a peacetime dinner party. THEIR DEFINING MOMENT
While there are many great moments of the Basterds in action, their defining moment has to be the speech that explicitly sets out their mission, tactics and objective - if only for the way that Pitt pronounces the word "Nazi".

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Con Air

ABOUT THE CREW
As Band Aid, Audioslave and Automatic Baby have proved, it's not unheard of for legendary musicians to come together to form a supergroup. Well, the line-up of bad guys in Simon West's 1997 action movie is kinda like that, only with rapists and criminal masterminds and psychos instead of drummers and guitarists and Mike Mills ruining One with atonal backing vocals. Led by Malkovich's sneering, scheming Cyrus the Virus, the poster child for the criminally insane, West's have-its-cake-and-not-only-eat-it-but-shoot-the-shit-out-it-in-glorious-slo-mo movie also includes Rhames' black radical Diamond Dog, Trejo's nasty rapist Johnny 23 and Chinlund's growly Billy Bedlam. Then it lets them hijack a plane and run riot, to be thwarted only by Nic Cage's rippling abs, wispy hair extensions and ludicrous Southern accent. MOST VALUABLE PLAYER
Garland Greene, the seemingly ordinary celebrity serial killer, played by Buscemi with detached amusement. A world-class nut who gets the best lines, yet the film not only paints him in a sympathetic light, but it lets him roam free at the end. In Vegas... THEIR DEFINING MOMENT
The standoff with the cops in the desert airstrip, in which every bad man gets his moment to shine.

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The Three Amigos

ABOUT THE CREW
In what is, to date, the funniest spin on the Seven Samurai/Magnificent Seven template, three of SNL's finest alums (although, curiously, Short and Chase both only did one season on the show, and Martin has only ever hosted) came together for this gloriously daft comedy in which their three dim-witted and unemployed silent movie stars are roped in to save a Mexican village from the infamous (that's more than famous) El Guapo. Along the way, they discover what it is to be true heroes, of course, but they also have a nice line in songs, dancing, absurd one-liners and, most memorably, killing invisible swordsmen. MOST VALUABLE PLAYER
Many have tried to single out one of the Three Amigos! for praise. All have failed. The perfect trio, they complement each other perfectly and each get superb stand-out moments. We couldn't choose a favourite anymore than we could turn down a duet with the Singing Bush. THEIR DEFINING MOMENT
The My Little Buttercup routine in the Cantina, where Messrs. Nederlander, Bottoms and Day encourage the clientele to join in their jaunty little ditty, completely oblivious to the fact that the locals, for circumstances too complex to go into here, think they're hardcore killers and are, to put it mildly, bricking it.

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Kill Bill

ABOUT THE CREW
In Pulp Fiction, Mia Wallace (Uma Thurman) tells Vincent Vega (John Travolta) about a TV show pilot she once shot called Fox Force Five, about five kick-ass female secret agents. The pilot was never picked up, but Quentin Tarantino clearly didn't forget about it, because in Kill Bill he recalibrated the quintet as a quartet of all-girl assassins - oh, and Michael Madsen's Bud, despite his errant Y chromosome - each proficient in swordsmanship, small arms fire and being absolutely smoking hot (oh, and Michael Madsen's Bud). Their name? The rather apt D.i.V.A.S. Not even Girls Aloud could hold a candle to this lot. MOST VALUABLE PLAYER
Do you even have to ask? Uma Thurman's The Bride, the doyenne of destruction. You can bury her, you can shoot her, you can stab her and blast her with rock salt, but you just can't kill her. THEIR DEFINING MOMENT
Sadly, we don't really get to see the D.i.V.A.S in action as a group in Tarantino's revenge thriller, but many tales are told of their legend. The closest we come is when Fox, Hannah and Liu - oh, and Madsen - pay a visit to their former colleague, Beatrix Kiddo's wedding and come bearing gifts of the high-velocity kind.

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X-Men

ABOUT THE CREW
Well, you have to have some superheroes on the list, don't you? X-Men 2 is the better film, of course, but there's something about the purity of the team that Bryan Singer assembled for his first stab at Marvel's merry mutants. Hugh Jackman's Wolverine is our eyes and ears in this strange new world, and it's through him that the chemistry begins to flow: the sexual tension with Famke Janssen's Jean Grey, the plain prickly tension with Cyclops ("you're a dick!"), and the fatherly attitude towards Anna Paquin's Rogue. Here, the heroes actually work together as a team, rather than part two where they're scattered to the four corners, and part three where billing issues dictated that Jackman and Berry come to the fore, combining to take down Magneto and co. at the end. MOST VALUABLE PLAYER
Wolverine is the focus, of course, but we're going to plump for Paddy Stewart's kindly, benign and hyper-intelligent Professor X - a character so powerful that each X-Men film found an excuse to take him out of the action early doors. It's just a shame he never found the opportunity to shout, 'To me, my X-Men!' at any point. THEIR DEFINING MOMENT
That Statue of Liberty finale, when Jean Grey holds Wolvie in the air, while Storm whips up a wind to lift him towards Magneto, and then Cyclops zaps the mutant baddie from a distance as Wolverine slices his machine to bits. Now that's teamwork.

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The Dirty Dozen

ABOUT THE CREW
Rapists. Thieves. Murderers and murdering, raping thieves. And that's just the good guys in Robert Aldrich's dark WWII tale, the finest guys-on-a-mission flick to yet grace the silver screen (Mr. Tarantino, the bar remains high for you and your Inglourious Basterds), in which Lee Marvin - as if he wasn't hard enough on his own - assembles twelve of the dirtiest, scummiest, skuzziest bar stewards this side of Goodison Park, trains them and sets them upon a Nazi citadel for a mission so suicidal and so dangerous that normal soldiers just won't do. As ever, there are various personality types here, from Bronson's granite-hewn Wladislaw, to Savalas' nutso Maggott and Walker's gentle giant (until pushed) Posey, but Aldrich somehow manages to flesh most of them out and generate genuine emotion when the climax comes and most of them don't make it. MOST VALUABLE PLAYER
John Cassavetes' Victor Franko, an anti-authoritarian livewire (much like Cassavetes himself) who manages to stand out even in this company, and become somewhat redeemed and something of a team player. When he buys the farm while celebrating victory, it's achingly sad. THEIR DEFINING MOMENT
The war-game run-through, when the denigrated Dozen come together to beat their regular soldier rivals and rub it in the face of snippy, snooty Colonel, Robert Ryan.

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The Usual Suspects

ABOUT THE CREW
Famously born when (amongst other factors), Chris McQuarrie and Bryan Singer started conceptualizing movie posters while bored in a cinema lobby (what about one where five guys are in a line-up?), the Usual Suspects are five criminals thrown together by fate into the same holding cell (or are they?). From there, they become the perfect team (or do they?), before falling foul of a criminal mastermind called Keyser Soze (or is he?) who sends them on one last job, very dangerous (Or is it? Etc. etc.) Spacey won an Oscar for his portrayal of the crippled narrator Verbal Kint, but the rest of the ensemble, from del Toro's incoherent Fenster, a character McQuarrie admits exists only to die, to Baldwin's fiery McManus. And admit it, the way Kevin Pollak holds a gun sideways is really, really cool. MOST VALUABLE PLAYER
Byrne's beleaguered ex-cop Dean Keaton, a good man trying to live a good life, but brought down by circumstance and conspiracy. Oh, and he's a red herring so big and red that Byrne himself thought he was Keyser Soze right up until seeing the movie for the first time. THEIR DEFINING MOMENT
The iconic line-up, where the whole bunch, hardened criminals all, are forced to step forward and read the line 'hand me the keys you fucking cocksuker.' Despite the seriousness of the charges and the threat of incarceration, not one of them can keep a straight face.

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The Young Guns

ABOUT THE CREW
The Brat Pack-heavy retelling of the legend of William H. Bonny, aka Billy The Kid, and his gun-toting gang may have lacked something in the authenticity stakes (in Young Guns II, it's revealed that Estevez' Billy lives to a ripe old age, for example), but more than made up for it with sheer A-list star power, at a time when it seemed entirely possible that Messrs. Estevez, Sutherland, Phillips and Sheen (although he's very much the youngest of the guns here, and the first to die) would rule the world, and not merely end up as fixtures on TV. MOST VALUABLE PLAYER
We've got a soft spot for Sutherland's big, bearded Doc, dispenser of wisdom, lead justice and terrible poetry. THEIR DEFINING MOMENT
Billy's reaction to the death of his friend Alex during the final battle, when he comes back into the heart of danger to off the bad guy, Murphy - decisive and deadly, not to mention risky, it bears all the unshakeable confidence of a young gun who thinks he can never die.

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Red Dawn

ABOUT THE CREW
John Milius' delirious right-wing fantasy version of a WWIII in which the Russkies invade America showed a dark side to the Brat Pack. The Wolverines - a group of schoolkids who make it into the mountains while all hell is breaking loose, and who then proceed to mount a fight-back against Ivan - would eat the Breakfast Club for, well, breakfast. And lunch. And dinner as well. Marshalled superbly by Patrick Swayze's stoic, older Jed and, briefly, Powers Boothe's level-headed pilot, the Wolverines evolve from gauche kids to, especially in the guise of C. Thomas Howell's psychotic Robert, gun-toting (and rocket-launching) guerillas. We're putting it down to the restorative powers of drinking fresh deer blood. Mmm... deer blood. MOST VALUABLE PLAYER
Swayze's, a born leader who manages to restore the frightened rag-tag bunch to something approaching sanity. And he even has time to follow the last request of his imprisoned father, Harry Dean Stanton: "Avenge meeeee!" THEIR DEFINING MOMENT
They're outgunned, outmanned, and they've even been betrayed. But that doesn't stop the Wolverines from giving it a damn good go when the Russians come to town for the climactic battle.

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The Magnificent Seven

ABOUT THE CREW
The crew that brings back memories of lazy Sunday afternoons spent in front of the TV as a kid - Charlie Bronson getting cut down in a hail of gunfire while protecting kids, Robert Vaughn's gunslinger getting his nerve back just in time to regain his honour and manhood before losing his life, the heroic nick-of-time by Dexter, the one that causes most problems in pub quizzes. And that's not even counting the contribution of the two big star turns, Brynner and McQueen, as the cowboys recruited by a poor Mexican village to ward off bandits. The first, and best, Seven Samurai tribute, it imbues each member with distinct personalities and story arcs in John Sturges' masterful Western. MOST VALUABLE PLAYER
Brynner's Chris, as striking as his bald head, and as commanding as they come. You'd have to be to outrank Steve McQueen. THEIR DEFINING MOMENT
When the Seven: apart from Dexter, setting up that last-minute return - decide to go in and fight against the Mexican bandit, despite overwhelming odds.

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The Channel 4 News Team (Anchorman: The Legend Of Ron Burgandy, 2004)

ABOUT THE CREW
Has there ever been a funnier crew than the perfectly complementary, fiercely (mostly) loyal Channel 4 News Team, who bestrode the world of San Diego news in the 1970s like bespoke-suited colossi? Don't answer that - rhetorical question. A ridiculous and riotous assembly of men-children, the joy of Anchorman is that Will Ferrell was selfless enough to let the spotlight move away from his blustering Burgundy and fall on Rudd's sleazy Brian Fantana, Koechner's closeted Champ Kind and, of course, Steve Carell's Brick Tamland, each of whom get classic comedic moments. Bodes well for Anchorman 2. MOST VALUABLE PLAYER
The immensely thick, but lovable Brick Tamland, whose every barmy utterance is pure comic gold. Note how he's the only one who stays loyal to Ron during his Jerry Garcia phase. THEIR DEFINING MOMENT
The perfectly executed leap of joy when Ron suggests they go shopping for new suits. Every group of friends should be able to feel this bliss.

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The Untouchables, 1987

ABOUT THE CREW
One of the more compact units in movie crew history - in real life there were, of course, more than just four Untouchables. After all, it takes more than four guys to bring down a criminal empire. But for the purposes of their eulogy to Eliot Ness and his crimebusters, director Brian De Palma and screenwriter David Mamet narrowed the focus to just four guys. Or, if we're being brutally honest, just two: Costner's uptight, by-the-book Ness and Connery's ballsy mentor, Malone - the guy who teaches Ness everything he needs to know about catching criminals. Garcia, as crackshot George Stone, and Smith, as the doomed number-cruncher Wallace - the first Untouchable to prove a misnomer - make decent impressions, but this is the Connery/Costner Show. MOST VALUABLE PLAYER
Connery's Malone. There's no mystery why this was the role that bagged the former 007 his only Oscar. Malone is a no-nonsense, charismatic real man, who doesn't suffer fools gladly, shoots first and dispenses wisdom like a foul-mouthed Yoda. THEIR DEFINING MOMENT
The first real act of teamwork from the gang, as they mount an unannounced raid on a Chicago booze factory, their act of courage in the face of corruption earning them the Untouchable sobriquet.

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Heat, 1995

ABOUT THE CREW
Robert De Niro's no-nonsense crew reflects the personality of Heat director, Michael Mann: obsessive attention to detail, elimination of anything extraneous or distracting, whip-smart. They're sharp, on the edge, where they gotta be. From the off, when they mount their first heist in a bubble of virtual silence, De Niro, Kilmer, Sizemore and Trejo act with the efficiency and teamwork of guys who've been doing this for a long, long time - a testament to the Method research that they did for the film, which actually involved casing a joint without being detected. We're not sure if it's impressive or scary that Robert De Niro could probably rob your house and not get caught. MOST VALUABLE PLAYER
It can't be anyone other than De Niro's McCauley, the ice-cool thief who is brought down by a fatal inability to adhere to his own rules. THEIR DEFINING MOMENT
The precision-timed bank heist, in which Dennis Haysbert briefly replaces the betrayed Trejo as the getaway driver, and the resulting street-set shoot-out, still one of the finest of all time.

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Die Hard, 1988

ABOUT THE CREW
The easy route for director John McTiernan to take with Die Hard would have been to make Hans Gruber's coterie of Eurotrash thieves (not strictly terrorists, remember) a faceless, personality-free bunch of drones, just waiting to get on the wrong end of one of John McClane's bullets. But, as with his preceding movie, Predator, McTiernan infuses just enough of the crew with personalities to make us, bizarrely, invest in their fates, from the intense rage of Karl over finding out that his brother Tony has been killed, to the cockiness of computer hacker Theo (the only member to survive) and even faux security guard Eddie, able to switch off the forced bonhomie and go into cold killer mode in an instant. MOST VALUABLE PLAYER
The brooding, charismatic, perfectly coiffed and utterly magnificent Hans Gruber, the daddy of the bunch, and a criminal mastermind who, refreshingly, likes to get his hands dirty. THEIR DEFINING MOMENT
The brutal efficiency of the group's takeover of Nakatomi Plaza, sliding into the office party almost unnoticed.

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Ocean's Eleven, 2001

ABOUT THE CREW
With Messrs. Damon, Clooney and Pitt taking care of the cool, it's up to the rest of Steven Soderbergh's revamped Eleven to bring the quirk. And, from the warring Malloy brothers (Caan and Affleck, so physically dissimilar that it suggests an adoption somewhere back down the line) to the sweaty electronics expert Livingston Dell (Jemison) to the technical know-how of alleged Cockney Basher Tarr (Cheadle) and the gnarled wisdom of Carl Reiner and Elliot Gould's old hands, the quirk is brought in spades. It's hard now, three movies into the franchise, to imagine that there was a time when Soderbergh and Clooney were going all-out for A-list names, from Luke and Owen Wilson to Bill Murray and Jet Li, to fill the line-up. MOST VALUABLE PLAYER
Brad Pitt's Rusty Ryan. OK, so it's Ocean's Eleven, but Rusty is the brains behind the organization, and so impacably cool that he makes liquid nitrogen look like hot coffee. THEIR DEFINING MOMENT
Because there are very few scenes with all Eleven together at any one time, we're going for the beautiful moment where, post-heist, the gang watch the fountains erupt at the Bellagio before melting away into the night.

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Star Trek Enterprise Crew

ABOUT THE CREW
Choosing an Enterprise crew is tricky, what with the Next Generation lot of Picard, Riker, Data et al mounting a good challenge. But with JJ Abram's Trek reboot coming up, it's not hard to remember the unique chemistry that made Kirk, Spock, Bones & Co. the original and best. The Holy Trinity undoubtedly dominated both the TV show and the movies, with their pointed but affectionate banter, but there was always room to hand over the spotlight at various points to Doohan's gruff Scotty, Koenig's excitable Chekov, Nichols' grounded Uhura, and Takei's commanding Sulu. MOST VALUABLE PLAYER
Kirk - bold, charismatic, swaggering and the glue that held the Enterprise crew together. Here was a man that, you sensed, his colleagues would follow into Hell, if that's where their five-year voyage boldly took them. THEIR DEFINING MOMENT
Spock's funeral in The Wrath Of Khan. Inarguably The Shat's finest acting moment, but the grief etched on the faces of Spock's crewmates showed the esteem in which the Vulcan was held and, by extension, the closeness of the colleagues.

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The Goonies

ABOUT THE CREW
Friendship lasts forever and Goonies never say die. Perpetual talk of a Goonies sequel is always intriguing, because it would be fascinating to find out if Mikey, Mouth, Chunk, Data and friends stayed true to their maxim. But the joy of Richard Donner's film is in the interplay between the intrepid Goonies, with the earnest Mikey, cocksure Mouth, naive and bumbling Chunk and the indefatigable inventor Data (a rare example of an Asian character in a big movie, and commendably an even rarer case where his race isn't commented on at any point) blending brilliantly as they search for the treasure of unfortunately-named pirate One-Eyed Willie. Unusually for a movie like this, there's no need to contrive circumstances where the friends fall out and learn valuable life lessons - instead, Donner and Spielberg know that there's enormous fun to be had from watching kids acting like kids: fearless, foolish and funny. MOST VALUABLE PLAYER
Astin, Brolin, Feldman and Quan all remained in the film business. Only Jeff Cohen got out, but his Chunk is the heart and stomach of The Goonies, if only for the Truffle Shuffle. THEIR DEFINING MOMENT
The superb opening credits, where a car chase introduces us, one by one, to the Goonies as they each show off their particular characteristics.

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The Lord Of The Rings: The Fellowship Of The Ring, 2001

ABOUT THE CREW
Given the strength of the bond between these nine and the length of their journey, it’s easy to forget that they’re only together for a tiny fraction of the Lord Of The Rings trilogy’s running time. Perhaps that’s because even this short time is enough to show how well-matched they all are, with the cheery hobbits blunting the introspective tendencies of Aragorn and Legolas and the grumpy exterior of Boromir and Gimli, while Gandalf switches from funny to ferocious as the occasion demands. They even have a cool uniform in those Lothlorien cloaks and leaf brooches – you know that would be the perfect thing for winter. MOST VALUABLE PLAYER
So many contenders here, but we’re going to avoid the obvious and suggest Sam Gamgee, who does all the cooking on their long trek and who provides the heart of the mission. He is the one who keeps his eye firmly on the prize, which is getting Frodo safely to Mordor no matter what the odds. THEIR DEFINING MOMENT
Gandalf gives his life for the rest in the Mines of Moria, faced with the mighty Balrog, in an unforgettable scene. After one of the great defiant speeches he cracks the bridge before the Balrog, but is dragged into the pit after it. His last words, “Fly, you fools!” show that his thoughts remain with his companions, who are shattered by his loss.

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Aliens, 1986

ABOUT THE CREW
When James Cameron decided to add an 's' to Alien, he knew that he needed to pit the drooling xenomorphs against characters who were more than just cannon fodder-in-waiting. Enter, then, a squadron of space marines, equipped to deal with any situation and any threat. Well, almost. Cameron's genius, of course, was in setting up the soldiers as ultra-confident killing machines, and then sending them into battle against true killing machines, who rip half the marines apart in mere seconds, allowing Cameron to focus on the contrasting personalities of the survivors. Hicks, Hudson, the cowardly Gorman, the embattled Vasquez and, of course, honorary member Ripley all get their moments in the spotlight, but Cameron's achievement was in giving virtually every member of the ensemble something to do - a good line here, a stand-out death there - so each one of them feels fleshed out and individual. MOST VALUABLE PLAYER
Bill Paxton's Pvt. William Hudson, whose wisecracking exterior hides a scared shitless, little boy lost interior. He also gets all the best lines. THEIR DEFINING MOMENT
When the crew wakes up on the Sulaco, and instantly falls into a well-worn routine of crabby, testing banter.

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Reservoir Dogs

ABOUT THE CREW
The coolest gang of thieves in movie history only share a couple of scenes, but the first in particular - the Like A Virgin/no tipping debate in the coffee shop pre-heist, in which Quentin Tarantino gives himself the film's opening line - is utterly indelible. Dogs may have been his debut, but Tarantino was smart enough to know that he needed his crew to be instantly iconic, and so in came the black suit uniform, and the colour-coded nicknames (appropriated from The Taking Of Pelham 123). But it was the personalities of the Dogs, from Keitel's decent but tortured Mr. White, to Buscemi's motormouth Mr. Pink and Roth's laidback but duplicitous Mr. Orange, that helped most to achieve cult status, as the surviving members of the gang turn on each other like, well... wild Dogs. MOST VALUABLE PLAYER
Michael Madsen's wild card, Mr. Blonde, an unpredictable and softly-spoken psycho who's bad news from the moment he enters, sucking on a shake, until the moment he exits, chest torn to ribbons with bullets after his impromptu ear-slicing dance. THEIR DEFINING MOMENT
The title sequence, in which each member is introduced in ultra-cool slo-mo, while Little Green Bag blares out on the soundtrack.

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Predator

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As Johnny Cash drawled in his signature tune, A Boy Named Sue, "I tell ya, I've fought tougher men, but I really can't remember when..." Sentiments the Predator can surely agree with after tangling with Major Dutch Shaeffer and his gang of gorilla-sized grunts: arguably the hardest pack of bastards in movie history. But merely being hard isn't enough to secure the top spot on this list - although we are talking here about soldiers so tough they don't have time to duck, or bleed. No, they get the number one position for their charisma, their bad jokes, their handiness with big guns (Old Painless, for example, is supposed to be mounted on a helicopter!), and their sheer bloody-mindedness in the face of an alien adversary who has them outgunned, outfought and outmatched. Not to mention the skillful, slyly economical way in which each team member's characteristics - the nerdish Hawkins (Shane Black, who bagged the role as part payment from producer Joel Silver for his Lethal Weapon script), the swaggering Blaine, the intense Mac - are sketched in just a few seconds. MOST VALUABLE PLAYER
Although Arnie's Dutch dominates the group, it's Sonny Landham's Billy, the Native American tracker who intimates from the off that the group is not long for this world, who really stands out. Built like the proverbial brick shithouse, on set, Landham was such a loose cannon that the production had to hire security guards to protect his castmates. Now that's an MVP in our book. THEIR DEFINING MOMENT
The orgy of destruction as the gang decimate mother nature with their enormous arsenal. All in an impotent rage at the sudden demise of their good buddy, Blaine. Next time you watch this, never forget: real jungle, folks, being really blown to shit.

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