Register  |   Log In  |  
Sign up to our weekly newsletter    
Follow us on   
Search   
Forum Home Register for Free! Log In Moderator Tickets FAQ Users Online

Your Favouritest Books: Reloaded

 
Logged in as: Guest
  Printable Version
All Forums >> [On Another Note...] >> Bookworms >> Your Favouritest Books: Reloaded Page: [1] 2 3 4 5   next >   >>
Login
Message << Older Topic   Newer Topic >>
Your Favouritest Books: Reloaded - 16/10/2005 10:40:09 AM   
Krazy_Beyootiful

 

Posts: 2877
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Around Lil and Cray's ankles
Does exactly what it says on the tin. This a list, orginally compiled by Sayes, of the favourite books of forum members. I don't know about anyone else but this has provided me with much much reading material and it's an excellent list. This is the most up-to-date list at the moment and any new suggestions will be added as they come in.

(I never heard from Sayes as to whether she is going to join the new forum and so far she hasn't, at least, not under her old name, so as it's been at least three weeks I'm going to post what I copied from the old place because too much effort went into it for it to be wasted. Sayes, if you do come back or are out there under a new name I'm sorry if you wanted to re-start this thread - we can always negotiate with the moderators and delete this version if you do )
 

Your Favouritest Books

 24 by William Diehl  - Diehl is better know for 'Sharkey's Machine', which I loved in print and on screen with Burt Reynolds. This is far superior fare, detailing a US agent in WW2 called Keegan and his enemy, a Nazi just known as '24'. A great novel with some heartbreaking scenes.

48 by James Herbert - Phill

1984 by George Orwell. It's always going to be incredibly relevant, unfortunately – DrNick.

2001 series – Borstal

Adventures in Capitalism by Toby Litt- great worldview. - Ruby Soho.

All Creatures Great and Small series by James Herriot. Love them - they are some wonderful stories. I attempt to read them once a year. If you love animals or just a good book - start with that one. (There are 4 in the series)- Pluto.

Love All the People: Letters, Lyrics, Routines by Bill Hicks. It's not a novel, but I'd highly recommend it. He won't appeal to all, but I promise he'll make you think. - potus.

American Psycho by Brett Easton Ellis (Mental) – Maharg.

Anaximander and the Architects: The Contributions of Egyptian and Greek Architectural Technologies to the Origins of Greek Philosophy by Robert Hahn. Winner of the shortest book title of the year award – Lulu Karma

Angela's Ashes by Frank McCourt - I picked this book up when I was round at my mum's one night to read the first page.....I didn't put it down until I finished – Octopussy. - The most important book I've ever read, as I realised how lucky I am in the childhood I had, and also learnt about the roots of my family (my Nan lived in the same county at around the same times as Frank McCourt, but fortunately in much better conditions) – Mark Cassius. – dark crystal

Angels and Demons by Dan Brown – Tommy - Amelie_Scotland

Animal Farm by George Orwell - One of the greatest political allegorys ever written and it is just the right length and soooooooooooo readable, im probably on my fourth time right now........ - Dim of the Droogies. – also, King Ralph.

Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy - I get so absorbed and into books anyway, but this took it one stage further for me. Just so stunning in every way you enter a whole new world when you read Anna Karenina and like it even after you've read the book. Absolutely astonishing experience. - Satine

Are You Dave Gorman by Dave Gorman and Danny Wallace – Probably the funniest book I've ever read – Tarbie. - Practically Perfect

Are You Experienced by William Sutcliffe - Very easy to read and a great funny story about backpacking round India. The end sucks a bit, but the getting there is great fun. - Pedros

Armadillo by William Boyd – darkcloud.

Around the world in 80 Days by Jules Verne – Squall Katsuragi.

Art of War, The by Sun Tzu. Essential reading for any armchair strategist or PC games fan, as well. Check it out- some of what he has to say is pretty obvious, but some of it is quite enlightening. - ColtM1991A1

A Scanner Darkly by Phillip K Dick - Phill

Assassin Trilogy, The, and the sequel The Fool Trilogy by Robin Hobb. Brilliant, I didn't know I liked fantasy but she's amazing. Oh, and there's even a wolf. – Shadow Wolf.

Axemakers Gift, The by James Burke – gods mulligan

Beach, The by Alex Garland. Ending is superb compared to the disapointment of the film.
Maharg. Second that on book vs film – Sayes.

Beloved by Toni Morrison - All about slavery and its repercussions for people and generations. The writing really is remarkable - a bit tricky to follow but DEFINITELY worth bearing with - horror and beauty combined. fantastic. – The Wicker Woman.

Berlin Noir by Phillip Kerr - Phill

Bible, The by some liar (greatest work of fictionn ever) – Don Genco. The Bible - God Himself and his messengers on Earth. I cant beleive that noone has said it already you are all heethens. – Sean Hannity. I said it already you dumb hick! – Don Genco. At least we can spell 'heathen'. – Vertigo Woo Yay.

Big Boy Did It and Ran Away, A by Christopher Brookmyre Scottish. American-style thriller. Very good. - Kingol

Big Sleep, The bu Raymond Chandler. Raymond Chandler's first and finest. Hardboiled with heart, witty, gritty and sublime. Although the plot goes astray at times, his sheer style carries it through. Read it, read it, read it! (And then watch the fine movie.)  - Marlowe

Birdsong by Sebastion Faulks – gods mulligan.

Black Dahlia, The by James Ellroy - Scatterbrain

Black Tulip, The  by Alexandre Dumas.  This is a short book and very cinematic.  It has a very bloody opening so that you're a put right there in the action at the beginning. - Black Tulip

Black Hawk Down by Mark Bowden (a story of modern war) – Ti

Black Wind by F.Paul Wilson - A book that spans the pre-world war 2 years and covers the friendship of an American and an american-Japanese boy. Both from San Francisco. It is based in reality but has vaguely supernatural overtomes (The Black wind is used by a sect called the kurakata kao (sic?..long time since I read it) who are a sect who are hell-bent on bringing the 'black wind' to destroy the Americans...how they achieve this Black Wind is both nauseating and apparently real...F.Paul Wilson states the kurakata kao actually exists). A fantastic sprawling novel that Wilson thinks is his beat and is hard to find. – Dirty Bear

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley - Damo 26. An example of fiction working at the level of George Orwell's 1984 and just as stunning a piece of social/political fiction. As scary and relevant today as it ever was. - Gretchen.

Bravo Two Zero by Andy McNab - ColtM1991A1.

Bridge, The by Iain Banks. Almost all his books are good, but these are exceptional. – DrNick.

Bridge Across Forever by Richard Bach – Lulu Karma.

Brighton Rock by Graeme Greene - captain kangaroo.

Brokeback Mountain by Annie Proulx – Amelie_Scotland

Brothers Karamazov, The by Fyodor Dostoyevsky - jasiri

Candide by Voltaire. Just fucking funny and so astute – sandyboy.

Catch 22 by Joseph Heller - captain kangaroo. - Genius. A work of art. – ilovebeerme. A damning indictment of military madness and stupidity that certainly rings true in our current social climate. – King Ralph. I can't see this one ever losing its position at the top of my list – Sharkboy. I love the story of how, a couple of decades after the book was first published, Joseph Heller response to a critic who informed him that he'd never written anything since as good as Catch-22 was 'Neither has anyone else!' – Mark Cassius. I love that the first line is 'It was love at first sight', and that that has nothing to do with anything. Extremely funny and simultaneously frustrating, John Yossarian has to be one of the greatest Anti-Heroes in modern literature. - doubleshiny

Catcher in the rye by JD Salinger - Ok, so i dont carry a copy of it with me everywhere; possibly a good thing, I don't know... but I love it... it just engrosses you from start to finish and makes me laugh and cry constantly and I like books that do that - Practically Perfect. - perfectly captures the sensation of being just on the cusp of your adult life, and you know it could truly go either way, and you could become either your wildest dreams or your worst fears. - Ruby Soho. - captain kangaroo. Even though I didn't read it till I was well into my 20s, I've never read anything which best sums up the frustrations of being young and unable or unwilling to conform to socities norms - feelings I still stongly have in my 30s. Plus it's brilliantly written..and no I am not a C.I.A 'Sleeper' Hitman - Fredo.


Cause of Death by Patricia Cornwell – David.

Caves of Steel, The by Isaac Asimov, Looks at human behaviour and forms of society in the future. IMO very thought provoking and both books really capture the imagination. - Vander

Choke by Chuck Palahnuik - Deadly_Little_Miho

Chronicles of Thomas Covernant (fantasy), by Stephen Donaldson. This IMO is the best fantasy book ever read, and thats coming from a Tokein fan. The story involves a man from our world and our time, Thomas Covenant, who has Leprosy, and its about his fight against his disease and the way poeple treat him as well as his strange journeys to another reality land which he can't decide if it is a hllucination of his illness causing him to go mad or really real. It involves a lot of pyschology and is much more complicated than Tolkeins works, but as a fantasy story its also full of great interesting races and original ideas. - hey blondie. Oh they are brilliant, so big, dense and involving. Utterly cliche-free as well. And, really, Tolkein is to this, what...well, Harry Potter is to Tolkein. It's very, very well done. It's partly my attraction to stories with no pat ending, but it's more than that, the sense of dislocation is bang on. And one of the best anti-heroes you'll ever read. However: if you don't like books where you can't happily and comfortably identify with the main character you'll probably hate it. really pissed off that he's writing another set of them though, I just can't believe for a second that they'll stand up to the first two trilogies. But then again I was amazed that the second trilogy was actually better than the first one. Oh and these books have a wizard called Kevin in. Does that not sell it in itself? ps I read the first couple of Gap books as they came out, but they didn't really grip me at all. And his Mordant's Need books are awful, I quit about 100 pages in. - Dr Nick.

Clan of The Cave Bear, The by Jean M Auel. You just get caught up in the story of Ayla as she grows up in an alien world that is so close to home. You actually begin to believe that it was really like that way back when. I love the other books in the series but have to admit that sometimes all the little things that Ayla invents sometimes get on my nerves but they're still fantastic and I also would loved to have ridden on the back of Baby the cave lion. - Machine.

Clear & Present Danger by Tom Clancy – David.

Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell - the book is actually six seperate stories each written in a different prose. It basically reads like an anthology of stories. However each story is interconnected with the previous and the next story and the overall theme. Brilliantly concieved and briliantly executed. This is one book I'll definately be picking up again. Highly recommended. - HIM

Communist Manifesto by k. marx and f.engels - probably the best piece of writing depicting the ills of the world post-industrialisation - cassie

Complicity by Iain Banks - basically pretty much any Iain (M) Banks book could go on the list, but tonight I prefer this one! – sharkboy. Phill.

CONCLAVE OF SHADOWS by Raymond E. Feist. I'm re-reading Lord of the Rings at the moment, but one of my favourite writers only got mentioned once although he wrote several series. I've got all his books and if you like Tolkien you will most definitely like Feist. Here's a list of his books so far. - SheELF

Confessions of a Justified Sinner by James Hogg. Brilliant, scary, and basically unbelievable that it was written 200 years ago - it reads like it was written yesterday. Short, too – DrNick.

Consider Phleabas by Ian M. Banks (A joy as are all Ian Banks Sci- Fi) - Maharg

Constant Gardner, The by Le Carrι – darkcloud

Cornelius Quartet, The by Michael Moorcock

Count of Monte Cristo (my classic pick) by Dumas - gods mulligan. - fluffy bunny.

Crow Road, The by Iain Banks. Almost all his books are good, but these are exceptional. – DrNick.

Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson. Not quite SF, not quite mainstream, but an immensely entertaining story weaving together present-time struggles to create a "data haven" in the Philippines with a WW2 plot about code crackers. Astonishing. - Crippa

Curse by Adam Cleveland. This book is self-published and by a friend of mine. I love it. It is one of the most clever takes on fantasy that I have seen. I was highly impressed - trinity33

Dancers at the End of Time, The by Micheal Moorcock

Danse Macabre by Stephen King. Basically the history of horror in writing, on film and TV, which is idiosyncratic and also authoratative. His lists of recommended books and films alone are worth the cover price. - doubleshiny

David Attenboroughs autobiography . I was in a lecture yesterday and I asked a German girl sitting next to me if she thought the lecturer looked like David Attenborough to which she replied "is that the hairy Glasgow comedian?" !!! So it seems that the person who IMO has done more for humanity in the last centuary than any inventor or other scientist is little known outside of Britain, but im sure you all know who he is. His autobriography is amazing, following his crazy journeys around the world and telling of times when he got in really tricky situations (like meeting head hunters in the Congo and beeing warned away with skulls on stakes) and also tells you about how he climbed the ladder in the BBC and how he managed to get nature programs to be taken seriously and be loved by the Briish public. Its pretty sad towards the end though. An amazing read about an amazing man, I definately urge you to read it. - Hey Blondie.

David Copperfield by Charles Dickens - Phill

Da Vinci Code, The by Dan Brown. Very enjoyable and highly recommended. – deadman - Tommy

Day of the Triffids by John Wyndham. - hozay - He is a fantastic writer and this a beautifully crafted book based on a simple, but brilliant, idea - King_Wah

Deception Point by Dan Brown. Very enjoyable and highly recommended.  - deadman

The Depford Mice Trilogy by Robin Jarvis -haen't read these since I was a kid but they were fantastic - film_gonzo

Domain by James Herbert. The best of the rats series. – Maharg.

Don Quioxote - The Man of Lamancha by Cervantes - once you get past the forst few chapters it becomes so damned good. and having Don Quioxte in your head is about the best gift you could ever be given - he makes life seem wonderous

Diamond Age, The by Neal Stephenson. Fantastical, epic, kinda weird – DrNick.

Discourse on Inequality by Jean-Jacques Rousseau – Don Genco

Discovery of Heaven, The by Harry Mulisch. The source material is tricky, but man, what a book.- Circe

Disgrace by JM Coetzee. Quite possibly the most depressing book in the world. - Circe

Diving Bell And The Butterfly, The by Jean-Dominique Bauby. I was first attracted to it by the sublime blue/silver foil cover, then flipped to the reviews on the back, and simply had to give it a go. And it truly lives up to the amazing reviews, a book of such poignant beauty, such aching purity, that it almost makes me cry here and now, for all it stands for. I read it again a few months ago, as a strange solace on public transport, and it's still incredibly powerful to me. You wouldn't believe it if it weren't true, and you're at least partially wasting your life without it. Please seek it out. I promise it'll be worth it! – blue phoenix. – Ditto. Check out Empire Book Club for this - first book off the rank. Sayes.

Downsize This by Michael Moore, especially the "Why doesn't GM sell crack?" essay. - Ruby Soho.

Dr Strangelove - confirms my worst fears about the universe. - Ruby Soho

Dracula - a classic. I just love the way it's written a truly original angle – Beese

Dune by Frank Herbert - a love it or hate it really. I love it. – DrNick. – Scatterbrain.

Earth Abides by George R Stewart - Premise is a man returns from hunting trip to find that virtually all of mankind has been killed by a virus. He meets up with a group of survivors and they try to rebuild but cannot maintain their previous way of life and they eventually become hunter gatherers. It is difficult to explain but is just a beautifully written well thought out piece of work. Cannot recommend it highly enough. - King_Wah

East of Eden by John Steinbeck – dark crystal

Eaters of the Dead by Michael Crichton. - ColtM1991A1.

Empire of the Sun by JG Ballard. Written from a (much younger)childs point of view (compared with Catcher). This is fascinating to me personaly as if I'd been born a couple of generations earlier I could well have gone through similar experiences. A lot of my family was intered by the Japenses during the war (albeit in Singapore not Shanghai as in the novel) and I just found that added extra resonance to the whole thing for me - Fredo.

Ender's Game by O S Card. - fluffy bunny. This has to be one of my all time favourite books. It really draws you in. - Omen666

Enduring Love by Ian McEwan – Pele.

Espedair Street by Iain Banks - Phill

Eucalyptus by Murray Bail – Pele.

Everything is Illuminated by Jonathan Safran Foer. Another incredible debut, this time from a teenage writer whose prose is so far ahead of his years it's scary. – sharkboy.

Excession by Iain M Banks is truly brilliant sci-fi. - Kingol

Eyre Affair, The by Jasper Forde is very funny, especially the crowd participation Richard III. (check out the website Jasperfforde.com , I've got a SpecOps 27 t-shirt) - Kingol. I really cant recommend either of these highly enough... they're the kind of books you cant read when with other people as you splutter embarrassingly and the tears start running down your cheeks – Practically Perfect

Fall, The by Albert Camus - Damo 26

Fallen Dragon by Peter F. Hamilton (sci fi).
I think this is his best book yet, and if you like the rest of his works you'll really love this. Set in space its about an 'asset realisation force' from Earth (little better than pirates) who invade a world in order to pillage it and bring back their assets to earth for their corperation. But the resistance on the world is much more than they expect, and the main character jurnes to uncover what gives this isolated world such power. A really great sci-fi read.

Far from the madding crowd by Thomas Hardy (just as the title says) - Ti

Father's Affair (De Passievrucht) by Karel (Glastra) van Loon. A perfect blend of literature and detective novel, not to mention the fact that it's one of the most compelling books ever written. - Circe

Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas by Hunter S. Thompson - roary rover

Fine Balance, A by Rohinton Mistry - Awesome book with great characters, though it is a bit depressing especially the end. But it's definitely up there with the best. - Pedros

Flicker by Theodore Roszak - Hugely entertaining and very paranoid story about a Californian film student who accidentaly discovers the secret (and quite sinister) history of movies. Straddles the fiction/non-fiction divide beautifully. Conspiracies! Heretics! Albinos! Dwarves! Intellectual sex! B-movies! What more can you wish for? (Has anyone else read this at all? No-one I know has even heard about it.) – Crippa Hey, I've read this. Like you say it's pretty good. Rather unsettling though, very odd book. - Up with People.

Folk of the Faraway Tree, The by Enid Blyton. Together with Phantom Tollbooth - little pieces of magic from my childhood that I still check in on from time to time. - Jules35.

Forever War, The by Haldeman - fluffy bunny

Foucaults Pendulum by Umberto Eco (see also the Name of the Rose) – gods mulligan

Fountainhead, The by Ayn Rand (I don't necessarily believe her philosophy but this book is awesome) – gods mulligan

Frankenstein by Mary Shelley. - aimless.

Freaky Deaky by Elmore Leonard - Phill

From Hell by Alan Moore - Phill

Future of and Illusion by Sigmund Freud. – gods mulligan.

Gateway by Pohl - fluffy bunny

Generation X bu Douglas Couplamd - Deadly_Little_Miho

Get in the Van by Henry Rollins. Forget The Dirt, this is a real powerful rock story. - Ruby Soho

Ghostwritten by David Mitchell - I only recently came across this guy, but this is an astonishing debut, interweaving 10 tales from across the world. – sharkboy.

Girl of the Limberlost by Gene Stratton Porter - one of the saddest yet most uplifting books I have ever read telling of a girls tumultuous relationship with her mother whose resentment for her father colours her feeling for her daughter enormously – Practically Perfect.

God of Small Things, The by Arundhati Roy. The prose is lyrical and unique. Something to be savoured if you're in the right mood. Roy's (who is female by the way) 'voice' shines through. It's so distinctive and beautiful that if you were read a line out of context you may just guess the work.

Godel, Escher, Bach by Douglas Hofsteader [sp] was a pretty important book for me, changed my thinking on a lot of stuff. – Brother5

Godfather, The – Borstal. Rosco P Coltrane

Good and Evil by Nietzsche – gods mulligan

Good Morning Midnight by Jean Rhys. Incredibly sad, kind of a precursor 'down and out' story, but worth it. – DrNick.

Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman – Squall Katsuragi. Truly excellent (Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman is also worth a look) - Kingol

Goodbye to Berlin by Christopher Isherwood. Fucking Amazing. Captures the sense of thirties Berlin as a lost city in a way a Barely know how to describe. - Up with People. It is brilliant isn't it. Definitely one of my favourites ever. – Practically Perfect.

Goodnight Mister Tom by Michelle Magorian. Technically a kids book, but still makes me cry every time i read it. Also second Beloved by Toni Morrison, amazing book. - ezza

Gormenghast by Mervyn Peake - Silent Bob 17

Grapes of Wrath, The by Steinbeck. The book is an undisputed masterpiece, and never more relevant then in this day and age.

Gray's Anatomy – it's beautiful. - Ruby Soho

Great Expectations. Fucking cracking book. - Twinkle. Phill.

Great Gatsby, The by F. Scott Fitzgerald. Quite possibly the great American novel. I adore it. Both utterly of it's time and eternally relevant, The last few lines.....Go and read them right now. – Up with People. – aimless.

Great Train Robbery, The by Michael Crichton - ColtM1991A1 

Gulliver's Travels by Jonathon Swift is satire at it's most brutal and effective. A lot of people think of it as a childrens tale when it's actually one of the most disturbing books I've read. Still funny but that last book written when he was going mad.....Brrrr. Harsh stuff . – Up with People.

Handful of Dust by Evelyn Waugh - everyone else I know hates this but I love it... did it for my GCSE text last year and it reintroduced me to waugh who I had previously discarded after a failed attempt to read brideshead... which I recently retried and loved.... but anyways... the book is so funny and yet so tragic at the same time... I reread it every couple of months i love it so much...- Practically Perfect.

Have a nice day by Mick Foley. – Squall Katsuragi.

Ham on Rye by Charles Bukowski - if you haven't yet discovered Bukowski, drop whatever you're doing and get your hands on this or any book by (IMO) the greatest American poet and writer of the 20th century. A great place to start, Ham on Rye is a semi-autobiographical account of his youth, told through his alter-ego Henry Chinaski. Very funny, very moving and very very good. – sharkboy.

Hard Times by Charles Dickens - Damo 26

Harry Potter (all and especially 3&4) by JK Rowling – darkcloud.

Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad. People make a big fuss about this for a reason. And it takes less time to read than Apocalypse Now takes to watch – DrNick.

Heavier Than Heaven by Charles R. Cross. One of the few biographies I've ever read, Charles R. Cross manages tell the story of Kurt Cobain's life from his childhood to his suicide with such intimacy that you feel as if you were watching over him. – Mark Cassius.

Hero of a Thousand Faces by Joseph Campbell. The book with Bill Moyers is really good too but the name eludes me at the moment – gods mulligan

High Fidelity by Nick Hornby. Is a fantastic read that rings true for obsessive list-making musos like myself – King Ralph. - Silent Bob 17

Hiram Key, The by Knight and Lomas (all about Rosslyn Chapel for you Scots) - gods mulligan

His Dark Materials by Philip Pullman. My all-time favourite ever ever ever book- I love simply everything about this book. Its written so that you can imagine every scene perfectly inside your head, without ever getting bogged down in superfluous detail. The sad buts tear at your heart and the triumphs make you laugh aloud for joy. - Ruby Soho. – darkcloud. This ain't no kids' story. The very biggest themes written about brilliantly. And I defy you not to be gutted that it's finished at the end – DrNick. - They are just superb reading from start to finish. They raise a lot of questions, but never seem to take sides or try to make you think one way or another. Calling it a children's book is an insult, but I'm sure glad children are reading it. – Dirty Bear

Hitchhickers Guide to the Galaxy, The by Douglas Adams - captain kangaroo. lovely, funny books that never fail to cheer me up and have a wonderful, warm wit and imagination – TweetyPie.

Hobbit, The by Tolkien – darkcloud.

Hornblower by C S Forester (the whole series).  Everything you ever wanted to know about the Napoleonic navy in quaint 50s style writing involving the kind of rip-roaring adventure (and romance) you can't beat. - Black Tulip

Hound of the Baskervilles, The by Arthur Conan Doyle - Angus the Haggis

Hours, The by Micheal Cunningham. Very moving story, told in such a short space of time, and completely based on 'Mrs Dalloway' but hey it's still good - Strider's Gal. - Satine.

I Am Legend by Richard Matheson - tbird

I Know This Much is True by Wally Lamb. Ok - so it is a big chunky holiday type of novel and it can seem a little off putting as it is an Oprah Winfrey book club book, but once you start it you will most likely fly through its 800 page odd length. It is a tale of twins, one of whom is schizophrenic while the other is a simple 'working' man who is just trying to maintain a life while his brother steadily goes increasingly mad, and deal with his memories of a confused childhood. Then the brother makes a bold and shocking anti gulf war protest and both their lives are thrown into dissaray. both heart breaking and heart warming, fascinating and so full of character you wonder how the hell an author can make someone so vividly and so believably out of paper and words. - Sandyboy.

From start to finish - just a great read - and though some have called the ending a little too Hollywood - fuck it, i loved it.

If Chins Could Kill by Bruce Campbell – Squall Katsuragi

I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou - It gives an account from the other side of the tracks to To Kill A Mockingbird.. What it is like to grow up poor and black in the American South. - King_Wah

Imajica by Clive Barker – David. - weird, wonderful, fucked up genius – DrNick.

Infinity Welcomes Careful Drivers by Grant Naylor - First Red Dwarf book and the only one I've ever finished and then started reading again without even putting down. It's no Oscar Wilde but it's damn funny – ilovebeerme.

Inferno, The by Dante (in Italian). – Don Genco.

Inishowen by Joseph O'Connor. An amazing book, I've tried to make everybody I know read it. Very sad, very funny, and very Irish! – Shadow Wolf.

Into Thin Air by Jon Krakauer - A first hand account of the events on Everest in May 96 that led to tragedy. Gripping and at times heartbreaking.- Jules35

Invisibles, The by Grant Morrison and various – Squall Katsuragi. - reading this is the most fun i've ever had on a train. - Ruby Soho

Invisible Monsters by Chuck Palahnuik - roary rover

Ishmael by Daniel Quinn (and 'the story of B' - these books are must reads. I believe that in order to be a member of the human race everyone should read these books. This man has a truly awesome insight into human history, myth and why we are finding ourselves in the terrible situation we are presently in) – gods mulligan

IT by Stephen King – must a fa Er. Huge Stephen King fan and this has to be my favourite (shame about the film!) - Hobbitonlass

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte - Damo 26

Jaws by Peter Benchley - Damo 26

Jesus the Man by Barbara Thiering (very interesting theory regarding the life of Jesus). – gods mulligan.

Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrel by Susanna Clarke - jstarbuck

Jonathan Livingston Seagull by Richard Bach – Lulu Karma.

Jude The Obscure by Thomas Hardy. Hardy is a master of the human condition, he understands the underlying principles of life and portrays them vividly so that we all can learn important lessons from reading his work. - Gretchen.

Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton. Written before they habitually turned his novels into movies (and the plots suffered accordingly), they're thought-provoking, great reads, and well worth checking out if you like well-researched thrillers. – ColtM1991A1.

Kafka by the Shore by Haruki Murakami. It's not as good as his Wind up Bird Chronicles (hard one to beat really)
but it's still a great read.An Urban fantasy involving a runaway teenage boy, a man who can talk to cats,ghosts from WWII,fish falling from the sky,a strange library and a mystical forest.One critic wrote "Altered my mind and played havoc with my life". - hozay

Killshot by Elmore Leonard - Phill

Kinflicks by Lisa Alther - Ginny Babcock's adventures growing into womanhood intercut with the present where she is going to see her mother in hospital. Whenever she reaches a new stage she does it with full and determined attention, whether it be cheerleader, college student, peace activist, lesbian or married woman. It's hilarious throughtout but is incredibly powerful and moving in parts that Ginny's coming to terms with her mother's approaching death. - livila

Kisscut by Karin Slughter - I love everything Miss Slaughter writes, but this is what got me into it. Very dark and haunting.
- Circe

K-Pax trilogy, The by Gene Brewer. Cheers me up again afterwards. - Ruby Soho

Kremlin Device, The by Chris Ryan - ColtM1991A1

LA Confidential by Ellroy - fluffy bunny

La Dame Aux Camelias by Dumas fils.  An old-fashioned but emotional doomed romance. - Black Tulip.

Lady Chatterley's Lover by D.H. Lawrence - Angus The Haggis

LadyKiller by Martina Cole – David.

Lanark by Alisdair Gray. This is not only the finest Scottish novel of the 20th century (strong words there I'll have you know), but one of the finest novels of the last fifty years anywhere. Perfect. – DrNick.

Le Grand Meaulnes by Alain Fournier (who sadly died in WW1). This was his only novel, but there are other poems and unfinished prose pieces. I'll refrain from giving away the plot, but suffice to say it is the most beautifully written piece I have ever read. I've read it about 6 - 7 times and I can't wait to read it again! – Guess Who? - Deadpool.

Legend by David Gemmell - Another great fantasy book only this one is more action based, great action and the main characters are no safe like some in other authors works (david Eddings for example) – James2183

Legion by William Peter Blatty - Phill

Les Jeux Sont Fait by Jean-Paul Sartre – Don Genco

Les Miserables - Victor Hugo 
This is one of the most moving and affecting books I have ever read. To say it changed my life is melodramatic but to say it changed a lot of my way of thinking is no understatement. It tells the story of Jean Valjean, a good man driven to theivery by his circumstances and forever tormented by what he became. It is bascially a study of the parisian underclasses and it contains some of the most beautiful writing I've ever read (It is better in french but if you read the right translation then the English version is still beautiful) - Krazy Beyootiful.

L'Etranger by Albert Camus. Memories of French A level and impressing my pals with my knowledge of absurdist theory and (more importantly) the origin of Cure songs! – sharkboy.

Life of Pi by Yann Martel - heartbreaking and life-fulfilling. - i007_Bond_007i

Lila by Robert Pirsig. Lila is like one of my bibles – gods mulligan

Lion of Macedon by David Gemmell - fluffy bunny

Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe - again takes me back to my childhood and some great memories, can't wait to see the film. I have always loved reading from a very young age so have a lot of favourites but these are some that stick in my mind. - Hobbitonlass – dark crystal

Little Prince, The by Antoine de Saint-Exupιry to the list. I'm surprised nobody's mentioned it before(correct me if I'm wrong!), it has to me my favoritestestestestestest book ever! It's just so beautiful. Everyone should read this. Not even a hundred pages, and you will never look at the night sky the same way you did before. - amelie

Little White Horse, The by Elizabeth Goudge - kids book, but I love it – Practically Perfect

Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov. Nabakov's use of the english language makes my soul palpitate and my heart ache. Not only is his work very intelligent, he writes the most poetic prose I have ever read in my life, astonishingly beautiful. And it wasn't even written in his first language. - Twinkle. The language is amazing; sensual, poetic and full of texture. Ignore anyone who tells you that this is a book about paedophilia. It's a sensitive portrayal of a man weighed down by his obsession with Lolita and an intelligent representation of their time together. - Gretchen

Lord of the Flies by William Gerald Golding - superb, frightening and compelling and so so well written (aside from the fuck up with piggys glasses) - sandyboy.

Lord of the Rings - JRR Tolkien (all the middle earth books) - Maharg – These were by far the most often listed, surprise surprise, so haven't listed all the comments. Suffice to say, they were effusive.

Lover, The - Marguerite Duras. I went through a Duras phase as a teenager (after my Jack London phase, wolves again!), I would recommend L'amant (The lover) but also Un barrage contre le pacifique (don't know the English title). Fantastic style, I want to write like her. - Shadow Wolf. I second 'The Lover', it was one of my favourites as a teenager. – Sayes.

Magician by Raymond E Feist - IMO the great fantasy book in the genre. beats Lord of the rings hands down, better characters, more vast, awesome story – James2183. - Scatterbrain.

Magus, The by John Fowle - I'm astounded that isn't in this list – it is now. This is without a shadow of a doubt my favourite book ever, beating its closest rivals by a substantial margin. Surely someone else must agree? - Rikkie oh I thought it was on the list? We've definitely had big threads about it, great book. – Dr Nick.

Maltese Falcon by Hammett - fluffy bunny

Master and Marguerita, The by Mikhail Bulgakov is a hell of a book. The devil appears in communist Moscow. And that is barely half of it. Perhaps the greatest thing to emerge from Russian communism. Darkly comic and profundly moving . – Up with People.

Masters of Rome series by Colleen McCullogh. A massive work spanning several decades of the Roman Republic ending just before it classifies itself as an Empire, taking in Marius, Pompey and Julius Caesar himself. Although the writing style may put of some people and it is quite hard to keep track of all the names (Romans had a very strange system of names and everyone sounhds like each other, especially if they are of the same family branch!) it is an amazing work, thoroughly researched and utterly captivating. - Beckmonster

Matilda by Roald Dahl. Dahl and forever will be, my favourite writer. He gave me a love for books all children should have (thank J.K. Rowling for making sure it still happens today), and I was at pain to pick only one. But this was my favourite, the story of a young girl who is so strong and brave in spite of all the adversities placed upon her by the 'always right' adults in her life. – Mark Cassius.

Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner, The by James Hogg. Dark and mysterious, but a fascinating read - being Scottish, even more eye-opening into our history and tradition – Octopussy.

Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden - Angus the Haggis

Men at Arms by Terry Pratchet (Any Gaurds book - Hilarious) - Maharg

Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides - This is an amazing book, telling the story of Calliope Stephanides and her transformation into Cal, the person she became. This novel is all at once intimately detailed and sprawlingly epic - and throughout the prose is elegantly and beautifully written. It's been a long time since I've fallen in love with a book so instantaneously, but I could hardly avoid it when reading such a wonderful book. - Krazy_Beyootiful

Moonstone, The by Wilkie Collins – Pele.

Moth Diaries, The by Rachel Klein. - its a great gothic tale about adolescence,lust and obsession with a vampire twist
very odd and im planning on buying the film rights when im old enough to be a director!! - Amelie_Scotland


Mother London by Micheal Moorcock

Mountains of Madness, The by HP Lovecraft – Squall Katsuragi

Mr Nice by Howard Marks - An outstanding read. I'm sure I've gone into detail about this in a previous post but generally it's about a Welsh guy who goes to Balliol Uni and becomes a Dope dealer to the studes. He then eventually becomes the DEA's most wanted man (for making monkeys of them). Both Funny and moving. – kaotic.

Murder Rooms by David Pirie (there are currently three in this series).  You can read these on a rainy sunday, and the day will slip by in an exciting torrent of murder mysterys, each with the kind of conclusion you will never guess.  They are Sherlock Holmes with a more immediate feel. - Black Tulip

My Sister's Keeper by Jodi Picoult.  If you only read one of her books (which I would recommend doing as they get repetitive) read this one - it's a complex look at a difficult subject and if you don't cry while reading this then you're not human! - Crayon

Naked Sun, The by Isaac Asimov. Sequel to Caves...Looks at human behaviour and forms of society in the future. IMO very thought provoking and both books really capture the imagination. - Vander

Necroscope, The (Series) by Brian Lumley - Maharg

Nightwatch by Terry Pratchett - Sarxos

Northern Lights by Phillip Pullman - Silent Bob 17.

Norweign Wood by Haruki Murakami - This book is truly a treasure found. I only came across it by accident whilst wandering round Waterstones one afternoon and was hooked from the first beautfully written page. Set in 1960's Japan and named after the Beatles song it is an absorbing, poetic beautifully written tale of first love. I will not give much of the story away but you must read it and get lost in its beauty. - vernieboy

Notes From A Small Island by Bill Bryson. A book I can read over and over and never get bored of. So much more enjoyable than the majority of gushing travelogs. - doubleshiny

Now It Is Time To Say Goodbye. (author) The story of a gay couple who leave new york after 500 people they know / have met / have loved die of AIDS and move to a small town called Gallatea / Galatia. once there they are drawn slowly into the towns past and its ravenously racist nature - a fantastic story told from roughly 40 first person points of view. shocking, hypnotic, surreal and beautiful. Such a perfect book. – sandyboy.

Number9dream by David Mitchell - captain kangaroo

Nymphomation by Jeff Noon. Great fun, clever too – DrNick.

Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck - It is one of the best books of all time, in my opinion. It is one of the most tragic stories I have read. Actually, I have a copy. I just might need to give it another reading. – Lulu Karma. One of my best mates is such a Lenny. Pats you on the back affectionately and you need chiropractor sessions. - ilovebeerme. – Disco Stu. The first paragraph of each chapter is a perfect study in characterisation – Sayes.

Odyssey, The by Homer. 'Troy' was damn good but this... is the mutts nutz! It's got everything you could ask for from a film. Adventure, cunning, romance, naked men, blood & gore, honking great big monsters! - Beckymonster

Old Kingdom Trilogy by Garth nix (Sabriel, Lirael, Abhorsen) [Sabriel already in List] Brilliant fantasy series, I always had the feeling I was reading some kind of mythology. Its absolutely gorgeously written, right down to the character and place names - Lirael, Ancelstierre... There's a real magic to the books and the writing is mature enough to make it more than just another fantasy series for kids. The only problem is that the series is now complete! - Darkcloud. - On a complete whim I bought Lirael at Kings Cross station and by the time I reached newcastle i was nearly finished it. I also chuckeled when I remembered Darkcloud's title! I then read Abhorsen quickly and now Im reading Sabriel, so I've kind of gone at the series a bit cocked, but only because I had never heard of the series so I didnt know it was one! Indeed, I can remember getting to about 40 pages from the end of lirael and wondering if it was going to have the worst endiong ever as there was so much still to bring together. A wonderful series, with vivid characters drawn everywhere. I loved Mogget, and I thought the Sam character was woven beautifully. Whatever did happen to Chlorr of the Mask though, I fear she may return to haunt Lirael Goldenhand..... Hope so anyway!!!! - Kid A. I've (literally) just finished reading the trilogy after it was recommended to me by Kidders here. (Fortunately since I had forewarning I was able to start with Sabriel.) Anyway I was thoroughly enchanted by it, and truly it is not the sort of book I would normally go for. Anyway as I said I have literally just finished it; I reached the end of Abhorsen about 5 minutes ago and I never expected it, but the ending was kinda.... emotional. It just tied everything up beautifully. I too wonder what's happened to Chlorr, and god I would love to see this series extended! And Mogget was just absolutely brilliant - "that's only the fourth most stupid plan I've heard from an Abhorsen". - JV I think The Creature in the Case is a short story set in the Old Kingdom, rather an extension of the trilogy as such. even so I'll be getting my hands on it asap. I even went as far as to get the 3rd book in his Keys to the Kingdom series (Drowned Wednesday) from Australia since it was released there about 6 months before it will come out here. The Old Kingdom series has rightfully taken its place among my very favourite fantasy books. Its hard to put your finger on, there's just an incredible magic about the books. - Darkcloud.

On The Road by Jack Kerouac - captain kangaroo.  Wow. This book is immense. - damn i'm good!

One by Richard Bach – Lulu Karma

One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey. Packs an even greater punch than the film (one of my favourites) Incredibly funny but heartbreaking at the same time. Beautifully crafted characters and multiple themes that will leave you musing on it for weeks. - Gretchen.

One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcνa Mαrquez - Started to read it twice and gave up after about fifty pages. Third time it sucked me in and I just plowed right through it. Haven't re-read it since so the story is a bit foggy in my mind, but it stands as one of my great reading experiences ever. Latin-american magical realism. - Crippa

Only Forward by Micheal Marshell Smith (Great vision of the future.) - Maharg

Outsider, The by Camus – aimless

Papillon by Henri Charriere. Regardless of whether you regard this as an embellished autobiography or well-written work of fiction, it's still engrossing and a great tale of adventure – ColtM1991A1

Paradoxes by Sainsbury (not the food shop) is a mind-bending book with the kind of weird philosophical problems that'll impress your friends while driving you mad - Black Tulip

Passage to India by E.M. Forster. Simply beautiful with vivid imagery and massive symbolic meanings everywhere. - Circe

Pastoral Symphony, The by Andre Gide about a preacher who falls for a young blind girl in his charge and in non fiction - Damo 26

Perdido Street Station by China Mielville - novadash

Perfume by Patrick Suskind. One of the most original books I've ever read, this one immerses the reader in the smells of revolutionary France. – sharkboy.

Phantom Tollbooth, The by Norton Juster - Jules35. See Folk of the Faraway Tree.

Philosphers Stone, The by Colin Wilson. Any of Colin Wilsons books are excellent especially his research and investigation of the occult and paranormal. – gods mulligan

Picture of Dorian Grey, The by Oscar Wilde - Angus the Haggis

Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett - gods mulligan
One River - Wade Davis (or Serpent of the Rainbow which is also excellent) – gods mulligan

Plague, The by Albert Camus - jasiri

Plato's Republic (in Greek) by some bloke – Don Genco.

Player of Games by Ian M Banks - fluffy bunny

Poor Things by Alasdair Gray. Funny and sad at the same time / I like it better than Frankenstein. - Circe

Popcorn by Ben Elton. As funny a satire on media violence and media itself as you'll ever find. Hard not to think about Natural Born Killers while you read it... - Crippa

Portrait of the Artist, A as a Young Man by James Joyce. Favourite book, describes the life of Joyce as a youngster, and its power is incredible. From the religious terrorising, the visions of hell, and his final liberation. In fact, every sentence is expertly written. Read the first 300 pages of Ulysses, Undoubtedly it's brilliant, but hasn't caught me in the same way.- The Necromancer. – aimless. - novadash

Postman, The by David Brin. Post Apocalyptic story telling at it's best, with a lot of messages and depth to it that we'd do well to take heed of – ColtM1991A1

Post Office by Bukowski - novadash

Power Of One, The by Bryce Courtenay. A story about love, loss and friendship, The Power of One follows a young boy called Peekay from infancy to manhood and charters his struggles with racial prejudice and his fiery ambition to becoming welterweight champion of the world. The above blurb really doesn't do the book justice, but just trust me when I say that it is an incredibly moving tale with characters that you can't fail to become attached to. - Shawlord

Prayer For Owen Meany, A by John Irving - Just wonderful. I blubbed at the end - Tarbie. It's my absolute favourite book in the whole wide world – Clara Loft. – I loved it too – Sayes. My favourite book from my favourite author. The only piece of fiction to every make me cry. - Jules35.

Preacher series, The by Garth Ennis and Steve Dillon – Squall Katsuragi

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen - first read this when I was about 7 and loved it... then the tv series came along and well..... *swoon*...... me, shallow, never...- Practically Perfect

Prince, by Nicco Machiavelli. I find to be most engaging when I'm in a particularly devious mood – ColtM1991A1 

Princess Bride, The by William Goldman - a fantastic, timeless fairytale - film_gonzo

The Prisoner of Azkabahn by JK Rowling. Loved the Dementors - Maharg

Pure Dynamite by Tommy Billington. As any other pro wrestling fans on this forum will attest, there have been a plethora of books on the industry entering the market over the past few years, but this is by far the best of them. Tommy Billington, a/k/a The Dynamite Kid, wrestled in the U.K., Japan and for the WWF where he was probably one of the top ten stars of the promotion when it reached it's peak (he wrestled in one of the top matches in front of 93 000 fans at WrestleMania III). Later in life he became penniless and paralysed. His story of glory, pain and drugs is told in graphic detail. A 'Raging Bull' style biopic is SCREAMING to be made, and it would be a perfect role for (off the top of my head) Russell Crowe. – Mark Cassius
 
The Queen of the Damned by Anne Rice  I've read the first three of the Vampire Chronicles and for some reason that is my favourite. I'm sure many people don't read Anne Rice for the reasons I used to avoid her books, I asumed they would be the typical gothic horror - ok but not fantastic. I discovered that Anne Rice is a wonderful writer she really pulls you into this world of Vampires. It is very difficult not to become attached to the characters. Anyway I recommend this book as I couldn't put it down. I can't recommend any of the later ones as I have yet to read them, but I've seen many mixed reviews, some good, some bad. - Emiwee

Quincunx, The by Charles Palliser – Scatterbrain.

Railway Man, The by Eric Lomax, a prisoner of war, forced to work on the Burma-Siam railway in 1943. He endured brutal torture by the Japanese but survived and fifty years later he met one of his torturers again - the meeting is so heartbreaking, emotional and uplifting, it's the only book to have had me in floods of tears. It's about forgivness and reconciliation (hey, another concept which isn't a bad idea at the moment) - Vertigo Woo Yay.

Reasons To Live  by Amy Hempel - Deadly_Little_Miho

Remains Of The Day by Kazuo Ishiguro: The best, most understated, beautiful love story I have ever read. Another treatise on past, memory and regret, as with all Ishiguro, but this one is filled with lost love and romance, and is deeply, deeply sad in almost every way. The only book I can think of that actually makes me cry. - bionic pigeon

Return Of The Native, The by Thomas Hardy. - Damo 26.

Rising Sun by Michael Crichton - ColtM1991A1

Runaway Chapati, The by Gill Budgell is brilliant, providing you are 3-5 years old. – Big Jim Slade.

Running from Safety by Richard Bach – Lulu Karma

Sabriel by Garth Nix. Excellent; 'children's' fantasy (1st in trilogy) - Kingol

Sandman, The by Neil Gaiman and various artists. Yes, it's a comic book, but it's one of the finest stories told in any format. Life, dreams, reality, Death (the cutest goth you're ever going to meet!) cats, books, everything else in between but above all it's about stories. Gaiman is a superb writer and the artists always are excellent. Just bloody wonderful both when I first read it and now upon re-reading it a couple of years later! - Beckymonster

Savages by Joe Kane - gods mulligan

Screwtape Letters, The by C.S.Lewis. - Damo 26.

Secret diary of Adrian Mole aged 13 and 3 quarters, The by Sue Townsend - Silent Bob 17. Adrian Mole - Sue Townsend is also a classic – James2183.

Sentimental Journey by Laurence Sterne. It made me giggle. So shoot me. - Circe

Shadowlands by Gordon Stephens is a great book, and how could no one mention winnie the pooh!!! - Gaia

Sharpe Series by Bernard Cornwell - Winkelmesser

She by H Rider Haggard – Squall Katsuragi

Shipping News, The by E. Annie Proulx - really nice read, and interesting style. Really enjoyed this book and reading it over again - much better than the film! - Strider's Gal.

Shogun by James Clavell - Awesome tellings of Japanese history and how different cultures can be – ilovebeerme

Sign and the Seal by Graham Hancock (all of his stuff is interesting) – gods mulligan

Silmarillian by JRR Tolkein – David.

Sin City by Frank Miller: The best, most adult graphic novels ever written. The stand out for me is Family Values - damn i'm good!

Single & Single by Le Carrι – darkcloud.

Skallagrigg by William Horwood . Ignore the awful BBC adaptation, and give it a go. It's a very hard book to describe as normally when people hear the subject matter, they mentally turn off. The story follows two main characters: Arthur and Esther. Arthur's story starts in the 1920's when he is committed to an asylum - he has severe cerebral palsy. In the asylum, he provides hope for the other inmates with his stories of a mystical being - The Skallagrigg - who protects those whom society has rejected. In the 80's Esther, a brilliant young girl whose potential has been ignored - even by her own father - because she too has cerebral palsy, begins to hear the stories about "The Skallagrigg" and determines to find out their source...This book totally changed the way I looked at C.P. sufferers, and although the subject matter sounds dreary it's a truly wonderful book. I have recommended it to many people - online and IRL - and those that bothered to read it all loved it. It's also one of the few books I have read that physically moved me to tears. - Le Marchand.

Slaughter House Five by Kurt Vonnegut – Lulu Karma

Smoking in Bed Conversations with Bruce Robinson - Phill

Songlines, The by Bruce Chatwin - a completely beautiful book which ends up being about a unified, world consciousness and culture (not a bad idea at the moment...) - Vertigo Woo Yay

Songs My Mother Taught Me by Marlon Brando - Winkelmesser

Sound and The Fury, The by William Faulkner - I'd never have read it if I didn't have to, but I'm so glad I put in the effort. Very few books require as much of the reader, but it rewards it all. Unlike Ulysses – DrNick.

Snow Falling on Cedars by David Gutterson - FAR better than the film – Octopussy. Way better than film, I agree – Sayes.

Sophie's World by Jostein Gaarder. It's marketed as a teenagers book but there are plenty big words in there that I couldn't fathom. Its metafiction about a teenage girl and this bloke who gives her lessons in philosophy. Covers most of the major philosophers from the year dot, right up to the present and also includes a bit of science, religion and psychiatry. Perfectly pitched explanations of various philosophical theories using everything from metaphor to actual demonstration that are as simplistic as they can be whilst rarely patronising. Its good to use as a bluffers guide as well. Read this and convince people you're clever.It can be read as a story as well as an introduction to philosophy and its got interesting characters, bit of a dull plot but thats part of the point and a twist that beats anything conjured up in Spike Jonze or M Night Shamylan films. - PrivateJoker


Space Vampires by Colin Wilson. Any of Colin Wilsons books are excellent especially his research and investigation of the occult and paranormal. – gods mulligan

Spares - Michale Marshall Smith: One of the best Sci Fi novels of recent times. Intelligent, funny, horrific and thrilling. - damn i'm good!

Sparrow, The by Mary Doria Russell is far, far better than any book about Jesuits in space has a right to be. Fascinating but quite nasty towards the end. – Up with People.

Spieglein das Kaetzchen - a book about how your mind can get you through anything, as told by a small grey kitten. - Ruby Soho

Stand On Zanzibar by John Brunner. During my university years I read this god knows how many times, it just blew me away. – Brother5.

Stand, The by Stephen King. I've always wondered what a post apocalyptic world would be like. I just love the story of The Stand. - Rocky Balboa, tbird, roary rover

Stars My Destination, The by Alfred Bester - A tale of vengeance in the 24th century and one of the best SF novels I've read. – Crippa - fluffy bunny.

Starships Troopers by Robert A. Heinlein. Because its take on the Value of Human life and the way it slices open the faults of our democracy and lays them bare for all to see. – Hacksign. I like this book, too. Heinlein was a great story teller – Deadpool.

Story of B, The by Daniel Quinn. These books are must reads. I believe that in order to be a member of the human race everyone should read these books. This man has a truly awesome insight into human history, myth and why we are finding ourselves in the terrible situation we are presently in. – gods mulligan

Stranger in a Strange Land by Robert A. Heinlein - fluffy bunny

Sunne in Splendour, The by Sharon Penman. Its a great book, as are all her books. Really captures the atmosphere of the times and presents a very different (and very believable) version of Richard III  - Izzardesque2

Survivor  by Chuck Palahnuik - Phill

Tai Pan by James Clavell - Awesome tellings of Japanese history and how different cultures can be – ilovebeerme

Talisman, The – by Stephen King and Peter Straub - Hard to get into, but very rewarding. It's a fantasy based book that loosely ties in with King's 'Tower' series. People who label King just a horror hack don't know what they are talking about – Dirty Bear

The Moons a Balloon by David Niven - Winkelmesser

Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe - jasiri

Think by Simon Blackburn.  A simple but engaging introduction to philosophy.  It's hard work if you aren't used to philosophical texts but it is so rewarding.  You'll be questioning your own existence as well as Descartes in no time. - Black Tulip

Third Policeman, The by Flann O'Brien. Possibly the funniest book ever written – Obsidian.

This House Is Haunted: An Invetsigation of The Enfield Poltergeist by Guy Lyon Playfair, which is really very scary. - Damo 26

Three Hearts and Three Lions - Poul Anderson – Squall Katsuragi

Three Musketeers, The by Alexandre Dumas because it is more fun and shorter than Monte Cristo, but told with equal skill.  Honestly, you just can't put it down. - Black Tulip

Time Machine, The by H G Wells.  This is a wonderful little fable for the hubristic actions of mankind, not to mention being a neat little introduction to simple philosophical topics. - Black Tulip

Time Stops For No Mouse by Micheal Hoeye - an extraordinary tale about a mouse who has to save the girl he fancies from a very naughty mole!!!!! it managed to spawn 2 sequels: The Sands of Time  and  No Time Like Show Time.    these would make excellent films with the right actors and director.  - - - - - - highly recommended - luvinfilms

Time Traveller's Wife, The by Audrey Niffeneger - jstarbuck

Titus Groan - Mervyn Peake - Silent Bob 17

To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee – Lulu Karma. – King Ralph. – Sayes. - The perfect book about childhood and the loss of innocence when seeing the twisted, bigoted world of adults. My one note of caution would be if you enjoy it you should also read I Know Why The Caged Bired Sings by Maya Angelou - King_Wah

Trainspotting by Irvine Welsh - Silent Bob 17 - (Speaks for itself) – Maharg. Trainspotting - I assume you've all heard of this one! – sharkboy.

Treasure Island by RL Stephenson - fluffy bunny.

Tree Grows In Brooklyn, A by Betty Smith - if you've not read it already......read it – Octopussy.

Under an English Heaven by Robert Radcliffe, really a marvelous book, very well researched, with characters you rally care about by the end. I cried for the whole last chapter! - Strider's Gal.

Ulysses by James Joyce. Unlike Dr Nick (did you know his real name is Shirley?) i do think ulysses pays off. it takes time and effort to get through and some of it is simply inpenetrable, but so many passages literally light up your mind. the language, the rhythm, the sheer achievement - i honestly think this is one of the most important things ever writing – sandyboy. The proud, masculine name of Shirley echoes throughout history, and I shall carve it with pride (er...). sandyboy's real name is actually Ulysses (could have been worse, if he was a girl he was getting Clytemnestra) and he was forced to read it as a child by the evil elders of the pinko commune he was raised in. True story. I would wholeheartedly agree that Ulysses is one of, if not the, most significant and important achievement of writing in the English language. There just wasn't a lot of love from me to it when I read it. Twice – DrNick. is true - i waas raised by pinkos and shirley nick was suckled by sheep. Ulysseys is great but i cannot explain why, and i think that is what i love about it. – sandyboy.

Utopia by Thomas More. – Don Genco.

Utopia by Lincoln Child - Yokima

Use of Weapons, The by Iain Banks. Almost all his books are good, but these are exceptional. – DrNick.

V For Vendetta by Alan Moore - Phill

Vurt - Jeff Noon - Phill

Wasp Factory, The by Iain Banks - Scatterbrain – Big Jim Slade

Watchmen by Alan Moore (and some other guy). Best. Comic. Ever – DrNick. The 'some other guy' is Dave Gibbons, the artist, whio deserves as much credit as Moore for why it's such a seminal comic book (I'm on my second copy after the first fell apart from being read so much). He also draws Frank Miller's occasional and brilliant Martha Washington stories. – Vertigo Woo Yay. Yeah, I was kind of kidding with the 'some other guy' comment - nuances don't really travel well through this kind of thing! – DrNick.

Waterland by Graham Swift: a strange mix of Fenland history and a fictional autobiography, which studies analyses the importance of history, fact, memory and madness. - bionic pigeon

Watership Down by Richard Adams. I read this when I was 9 or 10 and have read it several times a year since. I will never get tired of it; the writing is beautiful. - trinity33 Someone mentioned this earlier, I remember this is one of the first books that actually moved me to tears - Hobbitonlass

We Have Always Lived In The Castle by Shirley Jackson. Brilliant characterisation and a stangely uneasy read. - doubleshiny

Weaveworld by Clive Barker – David. – DrNick.  Simply his most amazing work. Dark, twisted and amazingly provoking. - damn i'm good!

Wheel of Time series, The by Robert Jordan – Squall Katsuragi

White Jazz by James Ellroy - I like everything I've read by Ellroy, but this one is one of the most intense books ever. Bad men doing bad things in 50's L.A. Intricate plot, chopped-up language, absolutely feverish. Closely followed by "American Tabloid" in my Ellroy top-5. - Crippa

Who Wrote the Bible by Richard Elliott Friedman. for those interested in the details regarding the writing of the first 5 books of the bible. – gods mulligan

Wild Swans by Jung Chang - this book had me enthralled form start to finish – Octopussy. I'm reading this at the minute incidentally, certainly very good reading so far – Darkcloud.

Wind-up Bird Chronicle, The by Haruki Murikami (even though it fucked up my head) - Scatterbrain. Getting very hip these days, but is still a fantastic author. This is the natural plateau of his work, combining all the elements of his past books and more to study the atrocities in Japan during WW2, and the effect their repression has on contemporary society. It's also bloody funny and deeply disturbing. - bionic pigeon

Withnails by Richard E Grant – Pele.

Without Remorse by Tom Clancy. I'd have to say almost anything by Tom Clancy, but particularly If you want to know how John Clark got to be such a badass this is where you start. Otherwise, try Cardinal Of The Kremlin for an insight into espionage & tradecraft, or Debt Of Honour followed by Executive Orders for some great action/thriller stuff.

Woodlanders, The by Thomas Hardy.  This doesn't have the fame of Tess or Jude, but it was Hardy's favourite and it packs a massive emotional punch. - Black Tulip

World According to Garp, The by John Irving (just finished this, really excellent stuff) – darkcloud. - I think is my favourite John Irving book. - Kingol

Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte - Damo 26 Wuthering Heights is superb. I think the fact that I am doing it for my A-Level (only recently finished reading it), adds to my love of it! Going deeper into the novel has made me love it so much! The characters are so complex and the symbolism throughout is fantastic. "I cannot live without my life! I cannot live without my soul!" - Private Mojo.

Yes Man by Danny Wallace - One of the few books I've laughed out loud to, unfortunately I read it mostly in public so I got a few wierd looks.- Pedros

Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenence by Robert Pirsig – gods mulligan


Some other comments…

absolutely anything by Tom Robbins or Robertson Davies who are genius's of the english language – gods mulligan

Any short stories & novellas by Guy De Maupassant

Every single Jeeves story – DrNick.

Funniest book, (oddly, considering I normally hate Terry Pratchett books), is his collaboration with comics writer Neil Gaiman, Good Omens - had me laughing out loud for ages.

Hermann Hesse is my favorite writer, Steppenwolf is my favorite of his but I also love Damian, Siddartha, etc. - Shadow Wolf

Most books by Iain Banks – darkcloud.

I think no reading lst can be complete without a few novels of George Pelecanos. I'd like to propose 'Shame the devil', 'Hard Revolution' and 'Right as rain', just for starters. - BillyDolworth

My favourate author of all time has to be Andy McNab. For suspense, twists and sheer authenticity this guy just can't be beaten. Even Chris Ryan, who's work is in itself fantastic, struggles to keep up. I've only just started reading his stuff, picked up Remote Control back in March and have been hooked since. I'm now on Dark Winter (yea, I'm a slow reader). All the authors I loved before then just kinda pale into insignificance when compared. I highly recommend these books. And if not them, The Hit List by Chris Ryan. Top stuff. - Da Big Cheese
 



 
 
 

< Message edited by Krazy_Beyootiful -- 13/1/2006 2:33:03 PM >


_____________________________

How can we be happy in a world where predictive text can spell Indictment but not Flapjacks?
Post #: 1
RE: Your Favouritest Books: Reloaded - 16/10/2005 6:49:56 PM   
Izzardesque2


Posts: 2899
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Get back to Russia!
I recommended The Sunne in Splendour by Sharon Penman which isn't in there!!

Anyway, its a great book, as are all her books. Really captures the atmosphere of the times and presents a very different (and very believable) version of Richard III

(in reply to Krazy_Beyootiful)
Post #: 2
RE: Your Favouritest Books: Reloaded - 16/10/2005 9:27:04 PM   
Krazy_Beyootiful

 

Posts: 2877
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Around Lil and Cray's ankles
quote:

ORIGINAL: Izzardesque2

I recommended The Sunne in Splendour by Sharon Penman which isn't in there!!

It is now.

_____________________________

How can we be happy in a world where predictive text can spell Indictment but not Flapjacks?

(in reply to Izzardesque2)
Post #: 3
RE: Your Favouritest Books: Reloaded - 16/10/2005 10:16:41 PM   
crayon


Posts: 3515
Joined: 1/10/2005
From: East-ish
Well done for bringing this back KB!  I never really looked at in in the old forum - it's a bit daunting - but I promise I'll have a read through and add at least one book later!

_____________________________


Beauty is in the eye of the beholder and it may be necessary from time to time to give a stupid or misinformed beholder a black eye.



I shall call him squishy, and he shall be mine, and he shall be my squishy!

(in reply to Krazy_Beyootiful)
Post #: 4
RE: Your Favouritest Books: Reloaded - 17/10/2005 1:18:55 AM   
sandyboy


Posts: 4
Joined: 3/10/2005
I would add in

Don Quioxote - The Man of Lamancha by Cervantes - once you get past the forst few chapters it becomes so damned good. and having Don Quioxte in your head is about the best gift you could ever be given - he makes life seem wonderous

go - go read it now

(in reply to crayon)
Post #: 5
RE: Your Favouritest Books: Reloaded - 17/10/2005 1:28:02 AM   
crayon


Posts: 3515
Joined: 1/10/2005
From: East-ish
quote:

ORIGINAL: sandyboy

go - go read it now


*wanders off to look for a copy*

Can I add My Sister's Keeper by Jodi Picoult?  If you only read one of her books (which I would recommend doing as they get repetitive) read this one - it's a complex look at a difficult subject and if you don't cry while reading this then you're not human!

Oh, and Frankenstein was written by Mary Shelley, not Mary Wollstonecraft (her mother).


_____________________________


Beauty is in the eye of the beholder and it may be necessary from time to time to give a stupid or misinformed beholder a black eye.



I shall call him squishy, and he shall be mine, and he shall be my squishy!

(in reply to sandyboy)
Post #: 6
RE: Your Favouritest Books: Reloaded - 17/10/2005 1:21:22 PM   
Krazy_Beyootiful

 

Posts: 2877
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Around Lil and Cray's ankles
Added both of those. Sandyboy I got a tiny bit confused as to who was the author of yours but I think I got it right. If I didn't feel free to rant incoherently and at length about my incompetence.

Crayon - cheers honey. I didn't notice the Frankenstein thing - it has been corrected. And you don't have to read the whole list - I just use it as a reference list if I run out of reading material. Stabbing my finger at the computer screen usually helps me find a title.

_____________________________

How can we be happy in a world where predictive text can spell Indictment but not Flapjacks?

(in reply to crayon)
Post #: 7
RE: Your Favouritest Books: Reloaded - 17/10/2005 7:23:55 PM   
Ti


Posts: 467
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: The Home of the Land
Can I add two more to the list? Both are excellent, although total opposites.
Far from the madding crowd by Thomas Hardy (just as the title says);
Black Hawk Down by Mark Bowden (a story of modern war);

_____________________________

It's true, I'm a rageoholic! I just can't get enough RAGEOHOL!

My books

My Blu-ray collection

(in reply to Krazy_Beyootiful)
Post #: 8
RE: Your Favouritest Books: Reloaded - 17/10/2005 8:58:10 PM   
deadman


Posts: 2754
Joined: 30/9/2005
I'd like to add in The Da Vinci Code and Deception Point by Dan Brown. Both are very enjoyable and highly recommended.

(in reply to Ti)
Post #: 9
RE: Your Favouritest Books: Reloaded - 18/10/2005 3:33:26 AM   
sandyboy


Posts: 4
Joined: 3/10/2005
quote:

ORIGINAL: deadman

I'd like to add in The Da Vinci Code and Deception Point by Dan Brown. Both are very enjoyable and highly recommended.


i've never heard of those - are they good then?

(in reply to deadman)
Post #: 10
RE: Your Favouritest Books: Reloaded - 18/10/2005 12:24:50 PM   
deadman


Posts: 2754
Joined: 30/9/2005
quote:

ORIGINAL: sandyboy

quote:

ORIGINAL: deadman

I'd like to add in The Da Vinci Code and Deception Point by Dan Brown. Both are very enjoyable and highly recommended.


i've never heard of those - are they good then?


Yes, I found them to be exceptionally good. I hadn't read anything similar to them before and they truly felt like a breath of fresh air. I've also heard good things about Angels and Demons and Digital Fortress which are also by Dan Brown.

(in reply to sandyboy)
Post #: 11
RE: Your Favouritest Books: Reloaded - 18/10/2005 2:50:47 PM   
BillyDolworth

 

Posts: 28
Joined: 18/10/2005
Impressive little list, but how anyone has failed to mention Steinbecks' "The Grapes of Wrath' until now is beyond me. The book is an undisputed masterpiece, and never more relevant then in this day and age.

Oh, and I think no reading lst can be complete without a few novels of George Pelecanos. I'd like to propose 'Shame the devil', 'Hard Revolution' and 'Right as rain', just for starters.

And 'Gates of fire' by Pressfield...

(in reply to deadman)
Post #: 12
RE: Your Favouritest Books: Reloaded - 18/10/2005 7:55:06 PM   
Krazy_Beyootiful

 

Posts: 2877
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Around Lil and Cray's ankles
All updated, even Dan Brown.

And thank you to the higher power who "topped" this.  Makes it easier for me to find it.

_____________________________

How can we be happy in a world where predictive text can spell Indictment but not Flapjacks?

(in reply to BillyDolworth)
Post #: 13
RE: Your Favouritest Books: Reloaded - 18/10/2005 8:21:34 PM   
crayon


Posts: 3515
Joined: 1/10/2005
From: East-ish
So wait...what you're saying is that you will add any book to that list so long as it has been recommended by a forumite?

This has potential   (Why is there no 'strokes white cat while cackling in an evil manner' smiley?)


_____________________________


Beauty is in the eye of the beholder and it may be necessary from time to time to give a stupid or misinformed beholder a black eye.



I shall call him squishy, and he shall be mine, and he shall be my squishy!

(in reply to Krazy_Beyootiful)
Post #: 14
RE: Your Favouritest Books: Reloaded - 21/10/2005 1:28:46 AM   
Phill

 

Posts: 23
Joined: 4/10/2005
From: Cumbria
I'd add...
The Great Gatsby by F Scott Fitzgerald
David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
Legion by William Peter Blatty
From Hell by Alan Moore
The Dancers At The End Of Time by Michael Moorcock
Mother London by Michael Moorcock
Smoking In Bed Conversations With Bruce Robinson
Vurt By Jeff Noon
Survivor By Chuck Pahlinuk
48 by James Herbert
Freaky Deaky by Elmore Leonard
Killshot by Elmore Leonard
Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov
A Scanner Darkly by Phillip K Dick
Complicity by Iain Banks
Espedair Street by Iain Banks
A Magick Life A Biography Of Alistair Crowley
The Cornelius Quartet By Michael Moorcock
All Roald Dahl
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Berlin Noir by Philip Kerr
The Flashman Books by George McDonald Fraser
Quartered Safe Out Here by George McDonald Fraser
The HitchHickers Series by Douglas Adams
Good Omens by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett
V For Vendetta by Alan Moore

I'll stop there! I do read a lot...

(in reply to crayon)
Post #: 15
RE: Your Favouritest Books: Reloaded - 21/10/2005 8:38:47 AM   
DanielFullard


Posts: 1025
Joined: 19/10/2005
From: Durham, England
A Clockwork Orange
Pride and Prejudice

(in reply to Phill)
Post #: 16
RE: Your Favouritest Books: Reloaded - 21/10/2005 11:40:15 AM   
vernieboy


Posts: 873
Joined: 10/10/2005
Norweign Wood By Haruki Murakami - This book is truly a treasure found. I only came across it by accident whilst wandering round Waterstones one afternoon and was hooked from the first beautfully written page. Set in 1960's Japan and named after the Beatles song it is an absorbing, poetic beautifully written tale of first love. I will not give much of the story away but you must read it and get lost in its beauty.

_____________________________

"Nothing's worse than having an itch you can never scratch."


(in reply to DanielFullard)
Post #: 17
RE: Your Favouritest Books: Reloaded - 21/10/2005 6:40:56 PM   
Krazy_Beyootiful

 

Posts: 2877
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Around Lil and Cray's ankles
Hey - I hate to be annoying and make you all read a super long post but it'd be so much easier for me if you didn't reccomend books that are already in the list. Thanks guys.

Also, feel free to comment on the books you're reccomending.

Oh and Crayon, behave yourself.

_____________________________

How can we be happy in a world where predictive text can spell Indictment but not Flapjacks?

(in reply to vernieboy)
Post #: 18
RE: Your Favouritest Books: Reloaded - 21/10/2005 7:14:08 PM   
livila


Posts: 1296
Joined: 30/9/2005
Kinflicks by Lisa Alther.
Ginny Babcock's adventures growing into womanhood intercut with the present where she is going to see her mother in hospital. Whenever she reaches a new stage she does it with full and determined attention, whether it be cheerleader, college student, peace activist, lesbian or married woman. It's hilarious throughtout but is incredibly powerful and moving in parts that Ginny's coming to terms with her mother's approaching death.

(in reply to Krazy_Beyootiful)
Post #: 19
RE: Your Favouritest Books: Reloaded - 22/10/2005 1:11:27 PM   
jstarbuck


Posts: 74
Joined: 30/9/2005
I'd add:

Time Traveller's Wife, The - Audrey Niffeneger
Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrel - Susanna Clarke

(in reply to livila)
Post #: 20
RE: Your Favouritest Books: Reloaded - 24/10/2005 3:29:57 AM   
hozay


Posts: 3378
Joined: 13/10/2005
From: the long,dark teatime of the soul
I just read Kafka by the Shore by Haruki Murakami.
It's not as good as his Wind up Bird Chronicles (hard one to beat really)
but it's still a great read.An Urban fantasy involving a runaway teenage boy,
a man who can talk to cats,ghosts from WWII,fish falling from the sky,a strange
library and a mystical forest.One critic wrote "Altered my mind and played
havoc with my life".

(in reply to livila)
Post #: 21
RE: Your Favouritest Books: Reloaded - 24/10/2005 12:15:50 PM   
Krazy_Beyootiful

 

Posts: 2877
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Around Lil and Cray's ankles
Everything is updated. And I've also added a new entry from myself...

Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides

_____________________________

How can we be happy in a world where predictive text can spell Indictment but not Flapjacks?

(in reply to hozay)
Post #: 22
RE: Your Favouritest Books: Reloaded - 24/10/2005 4:38:40 PM   
film_gonzo


Posts: 14
Joined: 3/10/2005
From: Dublin
I'd recommend

The Princess Bride by William Goldman - a fantastic, timeless fairytale
and
The Depford Mice Trilogy by Robin Jarvis -haen't read these since I was a kid but they were fantastic

(in reply to Krazy_Beyootiful)
Post #: 23
RE: Your Favouritest Books: Reloaded - 24/10/2005 5:43:05 PM   
deadman


Posts: 2754
Joined: 30/9/2005
quote:

ORIGINAL: film_gonzo

I'd recommend

The Depford Mice Trilogy by Robin Jarvis -haen't read these since I was a kid but they were fantastic



They were indeed very good, although I prefer the Depford Mice Histories myself.

(in reply to film_gonzo)
Post #: 24
RE: Your Favouritest Books: Reloaded - 24/10/2005 9:42:21 PM   
crayon


Posts: 3515
Joined: 1/10/2005
From: East-ish
quote:

ORIGINAL: Krazy_Beyootiful

Everything is updated. And I've also added a new entry from myself...

Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides


ooh, that's really good!  I love how you know exactly what happens at the end from the start, but you still read all through the book to find out how it happens!


_____________________________


Beauty is in the eye of the beholder and it may be necessary from time to time to give a stupid or misinformed beholder a black eye.



I shall call him squishy, and he shall be mine, and he shall be my squishy!

(in reply to Krazy_Beyootiful)
Post #: 25
RE: Your Favouritest Books: Reloaded - 25/10/2005 8:05:30 PM   
Black Tulip


Posts: 63
Joined: 24/10/2005
From: Wessex
I'd have to add
The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas because it is more fun and shorter than Monte Cristo, but told with equal skill.  Honestly, you just can't put it down.
The Black Tulip by Alexandre Dumas.  This is a short book and very cinematic.  It has a very bloody opening so that you're a put right there in the action at the beginning.
The Time Machine by H G Wells.  This is a wonderful little fable for the hubristic actions of mankind, not to mention being a neat little introduction to simple philosophical topics.
The Woodlanders by Thomas Hardy.  This doesn't have the fame of Tess or Jude, but it was Hardy's favourite and it packs a massive emotional punch.
Murder Rooms by David Pirie (there are currently three in this series).  You can read these on a rainy sunday, and the day will slip by in an exciting torrent of murder mysterys, each with the kind of conclusion you will never guess.  They are Sherlock Holmes with a more immediate feel.
La Dame Aux Camelias by Dumas fils.  An old-fashioned but emotional doomed romance.
Hornblower by C S Forester (the whole series).  Everything you ever wanted to know about the Napoleonic navy in quaint 50s style writing involving the kind of rip-roaring adventure (and romance) you can't beat.
Think by Simon Blackburn.  A simple but engaging introduction to philosophy.  It's hard work if you aren't used to philosophical texts but it is so rewarding.  You'll be questioning your own existence as well as Descartes in no time.
Paradoxes by Sainsbury (not the food shop) is a mind-bending book with the kind of weird philosophical problems that'll impress your friends while driving you mad

Those are the few that come to mind at this moment...but I'm sure there are others!

(in reply to Krazy_Beyootiful)
Post #: 26
RE: Your Favouritest Books: Reloaded (Updated 26/10) - 27/10/2005 1:50:24 PM   
movieman


Posts: 71
Joined: 30/9/2005
quote:

ORIGINAL: Krazy_Beyootiful
Chronicles of Thomas Covernant (fantasy), by Stephen Donaldson. This IMO is the best fantasy book ever read.....


Can only agree....


_____________________________

"We must not confuse dissent with disloyalty."

(in reply to Krazy_Beyootiful)
Post #: 27
RE: Your Favouritest Books: Reloaded (Updated 26/10) - 27/10/2005 9:16:03 PM   
Jasiri


Posts: 2496
Joined: 23/10/2005
A few of my favourites.

The Brothers Karamazov
by Fyodor Dostoevsky.
The Plague by Albert Camus
Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe


< Message edited by jasiri -- 30/10/2005 10:37:02 AM >

(in reply to movieman)
Post #: 28
RE: Your Favouritest Books: Reloaded (Updated 26/10) - 28/10/2005 5:25:03 PM   
Deadly_Little_Miho


Posts: 398
Joined: 30/9/2005
I've just recently really gotten into a lot of transgressional fiction, and would highly recommend; Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture by Douglas Coupland; Choke by Chuck Palahniuk and Reasons to Live by Amy Hempel.
 

_____________________________

"Give a man a fish, he'll eat for a day, but hit a man with a brick and you can have all his fish... And his wife!"

(in reply to Jasiri)
Post #: 29
RE: Your Favouritest Books: Reloaded (Updated 26/10) - 2/11/2005 5:00:57 PM   
Marlowe


Posts: 15
Joined: 30/9/2005
I can't let this list go on any longer without a Raymond Chandler in it. It's got to be...

The Big Sleep- Raymond Chandler's first and finest. Hardboiled with heart, witty, gritty and sublime. Although the plot goes astray at times, his sheer style carries it through. Read it, read it, read it! (And then watch the fine movie.)

_____________________________

Oh God, what a way to die. Shot by a transvestite on an unrealistic grassy knoll.

(in reply to Deadly_Little_Miho)
Post #: 30
Page:   [1] 2 3 4 5   next >   >>
All Forums >> [On Another Note...] >> Bookworms >> Your Favouritest Books: Reloaded Page: [1] 2 3 4 5   next >   >>
Jump to:





New Messages No New Messages
Hot Topic w/ New Messages Hot Topic w/o New Messages
Locked w/ New Messages Locked w/o New Messages
 Post New Thread
 Reply to Message
 Post New Poll
 Submit Vote
 Delete My Own Post
 Delete My Own Thread
 Rate Posts


 
Movie News  |  Empire Blog  |  Movie Reviews  |  Future Films  |  Features  |  Video Interviews  |  Image Gallery  |  Competitions  |  Forum  |  Magazine  |  Resources
 
Forum Software © ASPPlayground.NET Advanced Edition 2.4.5 ANSI

3.391