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RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 15/2/2013 12:06:53 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
I actually meant to try that. I really like Greg Davies and if Samberg could impress me in it, all the better. Did he refuse to watch it because it was British?

(in reply to MonsterCat)
Post #: 1621
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 15/2/2013 12:08:27 PM   
MonsterCat


Posts: 7934
Joined: 24/3/2011
From: St. Albans, Hertfordshire
The fuck knows with that guy?

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"I am a writer, a doctor, a nuclear physicist and a theoretical philosopher. But above all, I am a man, a hopelessly inquisitive man, just like you."

Films watched in 2013

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 1622
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 15/2/2013 12:10:08 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.

(in reply to MonsterCat)
Post #: 1623
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 15/2/2013 12:11:47 PM   
AxlReznor

 

Posts: 1623
Joined: 2/12/2010
From: Great Britain
And there I was thinking he only watched things that Joss Whedon is in some way involved in.

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 1624
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 15/2/2013 1:30:39 PM   
matty_b


Posts: 14555
Joined: 19/10/2005
From: Outpost 31 calling McMurtle.
Hoop Dreams (Steve James)

SPOILERS Truly great sports films aren't about the sports at all, they're generally anything but. Therefore, Hoop Dreams isn't really about the hoops, it's about the dreams and Steve James' epic documentary is just as mesmerising to those who fantatically follow their local team every weekend to those who don't have a clue about the sport. It follows two African-American students, William Gates and Arthur Agee, who both display an impressive streak of talent for basketball despite their young age. It's never said that they will definitely be the next big thing - but they've got a chance, and with both coming from impoverished backgrounds, a chance is all they're asking for.

While there is inevitably footage of games that both boys partake in - and it's as gripping as any other sports footage, recreated or otherwise, as valuable points and championships weight heavily around the boys' necks - it's not the sole focus of the documentary. We spend just as much time with them trying to do their homework which will lead to the precious grade point average they need to grasp that scholarship that could potentially set them up for life. We see them dealing with poverty, absent fathers, friends trying to lead them down the wrong path, impending fatherhood, ball-breaking coaches and stalwart mothers who will sacrifice anything for them, but not afraid to smack them into line either. There are injuries, setbacks, triumphs, defeats, heartbreak and defiance in the face of great odds sprinkled throughout. The scope and sprawl of William's and Arthur's story gives the film a thick, epic feel like the great American novel that is so often talked about. But what's truly remarkable is how resolutely human and heartfelt the film stays despite its running time and without ever recoursing to cheap sentimentality. It doesn't need to resort to tricks or obvious manipulation because these are good, honest kids who have simple dreams that aren't really about basketball - they are dreams about growing up, overcoming any obstacles that life throws at you and making a good life for yourself.

And despite the lack of sentimenality it's sometimes as moving as any other film you care to mention, and sometimes when focusing on people other than William or Arthur - William's mother passes her qualification as a nurse and her joy is infectious and incredibly humbling. Arthur has a late game with his father which turns from a pleasant way of passing the time to a game where the subtext is incredibly clear between mostly-absent parent and angry and aggrieved son. Best of all is the relatively simple way the film ends; the boys' future in basketball is unclear (they're not even sure themselves if they want to continue in it), so we see instead the boys graduating college and moving out of the family home for the first time - and after we have spent so much of the film with them and investing in them, it's as much of a wrench for us as it is for their mothers, with their unceasing and unstinting love. As much about basketball as The Wire is about drug dealers (and this film and that TV series really do have a lot in common, particularly season four), Hoop Dreams is about the American dream, about hope and about life. (5)


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Post #: 1625
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 15/2/2013 2:34:28 PM   
MOTH

 

Posts: 3479
Joined: 3/10/2005
From: Sittin' on the dock of the bay
Hoop Dreams is one of the few films in recent years to get a 10/10 rating on the MOTHometer.
Roger Ebert calls it the great American documentary and caught up with William and Arthur in 2009 to see how their lives had turned out. Interesting read.
http://blogs.suntimes.com/ebert/2009/11/the_great_american_documentary.html

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I've only gone and set up a blog! This week I've been mostly reviewing The Lego Movie and Wadjda. Click: The Fast Picture Show

(in reply to matty_b)
Post #: 1626
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 15/2/2013 5:38:14 PM   
rick_7


Posts: 6151
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: The internet
It's definitely one of the best three movies ever. Top review, Matty (do you ever get bored of hearing that?).

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Blog: DJANGO! DUMBO! DESPICABLE ME 2! Plus: other stuff.

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(in reply to MOTH)
Post #: 1627
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 15/2/2013 6:28:46 PM   
matty_b


Posts: 14555
Joined: 19/10/2005
From: Outpost 31 calling McMurtle.
Why, no, Rick. No, I don't. Thank you.

And that was a good read, MOTH. Cheers for linking to it.


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Cool Breeze
Mattyb is a shining example of what the perfect Empire Forum member is.


(in reply to rick_7)
Post #: 1628
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 15/2/2013 7:34:22 PM   
rick_7


Posts: 6151
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: The internet
quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

Andy Samberg - Mystifyingly unfunny.

I like it.

Great reviews of Ralph and Paperman, btw. Two of the nicest surprises of the year so far. How could anyone dislike Paperman?

*Sits back and waits for Elab*

Haha. And cheers.

*SOME SPOILERS*
The Mouse That Roared (Jack Arnold, 1959)
- A tiny, English-speaking state buried in the French Alps declares war on America, hoping that - following an immediate surrender - it will be flooded with the aid needed to revive its ailing, wine-based economy. Unfortunately, the Duchess (Peter Sellers) and Prime Minister (Peter Sellers) send over-earnest military chief Tully Bascomb (Peter Sellers) to execute their plan, and he returns with hostages and a nuclear bomb. This '60s satire, with faint echoes of Passport to Pimlico, has an absolutely uproarious first 20 minutes (including a perfect opening gag), before settling into a less exceptional groove, making a few wry points about Cold War paranoia and the '60s power balance, but getting most of its pizazz from Sellers' sublime comic gifts - witness the way he turns the Duchess's theoretically unpromising harpsichord performance into a comic highlight, simply by adding a confirmatory "ye may" at the end of a line. Jean Seberg isn't altogether hideous as the love interest. (2.5)

< Message edited by rick_7 -- 15/2/2013 7:36:15 PM >


_____________________________

*Wendy Hiller fanboy*

Blog: DJANGO! DUMBO! DESPICABLE ME 2! Plus: other stuff.

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(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 1629
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 15/2/2013 8:29:58 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54583
Joined: 1/10/2005
I didn't sodding dislike it. I just didn't think it was brilliant. 

_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to rick_7)
Post #: 1630
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 15/2/2013 8:57:05 PM   
paul_ie86


Posts: 11422
Joined: 4/1/2007
From: Chelsea Hotel #2
5. Wreck-It Ralph (2013)
Have to say I loved this. The best thing about it is Sarah Silverman's performance. I've liked her since I saw The Sarah Silverman Program on Paramount Comedy however long ago it was debuted on there, but she takes it to another level here. She is responsible for whenever I welled during the film, basically whenever Vanellope's cart was destroyed. (). John C. Reilly was great in the lead as well and had a great chemistry with Silverman. Wash, Kenneth and Sue were all really good in their roles too. (4)

< Message edited by paul_ie86 -- 16/2/2013 12:22:27 AM >


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Post #: 1631
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 15/2/2013 9:12:27 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.

quote:

ORIGINAL: elab49

I didn't sodding dislike it. I just didn't think it was brilliant. 




quote:

The best thing about it is Sarah Silverman's performance. I've liked her since I saw The Sarah Silverman Program on Paramount Comedy however long ago it was debuted on there,


I've liked her since Larry Sanders. I'm so old.

(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 1632
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 15/2/2013 9:15:27 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54583
Joined: 1/10/2005
At the moment my Animated short list goes

Fresh Guacamole
Head over Heels
Paperman/Adam and Dog
Simpsons

I still think The Simpsons epi is a pretty bad inclusion.


_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 1633
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 15/2/2013 9:18:13 PM   
paul_ie86


Posts: 11422
Joined: 4/1/2007
From: Chelsea Hotel #2

quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson
quote:

The best thing about it is Sarah Silverman's performance. I've liked her since I saw The Sarah Silverman Program on Paramount Comedy however long ago it was debuted on there


I've liked her since Larry Sanders. I'm so old.




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My Group Project's facebook page. Please like

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 1634
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 15/2/2013 9:30:39 PM   
scarface666brooksy!!


Posts: 3544
Joined: 24/10/2007
From: The Valley of the Wind
I like Andy Samberg

Great review of Hoop Dreams Matty. I watched it last year on a doco binge and it was one of the best I saw (F For Fake > the rest tho)

Wreck-It Ralph is great fun.



< Message edited by scarface666brooksy!! -- 15/2/2013 9:31:54 PM >


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Post #: 1635
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 15/2/2013 10:38:28 PM   
Rebel scum


Posts: 3483
Joined: 2/1/2006
17-Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull (Spielberg, 2008) 8/10

I never understood the huge level of backlash this had. Sure, it's nowhere near the quality of the first and third, but at least it's not got Willie Scott in it. The early scenes where Indy looks over the pictures of Henry Jones Snr and Brody is memorably upsetting, and the following scene in the bar with Mutt is well-written, funny and leads into a fantastic set piece. Even when the shit hits the fan and they wind up in the jungle the film's still fun (except for the fucking monkeys), with the action sequences better shot and staged than in most blockbusters nowadays. The ending is a bit silly, but so is a magic golden box, three magic stones and a cup of invincibility - let's get some perspective here.

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(in reply to scarface666brooksy!!)
Post #: 1636
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 15/2/2013 11:48:23 PM   
Harry Tuttle


Posts: 7993
Joined: 12/11/2005
From: Sometime in the future.
Under Milk Wood (Andrew Sinclair, 1972)

I was lucky enough to watch this on the big screen today followed by a Q&A with the director, which was fab. First things first, the film. Well it's been a while since I last watched this, I think it's because I associated it so much with my English GCSE I probably kept my distance from it over the years despite having enjoyed it way back when. The GCSE association is probably also why I'd forgotten the sexualism, which is pretty subtextual in the original play if memory serves me,  but pretty overt in the big screen adaptation which includes Ruth Madoc's getting her breasts out for Del Boy and probably the creepiest menage a trois I can recall seeing.

All in all it's a very good adaptation that still relies on the voices of the cast to portray the story so it's a good thing they got one of the greatest voices in history for the part of Stranger number 1. Of course Burton was synonomous with the role following the radio play so it would have been folly to have cast anyone else but the real surprise here is Peter O'Toole who rocks the Welsh accent pretty well IMO. The massive cast pretty much puts in a good shift across the board with the likes of Glynis Johns and Victor Spinetti providing great support. Sinclair also manages to capture the dream like quality required for the story and does a decent job with material that was only ever intended to be a play for voices. 4
 
The Q&A afterwards was very informative. I was lucky enough to ask the first question (after the guy from BAFTA Cymru) and I asked him as expansive a question as I could. I asked him what part of the process of making the film posed the biggest challenge, getting it made in the first place, adapting it to screen, casting it or the production itself. Sinclair said he was very lucky that the film got made in the first place and had it not been for the involvement of Burton it probably wouldn't have. He didn't really go into the adaptation process much other than to say he tried to be as reverential to the source material as possible whilst trying to add a coherent story thread.

His anecdotes about the casting and production were fairly amusing though. Obviously Burton was a no brainer and he soon got O'Toole on board as well so he basically had 2 of the most bankable stars in the world on board and then he got a phone call from Burton's agent telling him it was his lucky day, he now had three of the most famous stars in the world involved to which he said, and I'm near enough quoting here, "the day I was told we had Elizabeth Taylor involved in the film was the worst day in my professional career". He basically knew there and then that Burton was going to be absolutely hammered throughout most of the shoot. He already had one drinking partner on board in O'Toole so the last thing he needed was another. He pleaded with Burton to stay sober for the shoot, trying to play on the fact the Burton and Dylan had been close in real life. Burton promised he'd stay sober but his idea of sober was apparently 2 bottles of vodka a day rather than the 4 he would get through on a drinking day . The fact that he and Taylor were pretty much paralytic by lunch time most days is the reason why neither of them have any on screen dialogue.

Conversely though, O'Toole was sober for most of the shoot because it was too uncomfortable for him to be bleary eyed due to the contacts he had to wear. It was only during the last few days of shooting, when he was playing a younger Captain Cat the he joined the Burtons in their liver busting drinking sessions.

One thing that became clear was that Sinclair and Taylor hated each other. Taylor basically told him to his face that she hated him, mainly because he took umbrage at the fact the she tried to portray a welsh fishing village hooker as Cleopatra, and probably also because he made sure his cameraman made a great show of having to go to great lengths to disguise her double chin when she was lying down. His exact words to describe her were "She had the most beautiful eyes I'd ever seen and a very beautiful face but she had a body like a sackful of spanners". Pretty catty to say the least but it was apparent that dealing with her had left some deep scars. Apparently, on the last day of shooting before she and Burton had to piss off back to Switzerland for tax purposes, she told Sinclair that she was going to fuck up his film and walked off the set without recording her final set of lines. Burton and O'Toole promised that they'd sort it out but by the time they found her she was paralytic so they each had to hold her up, one on each side while she recorded her lines.

To be honest by the time he'd answered my question he'd pretty much covered all that he could about the production so I kind of fucked things up a little for everyone else but fuck 'em, they should have got in before me . I think he did go into a bit more detail about casting the minor roles afterwards. Glynis Johns basically knocked on his door and told him she'd play any part in the film, he stated that nobody was on more than £200 a week due to the budget only being £300,000 but she didn't care. He said he couldn't refuse her because he'd ha d a crush on her since he was 17 .

All in all a great afternoon and it was brilliant to get a sense of the film making process, specifically one that involved some of the biggest names on the planet at the time.

< Message edited by Harry Tuttle -- 15/2/2013 11:49:13 PM >


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Post #: 1637
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 15/2/2013 11:52:43 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54583
Joined: 1/10/2005
Give me a shout if Rawlinson starts crying and posting threats at you for getting to see this, yes? I'm getting used to using Pre-Mod now. 

_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to Harry Tuttle)
Post #: 1638
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 15/2/2013 11:56:59 PM   
Harry Tuttle


Posts: 7993
Joined: 12/11/2005
From: Sometime in the future.


He knew I was going, I'd asked him if he could think up an interesting question for me but he forgot. I did alright I reckon, it probably wasn't the most interesting question but it got me a lot of info and took up about two thirds of the Q&A session .

< Message edited by Harry Tuttle -- 16/2/2013 12:15:13 AM >


_____________________________

Acting...Naturaaal

Your knowledge of scientific biological transmogrification is only outmatched by your zest for kung-fu treachery!

Blood Island. So called because it's the exact shape of some blood

(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 1639
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 16/2/2013 12:43:26 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 77670
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo
5. Die Hard With A Vengeance (8th view, 1995, John McTiernan) - 4/5
For many years this has been my favourite Die Hard film but for the first time ever I now think it's second to the original. But still a hell of a lot of fun. Am I misremembering the water riddle sequence or has it been cut on the version I have?

13. Die Hard 2 (4th view, 1990, Renny Harlin) - 4/5
The weakest of the first four but by all accounts a masterpiece compared to the fifth.

_____________________________

So, sir, we let him have it right up! And I have to report, sir, he did not like it, sir.

Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

(in reply to Harry Tuttle)
Post #: 1640
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 16/2/2013 8:12:36 AM   
MOTH

 

Posts: 3479
Joined: 3/10/2005
From: Sittin' on the dock of the bay
Moonrise Kingdom (Wes Anderson, 2012)
Lovely performances, especially from the two young teens, striking production design and imagery, and a deadpan humour combine to make a sweetly offbeat romantic comedy. It's not particularly deep or profound, but it is warm, charming and - yes - quirky. But in a good way. I really liked it. (8/10)

_____________________________

I've only gone and set up a blog! This week I've been mostly reviewing The Lego Movie and Wadjda. Click: The Fast Picture Show

(in reply to Gimli The Dwarf)
Post #: 1641
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 16/2/2013 10:22:50 AM   
matty_b


Posts: 14555
Joined: 19/10/2005
From: Outpost 31 calling McMurtle.
Apocalypse Now Redux (Francis Ford Coppola)

Less is more sometimes. It's still fantastic, but Coppola was right to lose the French plantation sequence first time round. (4.5)


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Cool Breeze
Mattyb is a shining example of what the perfect Empire Forum member is.


(in reply to rick_7)
Post #: 1642
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 16/2/2013 10:28:51 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.

quote:

ORIGINAL: Harry Tuttle

Under Milk Wood (Andrew Sinclair, 1972)

I was lucky enough to watch this on the big screen today followed by a Q&A with the director, which was fab. First things first, the film. Well it's been a while since I last watched this, I think it's because I associated it so much with my English GCSE I probably kept my distance from it over the years despite having enjoyed it way back when. The GCSE association is probably also why I'd forgotten the sexualism, which is pretty subtextual in the original play if memory serves me,  but pretty overt in the big screen adaptation which includes Ruth Madoc's getting her breasts out for Del Boy and probably the creepiest menage a trois I can recall seeing.

All in all it's a very good adaptation that still relies on the voices of the cast to portray the story so it's a good thing they got one of the greatest voices in history for the part of Stranger number 1. Of course Burton was synonomous with the role following the radio play so it would have been folly to have cast anyone else but the real surprise here is Peter O'Toole who rocks the Welsh accent pretty well IMO. The massive cast pretty much puts in a good shift across the board with the likes of Glynis Johns and Victor Spinetti providing great support. Sinclair also manages to capture the dream like quality required for the story and does a decent job with material that was only ever intended to be a play for voices. 4
 
The Q&A afterwards was very informative. I was lucky enough to ask the first question (after the guy from BAFTA Cymru) and I asked him as expansive a question as I could. I asked him what part of the process of making the film posed the biggest challenge, getting it made in the first place, adapting it to screen, casting it or the production itself. Sinclair said he was very lucky that the film got made in the first place and had it not been for the involvement of Burton it probably wouldn't have. He didn't really go into the adaptation process much other than to say he tried to be as reverential to the source material as possible whilst trying to add a coherent story thread.

His anecdotes about the casting and production were fairly amusing though. Obviously Burton was a no brainer and he soon got O'Toole on board as well so he basically had 2 of the most bankable stars in the world on board and then he got a phone call from Burton's agent telling him it was his lucky day, he now had three of the most famous stars in the world involved to which he said, and I'm near enough quoting here, "the day I was told we had Elizabeth Taylor involved in the film was the worst day in my professional career". He basically knew there and then that Burton was going to be absolutely hammered throughout most of the shoot. He already had one drinking partner on board in O'Toole so the last thing he needed was another. He pleaded with Burton to stay sober for the shoot, trying to play on the fact the Burton and Dylan had been close in real life. Burton promised he'd stay sober but his idea of sober was apparently 2 bottles of vodka a day rather than the 4 he would get through on a drinking day . The fact that he and Taylor were pretty much paralytic by lunch time most days is the reason why neither of them have any on screen dialogue.

Conversely though, O'Toole was sober for most of the shoot because it was too uncomfortable for him to be bleary eyed due to the contacts he had to wear. It was only during the last few days of shooting, when he was playing a younger Captain Cat the he joined the Burtons in their liver busting drinking sessions.

One thing that became clear was that Sinclair and Taylor hated each other. Taylor basically told him to his face that she hated him, mainly because he took umbrage at the fact the she tried to portray a welsh fishing village hooker as Cleopatra, and probably also because he made sure his cameraman made a great show of having to go to great lengths to disguise her double chin when she was lying down. His exact words to describe her were "She had the most beautiful eyes I'd ever seen and a very beautiful face but she had a body like a sackful of spanners". Pretty catty to say the least but it was apparent that dealing with her had left some deep scars. Apparently, on the last day of shooting before she and Burton had to piss off back to Switzerland for tax purposes, she told Sinclair that she was going to fuck up his film and walked off the set without recording her final set of lines. Burton and O'Toole promised that they'd sort it out but by the time they found her she was paralytic so they each had to hold her up, one on each side while she recorded her lines.

To be honest by the time he'd answered my question he'd pretty much covered all that he could about the production so I kind of fucked things up a little for everyone else but fuck 'em, they should have got in before me . I think he did go into a bit more detail about casting the minor roles afterwards. Glynis Johns basically knocked on his door and told him she'd play any part in the film, he stated that nobody was on more than £200 a week due to the budget only being £300,000 but she didn't care. He said he couldn't refuse her because he'd ha d a crush on her since he was 17 .

All in all a great afternoon and it was brilliant to get a sense of the film making process, specifically one that involved some of the biggest names on the planet at the time.


Brilliant stuff, Harry.

And he sounds a good man, Glynis Johns was amazing. I think I would have struggled to avoid asking lots of questions about an early 20s Susan Penhaligon.

(in reply to Harry Tuttle)
Post #: 1643
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 16/2/2013 10:42:02 AM   
impqueen


Posts: 7474
Joined: 24/7/2006
That's awesome Harry glad you had a good time and nice one on the question front.

_____________________________

Yes, always.


(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 1644
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 16/2/2013 11:09:07 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 77670
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo
13. Die Hard 4.0 (3rd view, 2007, Len Wiseman) - 4/5
Ever so slightly better than Die Hard 2.



_____________________________

So, sir, we let him have it right up! And I have to report, sir, he did not like it, sir.

Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

(in reply to impqueen)
Post #: 1645
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 16/2/2013 1:31:38 PM   
rick_7


Posts: 6151
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: The internet

quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson


quote:

ORIGINAL: Harry Tuttle

Under Milk Wood (Andrew Sinclair, 1972)

I was lucky enough to watch this on the big screen today followed by a Q&A with the director, which was fab. First things first, the film. Well it's been a while since I last watched this, I think it's because I associated it so much with my English GCSE I probably kept my distance from it over the years despite having enjoyed it way back when. The GCSE association is probably also why I'd forgotten the sexualism, which is pretty subtextual in the original play if memory serves me,  but pretty overt in the big screen adaptation which includes Ruth Madoc's getting her breasts out for Del Boy and probably the creepiest menage a trois I can recall seeing.

All in all it's a very good adaptation that still relies on the voices of the cast to portray the story so it's a good thing they got one of the greatest voices in history for the part of Stranger number 1. Of course Burton was synonomous with the role following the radio play so it would have been folly to have cast anyone else but the real surprise here is Peter O'Toole who rocks the Welsh accent pretty well IMO. The massive cast pretty much puts in a good shift across the board with the likes of Glynis Johns and Victor Spinetti providing great support. Sinclair also manages to capture the dream like quality required for the story and does a decent job with material that was only ever intended to be a play for voices. 4
 
The Q&A afterwards was very informative. I was lucky enough to ask the first question (after the guy from BAFTA Cymru) and I asked him as expansive a question as I could. I asked him what part of the process of making the film posed the biggest challenge, getting it made in the first place, adapting it to screen, casting it or the production itself. Sinclair said he was very lucky that the film got made in the first place and had it not been for the involvement of Burton it probably wouldn't have. He didn't really go into the adaptation process much other than to say he tried to be as reverential to the source material as possible whilst trying to add a coherent story thread.

His anecdotes about the casting and production were fairly amusing though. Obviously Burton was a no brainer and he soon got O'Toole on board as well so he basically had 2 of the most bankable stars in the world on board and then he got a phone call from Burton's agent telling him it was his lucky day, he now had three of the most famous stars in the world involved to which he said, and I'm near enough quoting here, "the day I was told we had Elizabeth Taylor involved in the film was the worst day in my professional career". He basically knew there and then that Burton was going to be absolutely hammered throughout most of the shoot. He already had one drinking partner on board in O'Toole so the last thing he needed was another. He pleaded with Burton to stay sober for the shoot, trying to play on the fact the Burton and Dylan had been close in real life. Burton promised he'd stay sober but his idea of sober was apparently 2 bottles of vodka a day rather than the 4 he would get through on a drinking day . The fact that he and Taylor were pretty much paralytic by lunch time most days is the reason why neither of them have any on screen dialogue.

Conversely though, O'Toole was sober for most of the shoot because it was too uncomfortable for him to be bleary eyed due to the contacts he had to wear. It was only during the last few days of shooting, when he was playing a younger Captain Cat the he joined the Burtons in their liver busting drinking sessions.

One thing that became clear was that Sinclair and Taylor hated each other. Taylor basically told him to his face that she hated him, mainly because he took umbrage at the fact the she tried to portray a welsh fishing village hooker as Cleopatra, and probably also because he made sure his cameraman made a great show of having to go to great lengths to disguise her double chin when she was lying down. His exact words to describe her were "She had the most beautiful eyes I'd ever seen and a very beautiful face but she had a body like a sackful of spanners". Pretty catty to say the least but it was apparent that dealing with her had left some deep scars. Apparently, on the last day of shooting before she and Burton had to piss off back to Switzerland for tax purposes, she told Sinclair that she was going to fuck up his film and walked off the set without recording her final set of lines. Burton and O'Toole promised that they'd sort it out but by the time they found her she was paralytic so they each had to hold her up, one on each side while she recorded her lines.

To be honest by the time he'd answered my question he'd pretty much covered all that he could about the production so I kind of fucked things up a little for everyone else but fuck 'em, they should have got in before me . I think he did go into a bit more detail about casting the minor roles afterwards. Glynis Johns basically knocked on his door and told him she'd play any part in the film, he stated that nobody was on more than £200 a week due to the budget only being £300,000 but she didn't care. He said he couldn't refuse her because he'd ha d a crush on her since he was 17 .

All in all a great afternoon and it was brilliant to get a sense of the film making process, specifically one that involved some of the biggest names on the planet at the time.


Brilliant stuff, Harry.

And he sounds a good man, Glynis Johns was amazing. I think I would have struggled to avoid asking lots of questions about an early 20s Susan Penhaligon.

Yeah, that was really interesting, thanks Harry.

_____________________________

*Wendy Hiller fanboy*

Blog: DJANGO! DUMBO! DESPICABLE ME 2! Plus: other stuff.

"Nothin's really been right since Sam the Lion died."

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 1646
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 16/2/2013 1:38:27 PM   
rick_7


Posts: 6151
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: The internet
Body Heat (Lawrence Kasdan, 1981) is a sweaty, scintillating neo-noir, in which the horniest woman in America (Kathleen Turner) shags a moustache (William Hurt) into killing her husband. You almost want Hurt to die or go to jail so his willy can have a rest. While it's an homage to vintage '40s noir like Double Indemnity and The Postman Always Rings Twice (right down to a nattily incorporated fedora), Body Heat also stands superbly on its own two feet: the dialogue is colourful, the plotting keeps you guessing - despite being rich in fatalism - and Turner is dynamic as a woman so warm that she must take off her clothes at every opportunity. Hurt is wooden in places (particularly his penis), the revelations near the end - while gripping - are perhaps revealed too conveniently, and the film should really have ended on a freeze-frame of that photo, but it's still a classy, compelling crime flick, with a sweltering, stifling atmosphere and showy supporting turns from Mickey Rourke and Ted Danson - almost unrecognisable with a fringe that disguises the sheer length of his Easter Island head. And while the writer-director's idea of his hero keeping an illicit affair under wraps is to have him lob a chair through a plate glass window at his lover's house, that scene with the contract discussions is worthy of Wilder. They don't call his Law-rence Kasdan for nothing. (3.5)

< Message edited by rick_7 -- 16/2/2013 1:39:43 PM >


_____________________________

*Wendy Hiller fanboy*

Blog: DJANGO! DUMBO! DESPICABLE ME 2! Plus: other stuff.

"Nothin's really been right since Sam the Lion died."

(in reply to rick_7)
Post #: 1647
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 16/2/2013 1:59:49 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
quote:

Body Heat (Lawrence Kasdan, 1981) is a sweaty, scintillating neo-noir, in which the horniest woman in America (Kathleen Turner) shags a moustache (William Hurt) into killing her husband. You almost want Hurt to die or go to jail so his willy can have a rest.




Great review as always, Rick.

Have you thought about voting in our Oscar poll, btw?

(in reply to rick_7)
Post #: 1648
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 16/2/2013 2:04:06 PM   
rick_7


Posts: 6151
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: The internet

quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

quote:

Body Heat (Lawrence Kasdan, 1981) is a sweaty, scintillating neo-noir, in which the horniest woman in America (Kathleen Turner) shags a moustache (William Hurt) into killing her husband. You almost want Hurt to die or go to jail so his willy can have a rest.




Great review as always, Rick.

Have you thought about voting in our Oscar poll, btw?

Thank you.

I'm not sure I've seen enough of this year's crop to vote properly, but I will try to do a list for the '50s poll.

_____________________________

*Wendy Hiller fanboy*

Blog: DJANGO! DUMBO! DESPICABLE ME 2! Plus: other stuff.

"Nothin's really been right since Sam the Lion died."

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 1649
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2013 - Discus... - 16/2/2013 2:08:19 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
Gimli is so actress starved at the moment that he's considering voting for Snow White and the Huntsman. You'll fit in just fine. And you don't have to vote just based on the actual nominations, you can choose from anything that was eligible.

(in reply to rick_7)
Post #: 1650
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