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Money in Football

 
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Money in Football - 12/2/2013 12:06:56 AM   
Sexual Harassment Panda


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I'd be interested in seeing everyone's views on the current financial state of football, from Tony Fernandes throwing everything at the wall to see what sticks (and what turns up in his car park) to the new Financial Fair Play rules.

Is Fernandes right to be throwing everything at the club to try and save his clubs fortunes and get them that big EPL payday what with the new lucrative TV deal kicking in next season and all? Or after spending so much in the summer after scraping out of the drop zone on final day, should he have learnt his lesson and looked at a more reserved approach? Surely if this goes wrong we're going to see a QPR quick fire sale, or you'd hope player contracts have relegation clauses in relating to wages.

What if the new FFP rules, is Wenger right? Should clubs have more freedom with how they spend their own money? Are we crippling the league in terms if quality because we won't be able to afford all the quality players? Will it be detrimental as a knock on effect to the English game (national team) or a benefit? Will these restraints start seeing more if the better English players going abroad to seek a payday? Could this actually benefit the national team?

Interestingly Barcelona's wage bill has apparently been leaked today, how true it is I don't know, but even BBC are tweeting it, so you'd hope they're confident in it's legitimacy.

Apparently, the Barcelona player wages. Some HUGE sums of money being paid. Do you agree? >>
Lionel Messi - £256,000
Daniel Alves - £200,000
Xavi - £170,000
Víctor Valdés £140,000
Alex Song - £120,000
David Villa - £120,000
Carles Puyol - £120,000
Andrés Iniesta - £115,000
Javier Mascherano £110,000
Gerard Piqué - £100,000
Cesc Fàbregas - £95,000
Jordi Alba - £87,000
Alexis Sánchez - £87,000
Pedro £87,000
Eric Abidal - £85,000
Adriano - £50,000
Thiago - £38,000
Ibrahim Afellay - £37,500
José Manuel Pinto - £33,500
Sergio Busquets - £33,500
Keirrison - £21,000
Cristian Tello - £18,000
Martín Montoya - £15,000

It makes for interesting reading, most striking for me if true is Puyol and Messi. We're in an age where loyalty is heralded but very hard to find. But we often hear that Messi wouldn't ever dream of leaving Barcelona, but yet he's on phenomenal wages, double that of Puyol, a true servant to the club. Admittedly a player of his calibre deserves these type of wages more than most, however if he was that happy at the club and willing to stay no matter what, surely the club would never have had the need to even offer these type of wages. So is true loyalty still a part of football? Or will a big pay cheque always turn even the most humble of heads?

< Message edited by Sexual Harassment Panda -- 12/2/2013 7:51:11 AM >


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Post #: 1
RE: Money in Football - 12/2/2013 12:51:55 AM   
Olaf


Posts: 23709
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As much as I'd like it to work, FFP is never going to come about the way it needs to. UEFA want to get paid too and a Champions League without Barca, Real, Chelsea, City etc isn't going to be very lucrative. At the very least though, I'm glad to see some steps being made towards some kind of wage capping which is arguably more important than controlling transfer fees. (A prime example of this is QPR's impending administration when the players who don't have a relegation clause - Samba is one if I recall correctly - will still want to be paid £100k in the Championship.)

as for Messi, I think that's just a case of being paid what he deserves (albeit insane money outside of the context of football) rather than a lack of loyalty. didn't Anzhi Makhachkala trigger his release clause and offer him something like £450k p/w only for him to turn them down? I'm more amazed at Dani Alves being their second-top earner.

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Post #: 2
RE: Money in Football - 12/2/2013 1:01:52 AM   
directorscut


Posts: 10891
Joined: 30/9/2005
LOL @ Song getting paid more than Judas.

Surely an across the board wage cap and transfer fee per season/window cap would be better than FFP, which to me looks like it's only going to protect the big teams and prevent the smaller teams from challenging them?

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Post #: 3
RE: Money in Football - 12/2/2013 2:27:39 AM   
Cloud Cuckoo


Posts: 408
Joined: 7/2/2013
From: Mind your own

quote:

ORIGINAL: Sexual Harassment Panda

Apparently, the Barcelona player wages. Some HUGE sums of money being paid. Do you agree? >>
Lionel Messi - £256,000
Daniel Alves - £200,000
Xavi - £170,000
Víctor Valdés £140,000
Alex Song - £120,000
David Villa - £120,000
Carles Puyol - £120,000
Andrés Iniesta - £115,000
Javier Mascherano £110,000
Gerard Piqué - £100,000
Cesc Fàbregas - £95,000
Jordi Alba - £87,000
Alexis Sánchez - £87,000
Pedro £87,000
Eric Abidal - £85,000
Adriano - £50,000
Thiago - £38,000
Ibrahim Afellay - £37,500
José Manuel Pinto - £33,500
Sergio Busquets - £33,500
Keirrison - £21,000
Cristian Tello - £18,000
Martín Montoya - £15,000



Is that a week?? Fucking hell!!! Messi could magic the ball into the net with his mind and he wouldn't merit that sort of money. Well, okay, but only JUST.


quote:



It makes for interesting reading, most striking for me if true is Puyol and Messi. We're in an age where loyalty is heralded but very hard to find. But we often hear that Messi wouldn't ever dream of leaving Barcelona, but yet he's on phenomenal wages, double that of Puyol, a true servant to the club. Admittedly a player of his calibre deserves these type of wages more than most, however if he was that happy at the club and willing to stay no matter what, surely the club would never have had the need to even offer these type of wages. So is true loyalty still a part of football? Or will a big pay cheque always turn even the most humble of heads?


I don't think true loyalty has been a part of professional football for a very long time, not when opportunity, money and success is concerned. Rangers fan Kenny Dalgleish seemed to have no qualms about becoming a Celtic legend. Denis Law went from Man United to Man City.

I suppose it's easy to judge when not in their situation. As professional footballers they want to play regularly, to win regularly, and to get paid lots for doing so. Is it immoral of them to try and squeeze as much cash out while they can? It's a short career after all, and not everyone slides effortlessly into punditry or management. You can't really blame them for taking it while they can, if clubs are willing to pay it.

That said, I agree Messi's wages are utterly insane. Little wonder he would "never dream of leaving Barcelona" under those circumstances. But then why else should he have great loyalty to Barcelona, a league club from a different country, when he is talented enough to be paid exorbitant amounts anywhere? That's the crux here. Puyol is on half the amount because no one would pay £250k for him. Messi could get that elsewhere.

It's sad, but in answer to your question, I think when it comes to the most gifted players loyalty needs to be bought. Which means it's not real loyalty at all.


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Post #: 4
RE: Money in Football - 12/2/2013 9:30:14 AM   
Flatulent_Bob


Posts: 8064
Joined: 30/9/2005
Good thread Nath, we used to have these all the time but its all died off recently.

Personally I'm against FFP, the problem with football and debt is we protect teams too much when they get into financial difficulties instead of letting them go. It might stop fans continually pestering for new signings, demaning players be paid them what they want to stay etc etc.

What we should look to be doing is ensuring that football clubs cannot have burdening debt, ie if a sugar daddy or consortiums wants to stand up a club it cannot be in loans they are responsible for funding it themselves.
I also think that clubs should have to have enough funds to cover the wage bill for that season. That can be via predictions based on last seasons turnover rather than having a couple of hundred million in the vault like casinos have to cover the chips upstairs, but if clubs have large wage bills they can't cover again these owners need to put that money into the clubs coffers.

This way owners/clubs can dream of making the Premiership or Champions League and the only person who really stands to lose out big is the owners in charge. Yes the owners could leave and the club would have to pick up the cost from the end of the season, but at least they'd have to fire sale the high earners for the start of the next season but you wouldn't get them limping along for 2-3 years with ridiculous wage bills.

If club go into administration then they should be relegated at least one league if not out of the league entirely IMHO.

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Post #: 5
RE: Money in Football - 12/2/2013 10:00:21 AM   
Professor Moriarty

 

Posts: 10469
Joined: 6/10/2005
From: the waters of Casablanca

quote:

ORIGINAL: Cloud Cuckoo

That said, I agree Messi's wages are utterly insane. Little wonder he would "never dream of leaving Barcelona" under those circumstances. But then why else should he have great loyalty to Barcelona, a league club from a different country, when he is talented enough to be paid exorbitant amounts anywhere? That's the crux here. Puyol is on half the amount because no one would pay £250k for him. Messi could get that elsewhere.

It's sad, but in answer to your question, I think when it comes to the most gifted players loyalty needs to be bought. Which means it's not real loyalty at all.



It won't come as a surprise to know that I'm not personally acquainted with Messi. However, I do think the insinuation that his loyalty to Barca doesn't extend past a weekly cheque to be harsh. Given that he was diagnosed with growth hormone deficiency at a young age and needed about 12 grand a year of treatment, which Barca paid for and it can be argued made him the man and footballer he is today, I can see him feeling like he owes Barca his loyalty.


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Post #: 6
RE: Money in Football - 12/2/2013 10:52:16 AM   
OPEN YOUR EYES

 

Posts: 4409
Joined: 5/2/2012

quote:

ORIGINAL: Sexual Harassment Panda

Lionel Messi - £256,000
Daniel Alves - £200,000
Xavi - £170,000
Víctor Valdés £140,000
Alex Song - £120,000
David Villa - £120,000
Carles Puyol - £120,000
Andrés Iniesta - £115,000
Javier Mascherano £110,000
Gerard Piqué - £100,000
Cesc Fàbregas - £95,000
Jordi Alba - £87,000
Alexis Sánchez - £87,000
Pedro £87,000
Eric Abidal - £85,000
Adriano - £50,000
Thiago - £38,000
Ibrahim Afellay - £37,500
José Manuel Pinto - £33,500
Sergio Busquets - £33,500
Keirrison - £21,000
Cristian Tello - £18,000
Martín Montoya - £15,000




Just think in how much the agents are earning to.The mind boggles.

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Post #: 7
RE: Money in Football - 12/2/2013 10:58:34 AM   
MOTH

 

Posts: 3479
Joined: 3/10/2005
From: Sittin' on the dock of the bay

quote:

ORIGINAL: OPEN YOUR EYES


quote:

ORIGINAL: Sexual Harassment Panda

Lionel Messi - £256,000
Daniel Alves - £200,000
Xavi - £170,000
Víctor Valdés £140,000
Alex Song - £120,000
David Villa - £120,000
Carles Puyol - £120,000
Andrés Iniesta - £115,000
Javier Mascherano £110,000
Gerard Piqué - £100,000
Cesc Fàbregas - £95,000
Jordi Alba - £87,000
Alexis Sánchez - £87,000
Pedro £87,000
Eric Abidal - £85,000
Adriano - £50,000
Thiago - £38,000
Ibrahim Afellay - £37,500
José Manuel Pinto - £33,500
Sergio Busquets - £33,500
Keirrison - £21,000
Cristian Tello - £18,000
Martín Montoya - £15,000




Just think in how much the agents are earning to.The mind boggles.



If I were Iniesta I'd be sacking mine!


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Post #: 8
RE: Money in Football - 12/2/2013 12:19:42 PM   
Flatulent_Bob


Posts: 8064
Joined: 30/9/2005
Danny Alves has had their pants down.

Best agent....EVER!

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Oh my God! They banned Kenny!


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Post #: 9
RE: Money in Football - 12/2/2013 12:27:54 PM   
Sexual Harassment Panda


Posts: 13308
Joined: 30/9/2005
Cesc Fabregas' agent is clearly out of his depth as well, to have been chased by Barca for multiple years it was clear they were desperate to have him on their books, surely he could have squeezed more out of them than he did? Not that £95k a week is to be sniffed at!

Another good talking point would be how much money has influenced and created this high turnover situation as far as managers jobs are concerned. Has the need to earn money to compete meant managers are becoming more and more disposable? Or perhaps the stupid amounts of investment in transfer fees and wages? But it's a double edges sword because the more managerial positions carry less job security, the more wages managers will demand, and the more we see managers seemingly taking roles just for the pay off, knowing success is unlikely.

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Post #: 10
RE: Money in Football - 12/2/2013 12:45:39 PM   
Professor Moriarty

 

Posts: 10469
Joined: 6/10/2005
From: the waters of Casablanca

quote:

ORIGINAL: Sexual Harassment Panda

Another good talking point would be how much money has influenced and created this high turnover situation as far as managers jobs are concerned. Has the need to earn money to compete meant managers are becoming more and more disposable? Or perhaps the stupid amounts of investment in transfer fees and wages? But it's a double edges sword because the more managerial positions carry less job security, the more wages managers will demand, and the more we see managers seemingly taking roles just for the pay off, knowing success is unlikely.


I think there are a number of keys to high manager turnover.

Firstly, when owners feel they have thrown a lot of money at a problem, i.e. the team wasn't performing as well as they thought it should, so they spent money on players. But the results are not significantly better they look at the next link in the chain, the manager. And decide to throw some money at that problem too. It's a quick fix mentality, where you believe that any problem you have can be fixed with a few million. Unfortunately whichever level you are at, there is a good likelihood that there will be other teams throwing similar money to try to get the same result.

Secondly, you have panic. If it looks like the team is going to get relegated (not qualify for the CL, etc) then bring in a new manager. Even a bounce of a couple of wins might do the trick. Its a dangerous ploy, especially in a relegation scrap, as undoubtedly he'll want to spend money and odds are that the incumbant is one who has just got you promoted, which might be next year's job again.

Finally, there seems to be some degree of friction between modern owners who would basically like to pick the team themselves and traditional managers who think they should have the say on not only the team selection and tactics, but also who comes into and leaves the team.

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Post #: 11
RE: Money in Football - 12/2/2013 1:23:27 PM   
Cloud Cuckoo


Posts: 408
Joined: 7/2/2013
From: Mind your own

quote:

ORIGINAL: Professor Moriarty

It won't come as a surprise to know that I'm not personally acquainted with Messi. However, I do think the insinuation that his loyalty to Barca doesn't extend past a weekly cheque to be harsh. Given that he was diagnosed with growth hormone deficiency at a young age and needed about 12 grand a year of treatment, which Barca paid for and it can be argued made him the man and footballer he is today, I can see him feeling like he owes Barca his loyalty.




That I didn't know. However if he was that grateful/loyal would he accept £100,000k from them every month?? I don't care which sphere of life you come from or what your background is, no one needs that amount of money. No one. Wouldn't a true supporter put some of that back into the club?


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Post #: 12
RE: Money in Football - 12/2/2013 1:46:26 PM   
Professor Moriarty

 

Posts: 10469
Joined: 6/10/2005
From: the waters of Casablanca
As I said, I don't know the guy. So I don't know if he'd play for 50 grand a year or whether he'd leave in a huff if they paid him a paltry 250K a week.

I can't really think he's overpaid tbh, he's the best footballer in the world. Its the biggest sport in the world and imo he's paid accordingly. I'm also not sure what is too much. The lowest paid player in Barcelona according to that list is on about 2/3 million a year. In my position that still seems a fecking massive salary.

One thing I absolutely guarantee is that when FFP comes in, or the new TV money hits. Fans will not suddenly see the ticket prices halve. Or suddenly a ticket for a family of 4 is 20 quid. Its not going to happen. Which in my head means I'd rather see the players getting the money than it go to a billionaire owner or a a group of suited executives. At least then you can (rather ironically) pay money to go to a game to shout at the players that they aren't worth the money they are paid.

I expect that if you compare what Messi is earning with a top golfer, basketball player, tennis player, American footballer or any other high profile sport its quite comparable. And when you look across entertainment he's probably getting what a major Hollywood star or internationally acclaimed singer is on.

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Post #: 13
RE: Money in Football - 12/2/2013 8:11:58 PM   
elven


Posts: 373
Joined: 19/12/2005
From: West Brom
May sound silly, but is this after tax?

Because I'm sure some clubs will pay the highest earners that sum of money AND cover the players tax to, I'm sure that's a big thing at Real Madrid ? (IMAGINE THE COSTS!!) Does that include his other factors ? Bonuses(for barcas sake I hope its only about €100 per goal...)? Image Rights? etc

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Post #: 14
RE: Money in Football - 12/2/2013 11:09:31 PM   
Saltire


Posts: 1974
Joined: 5/7/2011
From: Dundee

quote:

ORIGINAL: Cloud Cuckoo


quote:

ORIGINAL: Sexual Harassment Panda

Apparently, the Barcelona player wages. Some HUGE sums of money being paid. Do you agree? >>
Lionel Messi - £256,000
Daniel Alves - £200,000
Xavi - £170,000
Víctor Valdés £140,000
Alex Song - £120,000
David Villa - £120,000
Carles Puyol - £120,000
Andrés Iniesta - £115,000
Javier Mascherano £110,000
Gerard Piqué - £100,000
Cesc Fàbregas - £95,000
Jordi Alba - £87,000
Alexis Sánchez - £87,000
Pedro £87,000
Eric Abidal - £85,000
Adriano - £50,000
Thiago - £38,000
Ibrahim Afellay - £37,500
José Manuel Pinto - £33,500
Sergio Busquets - £33,500
Keirrison - £21,000
Cristian Tello - £18,000
Martín Montoya - £15,000



Is that a week?? Fucking hell!!! Messi could magic the ball into the net with his mind and he wouldn't merit that sort of money. Well, okay, but only JUST.


quote:



Messi goes upto £300k a week if they win the CL on his contract next year too. You can treble that amount he earns when sponsors money comes into it too. Those wages don't surprise me, Barca pay the highest wages per player in the world and have done for a while.

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Post #: 15
RE: Money in Football - 12/2/2013 11:15:03 PM   
Saltire


Posts: 1974
Joined: 5/7/2011
From: Dundee

quote:

ORIGINAL: elven

May sound silly, but is this after tax?

Because I'm sure some clubs will pay the highest earners that sum of money AND cover the players tax to, I'm sure that's a big thing at Real Madrid ? (IMAGINE THE COSTS!!) Does that include his other factors ? Bonuses(for barcas sake I hope its only about €100 per goal...)? Image Rights? etc


I believe it is, Ronaldo was moaning about his contract at Real as the tax rate went up in Spain and his contract afterwards meant he was paying far more in tax than he liked and part of the problem he is supposedly 'unsettled' at Madrid.

Btw Ibrahimovic earns 15 Million Euros AFTER tax at PSG where in France the tax rate is 75% meaning they fork out 60 Million Euros on him a season!

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Post #: 16
RE: Money in Football - 13/2/2013 1:09:29 AM   
Cloud Cuckoo


Posts: 408
Joined: 7/2/2013
From: Mind your own
quote:

ORIGINAL: Professor Moriarty

I can't really think he's overpaid tbh, he's the best footballer in the world. Its the biggest sport in the world and imo he's paid accordingly ... I'd rather see the players getting the money than it go to a billionaire owner or a a group of suited executives. At least then you can (rather ironically) pay money to go to a game to shout at the players that they aren't worth the money they are paid.



These are good points well made. You are quite right; far preferable that the one with the talent gets the biggest slice than it become change down the sofa of some billionaire corporate fat cat (though I expect they do okay). You have persuaded me!

It is just startling seeing these wages, knowing that a man who kicks a ball into a net for a living is paid, every week, over five times the annual salary of those who risk their lives to save others. It's hard to make sense of that - and the same goes for movie stars, golfers, basketball players, etc. What a topsy turvy world.

If I earned over £250k a week and didn't donate a sizeable chunk to good causes I don't think I could sleep at night. But then I am female.

< Message edited by Cloud Cuckoo -- 13/2/2013 1:10:30 AM >


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Post #: 17
RE: Money in Football - 13/2/2013 10:54:52 AM   
Professor Moriarty

 

Posts: 10469
Joined: 6/10/2005
From: the waters of Casablanca
Are you asserting that women are more philanthropic than men, or just suffer deeper guilt if they do not behave that way

Again, I'd not have any knowledge of Messi's charity contributions. Nor those in industry or entertainment, etc. that we can also define as mega-earners. Personally I don't think there should be a requirement for anyone to give any of their earnings to charity based on the amount they earn, they should do it because they feel it right to help out their fellow man to the best of their ability, whether you earn a low or high amount.

What I will say (in some kind of defense, even if he doesn't need it) is that he is / was a UNICEF ambassador and I'd guess that a lot of kids from deprived backgrounds are kicking a ball or tin can around and dreaming of being Messi. I don't know what that is worth, but I'd say something.

I know there is a gender bias in sport (hey you brought sex into this), so that even if women can earn large amounts playing tennis, basketball, golf or athletics (for example) they are not likely to make tens of K a week playing football. But I guess that the vast majority of men had this opportunity. A very small percentage will have never had a kick about. A good few will have played for school and other youth teams. And there are many who play professionally or at least semi-professionally in lower leagues earning not an awful lot. So, it is only the very few who make it to the top with a combination of talent and persistence. I guess what I'm saying is that there is a vast pyramid that is driven by some law of economics that it is possible for the chosen few to earn mega bucks, whereas a firefighter or some other life saving profession is a relatively flat structure that is much easier for anyone to enter and get a wage. I'm not trying to belittle firefighters, etc. and agree that the concept seems that it should be more highly rewarded than kicking a ball around, but it seems simple economic theory that this cannot be the case.

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Post #: 18
RE: Money in Football - 13/2/2013 2:44:11 PM   
Cloud Cuckoo


Posts: 408
Joined: 7/2/2013
From: Mind your own

quote:

ORIGINAL: Professor Moriarty

Are you asserting that women are more philanthropic than men, or just suffer deeper guilt if they do not behave that way


Umm, neither; it was a joke based on gender stereotypes, as indicated by the grinning emoticon.


quote:


Again, I'd not have any knowledge of Messi's charity contributions. Nor those in industry or entertainment, etc. that we can also define as mega-earners. Personally I don't think there should be a requirement for anyone to give any of their earnings to charity based on the amount they earn, they should do it because they feel it right to help out their fellow man to the best of their ability, whether you earn a low or high amount.


At no point did I suggest it should be mandatory for high earners to contribute a percentage to charity. I am not a communist. I said that personally, were I sleeping on a mattress stuffed with cash, it is something I would do. I don't expect everyone to share the same morals as me.


quote:


I know there is a gender bias in sport (hey you brought sex into this)


*sigh* See above.


quote:

so that even if women can earn large amounts playing tennis, basketball, golf or athletics (for example) they are not likely to make tens of K a week playing football. But I guess that the vast majority of men had this opportunity. A very small percentage will have never had a kick about. A good few will have played for school and other youth teams. And there are many who play professionally or at least semi-professionally in lower leagues earning not an awful lot. So, it is only the very few who make it to the top with a combination of talent and persistence. I guess what I'm saying is that there is a vast pyramid that is driven by some law of economics that it is possible for the chosen few to earn mega bucks, whereas a firefighter or some other life saving profession is a relatively flat structure that is much easier for anyone to enter and get a wage. I'm not trying to belittle firefighters, etc. and agree that the concept seems that it should be more highly rewarded than kicking a ball around, but it seems simple economic theory that this cannot be the case.



I really don't need this explained to me. I wasn't querying the logistics of football players being extravagantly paid; I was commenting on the morality of it, given how unnecessary and unimportant their job is.


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Post #: 19
RE: Money in Football - 13/2/2013 7:16:50 PM   
Rinc


Posts: 12841
Joined: 2/10/2005
From: A park bench, with a newspaper quilt

quote:

ORIGINAL: MOTH

If I were Iniesta I'd be sacking mine!



If I were Busquets I'd be burying mine in the ground.

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Post #: 20
RE: Money in Football - 14/2/2013 1:04:43 AM   
Saltire


Posts: 1974
Joined: 5/7/2011
From: Dundee

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rinc


quote:

ORIGINAL: MOTH

If I were Iniesta I'd be sacking mine!



If I were Busquets I'd be burying mine in the ground.


Lol true, how he's on less than Thiago who is a brilliant player, but not a first teamer is beyond me, when Busquets is virtually the crux of the way Barcelona play.

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Post #: 21
RE: Money in Football - 15/2/2013 7:42:32 AM   
Sexual Harassment Panda


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And now Man Utd's wage list has apparently been leaked:

quote:



Below is a list of Manchester United’s player wages as of September 2012. The figure shown is a weekly wage before tax.

Wayne Rooney - £180,000
Robin van Persie - £180,000
Rio Ferdinand - £110,000
Nemanja Vidic - £90,000
Ashley Young - £90,000
Patrice Evra - £75,000
Ryan Giggs - £70,000
Javier Hernandez - £60,000
Shinji Kagawa - £60,000
Antonio Valencia - £60,000
Michael Carrick - £55,000
David De Gea - £50,000
Danny Welbeck - £50,000
Darren Fletcher - £50,000
Jonny Evans - £45,000
Andres Lindegaard - £45,000
Luis Nani - £45,000
Chris Smalling - £40,000
Phil Jones - £40,000
Rafael da Silva - £40,000
Paul Scholes - £30,000
Alexander Buttner - £25,000
Angelo Henriquez - £20,000
Tom Cleverley - £20,000
Federico Macheda - £6,000
Nick Powell - £5,000



< Message edited by Sexual Harassment Panda -- 15/2/2013 7:43:42 AM >


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Post #: 22
RE: Money in Football - 15/2/2013 9:39:59 AM   
Your Funny Uncle


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I thought Nani and Scholes would be on more and Rio doesn't deserve that much but apart from that it looks about right!

Would be really intreseted in seeing Arsenals...

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Post #: 23
RE: Money in Football - 15/2/2013 12:32:58 PM   
horribleives

 

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I imagine Scholes was on more than that the first time round.

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Post #: 24
RE: Money in Football - 15/2/2013 1:31:55 PM   
Professor Moriarty

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: horribleives

I imagine Scholes was on more than that the first time round.


I'm also wondering if these are basics. For example, in the case of Scholes, I could easily imagine that there is a significant pay as you play component to his contract.

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Post #: 25
RE: Money in Football - 15/2/2013 1:33:47 PM   
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Plus Scholes will see more of his wages than most as he doesn't have an agent if I recall correctly.

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Post #: 26
RE: Money in Football - 15/2/2013 1:49:59 PM   
horribleives

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: Harry Tuttle

Plus Scholes will see more of his wages than most as he doesn't have an agent if I recall correctly.


Aye, I remember reading a (rare) quote from him years ago saying he never bothered with one as he had no interest in publicity, sponsorship deals or haggling over contracts and had no intention of ever moving to another club. What a star. And probably the last of his ilk too.

< Message edited by horribleives -- 15/2/2013 1:51:46 PM >


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Post #: 27
RE: Money in Football - 15/2/2013 1:51:25 PM   
Professor Moriarty

 

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Do you not think that when he looks at that list he'll realise why he should have had an agent

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Post #: 28
RE: Money in Football - 15/2/2013 1:58:22 PM   
erasheha1985

 

Posts: 69
Joined: 26/7/2011
quote:

ORIGINAL: Your Funny Uncle

I thought Nani and Scholes would be on more and Rio doesn't deserve that much but apart from that it looks about right!

Would be really intreseted in seeing Arsenals...



Surely most of our wage bill goes to our massively paid manager, our austerity doesn't apply to him

I expect our wage bill is bigger than most imagine actually. Just on the charity thing, there are loads of players who plough money into charities and have foundations set up, Kaka has long been known for this, Drogbah too, whilst Craig Bellamy who is generally unpopular has a school and football academy in Sierra Leone.

I really don't know how FFP will work, surely all it will take is a legal challenge from a club or clubs that UEFA dare to exclude from the champions league. Do we really see that happening, I know they say yes, but at the slightest hint of a breakaway super league they will, it's partly why the champions league was expanded in the first place, because people like President Silvio thought AC Milan should be in every season no matter what. And it would hardly be fair, I mean Arsenal say everything will change with FFP, being one of the worlds most profitable clubs, but Man Utd could potentially blow everybody out of the proverbial water in England.

< Message edited by erasheha1985 -- 15/2/2013 2:03:59 PM >

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Post #: 29
RE: Money in Football - 17/2/2013 11:22:05 AM   
Sexual Harassment Panda


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It's ironic that had he been advised by an agent himself he may now be voicing his very valid opinions in a more reputable newspaper, however what does everyone make of Gary Neville's views on agents?

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/football/article-2279744/Football-sleepwalking-crisis-agents-It-act-Gary-Neville.html

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