Connie And Carla Review

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Small-town singing duo Connie and Carla witness a murder and go on the run to LA. Deciding to pass themselves off as drag queens, they find fame and friendship in the local gay scene. But will their success help the murderer track them down?


My Big Fat Greek Wedding may have thrust writer-star Nia Vardalos into the spotlight but, after a disappointing TV spin-off series, much rests on this, her next big-screen outing. Wearing its inspirations on its sleeve, the cross-dressing comedy sees women passing themselves off as female impersonators (cf. Victor/Victoria), hiding from mobsters (cf. Some Like It Hot, Sister Act and Desperately Seeking Susan) and discovering a whole new world (cf. all of the above).

But this is so derivative it has no soul of its own. Writer Vardalos and director Lembeck appear fascinated by the duo's frequent stage performances of musical medleys (funny, but only for so long), and seem to have little time or inclination for characterisation or plot development. The cartoon baddies pose no tangible threat, and a subplot about a straight man (Duchovny – also Vardalos' love interest) coming to terms with his gay brother's lifestyle is no more than a patronising sermon.

Unlike My Big Fat Greek Wedding, this manhandles its set-pieces, gradually draining them of humour with undisciplined editing and poor delivery. And while Collette amuses as a pouty, goggle-eyed would-be drag-queen, Vardalos' performance is as mediocre as her script.

A good-natured but self-indulgent camp comedy lacking in originality, character and comic timing. My Big Fat Greek Wedding is looking increasingly like a fluke.