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12 Years A Slave - 6/1/2014 1:32:46 PM   
Empire Admin

 

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This film deserves a 5 star - 6/1/2014 1:32:46 PM   
Desbris

 

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You give this a 4 star and Smaug a 5 star? This is quite frankly, absurd. Clearly you have no understanding of what makes a "great" film. If you believe Smaug is a great film then you are clearly delusional.

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Post #: 2
RE: This film deserves a 5 star - 6/1/2014 9:05:21 PM   
Hood_Man


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Desbris

You give this a 4 star and Smaug a 5 star? This is quite frankly, absurd. Clearly you have no understanding of what makes a "great" film. If you believe Smaug is a great film then you are clearly delusional.

http://www.yzgeneration.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/Facepalm-Dr-House.gif

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Post #: 3
Fantastic review - 7/1/2014 1:15:07 AM   
Sambora

 

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Having seen the film in the US, this is a stand out review - doesn't get swept up in the subject and reviews the actual film. McQueen still has a faint grasp on film structure, so this film is not, in my view, a classic, despite the cinematography and performances. The Fassbender performance is, as Ian Freer says, ridiculously over the top, giving way to a mild sign of humanity. The character would have been infinitely more memorable had it been coloured with more humanity (whilst carrying out these subhuman punishments) from the off. And the Brad Pitt cameo is up there with the worst, most narcissistic ever put to celluloid.

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RE: This film deserves a 5 star - 7/1/2014 7:18:30 AM   
horribleives

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: Desbris

You give this a 4 star and Smaug a 5 star? This is quite frankly, absurd. Clearly you have no understanding of what makes a "great" film. If you believe Smaug is a great film then you are clearly delusional.


You're not wrong.


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Post #: 5
RE: This film deserves a 5 star - 7/1/2014 10:50:55 AM   
Your Funny Uncle


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Five stars from me.

Just a top quality movie all round, great acting and fascinating subject matter. I personally thought Fassbender was outstanding, as was Cumberbatch. It goes without saying that Chiwetel Ejiofor is the stand out. Certainly in line for a few Oscars here I think.

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RE: 12 Years A Slave - 7/1/2014 11:01:33 AM   
MonsterCat


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You'll probably give it four stars when it's on DVD. You make me fucking sick.

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Post #: 7
RE: 12 Years A Slave - 7/1/2014 4:42:57 PM   
spamandham

 

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So apparently slavery is bad? Also, being whipped stings a bit? Who knew?!

This film doesn't care, because it will relentlessly beat you over the head with this inane message for 2 goddamn hours.

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Post #: 8
RE: Fantastic review - 7/1/2014 11:48:34 PM   
Qwerty Norris


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From: Edinburgh

quote:

ORIGINAL: Sambora

The Fassbender performance is, as Ian Freer says, ridiculously over the top,


He doesn't actually say that at all.

Fassbender's also playing a raging, bigoted alcoholic. Mild hysteria is in his persona.

And his performance is magnificent.

The film however is all Ejiofor's.

quote:

So apparently slavery is bad? Also, being whipped stings a bit? Who knew?!

This film doesn't care, because it will relentlessly beat you over the head with this inane message for 2 goddamn hours.


Some day, your rambling will make sense.

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Qwerty's Top 10 of 2013 (so far)

1. Zero Dark Thirty
2. No
3. A Hijacking
4. Behind the Candelabra
5. In The Fog
6. Good Vibrations
7. McCullin
8. Beyond the Hills
9. The Place Beyond the Pines
10. Wreck-it Ralph

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Post #: 9
RE: This film deserves a 5 star - 8/1/2014 12:01:59 AM   
elab49


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Desbris

You give this a 4 star and Smaug a 5 star? This is quite frankly, absurd. Clearly you have no understanding of what makes a "great" film. If you believe Smaug is a great film then you are clearly delusional.


Ian Freer didn't give Smaug anything.

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Django Unplugged - 8/1/2014 1:03:15 AM   
TheMightyBlackout


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McQueen allows the tale to unravel at its own pace, and never resorts to emotional button-pushing or hyperbole, letting the story paint its own picture long after you've finished watching.
But the lion's share of the praise really has to go to Chiwetel Ejiofor for his portrayal of Solomon. Ejiofor's isn't a performance which screams 'give me the Oscar', yet it's entirely deserving (as is the entire production) of the many awards it will receive.

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Post #: 11
RE: Fantastic review - 8/1/2014 12:45:29 PM   
spamandham

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: Qwerty Norris

Some day, your rambling will make sense.



It was a short sentence making a straight forward point. Would you like some help with some of the longer words?

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Post #: 12
RE: Fantastic review - 8/1/2014 1:06:10 PM   
Qwerty Norris


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Yes please.

To start of with.

Trolling?

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Qwerty's Top 10 of 2013 (so far)

1. Zero Dark Thirty
2. No
3. A Hijacking
4. Behind the Candelabra
5. In The Fog
6. Good Vibrations
7. McCullin
8. Beyond the Hills
9. The Place Beyond the Pines
10. Wreck-it Ralph

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Post #: 13
RE: Fantastic review - 8/1/2014 1:37:01 PM   
jonson


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Firstly you mean off not of, and secondly, you're the one doing the trolling.

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Post #: 14
RE: Fantastic review - 8/1/2014 2:17:30 PM   
Qwerty Norris


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From: Edinburgh

quote:

ORIGINAL: jonson

Firstly you mean off not of,


Touché.

quote:

ORIGINAL: jonson
and secondly, you're the one doing the trolling.



Have you seen his posts before?

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Qwerty's Top 10 of 2013 (so far)

1. Zero Dark Thirty
2. No
3. A Hijacking
4. Behind the Candelabra
5. In The Fog
6. Good Vibrations
7. McCullin
8. Beyond the Hills
9. The Place Beyond the Pines
10. Wreck-it Ralph

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Post #: 15
Sorely lacking - 9/1/2014 3:31:13 PM   
napchier

 

Posts: 5
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This movie monumentally failed to depict a 12 year span. It could have just as easily have been '2 months a slave,' the only discernible difference, with regards breadth of time, coming only at the end, with his wife and children being clearly older upon re-acquaintance with them. No such sign elsewhere in the movie. No considerable timescale portrayed whatsoever! Really spoiled it for me! Perhaps the carriage he returned home in was a former model of the tardis, leaping him 11+ years further in to the future, on route. The payoff at the end was somewhat subdued by the small scraps of further information posted in the end credits, but of course, that's how it was! For me, in comparison to Django Unchained, this film was largely forgettable.

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Post #: 16
RE: Sorely lacking - 9/1/2014 8:00:42 PM   
Your Funny Uncle


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Disagree entirely. It wasn't spelt out for us which makes a refreshing change. No '3 years later' or ' 1888' shit.

You could tell just by looking at Soloman that time had passed. The thinning of the face, the scars, the blemishes on his skin, his greying hair. Plus, the film is called '12 Years a Slave' what more do you want?

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RE: Sorely lacking - 9/1/2014 8:35:01 PM   
Qwerty Norris


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Joined: 26/10/2005
From: Edinburgh
quote:

ORIGINAL: napchier

This movie monumentally failed to depict a 12 year span. It could have just as easily have been '2 months a slave,' the only discernible difference, with regards breadth of time, coming only at the end, with his wife and children being clearly older upon re-acquaintance with them. No such sign elsewhere in the movie. No considerable timescale portrayed whatsoever!


But that's precisely the point of the film. Time stands still for those in captivity, whilst the world they're shut away from carries on without them. That's one of the reasons why the ending is immensely powerful; it's the moment Solomon truly comprehends the longevity of his absence.


_____________________________

Qwerty's Top 10 of 2013 (so far)

1. Zero Dark Thirty
2. No
3. A Hijacking
4. Behind the Candelabra
5. In The Fog
6. Good Vibrations
7. McCullin
8. Beyond the Hills
9. The Place Beyond the Pines
10. Wreck-it Ralph

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Post #: 18
RE: 12 Years A Slave - 10/1/2014 3:56:07 PM   
demoncleaner


Posts: 2340
Joined: 3/10/2005
From: Belfast
Just out from it.

I actually thought it was fantastic. Now there's an adjective I didn't think I'd be using against a ten tonne Issue film but after a slightly queasy start (cinema trying to scratch something cinematic out of a chamber-piece?) it definitely opens out into a big, immersive, perversely "enjoyable" and indelibly cinematic film. This is not the docu-drama of McQueen's first two films, and stylistically I think it sits pleasingly in the mid-ground between flighty Malick impressionism and David Lean ambition to do film as "visual novel". It's the favourable art-house moorings that make you think of the former, but it's also the inherent cynicism of the art-house than reign in the excesses of the lavish and ultra-sincere period epic.

I strongly disgree that Fassbender is guilty of over-acting, or in any way not on the money. He offers the "perverse enjoyment" I mentioned earlier. It's the first time that I think I've seen McQueen's own personality on screen (I mean in the way the Fassbender scenes were handled...I'm not suggesting McQueen is a psychopath). Anyone who has seen a snippet of an interview with the director can see McQueen carries himself with a hilarious dead-eyed truculence. It's a quality that means we know we'll be spared any semblance of sentimentality in his films. If people view Fassbender as over-acting I only see this as McQueen enjoying his muse for the first time on screen. But it's also wrong to suggest that this indulgence is excessive or jarring. McQueen's directorial eye is always dispassionate, he'll let locked takes of Ejiofor render the integrity of the Solomon character without stylistic bias or intervention. Similarly, those deeply uncomfortable scenes in the Fassbender house are achieved with lazy morbid curiosity. Forget the bias of 200 years of liberal civility...how would a Martian interpret this? And there's something in the useless insolence of Fassbender's masochist (he's primarily a masochist I think...the physical hurt on Patsy is self-flaggelation under a Freudian's lense) that allows us to segue now and then into a martian's eye view of this society. Again, I feel this is necessary as McQueen's refusal to be caught up in an accusation of beatification.

It's not all rosey, the film is not without its flaws. There's that chamber-piece feel in the early patches. A problem that was a deal-breaker for me with Lincoln. The idea that polished prose can pass for dialogue. It can in voice-over...or in the off-Broadway stage with the lights down and the actor addressing the audience. There are passages where this seems to afflict McQueen's film in the early stages. The remonstrating with Eliza is one scene. It feels forced and academic. By the time you have a night scene between Solomon and Patsy you realise this problem is elevated to verse...better acted and it becomes...Christ! Summat out of Shakespeare. The film starts with a somewhat arbitrary mix of arch discourse then naturalism. The patchwork between rhetoric and naturalism continues for the remainder of the film, but becomes more judicious. Ejiofor at centre is always credible. I felt that Paul Dano, Alfre Woodward, the actor that plays Patsy, Garrett Dillahunt and Fassbender where all better at making the poetic sound natural than the other actors who suffered in this respect (Brad Pitt, Scoot McNairy...and I hate to say it Cumberbatch).

So yeah...I haven't got a conclusion to this review...just that this was of course powerful stuff, but there's loads of cineaste stylistic tics to chew over as the art-house revenge on the Spielberg model.

5/5



< Message edited by demoncleaner -- 10/1/2014 4:45:30 PM >

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RE: Sorely lacking - 10/1/2014 4:28:35 PM   
demoncleaner


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From: Belfast
quote:

ORIGINAL: Qwerty Norris

quote:

ORIGINAL: napchier

This movie monumentally failed to depict a 12 year span. It could have just as easily have been '2 months a slave,' the only discernible difference, with regards breadth of time, coming only at the end, with his wife and children being clearly older upon re-acquaintance with them. No such sign elsewhere in the movie. No considerable timescale portrayed whatsoever!


But that's precisely the point of the film. Time stands still for those in captivity, whilst the world they're shut away from carries on without them. That's one of the reasons why the ending is immensely powerful; it's the moment Solomon truly comprehends the longevity of his absence.



Completely agree.

I've been saying this since defending the floor-mopping scene in Hunger. The monotony of the extended take. The monotony of one extended detail is in surrogate to the larger passage of time. If that sounds too arty-farty for some then a montage should be considered a viable alternative. But then a montage in credible cinema is like a fart at a funeral ever since Team America brought the device to the fore.

So basically, the uneventful exended take is Steve McQueen's patent on the passage of time and there's nothing we can do about it.


< Message edited by demoncleaner -- 10/1/2014 4:30:35 PM >

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RE: 12 Years A Slave - 10/1/2014 7:38:54 PM   
Emyr Thy King


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quote:

ORIGINAL: demoncleaner

Anyone who has seen a snippet of an interview with the director can see McQueen carries himself with a hilarious dead-eyed truculence.


Like this:

YouTube (click) (prepare to squirm more than Ronaldo on the floor)


< Message edited by Emyr Thy King -- 10/1/2014 7:40:22 PM >


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RE: 12 Years A Slave - 10/1/2014 8:11:21 PM   
demoncleaner


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Joined: 3/10/2005
From: Belfast
quote:

ORIGINAL: Emyr Thy King

quote:

ORIGINAL: demoncleaner

Anyone who has seen a snippet of an interview with the director can see McQueen carries himself with a hilarious dead-eyed truculence.


Like this:

YouTube (click) (prepare to squirm more than Ronaldo on the floor)



Ha ha yes

I'm 10 minutes into that clip and god love the wee earnest lady of the TIFF. McQueen seems baffled by the appliance of fake sincerity in aftermath of his film. Fuck me guys it might also be ok to enjoy it too. I certainly did. He seems rightly pissed off that there's an assumed need to garb it in funeral weeds. It's far too smart for that. As much as the film achieves sincerity and sympathy for the plight and the character it also does a lot to subvert the string-swept Oscar-bait genre.

But yeah! I love McQueen's demeanour in this press conference. Thank you for posting.


< Message edited by demoncleaner -- 10/1/2014 8:13:02 PM >

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Post #: 22
Seen it all before... - 10/1/2014 8:16:01 PM   
Azzurro06

 

Posts: 35
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You seen Roots? You seen this...You seen Amistad? You seen this...You seen etc etc etc ....seen all this before and its a total snore the umpteenth time over.

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RE: Seen it all before... - 10/1/2014 8:54:38 PM   
demoncleaner


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< Message edited by demoncleaner -- 11/1/2014 1:54:14 PM >

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Post #: 24
unflinching, uncompromising and brilliant - 11/1/2014 2:02:30 PM   
Qwerty Norris


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From: Edinburgh
A copy a paste job from my blog detailing my review...

Once an acclaimed video artist, now a bona fide mainstream movie presence; Steve McQueen is no stranger to the confinement of the human condition. His first feature Hunger was literal, his second offering Shame metaphorical. Now with his third 12 Years a Slave, the amalgamation of imprisoning the body and soul is complete; a difficult, often devastating reflection on one man’s endurance through America’s slave trade. A subject US cinema has occasionally glanced at, but ultimately lacked the courage to seriously look upon. Fittingly, it takes the efforts of an outsider to hold up the mirror for all to see.

Based on the experiences of Solomon Northup; a New York citizen with a young family and a talent for the cello. A free man tricked, bound and sold into slavery in 1841, a whole decade after the argument for emancipation started gathering momentum in the North of the country. The film tracks his journey of unimaginable hard-ship and injustice; from capture to his eventual release, taking in Paul Giamatti’s human auctioneer, Benedict Cumberbatch’s moral confliction and Michael Fassbender’s drunken masochism over a period suggested by the title; a title which, for the most part, is the only clue to the passage of time. Locations alter, an infant appears to be born out of rape, an additional set of wrinkles appear on Chiwetel Ejiofor’s tremendously evocative face, but that’s it – and it’s entirely deliberate.

For those held in captivity, time inevitably stands still, whilst the world they're shut away from carries on without them. Sean Bobbitt’s cinematography invokes this awful circumstance, the frame tightens and the image darkens the further we progress down the chronological order of events (although the narrative has an element of the non-linear, mostly for thematic purposes), further suggesting that Solomon’s world has become more introverted, more desperate and increasingly devoid of hope. The overwhelming release of the ending is predicated on this construct, reinforcing our protagonist’s comprehension over the longevity of his absence.

The cathartic conclusion however is also dependent on a savagely authentic portrayal of cruelty; a depiction which has attracted some crass accusations of torture porn among some seemingly unwilling to accept the horrible truth. In Hunger and Shame, McQueen displayed a fondness for the long take; the twenty minute conversation between IRA soldier Bobby Sands and a priest pleading him to reverse his assertion to starve himself. The jog Brandon partakes in across the streets of Manhattan in order to escape the premise of his sister fraternizing with his boss in his apartment. These sequences however are largely passive, in 12 Years a Slave, they reinforce brutality. When he’s first captured, Solomon is beaten in the shadows, the camera lays deafly still and every moment hurts. In the latter stages, a panoramic shot encompasses a woman being whipped, it’s stomach-churning and it’s horrifying, much like the entire concept of slavery itself.

This might be a predominantly American film, but there is no Hollywood sugar-coating at work. It’s not a triumph over adversity story that softens the edges and preaches sentimentality. It’s an anti-awards picture, yet ironically may clean up on Oscar night. It doesn't shy away from exposing the dark heart of American history, a subject matter where only seventies television serial Roots dared to venture once before. It’s unflinching, uncompromising and it’s brilliant.

5/5

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Qwerty's Top 10 of 2013 (so far)

1. Zero Dark Thirty
2. No
3. A Hijacking
4. Behind the Candelabra
5. In The Fog
6. Good Vibrations
7. McCullin
8. Beyond the Hills
9. The Place Beyond the Pines
10. Wreck-it Ralph

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Post #: 25
RE: 12 Years A Slave - 11/1/2014 2:18:22 PM   
horribleives

 

Posts: 4976
Joined: 12/6/2009
From: The North
quote:

ORIGINAL: demoncleaner

quote:

ORIGINAL: Emyr Thy King

quote:

ORIGINAL: demoncleaner

Anyone who has seen a snippet of an interview with the director can see McQueen carries himself with a hilarious dead-eyed truculence.


Like this:

YouTube (click) (prepare to squirm more than Ronaldo on the floor)



Ha ha yes

I'm 10 minutes into that clip and god love the wee earnest lady of the TIFF. McQueen seems baffled by the appliance of fake sincerity in aftermath of his film. Fuck me guys it might also be ok to enjoy it too. I certainly did. He seems rightly pissed off that there's an assumed need to garb it in funeral weeds. It's far too smart for that. As much as the film achieves sincerity and sympathy for the plight and the character it also does a lot to subvert the string-swept Oscar-bait genre.

But yeah! I love McQueen's demeanour in this press conference. Thank you for posting.



He might seem a tad abrupt but he's bang on the money with everything he says. And his lack of interest in Oscars is refreshing too.


< Message edited by horribleives -- 11/1/2014 2:20:20 PM >


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Post #: 26
RE: 12 Years A Slave - 11/1/2014 7:26:45 PM   
R W

 

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With the nominations of the 2014 BAFTAs recently, there are at least two films that will go head-to-head with one another and will be strong contenders for the upcoming Oscars. Competing against Alfonso Cuarón’s ground-breaking Gravity – with the most BAFTA nominations of eleven – is Steve McQueen’s third feature 12 Years a Slave (nominated for ten) which continues the recent line-up of films that historically explore the themes of racism and slavery.

Living as a free negro with his wife and two children in Saratoga Springs, New York, in 1941 Solomon Northop (Chiwetel Ejiofor) is kidnapped and sold into slavery, working on plantations in the state of Louisiana for twelve years before his release.

Following Hunger and Shame which both dealt with the bodily physicality of Michael Fassbender’s lead characters, 12 Years a Slave – based on Northop’s memoir – despite the subject matter which is new to McQueen although he had an interest in it, his latest touches on elements shown previously in his last two flicks. A common thread in McQueen’s catalogue is the destructive nature of the human body, displayed here with the slaves’ backs being lashed at, especially one sequence which is just as visually explicit as the lashing sequence from The Passion of the Christ.

Another element seen in the director’s work the theme of survival as first displayed in Hunger which was about the factual Bobby Sands’ survival in prison and his hunger strike. In the case of 12 Years a Slave, it is the true story of a free man sold to slavery in pre-Civil War America, fighting for his freedom.

While you are truly engaged by Solomon Northop (played extraordinary by Chiwetel Ejiofor) throughout this horrible journey, John Ridley’s screenplay never judges characters that would be considered as white supremacists, from Benedict Cumberbatch’s sympathetic performance as plantation owner William Ford to even Michael Fassbender’s Edwin Epps who is this vicious beast who is unpredictable and although is cruel to his slaves, but is strange in love with one slave Patsie, played wonderfully by newcomer Lupita Nyong'o.

It’s fair to say that from all of his films, director Steve McQueen is interested in showing the truth of whatever subject matter he’s tackling and certainly this film goes down-and-dirty with the subject of pre-Civil War American slavery, showing the physical brutality and the emotional distraught. With McQueen’s frequent collaborative cinematographer Sean Bobbitt, you do see the gritty texture of early 19th century America, while Hans Zimmer’s booming soundtrack gives an emotional hook to the story.

Unflinching but uncompromising, Steve McQueen’s 12 Years a Slave is a tough watch but is an extraordinary historical drama about an important true story about slavery and racism, while Chiwetel Ejiofor is doing an Oscar-deserving performance.

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Post #: 27
RE: 12 Years A Slave - 13/1/2014 10:52:01 PM   
Coyleone


Posts: 556
Joined: 13/10/2008
the film is decent, it's a powerful story, but from a technical and film making standpoint it does absolutely nothing special. It's incredibly generic in it's approach. There's a couple of really effective shots (tree hanging), but for the most part it's a by the numbers film that happens to be about a very touchy subject. It's the type of film that's presented to the general masses as some kind of monumental feat of film making, which it really is not.
That said, it kept me watching from start to finish because the story is effective enough to do that, and the performances are grand all across the board. I fully disagree with the Empire reviewer saying that it doesn't go for the heart strings or try to push it's message in a manipulative way. There were a lot of moments that screamed out 'YOU CRY NOW!' along with the score and scenes such as Ejiofor staring right in to the camera that just came off as irritating and cliche to me. Overall I think it's an important story but it isn't told with any directorial or stylistic flourishes that set it apart, but rather in the simplest way it could have possibly been told and shot, and that's just dull.

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Post #: 28
RE: 12 Years A Slave - 14/1/2014 9:20:11 AM   
Dr Lenera

 

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Joined: 19/10/2005
I suppose it’s little wonder that so few films tackle the subject of black slavery, and after this one I’m not sure there needs to be another. Director Steve McQueen’s previous two films Hunger and Shame left this writer cold, despite their obvious intelligence, but with 12 Years A Slave he wowed me. It’s an extremely powerful and harrowing drama which refuses to sugar coat or sentimentalise its subject [which means it's perhaps a little cold] except for the odd unnecessary addition [like some sexual tension] to the true story as told by the real Solomon Northup in his book of the same title. The film superbly conveys the standing still of time and, while it drags a little in the second half, the tension is never let go of for a moment. The brutality, especially a lengthy whipping scene which is no way suitable for a 15 certificate [but then this is a true story and historical, so of course it’s treated leniently by the BBFC], really is unpleasant, but that’s exactly how slaves were treated, and actually as much nastiness happens off-screen or is only partly shown than the stuff that you see. The most powerful scene is actually not a violent one. Solomon has been hung at night, and in the morning he just hangs there in excruciating agony, the camera just staying on him as everyone begins to casually go about their daily business and ignore him, the only major sounds being those of nature. It’s a scene of amazing poetry and subtle nastiness, and the kind of thing you just don’t see enough of nowadays.

McQueen’s direction throughout is superb, as is Sean Bobbitt’s cinematography: just take the afore-mentioned whipping scene where the camera slowly moves around the ‘action’ and for a while we are the person being whipped. I’ve always thought Chiwetel Ejiofor would be able to shine if he was given a lead role and so he does, executing every painful emotion flawlessly and often subtly, but he’s almost matched, incredibly, by Lupita Nyong’o, whose first feature film this is, in a truly heartbreaking role of someone who is in many ways the mirror image of Ejiufor’s. Sadly Michael Fassbender laughably overacts his evil character but the main person who lets the side down is Hans Zimmer, whose shoddy score mostly just repeats the same [very familiar] four chords, though that may be the fault of the director, who unaccountably likes this composer so much he had Harry Escott copy Zimmer’s The Thin Red Line score for Shame. Overall though this film really is almost worth the praise it’s been getting and should be seen….if you can take it.

8.5/10

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check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

(in reply to Coyleone)
Post #: 29
Brilliant filmmaking - 14/1/2014 11:57:06 PM   
tysmuse

 

Posts: 347
Joined: 24/9/2007
I went into this film with my expectations dimmed thinking "this is going to be 2 hours of brutal violence, and I don't want to see that". Completely wrong.
Thank goodness, it's not THAT violent. It is completely horrible, though. The ONE whipping scene is (obviously) horrible, but it's only graphic for a moment. The horrors of slavery are far more intelligently explored than just having white people beating black people. I can't believe that I actually thought that would be the case.
The true horror shown in this film through the detestable attitudes of Dano, Fassbender, et al (Paulson's character is pure poison!)
But, above all this, it is full of superb actors, all delivering great performances (maybe bar Pitt). It's superbly written. It looks fantastic. It sounds great. And it's edited brilliantly (and I can't remember a time I could say THAT about a film).

(in reply to Empire Admin)
Post #: 30
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