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RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 31/3/2013 9:06:49 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 77072
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo
March.


2. Arsenic and Old Lace (4th view, 1944, Frank Capra) - 5/5
6. Sherlock, Jr. (2nd view, 1924, Buster Keaton) - 5/5
7. The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (4th view, 1948, Huston) - 5/5
8. Them! (2nd view, 1954, Gordon Douglas) - 5/5
9. Anatomy of a Murder (2nd view, 1959, Otto Preminger) - 5/5
10. Sunset Boulevard (2nd view, 1950, Bill Wilder) - 5/5
11. Cloud Atlas (1st view, 2012, Lana and Andy Wachowski/Tom Tykwer) - 5/5*
12. Paths Of Glory (2nd view, 1957, Stanley Kubrick) - 5/5

15. Oz The Great and Powerful (1st view, 2012, Sam Raimi, 3D) - 4/5*
16. Tyrannosaur (1st view, 2011, Paddy Considine) - 4/5*
17. Dredd (2nd view, 2012, Peter Travis) - 4/5
12. The Bourne Legacy (2nd view, 2012, Tony Gilroy) - 4/5
22. Holy Motors (1st view, 2012, Leos Carax) - 4/5*
24. Julia's Eyes/Los ojos de Julia (1st view, 2010, Guillem Morales) - 4/5*
26. The Shop Around The Corner (2nd view, 1940, Ernst Lubitsch) - 4/5
28. The Green Slime (1st view, 1968, Kinji Fukasaku) - 4/5*
34. Argo (2nd view, 2012, Ben Affleck) - 4/5
37. RED (2nd view, 2010, Robert Schwentke) - 4/5
38. Berberian Sound Studio (1st view, 2012, Peter Strickland) - 4/5*
40. Loving Memory (1st view, 1971, Tony Scott) - 4/5*
41. The Cranes Are Flying (1st view, 1957, Mikhail Kalatozov) - 4/5*
43. The Burning Plain (1st view, 2008, Guillermo Arriaga) - 4/5*
45. The Imposter (1st view, 2012, Bart Layton) - 4/5*
49. Remember The Night (1st view, 1940, Mitchell Leisen) - 4/5*
50. Real Steel (2nd view, 2011, Shawn Levy) - 4/5
26. Salt (2nd view, 2010, Philip Noyce) - 4/5
51. Chocolate (1st view, 2008, Prachya Pinkaew) - 4/5*

62. Django (1st view, 1966, Sergio Corbucci) - 3/5*
63. The Robot vs. The Aztec Mummy (1st view, 1958, Rafael Portillo) - 3/5*
65. Rio (1st view, 2011, Carlos Saldanha) - 3/5*
66. V/H/S (1st view, 2012, Adam Wingard, David Bruckner, Ti West, Glenn McQuaid, Joe Swanberg, Radio Silence) - 3/5*
67. Juan Of The Dead (1st view, 2011, Alejandro Brugués) - 3/5*
703. Love (1st view, 2011, William Eubank) - 3/5*
71. OSS 117: Lost in Rio (1st view, 2009, Michel Hazanavicius) - 3/5*
75. Earth Girls Are Easy (1st view, 1988, Julien Temple) - 3/5*
76. Valley Girl (1st view, Martha Coolidge) - 3/5*
78. Robot Monster (1st view, 1953, Phil Tucker) - 3/5*
80. Devil Winds (1st view, 2003, Gilbert M. Shilton) - 3/5*
82. La Ronde (1st view, 1950, Max Ophüls) - 3/5*
86. Alexandra (1st view, 2007, Alexander Sokurov) - 3/5*
87. Flash Point (1st view, 2007, Wilson Yip) - 3/5*
90. The Exiles (1st view, 1961, Kent MacKenzie) - 3/5*

92. Slade In Flame (1st view, 19175, Richard Loncraine) - 2/5*
93. Salon Kitty (1st view, 1976, Tinto Brass) - 2/5*
95. La Belle et la Bête (2nd view, 1946, Jean Cocteau) - 2/5

97. Fatal Deviation (1st view, 1998, Simon Linscheid) - 1/5*


Shorts
Don't Hug Me, I'm Scared (2011, Becky Sloan/Joseph Pelling)


Performance of the month - Cary Grant in Arsenic and Old Lace
Twonk of the month - Most of the cash of V/H/S, Frédéric Bourdin in The Imposter
Line of The Month - Here's 10 dollars. Go out and haunt yourself a hotel
Title sequence of the month - Oz The Great and Powerful (they really need an oscar category for this)
Song of the month - The Green Slime
Monster of the month - So many to choose from! Probably the Robot Monster
Headscratchers of the month - The last half of Love, the final 20 minutes of Berberian Sound Studio, all of Holy Motors.


< Message edited by Gimli The Dwarf -- 31/3/2013 9:58:41 AM >


_____________________________

So, sir, we let him have it right up! And I have to report, sir, he did not like it, sir.

Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

(in reply to Gimli The Dwarf)
Post #: 2491
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 31/3/2013 9:56:08 AM   
Rinc


Posts: 12760
Joined: 2/10/2005
From: A park bench, with a newspaper quilt
A Separation (Asghar Farhadi, 2011) - 7* Mar
The Artist (Michel Hazanavicius, 2011) - 7 Mar
A Few Good Men (Rob Reiner, 1992) - 7 Mar
Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (Tomas Alfredson, 2011) - 7 Mar
The Myth of the American Sleepover (David Robert Mitchell, 2010) - 7* Mar
In the Line of Fire (Wolfgang Petersen, 1993) - 6 Mar
The Cabinet of Dr Caligari (Robert Wiene, 1920) - 6* Mar
US Marshals (Stuart Baird, 1998) - 6* Mar
Of Mice and Men (Gary Sinise, 1992) - 6* Mar
Another Earth (Mike Cahill, 2011) - 6* Mar
The Happening (M. Night Shyamalan, 2008) - 4* Mar
Nine ½ Weeks (Adrian Lyne, 1986) - 2 Mar


My March...

This month I have mostly been watching… TV shows again
I discovered that… what was a fun bit of titillation in my teens (before the internet arrived), is actually a steaming pile of elephant shit with little or no plot, vacuous characters and the most ridiculous and unsexy sex scenes I’ve ever seen – Nine ½ Weeks take a bow; Tinker Tailor was a lot better second time round without having just read the book and watched the TV series; I miss Wesley Snipes; The Happening has potential but its execution is useless.
I didn’t like… Nine ½ Weeks; most of The Happening; Demi Moore is pretty useless in A Few Good Men.
But I did like… the acting in A Separation, Tinker Tailor and the ensemble in Myth of the American Sleepover; Nicholson tearing up the screen in A Few Good Men; Walhberg trying to be a science teacher and talking to a tree in The Happening; the incredible visuals in Dr Caligari.
Film of the Month… A Separation
Turkey of the Month… Nine ½ Weeks


< Message edited by Rinc -- 31/3/2013 9:57:00 AM >


_____________________________

No spoilers please:

Invisiotext:
[ color=#F1F1F1 ]text[ /color ]

(in reply to Gimli The Dwarf)
Post #: 2492
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 31/3/2013 11:49:06 AM   
matty_b


Posts: 14446
Joined: 19/10/2005
From: Outpost 31 calling McMurtle.
John Dies at the End (Don Coscarelli)

There's a dog in this and in a way that's quite a fitting way to sum up the film; it's like a dog that is determined to lick you into submission, by which I mean the film is so relentlessly sure of its strangeness that it takes no prisoners as it whisks you away with it - you either go with it or you don't, and it doesn't soften the material to make it easier to get into. Even now I would find it difficult to describe what it's actually about - a bit like a very trippy version of Ghostbusters is about as close as I can get to it. It's just really, really odd, but personally, I pretty much loved it and alternated between being completely baffled and hugely amused by it. YMMV, though. (4)


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Cool Breeze
Mattyb is a shining example of what the perfect Empire Forum member is.


(in reply to Rinc)
Post #: 2493
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 31/3/2013 1:27:05 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.

quote:

ORIGINAL: matty_b

determined to lick you into submission



That should be your new title.

(in reply to matty_b)
Post #: 2494
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 31/3/2013 1:41:00 PM   
matty_b


Posts: 14446
Joined: 19/10/2005
From: Outpost 31 calling McMurtle.


I'm still rather fond of the one I have.


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Cool Breeze
Mattyb is a shining example of what the perfect Empire Forum member is.


(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 2495
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 31/3/2013 4:58:01 PM   
rick_7


Posts: 6151
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: The internet
ClintFest '13

Two Mules for Sister Sara (Don Siegel, 1970)
- A mercenary (Clint Eastwood) and a sweary, resourceful nun (Shirley MacLaine) - who he rather fancies - try to outwit lowlifes, Indians and the French, and so make his fortune, in this Mexican-set Western. The episodic story, by B-Western legend Budd Boetticher, is good but erratic, and the same goes for Ennio Morricone's score (which includes an earworm of a theme for MacLaine) and Siegel's direction - a sumptuous tracking shot one minute, a clumsy, uninteresting composition the next. It's good fun, though, with some nice moments of pathos and comedy, and excellent chemistry between the leads. Eastwood is excellent, gradually expanding his familiar, taciturn persona with flashes of vulnerability and even a nice little song, but MacLaine is even better, and I mean Apartment-good, tackling her character's intentional contradictions, and very real faith, with intelligence, imagination and great beauty of spirit. (3)

Tightrope (Clint Eastwood, 1984) - There's a sign on a nightclub door in this film that says: "If nudity offends you, don't come in", and it's good advice, what with all the clothesless women slinking around, getting into jacuzzis or oiling themselves up and wrestling on stage as a midget referee adjudicates and Clint watches. (Yes really.) He plays a cop, divorced and with two young kids, who's trying to track down a sex murderer, while accidentally getting really horny every time he has to go and interview anyone. All that changes when he strikes up a genuinely affecting friendship with tender, understanding anti-rape activist Genevieve Bujold. This creepy thriller is tawdry, sordid and often just plain old horrible, but it's also very well-acted - particularly by Eastwood and his real-life daughter Alison - features a distinctive jazzy score and offers some interesting insights into love, lust and "the darkness inside all of us". Like Sudden Impact, it shows that the mid-'80s Clint just couldn't keep away from fairground equipment at night. And like so many of the star's later movies, it studies and subverts the prejudices rife in his earlier work - in this case the way that films like Coogan's Bluff and High Plains Drifter took rape so alarmingly lightly. (2.5)

Other stuff:

Police Story 3: Supercop (Stanley Tong, 1992) - Hong Kong "supercop" Kevin Chan (Jackie Chan), who as you'll know alternates incredible feats of derring-do with getting whacked in the balls, takes on his most OTT assignment yet, battling drug traffickers with the help of high-kicking Chinese military official Michelle Yeoh. They go deep undercover, getting involved in a prison break and a hilariously excessive jungle shoot-out, and the result is one of the most purely enjoyable actioners of the '90s. In its shortened US cut (which contains incongruous hip-hop and dubbing, though at least the stars do their own voices), the film consists of a string of astonishing action set pieces, held together by the merest suggestion of plot, and interrupted only occasionally by some surprisingly bearable comedy. Jackie is great, being swung across the city by a helicopter at the climax - only to end up atop a moving train, like his hero Buster Keaton - but Yeoh completely steals the show, offering a series of staggering stunts and fight scenes. Like Jackie at the start of the original Police Story, she latches onto a lorry and refuses to be budged, but that's only the start of it: there are artful leaps through windows (another Keaton speciality), split-kicks at head height, and a gobsmacking piece of daredevilry near the close, as she lands a motorbike on that speeding train. I'm keen to see the authentic HK version of the movie, but this isn't bad for now: a popcorn movie of the highest order, and perhaps the only time Jackie's been bested on screen since he stopped working with Yuen Biao. (3.5)

The Hole (Nick Hamm, 2001) - Wooden teenagers play out Rashomon very badly in this risible horror-thriller, which is clunky and embarrassing in that special way that only British films can be. Thora Birch - speaking in a very Aussie "English" accent - emerges from a disused bunker covered in blood. She'd climbed in to try to snare the emo of her dreams, but her three companions - rounded out by long-headed rugger player Laurence Fox and the 16-year-old Keira Knightley, flashing her tits for no discernible reason - had put their lives in danger to avoid a geography field trip. What an extremely credible set-up; now let's find out who's telling the truth about what went on down there: Birch or a potentially malevolent nerd who sounds like Tony Blair. Birch - who gave such an extraordinary performance the same year in the decade's best film, Ghost World - is quite good, and there's a well sexy scene where a green-faced Knightley vomits profusely into a toilet, but The Hole is a thin, unrewarding and ultimately pointless exercise entirely lacking in thrills, scares and, in its second half, anything even resembling real human emotion. (1.5)

The Son (Dardenne brothers, 2002) - A fastidious, haunted carpenter (Olivier Gourmet), who helps young offenders, takes on his son's murderer as an apprentice in this draining, often stunning drama from the Dardenne brothers. That fascinating premise is given mature and unsentimental treatment that compares favourably with the similar In the Bedroom. While, in my limited experience, the Dardennes' films tend to end with a fraught confrontation in a wood, followed by a brief, understated moment of catharsis, it's never quite clear where this story is heading or what the protagonist's plans are - if indeed he knows. Their movies are so richly realistic as to sometimes appear humdrum, providing a meticulous presentation of everyday monotony. And here some of the photography choices are downright peculiar: I've certainly never been better-acquainted with the back of an actor's head. But they clearly believe that you can only understand a character by understanding their way of life and the rhythms within it, and that you can only observe such things properly by literally following them around. They also clearly feel a great affinity with young offenders, unusual in today's world, repeatedly portraying them as victims of society, so it's interesting to see the story told from their victims' side. My only complaint is that the film, while startlingly original and beautifully acted, is ultimately too restrained for its own good - certainly its selfish, unrepentant teenager is harder to side with than Rosetta or The Kid with a Bike. The decision to have him lament only the time he spent behind bars is a curious one that fatally undercuts the denouement. There's a feeling that this should have been a truly great film, whereas it's only a very good one. Actually, that's not my only complaint. The idea that a table football champion would play without keeping one hand on the goalie is ridiculous. What do they take us for, idiots? (3.5)

_____________________________

*Wendy Hiller fanboy*

Blog: DJANGO! DUMBO! DESPICABLE ME 2! Plus: other stuff.

"Nothin's really been right since Sam the Lion died."

(in reply to matty_b)
Post #: 2496
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 31/3/2013 5:21:41 PM   
matty_b


Posts: 14446
Joined: 19/10/2005
From: Outpost 31 calling McMurtle.
The Ladykillers (Alexander Mackendrick)

Still one of the most perfect blends of comedy and death from these shores or anywhere else for that matter. Many individual scenes and moments are hilarious in themselves (Herbert Lom slinging his violin into his arm like a machine gun slays me), and the performances are a joy. (5)

_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Cool Breeze
Mattyb is a shining example of what the perfect Empire Forum member is.


(in reply to rick_7)
Post #: 2497
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 31/3/2013 6:56:19 PM   
Harry Tuttle


Posts: 7987
Joined: 12/11/2005
From: Sometime in the future.
March.

02 - Star Wars V: The Empire Strikes Back (Irvin Kershner, 1980) - 5
10 - Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (Stanley Kubrick, 1964) - 5
18 - To Have and Have Not (Howard Hawks, 1944) - 5
20 - Double Indemnity (Billy Wilder, 1944) - 5
22 - Casablanca (Michael Curtiz, 1942) - 5
28 - The Big Sleep (Howard Hawks, 1946) - 5
29 - Hot Fuzz (Edgar Wright, 2007) - 5
34 - Key Largo (John Huston, 1948) - 4.5
35 - The Last Picture Show (Peter Bogdanovich, 1971) - 4.5
37 - In Bruges (Martin McDonagh, 2008) - 4.5
40 - Stardust (Matthew Vaughn, 2007) - 4.5
41 - The Caine Mutiny (Edward Dmytryk, 1954) - 4.5
42 - Enter The Dragon (Robert Clouse, 1973) - 4.5
43 - Kiss Kiss Bang Bang (Shane Black, 2005) - 4.5
49 - Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (Peter Jackson, 2003) - 4.5
53 - Ratatouille (Brad Bird, 2007) - 4.5
55 - In A Lonely Place - (Nicholas Ray, 1950) - 4
58 - Lincoln Lawyer (Brad Furman, 2011) - 4
59 - Looper (Rian Johnson, 2012) - 4
60 - Play It Again Sam (Herbert Ross, 1972) - 4
63 - The Long Goodbye (Robert Altman, 1973) - 4
75 - Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2 (David Yates, 2011) - 4
78 - The Killing (Stanley Kubrick, 1956) - 3.5
80 - Ong-Bak (Pranchya Pinkaew, 2003) - 3.5
84 - The Ides of March (George Clooney, 2011) - 3
87 - Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 1 (David Yates, 2010) - 3
93 - Rise of the Guardians (peter Ramsey, 2012) - 2.5
94 - Journey 2 the Mysterious Island (Brad Peyton, 2012) - 2.5
96 - Haywire (Steven Soderbergh, 2011) - 2.5

I started writing a review for The Killing just before my computer died on me last week. It's got everything I look for in a great film but for me the voiceover absolutely kills it stone dead hence the relatively low score. That's the only placing I feel the need to pre-emptively defend .

< Message edited by Harry Tuttle -- 31/3/2013 7:03:05 PM >


_____________________________

Acting...Naturaaal

Your knowledge of scientific biological transmogrification is only outmatched by your zest for kung-fu treachery!

Blood Island. So called because it's the exact shape of some blood

(in reply to matty_b)
Post #: 2498
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 31/3/2013 7:10:53 PM   
Qwerty Norris


Posts: 3944
Joined: 26/10/2005
From: Edinburgh

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation



No (Pablo Larrian, 2012, CHL/USA/FRA)- The Chilean political drama with some laughs is quite a jazzy film. Not because it features Shostakovich twice in the soundtrack, but it features a slow relaxing pace that is never plodding nor fast pacing, taking its patience in presenting its message properly, and not plodding too much to get to the point, while also remaining rather playful, funny and sometimes even tense. It's also features an incredible reaction of the Chilean late 80s, thanks to Larrian's and his cinematographer decision to use film stock from the 80s, mixing the filmed footage with stock footage seemlessly to the point where what was filmed and what is footage blurs completely, while simultanouesly also achieving some beautiful shots from the grainy, gritty, Dogme-like film. The theme of politics and the advertisement behind them is clever, the handling of the plebiscite voting of 1988 quite balanced, the performances mostly excellent and the delivery of its plot absolutely clever. I recommend it.




Nice review & pleasing to see others have checked this out. Out of the stuff I've seen this year so far it's one of the only two things that I'm near enough sure will be in my top 20 of 2013.


quote:

ORIGINAL: rick_7



The Hole (Nick Hamm, 2001) - Wooden teenagers play out Rashomon very badly in this risible horror-thriller, which is clunky and embarrassing in that special way that only British films can be. Thora Birch - speaking in a very Aussie "English" accent - emerges from a disused bunker covered in blood. She'd climbed in to try to snare the emo of her dreams, but her three companions - rounded out by long-headed rugger player Laurence Fox and the 16-year-old Keira Knightley, flashing her tits for no discernible reason - had put their lives in danger to avoid a geography field trip. What an extremely credible set-up; now let's find out who's telling the truth about what went on down there: Birch or a potentially malevolent nerd who sounds like Tony Blair. Birch - who gave such an extraordinary performance the same year in the decade's best film, Ghost World - is quite good, and there's a well sexy scene where a green-faced Knightley vomits profusely into a toilet, but The Hole is a thin, unrewarding and ultimately pointless exercise entirely lacking in thrills, scares and, in its second half, anything even resembling real human emotion. (1.5)




Heh, I remember seeing this turd at the cinema. The moment when the American lad fell & died was met with thunderous laughter by the entire audience.


_____________________________

Qwerty's Top 10 of 2013 (so far)

1. Zero Dark Thirty
2. No
3. A Hijacking
4. Behind the Candelabra
5. In The Fog
6. Good Vibrations
7. McCullin
8. Beyond the Hills
9. The Place Beyond the Pines
10. Wreck-it Ralph

(in reply to Deviation)
Post #: 2499
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 31/3/2013 7:11:18 PM   
garvielloken


Posts: 1189
Joined: 23/10/2011
March

Seven Samurai (1954 Akira Kurosawa)
Stalker (1979 Andrei Tarkovsky)
Singapore Sling (1990 Nikos Nikolaidis)
Dersu Uzala (1975 Akira Kurosawa)
Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004 Michel Gondry)
The Human Condition Trilogy (1959 - 1961 Masaki Kobayashi)
Sherlock, Jr. (1924 Buster Keaton)
The Devil in Miss Jones (1973 Gerard Damiano)
The Face of Another (1966 Hiroshi Teshigahara)
Human Lanterns (1982 Chung Sun)
Celine and Julie Go Boating (1974 Jacques Rivette)
The Opening of Misty Beethoven (1976 Radley Metzger)
The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948 John Huston)
A Canterbury Tale (1944 Powell & Pressburger)
Duel (1971 Steven Spielberg)
The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada (2005 Tommy Lee Jones)
I Married a Witch (1942 Rene Clair)
Street of Shame (1956 Kenji Mizoguchi)
Blade II (2002 Guillermo del Toro)
Blade (1998 Stephen Norrington)
Sister Dearest (1984 Jonathan Ross)
The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1965 Martin Ritt)
American: The Bill Hicks Story (2009 Matt Harlock / Paul Thomas)
No Country for Old Men (2007 Joel Coen)
ParaNorman (2012 Chris Butler / Sam Fell)
Fist of Legend (1994 Gordon Chan)
Birth (2004 Jonathan Glazer)
Chronicle (2012 Josh Trank)
Lincoln (2012 Steven Spielberg)
Argo (2012 Ben Affleck)
Ghidorah, the Three-Headed Monster (1964 Ishiro Honda)
Double Indemnity (1944 Billy Wilder)
Chasing Ghosts: Beyond the Arcade (2007 Lincoln Ruchti)
The Shop Around the Corner (1940 Ernst Lubitsch)
Grabbers (2012 Jon Wright)
La Ronde (1950 Max Ophüls)
X-Men: First Class (2011 Matthew Vaughn)
Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol (2011 Brad Bird)
House at the End of the Street (2012 Mark Tonderai)
Cloud Atlas (2012 Wachowski & Twyker)
Breathless (1960 Jean-Luc Godard)
Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines (2003 Jonathan Mostow)
Killer Elite (2011 Gary McKendry)

_____________________________

Exactly six miles north of Skagg Mountain in the Valley of Pain, there lives an evil devilmonster. His name is Bingo Gas Station Motel Cheeseburger With A Side Of Aircraft Noise And You'll Be Gary Indiana.

Razzle them, dazzle them. Razzle dazzle them.



(in reply to Harry Tuttle)
Post #: 2500
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 31/3/2013 7:29:25 PM   
Deviation


Posts: 27268
Joined: 2/6/2006
From: Enemies of Film HQ
I was always planning to see it, I am half Chilean so I felt the sudden obbligation to do so.

Also, I realized I wrote "reaction" instead of "recreation". LOL.

Plus, the advertisements of the Franja del No are so witty and the story is so fascinating, it is sort of impossible not to make an interesting film out of it. I need to check out Larrian's other stuff, Tony Manero looks brilliant/upsetting.

_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Dpp1978
There are certainly times where calling a person a cunt is not only reasonable, it is a gross understatement.

quote:


ORIGINAL: elab49
I really wish I could go down to see Privates

(in reply to Qwerty Norris)
Post #: 2501
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 31/3/2013 10:07:55 PM   
Rebel scum


Posts: 3483
Joined: 2/1/2006
I've had a really bad March as far as film-watching goes, seen way below the amount I wanted.

  1. Ghostbusters (Reitman, 1984)
  2. Tyrannosaur (Considine, 2011)
  3. Andrei Rublev (Tarkovsky, 1966)
  4. Stoker (Park, 2013)
  5. Laura (Preminger, 1944)
  6. The Big Sleep (Hawks, 1946)
  7. Cinema Paradiso (Tornatore, 1988)
  8. Star Trek II: The Wrath Of Khan (Meyer, 1982)
  9. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (Yates, 2009)
  10. Enter the Dragon (Clouse, 1973)
  11. Jackie Brown (Tarantino, 1997)
  12. The Miracle Maker (Hayes & Sokolov, 2000)
  13. The Tenant (Polanski, 1976)


_____________________________

"We are not safe! A dark menace rises to the east! Duckies go quack! Cows go moo! I want ice cream. Verily, will you two hobbits join my quest?"

(in reply to Deviation)
Post #: 2502
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 31/3/2013 11:53:14 PM   
MonsterCat


Posts: 7932
Joined: 24/3/2011
From: St. Albans, Hertfordshire
The Master (Paul Thomas Anderson; 2012)

Whenever I sit down to watch a new joint by my boy PTA, I usually have very high hopes that it will be just as great as what came before, but with that comes a sense of nervousness that I may not like it. And while The Master isn't quite as good or accessible as Boogie Nights or There Will Be Blood, it is still a pretty exceptional and sadly all too rare piece of challenging, adult film-making. And with that comes PTA's love of cinema and a genuine interest in the people he's writing about, no matter how jaded, complex and flawed they may be.

In terms of plot and structure it's not as rigid as the afore-mentioned films on Anderson's CV, but when the characters are this well drawn and compelling I don't think that matters too much in the grand scheme of things. Acting wise, there's rarely a false note, but it's Joaquin Phoenix who makes the biggest impression. His portrayal of the alcoholic WW2 vet is frighteningly believable. It's an extraordinary performance and the lack of recognition for this faultless piece of acting during the awards season just goes to show what a bunch of myopic numb nuts the Academy members really are.

So, even though it probably won't trouble TWBB as my top Anderson movie, it looks like it will make it's way into the top 5 at least. It's a film that exhibits Anderson's canny ability to make even the most deliberately paced films with heavy subject matter thoroughly entertaining and endlessly compelling. Superb stuff indeed.

< Message edited by MonsterCat -- 1/4/2013 12:11:46 AM >


_____________________________

"I am a writer, a doctor, a nuclear physicist and a theoretical philosopher. But above all, I am a man, a hopelessly inquisitive man, just like you."

Films watched in 2013

(in reply to Rebel scum)
Post #: 2503
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 1/4/2013 12:43:02 AM   
MonsterCat


Posts: 7932
Joined: 24/3/2011
From: St. Albans, Hertfordshire
Films for March. Check it, yo.

In order of preference.

1. The Exorcist (Friedkin; 1973)
2. The Thing (Carpenter; 1982)
3. There Will Be Blood (Anderson; 2007)
4. The Master (Anderson; 2012)
5. The Fly (Cronenberg; 1986)
6. Lost Highway (Lynch; 1997)
7. Batman Begins (Nolan; 2005)
8. The Dark Knight Rises (Nolan; 2012)
9. The Dark Knight (Nolan; 2008)
10. American Psycho (Harron; 2000)
11. Argo (Affleck; 2012)
12. Rust & Bone (Audiard; 2012)
13. Lawrence of Arabia (Lean; 1962)
14. Margin Call (Chandor; 2012)
15. Cabin in the Woods (Godard; 2012)
16. Philadelphia (Demme; 1993)
17. Killing Them Softly (Dominik; 2012)
18. American Mary (Soska; 2012)
19. Bloodsport (Arnold; 1988)

_____________________________

"I am a writer, a doctor, a nuclear physicist and a theoretical philosopher. But above all, I am a man, a hopelessly inquisitive man, just like you."

Films watched in 2013

(in reply to MonsterCat)
Post #: 2504
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 1/4/2013 12:56:40 AM   
directorscut


Posts: 10597
Joined: 30/9/2005
The Forbidden Kingdom (2008, Rob Minkoff): Highly derivative but fun Hollywood martial arts fantasy based on "Journey to the West", which must be about the millionth time that particular story has been mined. At times it feels like a checklist of other films - here's our "Hero" scene, here's our "Crouching Tiger" scene, here's our "House of Flying Daggers" scene, here's out "Bride with White Hair" scene, etc... The highlight of the film is Jackie Chan and Jet Li on screen together. They have an easy chemistry together and are lots of fun. The American lead however has about as much charisma and screen presence as a sack of spuds, and his martial arts are rubbish. So why give him the job? Why not hire a genuine martial artist? It's not like his acting could be much worse. The fight scenes (choreographed by Yuen Woo-ping) involving Chan and Li, though not on par with their legendary Hong Kong work, is pretty much as good as one can expect from the confines of Hollywood, though again there's a huge feeling of having seen this all before. Director Rob "Stuart Little" Minkoff brings nothing to the table, so why not hire Chan or Yuen Woo-ping - true innovators in the field - to direct it? The opening credits sequence featuring poster art from great martial arts films is quite cool, but it seems to me like your setting yourself up to fail when you remind the audience of those great films before your movie starts! The film was shot digitally and some of it (the night scenes in particular) looks absolutely vile. Long live film. Also, no gag reel at the end, WTH? (3)

Road House (1948, Jean Negulesco): Ida Lupino and Richard Widmark are dynamite in this quality noir. Lupino stars as a bar singer Widmark hires to sing at a road house near the Canadian border he co-runs with Cornel Wilde. Widmark has the hots for Lupino; Lupino and Wilde love each other, Widmark get jealous and every thing goes to pot. Widmark gives his classic psycho performance here, although he actually starts out as a pretty nice guy but then he snaps and with Widmark the change is utterly convincing. The film builds steadily to the tense final act where an unhinged (and armed) Widmark brings Lupino and Widle to his cabin in the woods and they and the audience waits on the edge of their seat for Widmark to blow up. Lupino sings a wonderful rendition of "One for My Baby (And One More for the Road)", a definitive example of smoky bar-room cool. (4)

Naruto Shippuden: The Movie (2007, Hajime Kamegaki): Unlike others I have no problem with the TV/movie makers adding new stories to the Naruto universe that are not related to the story of the manga,and some of my favourite episodes are those made up for the TV show. The problem here is that everything in this movie has already been done before and better in "Naruto", sometimes many time before. It's a bit stale. (2)

In the Line of Fire (1993, Wolfgang Petersen): Terrific thriller that is as finely crafted and tune as an expensive watch but doesn't skim on the characters. Compelling performances by Eastwood and Malkovich, riveting dialogue exchanges and expert direction by Petersen make this top class entertainment. (4)


March:

01. Cœur fidèle (1923, Jean Epstein)
02. Vampyr (1932, Carl Th. Dreyer)
03. In the Line of Fire (1993, Wolfgang Petersen)
04. The Girlfriends (1955, Michelangelo Antonioni)
05. The Rock (1996, Michael Bay)
06. Road House (1948, Jean Negulesco)
07. Dangerous Crossing (1953, Joseph M. Newman)
08. Air Force One (1997, Wolfgang Petersen)
09. The Prisoner of Shark Island (1936, John Ford)
10. St. Francis, God's Jester (1950, Roberto Rossellini)
11. The Lady Without Camelias (1953, Michelangelo Antonioni)
12. Robin Hood: Princes of Thieves (1991, Kevin Reynolds)
13. Shock (1946, Alfred L. Werker)
14. The Forbidden Kingdom (2008, Rob Minkoff)
15. Daisy Kenyon (1947, Otto Preminger)
16. Snow White and the Huntsman (2012, Rupert Sanders)
17. Naruto Shippuden: The Movie (2007, Hajime Kamegaki)


_____________________________



Member of the TMNT 1000 Club.

(in reply to MonsterCat)
Post #: 2505
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 1/4/2013 1:24:16 AM   
scarface666brooksy!!


Posts: 3544
Joined: 24/10/2007
From: The Valley of the Wind
March:

1. Toy Story (1995, Lasseter, Millionth viewing) (Mar)
2. Winter's Bone (2010, Granik, 2nd viewing) (Mar)
3. Akira (1988, Otomo, 3rd viewing) (Mar)
4. Confessions (2010, Nakashima, 1st viewing) (Mar)
5. Submarine (2010, Ayoade, 1st viewing) (Mar)
6. Tokyo Drifter (1966, Suzuki, 1st viewing) (Mar)
7. Through A Glass Darkly (1961, Bergman, 1st viewing) (Mar)
8. Up In Smoke (1978, Adler, 2nd viewing) (Mar)
9. Martha Marcy May Marlene (2011, Durkin, 1st viewing) (Mar)
10. Picnic at Hanging Rock (1975, Weir, 1st viewing) (Mar)
11. Return to Oz (1985, Murch, 1st viewing) (Mar)
12. Dr. Caligari (1989, Sayadian, 1st viewing) (Mar)
13. Dawn of the Dead (1978, Romero, 1st viewing) (Mar)
14. Brave (2012, Chapman et al, 2nd viewing) (Mar)
15. The Adventures of Barry McKenzie (1972, Beresford, 1st viewing) (Mar)
16. Oz The Great and Powerful (2013, Raimi, 1st viewing) (Mar)
17. Women In Cellblock 9 (1977, Franco, 1st viewing) (Mar)

March was a pretty good month for me, the Top 10 were all films I either loved or really really enjoyed, and the rest were all either really good films or decent as well (minus Cellblock 9 which was quite poor)

< Message edited by scarface666brooksy!! -- 1/4/2013 1:26:18 AM >


_____________________________

My Aussie Film Thread - Film #7 - Patrick (1978)


(in reply to directorscut)
Post #: 2506
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 1/4/2013 10:19:52 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 77072
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo
52. Tokyo! (1st view, 2008, Michel Gondry, Leos Carax, Bong Joon-ho) - 4/5*
This was a Rawlinson recommendation so it should come as no surprise that's it's utterly crazy. Good though.

1. Late Spring (1st view, 1949, Yasujirō Ozu) - 5/5*
2. Iron Man (5th view, 2008, Jon Favreau) - 4/5
3. Iron Man 3 (1st view, 2013, Shane Black) - 4/5*
4. ParaNorman (1st view, 2012, Sam Fell/Chris Butler) - 4/5*
5. Olympus Has Fallen (1st view, 2013, Antoine Fuqua) - 4/5*
6. Trance (1st view, 2012, Danny Boyle) - 4/5*
7. End Of Watch (1st view, 2012, David Ayer) - 4/5*
8. Akira (1st view, 1988, Katsuhiro Otomo) - 4/5*
9. A Bittersweet Life (1st view, 2005, Kim Ji-woon) - 4/5*
10. Iron Man 2 (3rd view, 2010, Jon Favreau) - 4/5

11. Oblivion (1st view, 2013, Joseph Kosinski) - 4/5*
12. Tokyo! (1st view, 2008, Michel Gondry, Leos Carax, Bong Joon-ho) - 4/5*
13. Capturing The Friedmans (2nd view, 2003, Andrew Jarecki) - 4/5
14. G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra (3rd view, 2009, Stephen Sommers) - 4/5
15. Paprika (1st view, 2006, Satoshi Kon) - 4/5*
16. Magical Mystery Tour (1st view, 1969, Bernard Knowles) - 4/5*
17. Street Fighter (1st view, 1994, Steven E. de Souza) - 4/5*
18. G.I. Joe: Retaliation (1st view, 2013, Jon M. Chu) - 4/5*
19. Hotel Transylvania (1st view, 2012, Genndy Tartakovsky) - 3/5*
20. Human Lanterns (1st view, 1982, Chung Sun) - 3/5*

21. Ivan's Childhood (1st view, 1962, Andrei Tarkovsky) - 3/5*
22. The Wackiest Ship In The Army (1st view, 1960, Richard Murphy) - 3/5*
23. Groundhog Day (4th view, 1993, Harold Ramis) - 3/5
24. Eraserhead (2nd view, 1977, David Lynch) - 2/5


Shorts

1. Goodnight Mr. Foot (1st view, 2012, Genndy Tartakovsky)

4. Hotel Transylvania (1st view, 2012, Genndy Tartakovsky) - 3/5*

< Message edited by Gimli The Dwarf -- 1/5/2013 5:05:52 AM >


_____________________________

So, sir, we let him have it right up! And I have to report, sir, he did not like it, sir.

Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

(in reply to scarface666brooksy!!)
Post #: 2507
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 1/4/2013 10:46:35 AM   
Rebel scum


Posts: 3483
Joined: 2/1/2006
25-The Wrestler (Aronofsky, 2008) 8/10

It lacks the beauty of The Fountain, the hectic mind-trip of Pi, the raw power of Requiem for a Dream and the lesbians of Black Swan, but this is still a cut above most sports films. Mickey Rourke is astonishing in the lead, and the fight scenes have a twisted brutality not seen sine Raging Bull. Towards the middle it does drag somewhat, but the ending is ruthless in how it turns you into an emotional wreck.

_____________________________

"We are not safe! A dark menace rises to the east! Duckies go quack! Cows go moo! I want ice cream. Verily, will you two hobbits join my quest?"

(in reply to Gimli The Dwarf)
Post #: 2508
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 1/4/2013 11:01:28 AM   
TRM


Posts: 4797
Joined: 20/10/2006
From: Bristol
March

Features:
The treasure of the sierra madre (John Huston, 1948) - 5
Sullivan's Travels (Preston Sturges, 1941) - 5
Starman (John Carpenter, 1984) - 4
The cranes are flying (MMikhail Kalatozov, 1957) - 4
Come drink with me (King Hu, 1966) - 4
The Silent Duel (Akira Kurosawa, 1949) - 4
Salesman (Albert Maysles & David Maysles, 1968) - 4
Dracula (Terence Fisher, 1958) - 4
Them! (Gordon Douglas, 1954) - 4
Fullmetal Alchemist : The conqueror of shambala (Seiji Mizushima, 2005) - 4
Capturing the Friedmans (Andrew Jarecki, 2003) - 4
Coeur Fidele (Jean Epstein, 1923) - 4
I was born but... (Yasusiro Ozu, 1932) - 4
The Master (Paul Thomas Anderson, 2012) - 4
The long day closes (Terence Davies, 1992) - 4
Camille (George Cukor, 1936) - 4
Dracula has risen from the grave (Freddie Francis, 1968) - 3
Bright Future (Kiyoshi Kurosawa, 2003) - 3
Darkman (Sam Raimi, 1990) - 3
Body Bags (John Carpenter & Tobe Hooper, 1993) - 3
The Big Steal (Don Siegel, 1949) - 2

Shorts:
The champion (Charles Chaplin, 1915) - 4

< Message edited by TRM -- 1/4/2013 11:02:20 AM >


_____________________________

I'm going out to the states to redeem the social outcasts. My only real ambition is to cultivate Texas. I love Texas. You must watch "The last picture show". That film! It was my first real sexual relationship.

(in reply to paul_ie86)
Post #: 2509
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 1/4/2013 12:13:41 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54433
Joined: 1/10/2005
Crikey. Um.

I like Bright Future more but it seems to be a more divisive Kurosawa. It really caught me when I watched it though. And Long Day Closes should be 5, so there

_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to TRM)
Post #: 2510
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 1/4/2013 12:40:58 PM   
Qwerty Norris


Posts: 3944
Joined: 26/10/2005
From: Edinburgh
A busy month at the cinema but a very quiet one at home.

1. Stoker (2012, Chan-Wook) -4/5
2. G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra (2009, Sommers) -2/5
3. Even The Rain (2010, Bollain) - 4/5
4. Robot & Frank (2012, Schreier) - 3/5
5. Arbitrage (2012, Jarecki) - 3/5
6. Oz: The Great & Powerful (2013, Raimi) -4/5
7. Cloud Atlas (2012, Twyker & the Wachowskis) -2/5
8. Side Effects (2013, Soderbergh) - 4/5
9. Shell (2012, Graham) - 4/5
10. Welcome To The Punch (2013, Creevy) - 3/5
11. G.I. Joe: Retaliation (2013, Chu) -2/5
12. Beyond The Hills (2012, Mungiu) -4/5
13. Reality (2012, Garrone) -3/5
14. Trance (2013, Boyle) -3/5

Film of the month? Probably a tie between Shell & Beyond The Hills (I noticed you weren't a fan elab?)

_____________________________

Qwerty's Top 10 of 2013 (so far)

1. Zero Dark Thirty
2. No
3. A Hijacking
4. Behind the Candelabra
5. In The Fog
6. Good Vibrations
7. McCullin
8. Beyond the Hills
9. The Place Beyond the Pines
10. Wreck-it Ralph

(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 2511
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 1/4/2013 1:28:04 PM   
TRM


Posts: 4797
Joined: 20/10/2006
From: Bristol
quote:

ORIGINAL: elab49

Crikey. Um.

I like Bright Future more but it seems to be a more divisive Kurosawa. It really caught me when I watched it though. And Long Day Closes should be 5, so there


It does seem to be getting easier to predict the ones which are likely to upset you  

I agree for the Kurosawa. I watched Tokyo Sonata last year and loved that one. The same is true with the Davies.

_____________________________

I'm going out to the states to redeem the social outcasts. My only real ambition is to cultivate Texas. I love Texas. You must watch "The last picture show". That film! It was my first real sexual relationship.

(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 2512
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 1/4/2013 5:57:41 PM   
Rhubarb


Posts: 24507
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: No Direction Home
March was quite quiet but of a fairly high standard


  1. Blood Simple
  2. The Red Sorghum
  3. Dracula (Fisher)
  4. Carnage
  5. Laputa: Castle in the Sky
  6. I Was Born But...
  7. Dracula Has Risen From the Grave
  8. M*A*S*H*
  9. The Master
  10. Marley
  11. OSS 117 A Nest of Spies


Sort of got a feeling I might have forgotten something as well to be honest.


< Message edited by Rhubarb -- 1/4/2013 6:00:08 PM >


_____________________________

Team Ginge
WWLD?


quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan

You organisational skills sicken me, Rhubarb.



(in reply to TRM)
Post #: 2513
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 1/4/2013 6:51:37 PM   
Deviation


Posts: 27268
Joined: 2/6/2006
From: Enemies of Film HQ

quote:

ORIGINAL: Gimli The Dwarf

52. Tokyo! (1st view, 2008, Michel Gondry, Leos Carax, Bong Joon-ho) - 4/5*
This was a Rawlinson recommendation so it should come as no surprise that's it's utterly crazy. Good though.


I want to see it, if not only to see the other appearance of Lavant's goblin gibberish-speaking thing.

_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Dpp1978
There are certainly times where calling a person a cunt is not only reasonable, it is a gross understatement.

quote:


ORIGINAL: elab49
I really wish I could go down to see Privates

(in reply to Gimli The Dwarf)
Post #: 2514
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 1/4/2013 9:03:33 PM   
MonsterCat


Posts: 7932
Joined: 24/3/2011
From: St. Albans, Hertfordshire
Anna Karenina (Joe Wright; 2012)

The set designs, cinematography and Wright's camera movements are all very impressive, but none of these things can liven up this fairly dull, oddly passionless romantic drama. It also doesn't help that Keira Knightley and Aaron Taylor Johnson seem to have forgotten that they can actually act, and have little chemistry between them (I mean, their sex scene was like watching two trees fucking). My interest level rose only when the gorgeous and talented Alicia Vikander turned up on screen, and Jude Law is actually fine as Karenina's starchy husband. Apart from that, there's not much to be engaged by with this frankly boring film.

< Message edited by MonsterCat -- 1/4/2013 9:14:49 PM >


_____________________________

"I am a writer, a doctor, a nuclear physicist and a theoretical philosopher. But above all, I am a man, a hopelessly inquisitive man, just like you."

Films watched in 2013

(in reply to Deviation)
Post #: 2515
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 2/4/2013 1:00:46 AM   
Ultimo Lee

 

Posts: 1667
Joined: 17/7/2007
From: Manchester
100! for the year, some fun, some rewatches and it's a shame Bruno Dumont doesn't live in Iran or China because someone has to make him stay at home and play with his iguana.

March (40) /Total for the Year (100)

FOUR
Dodgeball (Rawson Marshall Thurber, 2004) America {Mar} **
Turkish Delight (Paul Verhoeven, 1973) Holland {Mar}
Set Me Free (Léa Pool, 1999) Canada {Mar}
The Paperboy (Lee Daniels, 2012) America {Mar}
Night Moves (Arthur Penn, 1975) America {Mar}
Sightseers (Ben Wheatley, 2012) UK {Mar}
Money Movers (Bruce Beresford, 1978) Australia {Mar}
The Other Guys (Adam McKay 2010) America {Mar} **
Robot & Frank (Jake Schreier, 2012) America {Mar}
Buffet froid (Bertrand Blier, 1979) France {Mar}

THREE
Stardust Memories (Woody Allen, 1980) America {Mar}
Frankenweenie (Tim Burton, 2012) America {Mar}
Manhattan (Woody Allen, 1979) America {Mar}
This Is Love (Matthias Glasner, 2009) Germany {Mar}
Compliance (Craig Zobel, 2012) America {Mar}
Mouth to Mouth (Björn Runge, 2005) Sweden {Mar}
John Carter (Andrew Stanton, 2012) America {Mar}
Driving with My Wife's Lover (Kim Tai-sik, 2006) South Korea {Mar}
Life for Ruth (Basil Dearden, 1962) UK {Mar}
The Gate (Tibor Takács, 1987) America {Mar}
CQ (Roman Coppola, 2001) America {Mar}
Pool of London (Basil Dearden, 1951) UK {Mar}
Kiki's Delivery Service (Hayao Miyazaki, 1989) Japan {Mar} **
The Campaign (Jay Roach, 2012) America {Mar}
Daybreak (Björn Runge, 2003) Sweden {Mar}
Sleeper (Benjamin Heisenberg, 2005) Germany {Mar}
Manhunt (Patrik Syversen, 2008) Norway {Mar}

TWO
Interiors (Woody Allen, 1978) America {Mar}
Schpaaa (Erik Poppe, 1998) Norway {Mar}
Contagion (Steven Soderbergh, 2011) America {Mar}
The Case of Itaewon Homicide (Hong Ki-Seon, 2009) South Korea {Mar}
The Half Life of Timofey Berezin/ Pu-239 (Scott Z. Burns, 2006) America {Mar}
Bitter & Twisted (Christopher Weekes, 2009) Australia {Mar}
The Company of Wolves (Neil Jordan, 1984) UK {Mar}
Speed Zone (Jim Drake, 1989) America {Mar}
From Beyond (Stuart Gordon, 1986) America {Mar}
Ghoulies (Luca Bercovici, 1985) America {Mar}
Someone Else's Happiness (Fien Troch, 2005) Holland {Mar}

ONE
L'humanité (Bruno Dumont, 1999) France {Mar}
Twentynine Palms (Bruno Dumont, 2003) France {Mar}

** Rewatches: 7
__________________________________________________________________________________________

Documentaries (Order Of Viewing)
Death on the Staircase: The Last Chance (Jean-Xavier de Lestrade, 2013)
American Grindhouse (Elijah Drenner, 2010)
This is Not A Film (Jafar Panahi & Mojtaba Mirtahmasb, 2011)

Directors League Table
4: Woody Allen

3: Basil Dearden
Bruno Dumont
David O. Russell

2: Olaf de Fleur Johannesson
Pablo Larraín
Andrew Stanton

A Year In Pictures


_____________________________

Watched List 2014 (59)

My Letterboxd

(in reply to MonsterCat)
Post #: 2516
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 2/4/2013 1:13:15 AM   
KnightofZyryab


Posts: 5817
Joined: 26/12/2005
Trance

Danny Boyle's latest is a real showstopper. Following the relative conventionality of his recent output (Slumdog Millionaire, 127 Hours), Trance is a twisting, mind-bending mystery which unravels into a spectacularly dark and memorable finale. And memorable is an apt word, since the film uses memory (or in this case, its absence) as both a driver for the plot and the conceptual slipperiness of it to delve into the unruly dimensions of human nature in the form of the psychological subconscious. The amnesia belongs to James McAvoy's Simon, the inside man on an art gallery heist who is concussed by Vincent Cassel's gangster, Franck, after he diverts from the plan by stealing and hiding the painting in a place he cannot seem to remember. To shake the memory free, Franck forces Simon to see a hypnotherapist, Rosario Dawson's Elizabeth.

Simon's mind appears to be highly resistant to finding the memory however, and the more he is put under hypnotism by Elizabeth the more other memories shake lose and the intrigues proliferate - in the deep layers of his mind Simon is hiding more than a missing Goya. On top of that, as Simon nears the memories hidden in his brain, the line between reality and hypnotised trance starts to blur and the narrative perception of events fragments. The glossy cinematography contributes to the effect as the trance sequences segue eerily into reality, and retrospective visual markers, signifiers and motifs abound en route to the film's denouement. As a film about the human mind it speaks about the power of the unconscious and hidden psychological drives which take the waking mind hostage, and like Inception it simultaneously manages to make its audience think whilst set to the pace of a tense thriller. Of the three central performances Cassel is strong as lead gangster Franck (although perhaps in a role he can play on autopilot), but McAvoy and Dawson are the stand outs as Simon and Elizabeth, the ostensible protagonists of the film. Simon, a man with a gambling addiction who falls in with the wrong people is a character which McAvoy plays with an understated sense of heavy debt and guilt, which gradually turns to unease as more events transpire in his memory. It's an impressive performance that underlines McAvoy as one of the most talented, versatile current British actors. Rosario Dawson on the other hand arguably gives the performance of her career as Elizabeth, the benevolent hypnotherapist digging into Simon's psyche. At once beautiful, strong willed and benevolent, her ability to manipulate the mind is a foreshadow that there might be more to her than on first impression, and Dawson plays the ambiguity superbly, her demeanour a glassy surface, giving nothing away.

Trance is one of those films that revels in misdirection and is a brilliantly crafted, dark thriller, probably my favourite Danny Boyle film, and I'll be surprised if there's a film that messes with your mind more than this all year.

_____________________________

Imminent viewings : The Place Beyond the Pines

Read my blog at: http://alcentrodelaberinto.blogspot.com/

(in reply to MonsterCat)
Post #: 2517
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 2/4/2013 9:20:18 AM   
matty_b


Posts: 14446
Joined: 19/10/2005
From: Outpost 31 calling McMurtle.
Safety Not Guaranteed (Colin Trevorrow)

A scrappy, charming lo-fi comedy about a weirdo investigated by three journalists after he places a newspaper ad claiming to seek a companion for his next time travel excursion. Mark Duplass strikes the right note of not-quite-there ambiguity as the guy, while Aubrey Plaza, Karan Soni and Jake Johnson have a nice chemistry together as the three journalists; I'd quite happily see some kind of sequel with the three of them again. A bit like Scooby Doo, but better. (4)


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Cool Breeze
Mattyb is a shining example of what the perfect Empire Forum member is.


(in reply to Gimli The Dwarf)
Post #: 2518
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 2/4/2013 2:26:00 PM   
rick_7


Posts: 6151
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: The internet
Sounds really good, I'd like to see that.

A couple of rewatches.
 
2. Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (Ang Lee, 2000) - I hadn't seen Ang Lee's metaphysical, phantasmagorical epic kung fu love story since it blew me away at the cinema as a 16-year-old; remiss of me, I know. Twelve years on, and fuck me it looks good. Chow Yun-Fat and Michelle Yeoh play quiet, lovelorn warriors, kept apart by a shared sense of honour, whose tentative steps towards romance are interrupted most abruptly by highly-strung, arse-kicking governor's daughter Zhang Ziyi, and the high-pitched psychopath she calls master.
 
The script is blessed with a rare profundity, dealing with massive themes in a way that's elliptical yet grounded, and the methodically paced story - which includes a ludicrously ambitious half-hour flashback sequence dealing with Ziyi's formative romance - is offset by exuberant fights of fancy in which Yun-Fat or Yeoh zip skywards to pad speedily across rooftops in pursuit of the excitable, foul-mouthed little tyke, trading kicks and punches with her as they go. There are also more earthy - though no less remarkable - skirmishes that take place at ground level, including fight choreographer Yuen Woo-Ping's nod to his own work in The Matrix, as Ziyi firmly grasps her stolen sword, the Green Destiny, and Yeoh goes at her with everything she can find: a lance, a pole, a big ball on a stick (sorry to get all technical on you) and finally a dock-off sword of her own. These fight scenes attain a breathless intensity, especially when the remarkable Yeoh is involved, fuelled by a pounding traditional score and their timeless context: if you feel inexorably tied to these characters, weighed down as they are by these emotions, then it matters more when they're fighting for their lives. There's also something truly fantastical about that first action sequence, as if Jet Li had suddenly turned up in A Short Film About Killing: 20 minutes of steady, timeless talkiness and then an explosion of wonder, as Ziyi's masked thief heads for the clouds. Having said all that, Crouching Tiger didn't reinvent screen action in the way that prissy critics claimed back in 2000. They'd just been too sniffy to watch a wired-up wuxia film - like Once Upon a Time in China or Iron Monkey - until the director of The Ice Storm deigned to make one.
 
What Lee does bring to the genre, though, is a serious-mindedness and a firm grasp of mythology that's too often missing from kung fu films. When the film wants to be funny, it is (well, apart from that completely incongruous gag in the middle of the frenzied Yeoh-Ziyi HQ battle), but it has little of the mugging and none of the weak comic interludes that drag down too many martial arts movies. Its characters are remarkable, their thoughts concerned with lofty ideals, but they are also recognisable human beings, played to a tee by proper actors.
 
When you cast Chow Yun-Fat in a kung fu film, you forego a certain skill and athleticism (I think he's doubled in some long shots exhibiting Li Bu Mai's technical prowess), but gain immeasurable weight and authority. Ziyi is a trained dancer, not a martial artist, but she has an acrobatic grace, and negotiates her character's dramatic complexities with admirable skill. And Yeoh, well, she's both a great actress and the definitive female action star of the last couple of decades, so she's alright. I've always held that Armando Ianucci was correct, and that a man has truly reached adulthood when he knows what a radiator bleed key is. Perhaps, though, it's the moment when he watches this film and thinks that while Zhang Ziyi's not bad looking, but she's no Michelle Yeoh. (Last time, it was: "Wowsers, that Zhang Ziyi is gorgeous; who's that old woman?") In support, Chang Chen is good as "Dark Cloud", the bum-fluffed desert bandit who engages in a Bringing Up Baby/Ashes of Time hybrid of a burgeoning love story with Ziyi that fuses the battle-of-the-sexes, period romance and "I've-got-your-comb"/"Fuck off, give it back" genres.
 
Crouching Tiger is one of the great films of last decade, often claustrophobic in scale, but epic in its treatment of human emotion, and chock-full of magic, magnificence and good old-fashioned fucking mayhem. It looks beautiful, it sounds beautiful - hell, it is beautiful - and where it's going, we don't needs roads, or even floors. Goodness knows how it took me 12 years to rewatch it. See you in 2025, when I'll probably think Jade Fox is hotter than Michelle Yeoh and be asking to stick my poisoned dart in her. (4)
 
***
 
3. Silver Linings Playbook (David O. Russell, 2012) - A film so great that even Chris Tucker is good in it. I loved Silver Linings to pieces when I saw it at the cinema - entranced by its originality, performances and rich sense of character - and it's even better second time around. I wondered if there might be padding somewhere, but there isn't: every scene serves the story and that dramatic spark lit in the opening scene never fades. Bipolar Bradley Cooper is released from a psychiatric hospital eight months after almost beating someone to death, and tries to get his life back on track, looking to overcome his illness by finding "silver linings" in the everyday. Meeting self-confessed "slut", Jennifer Lawrence, the two strike up a bargain: she'll get a letter to his estranged wife (thus sort-of-circumventing a restraining order), if he'll be her partner in a dance contest.
 
For all the praise heaped on Lawrence, an actress of almost supernatural talent, I think she was lucky to get the Oscar ahead of Wallis - I suspect it has something to do with the old "I fancy her" criterion. She's excellent, but not Hushpuppy-excellent, and really it's Cooper's film. He dominates the movie with a complex, layered and ultimately unforgettable characterisation that does everything you want it to, and then some, never crossing into melodrama or cliche; always ringing true. There aren't many such revelations in cinema: where apparently limited, one-note performers suddenly rip off the lid, and out pours this explosion of talent - Ben Stiller in Tenenbaums and Adam Sandler in Punch-Drunk Love are other rare examples - and so when it happens, it's invigorating to witness. The supporting cast is also superb. De Niro is better than he has been in years and Jacki Weaver (looking a lot like Brigitte Mira) gives a superb performance as Cooper's mum - it's nice to see the Academy nominate such an unshowy performance - while Tucker, appearing as a nervy patient who's obsessed with a) The law, and b) His hair, confounds all those who thought he was a load of old rubbish. Like me. I suppose I better add him to that "revelations" list. Tentatively.
 
Silver Linings is a bold film and a brilliant one, expertly walking a tightrope, as it neither mythologises mental illness nor mines it for cheap humour. Yes, the gnawing unhappiness of Melancholia may be more akin to most people's experiences of depression (not the bit where the world ends or where she shags someone on a golf course, the other bit), but I find Silver Linings an inspirational and captivating film: funny, romantic and blissfully entertaining, yes, but with a point and a purpose that makes it truly great. That and the fact that Chris Tucker is good in it. (4)

< Message edited by rick_7 -- 2/4/2013 4:19:03 PM >


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(in reply to matty_b)
Post #: 2519
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 2/4/2013 2:39:31 PM   
matty_b


Posts: 14446
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From: Outpost 31 calling McMurtle.


Ah rick, you're a funny guy.

quote:

really it's Cooper's film. He dominates the movie with a complex, layered and ultimately unforgettable characterisation that does everything you want it to, and then some, never crossing into melodrama or cliche; always ringing true. There aren't many such revelations in cinema: where apparently limited, one-note performers suddenly rip off the lid, and out pours this explosion of talent - Ben Stiller in Tenenbaums and Adam Sandler in Punch-Drunk Love are other rare examples - and so when it happens, it's invigorating to witness.


I agree with this, like, loads and loads. Yeah, Day-Lewis completely disappeared into Abe, but he had an iconic figure to start with; Cooper didn't and that's why I think it should have been Cooper's Oscar.

The Pearl of Death/The Scarlet Claw (Roy William Neill)

Two Sherlock Holmes adventures and two of the best. The first is notable for both Holmes making a complete arse of himself in the opening ten minutes and letting a precious pearl get stolen, and for the appearance of The Creeper - a minor Universal horror character played by Rondo Hatton, which, rather cruelly, uses his facial disfigurement that occured during childhood as the basis for a monstrous killer.

The second has the memorable glow-in-the-dark villain and is thick with foggy mystery. (4)

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(in reply to rick_7)
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