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RE: Django Unchained

 
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RE: Django Unchained - 28/2/2013 11:54:04 AM   
chris kilby

 

Posts: 1271
Joined: 31/3/2010
Well that made an interesting double-bill with Lincoln

Retro as always and ever the cinematic magpie, QT is at it again. From the old Columbia logo at the start to virtually every western trope you can think of - from Sergios Leone and Corbucci to Peckinpah, Roy Rogers to Blazing Saddles.

Django Unchained is also The Searchers in reverse while a Searchers-style montage includes a wintery sojourn in the snow which homages the frozen landscapes of Corbucci’s other classic spaghetti western, The Great Silence as well as Altman’s McCabe and Mrs Miller. Then there’s the Wild Bunch-style slo-mo and bloody exit wounds. Quite a lot of blood actually.

QT starts as he means to continue, “borrowing” the theme tune from Sergio Corbucci’s original Django. The blood red titles too while the Mississippi mud is yet another visual echo. Curiously the plot of Django Unchained seems to be inspired by the song’s lyrics (about Django’s lost love) in a way the original wasn’t – Franco Nero was far too busy mowing down Klansmen with a frickin’ great machine gun, the one thing Django Unchained sadly lacks.

Hard to believe, but for all his flamboyant excess, QT’s Django Unchained lacks the sheer mad exuberance of Corbucci’s original and isn’t anywhere near as insane as something like Django Kill! The most mental film ever made in any genre, it makes El Topo look like El Top Cat.

Like McCabe and Mrs Miller (an “eastern”), Django Unchained isn’t a western at all – it’s a southern! Conspicuously set in 1858, “two years before the Civil War,” Django Unchained predates the Wild West – roughly the twenty years between the end of the Civil War and the completion of the railroads. QT being notoriously particular when it comes to historical accuracy.

Green and lush where most westerns are dry as dust, Django Unchained is an anti-western. And for all its sub-Leone posturing (sub-Corbucci, actually), Django Unchained is an anti-spaghetti western as well. Where, due largely to language difficulties among multinational casts and crews, the spaghettis cut dialogue to the bone and let the six-shooters (and Ennio Morricone) do the talking, Django Unchained is talky even by QT’s standards. His biggest yack-fest yet, even Lincoln is tight-lipped by comparison. Where spaghetti westerns tended to be nasty, brutish and short (at least until Leone got all epic on the subgenre’s ass), Django Unchained is saggy, uneven and way too long. It also has one explosive climax too many. QT’s first film since the death of his editor, Sally Menke, in 2010, maybe he owed even more of his success to her than he realises.

But what talk. And another film-stealing turn from the wonderful Christoph Waltz (a nod to German “sauerkraut westerns” based on the Old Shatterhand novels of Karl May) as loquacious dentist-cum-bounty hunter, Dr King Schultz, like a cross between Doc Holiday and Lee Van Cleef’s dapper Colonel Mortimer in For A Few Dollar$ More – conspicuously not the same villainous character he played in The Good, The Bad and The Ugly. Waltz even has a similarly fraternal relationship with Jamie Foxx’s Django that Van Cleef had with Clint Eastwood’s Man With No Name (Joe). A great running gag has the erudite Schultz forever apologising to ignorant shitkickers who don’t know what he’s talking about - “Speak English, goddamnit!” There’s umlaut of it about.

Schultz is very much the flamboyant ac-tor, but isn’t he just a benign version of the same performance Waltz gave in Inglourious Basterds? Mind you, that hasn’t done Samuel L Jackson’s career any harm. He’s been delivering the same performance he gave in Pulp Fiction for years! It’s a wonderfully florid turn and camp as Christmas - “You silver-tongued devil, you.” Surely it’s just a matter of time before we see Christoph Waltz sitting in a hollowed-out volcano and stroking a white cat…

No wonder Jamie Foxx looks even sadder-eyed than usual. Softly spoken at the best of times, his Django isn’t so much taciturn as virtually mute if not worryingly docile. Foxx is frustratingly passive where Eastwood, like most spaghetti western heroes, was impassive. At least until Django Unchained’s completely superfluous final conflagration which is simultaneously too much and too little, too late. He might be “The fastest gun in the south” (eventually), but Django’s many humiliations, from dressing like Little Boy Blue (“You mean you want to dress like that?”) to near-castration, repeatedly rob him of all dignity, do little to empower him and only serve to undermine his eventual triumph.

Worse, the exception to all the endless jibber-jabber, Django is ruthlessly upstaged throughout by Mssrs Jackson, DiCaprio and, especially, Waltz. Which has gotta be the reason Will Smith passed on a role QT reputedly wrote for him. A smart move in retrospect.

If anything, Django’s lost love, Broomhilda von Shaft (Who’s the black, gorgeous chick who’s enslaved by total dicks?) is even more docile and curiously underwritten than her man. So much for black power; QT’s love-in with his more verbose (white) characters further undermining the supposed point of his film. King Schultz evokes the legend of Siegfried and Brunhilda (which also inspired Wagner!) but Django is more Candide than Siegfried.

Where QT really scores though is in his unflinching (and righteously angry) portrayal of the horrors of slavery. In true exploitation style, Django Unchained doesn’t shy away from all the whuppin’ and brandin’. Or the unblinking sadism of its perpetrators. (The eye-wateringly brutal “Mandingo boxing” scene seems to be a pointed dig at modern boxing as well.) This is very much in the cruel spirit of Corbucci’s Jacobean revenge westerns – the original Django was banned in the UK for many years and The Great Silence has the bleakest, most horrible ending ever.

Predictably it has been said that an exploitation film like Django Unchained isn’t the right place to address a subject as delicate as slavery. Yet exploitation (notably, blaxploitation) cinema has a long if not exactly proud tradition of tackling racial themes more than mainstream cinema does. Mainstream American cinema certainly, Spielberg’s “Slavery Trilogy” of The Color Purple, Amistad and Lincoln notwithstanding.

But while the “trashy” Django Unchained has more to say about slavery than the “important” Lincoln, neither is as profound a film about racism as Blazing Saddles. Seriously. The film which supposedly killed the western (it didn’t – it was just the final nail in its coffin) there’s a surprising amount of Blazing Saddles in Django Unchained, from our heroes’ inter-racial dynamic (which also echoes James Garner and Lou Gossett Jnr in the less well-known comedy western, Skin Game, which riffed on Eastwood and Wallach’s scam in The Good, The Bad and The Ugly) to “They’ve never seen a nigger on a horse before.” The merciless piss-taking of The Birth of a Nation and the KKK’s amusing lack of peripheral vision is pure Blazing Saddles. In typically anachronistic QT style, of course: for obvious reasons the KKK wasn’t founded till after the Civil War. In 1866 to be precise. Quite right too. Why let historical facts get in the way of a good laugh?

Speaking of which, Leonardo Di Caprio hams it up outrageously as flamboyant, southern-fried boo-hiss panto villain, Calvin Candie. Leo really puts the “boy” in flamboyant here - wooden teeth notwithstanding it’s the youngest he’s looked in ages. Christoph Waltz we already knew about from his towering performance in Inglourious Basterds. But Leo is a camp revelation here and absolutely hilarious - Leonardo Di Camprio! Relishing his wild-eyed, hammer-wielding, scenery chewing performance, Leo clearly had a ball. Would sir like some eggs with that ham…?

A preening, smiling villain, Candie’s Old Ben speech/lecture about the then-fashionable but long-since discredited pseudo-science of phrenology sets him up as a proto-nazi. But even more interestingly, Candie’s hollow French affectations seem to (deliberately?) echo QT’s own Nouvelle Vague pretensions…

Then there’s Samuel L. Jackson’s Stephen… Jesus H Christ on a horse, where in the wide, wild world of sports do I start!?!

An awkward mirror of King Shultz and Django, and a clumsy stab at Pinteresque, wag-the-dog role-reversal, Stephen might be the Machiavellian power behind the fey boy-king’s throne (or the brains at least) but he’s still a grotesque Steppin’ Fetchit caricature of the worst kind and a colossal misjudgement so terrible it almost sinks the entire movie. There is simply no escaping the fact that this calculating Uncle Tom (who looks like a malevolent Uncle Ben!) is a hideous racist stereotype straight out of the 30s – the 1930s not the 1830s, although that would be an easy mistake to make.

Jackson’s frankly jawdropping performance single-handedly puts emancipation (and possibly his career) back about a hundred years. A car crash of Mad Max proportions, it’s just as morbidly compelling. I sat staring in slack-jawed disbelief and simply could not look away. The audience pissed itself laughing at Jackson’s shrill, eye-bulging antics of course and, I’ve got to admit, I did too. But it was awkward, uneasy laughter and more than a little nervous and uncomfortable. What were they thinking? I don’t know. Maybe they were trying to give Spike Lee a heart attack or something.

I like QT and enjoyed Django Unchained – honest! I’ve actually enjoyed the last three QT films more than the first three – since Kill Bill his films have grown more richly cinematic and Inglourious Basterds was a real grower. But I do wish he’d grow up a bit. Sure, his stubbornly arrested development is part of his perpetually adolescent charm, but he isn’t getting any younger and I would love to see him do a proper, grown-up western. Cos for all his stylistic Peckinpah borrowings, The Wild Bunch this ain’t.

While Inglourious Basterds’ gleefully reckless disregard for established history was audaciously entertaining, QT’s deliberately crude attempt to address the delicate subject of slavery (which remains the biggest open sore on the American psyche) ultimately comes across as clumsy. Cruelly exposing his limitations as a filmmaker, it’s as embarrassingly gauche and awkward as any obnoxious teenager who tries too hard to be provocative. Like a lot of teenagers, Django Unchained is a bit confused. Django might be unchained, but QT seems to have gone off the rails.

Just look at the evident glee with which he indiscriminately deploys his N-bombs. More toe-curling than shocking, QT’s grating use of “The N-Word” smacks of blatant Spike-baiting and is about as shocking as Madonna’s tits. And like Madonna’s tits, we’ve seen it all before. Put ‘em away, luv. You’re just showing yourself up now. When Mel Brooks deliberately broke this taboo he was making a serious point about racism. QT, for all his doubtless good intentions, sadly just looks racist.

(Actually, the biggest shock in Django Unchained is the shooting of a horse early on. It’s more taboo to “harm” animals than people in films these days. Weird.)

Frankly I’m baffled that it’s Django Unchained’s heavily stylised and deliberately OTT cartoon violence which has proved so controversial and not its overt racism. But perhaps that’s understandable in the immediate aftermath of yet another massacre at an American school. However, blaming Tarantino for Sandy Hook is like blaming Marilyn Manson for Columbine. It’s not like Hollywood hasn’t been glorifying (and fetishising) guns since the days of Tom Mix and William S. Hart. Nosireebob! Much easier to, er, shoot the messenger rather than face up to the most inconvenient and glaring truth of all.

And another thing - QT can’t fucking act! I actually groaned when his big face leered into view again. I hoped he’d finally got over this distracting Achilles heel of his. And to add insult to embarrassment, that was the worst Aussie accent since James Coburn in The Great Escape. Strewth! Gawd only knows what Wolf Creek star, John Jarrett, made of it.

Still an explosive cameo though. And just one among many. Don Stroud looking alarmingly like grizzled Peckinpah regular, RG Armstrong. Crazy, wild-eyed Bruce Dern who once fatally shot John Wayne in the back. While Don Johnson IS Colonel Sanders! As for Lee Horsley, anyone else remember TV’s Matt Houston? Just me again, huh?

Anywho, I still think the western will make a big comeback some day. The more “futuristic” the world gets the more science fiction will fall out of favour, the same way 007 has largely dispensed with gadgets now we all have ‘em. Most of what passes for sci-fi (as opposed to “proper” SF) are disguised westerns anyway – what is Han Solo but a space cowboy? Star Wars even lifted the burning homestead scene from Movie Brat favourite, The Searchers, while Taxi Driver lifted its entire plot. Maybe, just maybe, Django Unchained is a welcome step towards that comeback…


< Message edited by chris kilby -- 28/2/2013 12:18:48 PM >

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ONE OF QT'S BEST...... - 1/3/2013 8:10:19 AM   
ROTGUT

 

Posts: 371
Joined: 14/7/2008
Tarantino continues to rewrite history and the history books with this entertaining melange which you could only describe as a spag & slavery western . Great performances all around from the four big hitters - Waltz, Fox, Di Capprio and Jackson all backed up by some gruesomely staged violence and an excellent soundtrack. I'd stick this film just behind Pulp Fiction and Dogs, but it's still one of his best. FOUR STARS

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Post #: 152
RE: ONE OF QT'S BEST...... - 6/3/2013 12:20:01 PM   
intermission

 

Posts: 1
Joined: 6/3/2013
The scene where that slave was ripped apart by dogs was a bit much though would you not agree?

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Post #: 153
RE: Django Unchained - 18/3/2013 4:52:22 PM   
FilmMaster

 

Posts: 26
Joined: 25/5/2012
Verdict: Full of stylistic cinematography, engaging (and funny from some) performances and an intriguing plot, Django Unchained is a must-see cinema experience- Especially for fans of Tarantino’s films.


Plot: With the help of a German bounty hunter, a freed slave sets out to rescue his wife from a brutal Mississippi plantation owner.

For U.K audiences, this is a 2013 release (lucky buggers the rest of you). Since I started hearing about this at the very beginning of 2012, I was interested to see Tarantino's next film, and when the trailer came out, I could not wait. All I can say is it exceeded my expectations and was better than I thought. I would put this film on par amongst my favourites of 2012.

One thing I thought might have went wrong for the film was the role Leonardo DiCaprio had taken. The trailer made me think that DiCaprio was just going to be an overly confident eccentric asshole, giving an excessively annoying performance, but I was wrong. DiCaprio was fantastic in the film as the eccentric and evil Calvin. Jamie Foxx and Christoph Waltz were also exceptional in their roles. Foxx’s hard souled (but loving), but heroic and brave character was one you rooted for throughout the movie, hoping for somewhat happy outcome. Waltz gave a hilarious performance, which made the film all the more enjoyable.

Django is filled with interesting characters that add to the humour such as Samuel L. Jackson’s character, Stephen. What made Django Unchained so great was the humour. One scene in particular that really had me in stitches involved people on horses, with bags on their heads where a row then began about how they cannot see out of them. You really need to see it to laugh, and it was a truly hilarious scene. Django is full of great humour, while sometimes daring.

The film contains plenty of gore that sometimes feels a little excessive to show. That would be my only complaint with the film. Do we really need to see the blood gushing from a man’s arm after being broke?

Finally, I enjoyed the gorgeously shot cinematography of the film. Seeing all those wonderfully set-up western scenes and wide locations, was just beautiful to see. It was very well shot and convincing western. You can also see Tarantino’s Sergio Leone influence and streak with the extremely wide shots, and even a shoot-off. Not to mention the quick-zoom’s to characters faces.

It is well worth seeing this film while it is still out. If you like good witty humour, high tension and major suspense, then see Django Unchained. Some scenes will have you laughing, and others will have you on the edge of your sea- A real thrill-ride of a western.

9/10


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RE: It was great until... - 18/3/2013 11:58:53 PM   
Fospherous


Posts: 2
Joined: 18/3/2013
It dragged towards the end; those last twenty minutes especially - If Tarantino still had Menke she would have sorted that out. Nonetheless - an enjoyable Tarantino film, closest he's come to matching Pulp Fiction in my opinion.

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jonson)
Post #: 155
EMPIRE, please read this! - 13/4/2013 6:53:44 PM   
Ralph25

 

Posts: 43
Joined: 30/3/2013
From: Portugal
I can say without exageration that Tarantino does not disappoint. His classic bloodbaths, intriguing dialogue and black humor finally had a tribute that is "Django Unchained." Many people did not like the movie or for being too silly, or too long, or excessive violence. Will a Tarantino fan crazy as me, to realize the enormity of the great masterpiece that "Django" can be?

Not only is one of the best of Tarantino movies, but it is the tribute that the writer-director make to his films, giving a demonstration of who he is and its material.
Django is arguably the greatest production of Tarantino, but I know that size does not make the content, but greater in everything. Here we see the combination of the various elements of Tarantino's films, the title character and history elements, are there all together, just pay attention.

At the beginning we see Django (Jamie Fox) as a poor, simple and sufferer slave, who meets the great Dr. King Schultz (Crhistoph Waltz), and with him the chance of vengeance of his old owners, and later regaining his love Broomhilda (Kerry Washington), these first 45 minutes of the film we see how Django grow both spiritually and mentally and becomes a killing machine that becomes later. Also in these first few minutes of the film we see elements of "Kill Bill," for example, the Bride of Uma Thurman, a sufferer with visions of the past in search of redemption and revenge against those who took her all what he loved. Django is her male version, and as The Bride is an expert on samurai swords, Django is in revolvers.

In the next two hours we see the plan that Django and Schultz plan, a foolproof plan to recover the wife of Django from the cruel Calvin Candlie (Leonardo DiCaprio), a plan that seems to be impossible to know when Stephen (Samuel L. Jackson). In these two hours we see elements of "Inglourious Basterds" and "Pulp Fiction". From "Inglourious" is the plan that seems foolproof that will lead to an enhuge end with small twists and obstacles ahead, along with an intriguing dialogue scenes, as the dinner scene where the 5 characters are conected in one intriguing line of dialogue that lead's to the unexpected end, such as scene (like Empire mentioned) that resembles the scene of the German Pub. From "Pulp" is the friendly and contradictory partnership between Django and Schultz, that closely resembles the duo Vincent and Jules. Two people who are very friendly and respect one another but a small rivalry between the two in what has regarding their attitudes or as Schultz says "getting dirty".

The end of the second act, delivering the third and final act where the unexpected happens, like any Tarantino movie, a tremendous scale of grandeur.
Django might not show a Western as we think it would, mainly because the film is set in the American South, being then a Southern, but "Inglourious Basterds" did not show much of the war and not the situation of the Jews (only the beginning) and focuses attention on killing Nazis. Tarantino uses the environment to explore the southern's slavery that existed in America during the time, but at the same time maintaining the elements of a Western, not getting shot during a firefight; a small town with a old sheriff with a dirty past; a lone ranger looking for redemption.

At the same subject, the characters, all well-established, and in them we can see several elements of other Tarantino films. Django seems a mixture of Jackie Brown, The Bride and Vincent See, all alike in gestures and attitudes but also their situation in the whole plot. A character a bit shy but very smart and they can even be BADASS, and their situations in the story that almost seems to be a secondary character; Schultz looks a bit like Winnfiel Jules (Pulp Fiction) and Max Cherry (Jackie Brown), a character cultured with a very particular vision of the world and with his own philosophy of what is good; Stephen is the mixture of Marcellus Wallace (Pulp Fiction) and Ordell Robbie (Jackie Brown), a "n#" who thinks superior to all others and can be really cruel. The only character who seems to be the same original was Calvin Candie, a cynical and cruel slave owner.

Many complain that Django can hardly stands out in the film being the main one, but how many times in Tarantino's previous films the main character was half out when the secondary characters spoke. But here the very minor characters seem to stand out when they talk among themselves. When is a scene of Schultz, Calvin begins to talk stealing his scene; when is a scene of Calvin, Stephen starts talking and steals his scene; when is a scene is Stephen, Schultz starts talking and steals his scene. And so it goes on in this dialog triangle of secondary characters, and all of them in the Badass voice of Django appears as a rollercoaster doing everything shake. This just proves that Tarantino can still do screenplays with mastery and persuasion.

The performances of the entire cast can also be fantastic, on the style of Tarantino, Jamie Fox can install itself in the world of Tarantino with a performance that is the beginning of a simpleton slave until its evolution into a BADASS lone-ranger; Chistoph Waltz superb as always and once again manages to be the favorite character of the movie for those who attend; Leonardo DiCaprio gives one of his best performances; Samuel L. Jackson proving to be one of the best suporting actors in the business. All amazing as the movie itself.

"Django Unchained" manages to be one of the funniest films of Tarantino, but also one of the most intriguing ones, with a really well written screenplay. A great product delivery that Tarantino has always given us and as always challenging and causing controversy in society, proving that it still has much to give.


< Message edited by Ralph25 -- 15/4/2013 7:35:22 PM >

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Post #: 156
Django Unchained - 17/4/2013 3:55:31 PM   
ruddick

 

Posts: 32
Joined: 2/10/2011
Classic ( the best film of the year )

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RE: Django Unchained - 21/4/2013 9:29:28 AM   
adamthehorrorfan

 

Posts: 122
Joined: 16/10/2011
From: London, England
Definitely one of my favourites of Tarantino's films. Great dialogue and action sequences, where there are scenes of carnage that suddenly happen after normal conversations like in most of Tarantino's films. Great revenge flick and I could not recommend it enough.

I might even consider buying it when it's released on DVD.

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Post #: 158
Django Unchained (2013) - 30/5/2013 6:49:19 PM   
theMANOFBLU

 

Posts: 2
Joined: 30/5/2013
With any Quentin Tarantino film the expectation is always going to be at its highest. So what starts off as a new good looking film from QT turns into more of an event. Django really did live up to my expectations and I hope any other QT fan out there thought the same. When he first announced the release of Django Unchained, I thought okay another meaningless title, what is it going to bring and is it going to be as good as his previous films, is this is where it goes down hill for Quentin. Really I was just being pessimistic. Because yes it was just as intriguing as any other of his previous films. Quentin's love for cult cinema is commonly unknown by many, which was why I knew there was a western being loaded into the Quentin cannon anytime soon. He mentioned in one of his interviews that a big inspiration to him was Sergio Leone and his classic spaghetti western 'The Good, the Bad and the Ugly'. So to see Quentin tackle the ethics of the western genre made the release that much more of a double event. But strictly speaking Django isn't a western. If anything it should be tagged as a 'Southern' coming from the man himself. It has nothing to do with the western genre.

Unlike Inglorious Bastards, Django doesn't try to be a riot and doesn't try to be as politically correct as possible (referring to WW2). It concentrates more on character development, pointing at Django (Jamie Foxx). For the first time in Quentin history the story is more linear and concentrates on the portrayal and the story of one character's journey. Also there are no shifts in time like Quentin's previous films. We don't see Travolta being shot by Willis and then reappearing in a later scene which is based before that scene. This doesn't leave you so confused but that doesn't mean you're not left confused at times during the film. After all that is QT job. Which is why as Quentin fans we need to see the film another two to three times to get the full QT experience. Also we don't get 'Chapter 2

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Django Unchained (2013) - 30/5/2013 7:05:15 PM   
theMANOFBLU

 

Posts: 2
Joined: 30/5/2013
With any Quentin Tarantino film the expectation is always going to be at its highest. So what starts off as a new good looking film from QT turns into more of an event. Django really did live up to my expectations and I hope any other QT fan out there thought the same. When he first announced the release of Django Unchained, I thought okay another meaningless title, what is it going to bring and is it going to be as good as his previous films, is this is where it goes down hill for Quentin. Really I was just being pessimistic. Because yes it was just as intriguing as any other of his previous films. Quentin's love for cult cinema is commonly unknown by many, which was why I knew there was a western being loaded into the Quentin cannon anytime soon. He mentioned in one of his interviews that a big inspiration to him was Sergio Leone and his classic spaghetti western 'The Good, the Bad and the Ugly'. So to see Quentin tackle the ethics of the western genre made the release that much more of a double event. But strictly speaking Django isn't a western. If anything it should be tagged as a 'Southern' coming from the man himself. It has nothing to do with the western genre.

Unlike Inglorious Bastards, Django doesn't try to be a riot and doesn't try to be as politically correct as possible (referring to WW2). It concentrates more on character development, pointing at Django (Jamie Foxx). For the first time in Quentin history the story is more linear and concentrates on the portrayal and the story of one character's journey. Also there are no shifts in time like Quentin's previous films. We don't see Travolta being shot by Willis and then reappearing in a later scene which is based before that scene. This doesn't leave you so confused but that doesn't mean you're not left confused at times during the film. After all that is QT job. Which is why as Quentin fans we need to see the film another two to three times to get the full QT experience. Also we don't get 'Chapter 2' or anything like that. Django goes for the more 'Rescue the princess' type theme. The story sees Django a slave being "Unchained" by a bounty hunter slash dentist Dr King Schultz (QT latest discovery Christoph Waltz) who won his deserved Oscar for Inglorious Bastards in 2009. However over the campfire he is amazed to know that Django is married to another slave called Broomhilda Von Shaft (Kerry Washington) even though Foxx and Washington played a couple in Ray.

Now as this is a 'Rescue the princess' film, there is a villain. Django Unchained's finest element is the new Robert De Niro, AKA Leonardo DiCaprio's Calvin Candie. A plantation owner in the south. Who keeps slaves including Django's love. QT tries to make him a perfect, spiteful, prone to flattery, selfish, vain man who wants nothing else but money. But the result is naive and funny which doesn't disappoint. Now me being negative. Quentin's attempt to include black comedy leaves the viewer slightly confused and doesn't want to know why they are confused either. I know there has been some controversy on the films running time and frankly it is not long ENOUGH. It flew by for me and I feel that some scenes could have been longer but I have a hunch they were shortened for the best. But other than that the only other advice is don't watch the trailer as it doesn't do the film justice!

In conclusion Django Unchained is a delight to watch from two hours before the film starts to the end credits. Verdict: Another bloody, well scripted masterpiece that QT has fed to our hungry eyes. Django really does help define QT as one of the finest directors in modern day filming. The only issue now is, can he keep it up?


< Message edited by theMANOFBLU -- 30/5/2013 7:07:19 PM >

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Post #: 160
RE: Django Unchained (2013) - 3/6/2013 3:56:23 PM   
paulyboy


Posts: 2578
Joined: 30/9/2005
Only just got round to seeing this, not much I can say that hasn't already been said a dozen times in this thread. It's a thoroughly enjoyable romp and Waltz utterly steals the show (again), but as others have said it's a good 30 minutes too long, the ending really should have been after the big shoot-out, why Tarantino couldn't have just re-written that so Foxx delivered the final ass-whopping there instead of dragging it out for another half hour with that mining company tomfoolery is beyond me.

It still manages to scrape 4 stars though, the rest was great.

4/5

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Django Unchained review - 7/6/2013 3:28:21 PM   
onefilm

 

Posts: 1
Joined: 31/5/2013
Empire ask that people not post to advertise their own site.

You can include a personal link in sigs - and if you're a regular poster, it will be noticed. But you aren't allowed to post just to lead users to your own site.

< Message edited by elab49 -- 7/6/2013 3:51:28 PM >

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RE: Django Unchained - 5/7/2013 8:03:58 PM   
Will Frey

 

Posts: 11
Joined: 2/7/2013
I thought this flick was one of Tarantino''s best yet. It didn't have the impact that "Bastards" left me with, but it definitely had it's own sense of style. Dicaprio stole the show, as did Foxx.
If I had to point one thing I'd change would be the production value - It seemed at times like I was watching the Wild Wild West. Maybe I now fully understand why Quentin is planning on leaving the director's chair soon

8.5/10

W.Frey

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Post #: 163
A MUST SEE! - 7/7/2013 9:47:14 PM   
Keegan Gess

 

Posts: 12
Joined: 7/7/2013
From: Elgin, Scotland
Sure enough, the movie has it's flaws but with the awesome OTT violence and Christoph Waltz acting you can't get much better.

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Post #: 164
RE: ONE OF QT'S BEST...... - 13/7/2013 9:48:47 PM   
Keegan Gess

 

Posts: 12
Joined: 7/7/2013
From: Elgin, Scotland
But don't you think it probably happened in those days as-well? I think Quentin Tarantino PG'ed that era with Django Unchained.

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Love movies, especially Quentin Tarantino, Oliver Stone, Christopher Nolan and Sergio Leone's epic westerns. My favourite film however has to be either The Godfather Part II or Carlito's Way.

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Post #: 165
"Gentlemen, you had my curiousity, but now have my... - 18/11/2013 3:27:14 AM   
movienut707

 

Posts: 220
Joined: 19/10/2012
At its most basic roots, Django Unchained is essentially a fairy tale, albeit one long, violent and soaked in blood. So, while this isn't Tarantino's best, it is nevertheless a welcome new addition to his oeuvre.

< Message edited by movienut707 -- 18/11/2013 4:03:37 AM >

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Post #: 166
The D is silent!!!! - 27/2/2014 7:30:44 PM   
Ciaran McDaid

 

Posts: 65
Joined: 16/10/2011
Tarantino's best film since Pulp Fiction!!!!!

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Post #: 167
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