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RE: 1990s Top 100

 
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RE: 1990s Top 100 - 27/9/2012 9:36:27 AM   
rawlinson

 

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23. Industrial Symphony No 1: The Dream of the Broken-Hearted



Director: David Lynch
Year: 1990

Industrial Symphony is a haunting collaboration between David Lynch, Angelo Badalamenti and Julee Cruise. David Lynch was invited to stage a show at the Brooklyn Academy Of Music and this musical spectacle was a result. Taking its name from a series of art projects he created when he was a student, Industrial Symphony fits perfectly into Lynch's world. Lynch and Badalamenti took Cruise's music, basically half of her gorgeous 'Floating Into Night' album, and combined it with surreal imagery and a few new compositions in order to produce a unique concert.

The show opens with a conversation between Nic Cage and Laura Dern, seemingly reprising their Wild At Heart characters. Cage is breaking up with Dern on the phone and Dern is crushed. The rest of the film is then a hallucinatory dream of Dern's, focusing on how the broken-hearted are lost in the modern world.

Of course, Lynch being Lynch, this is no standard concert. It's more like a work of abstract theatre or performance art. Cruise floats in the air, various stage props include plastic dolls, the shell of a car, industrial smoke and flames, blinking lights and various supporting performances including a near-naked woman in the car, a dwarf sawing a log and a bizarre man on stilts. Lynch was always fond of industrial nightmares and this film feels like a throwback to the horrors of Eraserhead at times.

In fact, despite being a concert film, Symphony has lots of links to other Lynch works. Michael J. Anderson seems to be reprising his role from Twin Peaks, and of course the music of Julee Cruise played a big part of that show. While Cage and Dern's lovers are a tie-in to Wild At Heart. The film also explores some typical Lynchian themes. The entire film is in the mind of a female lead , we delve into the world of dreams and there's the contrast of seemingly innocent music with nightmarish visions (something that Lynch has returned to again and again in his work).

Ok, so this isn't for everyone. If you don't like Cruise's music and you're not a fan of Lynch in general then this isn't the film to win you over.But if you do like Lynch, or if you're a fan of ethereal music or just bizarre stage productions, then you may find something of value here.

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Post #: 451
RE: 1990s Top 100 - 27/9/2012 9:38:00 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
22. Ashes of Time



Director: Wong Kar Wai
Year: 1994

Challenging In the Mood for Love as my favourite WKW film is this beautiful (loose, very loose) adaptation of the novel "The Eagle Shooting Heroes" Ashes of Time has been criticised a lot of the years for being confusing. I don't think it really is, I think it can become easy to lose track of who is who, especially when you have Brigitte Lin playing two characters, one who wants to kill the lover of their sibling and one who wants to kill their sibling for wanting to kill their lover, but careful viewing shouldn't be a chore. Leslie Cheung plays Feng Ouyang, a desert dweller who acts as an agent for various swordsmen. People with troubles come to him and he arranges protection, or a murder, or whatever they need.

This should have been a failure, when other Asian directors more traditionally associated with dramas than martial arts epics have turned to the genre the results have always struck me as hollow (Crouching Tiger, Hero, House of Daggers) but Ashes of Time is achingly beautiful, both in terms of visuals and emotional weight. WKW, as always, gives us characters in emotional turmoil. Everyone in the film, including Cheung, is troubled by a lost or unrequited love of some kind. They use Ouyang's services for revenge, or as a way to help forget. WKW also subverts the ideas traditionally associated with action cinema. The action sequences are stunning, but they never play out as you crisply as you might expect given the genre. If you're looking for traditional Hong Kong action, this really isn't the film for you. Even the very notion of the wandering swordsman as an icon of cool is torn apart. Here they're just lonely or bitter, the film is about the despair at the heart of these characters. It's a visually intoxicating work, so tactile that you can almost feel every motion in the fight scenes. But ultimately it's a film of grief and loss, of emotional isolation and the effects it can have on a life. Just a work of art.

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Post #: 452
RE: 1990s Top 100 - 27/9/2012 9:40:02 AM   
rawlinson

 

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21. The Straight Story



Director: David Lynch
Year: 1999

Alvin Straight (Richard Farnsworth) hasn't spoken to his brother Lyle (Harry Dean Stanton) in years, then he gets news that Lyle has had a stroke. Determined to make amends, Alvin plans to travel from Iowa to Wisconsin to see him. Unable to drive, Alvin comes up with the idea of riding his old lawnmower across the American heartland.

From any other director, this would be a weird little curio simply because of its subject matter. From David Lynch, it's a weird little curio because it's a family friendly Disney release. It still retains Lynch's trademark oddness, but it's certainly the most mainstream of his work to date. I've also heard it called his most mature, but I think that stems from the false assumption that there's more maturity in telling a regular narrative than there is in Lynch's usual game-playing. Either way, it's certainly his warmest work since Twin Peaks. A large part of that warmth comes from Farnsworth, dying from cancer while making the film, Farnsworth delivers the performance of a lifetime. Farnsworth is key to the success of the film because he inhabits Alvin so thoroughly, making him one of those rare characters that you wish you knew away from the screen. Never sentimental, or begging for audience sympathy, it's a masterclass in acting.

The Straight Story is a brooding piece of cinema, a film that captures a side of America that's rarely explored. There's fine supporting work from the likes of Sissy Spacek, but next to Alvin, the most important character is the American farmlands that Alvin passes on his journey. It's a small story, but it feels so damned big, with Angelo Badlamenti's beautiful score pushing the film towards epic territory.

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Post #: 453
RE: 1990s Top 100 - 27/9/2012 9:42:47 AM   
rawlinson

 

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From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
20. Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me



Director: David Lynch
Year: 1992

When Lynch decided to make a spin-off film from Twin Peaks, he took the approach that made Lynch fans love him so much, instead of clearing up the cliff-hanger of the series, he decided to mainly ignore it. The film instead focuses on the last days of Laura Palmer, leading up to the murder that would spark the events of the original series. The benefits of not being restricted by network television meant that Lynch was able to really focus on the nightmarish aspects of Twin Peaks, and of Laura's dark sexuality, in the process creating one of his most upsetting films. If you haven't seen the series, then you'll be lost with this. If you have seen the series, you'll probably still be lost with this, but at least you've had the joy of seeing one of the greatest television shows of all time.

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Post #: 454
RE: 1990s Top 100 - 27/9/2012 9:43:43 AM   
rawlinson

 

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19. My Name Is Joe



Director: Ken Loach
Year: 1998

One of the great things about cinema is when you revisit a film that you'd previously respected but not love and then find yourself seeing the magic in it. I already held Peter Mullan's performance here to be one of the best of the 90s, but rewatching the film has made me see that it's a brilliant performance in a film that's an absolute masterpiece. Mullan stars as Joe Kavanagh, an alcoholic trying to turn himself into a man he can respect. He's been sober nearly a year and he's trying to help those around him, he manages a local football team along with his best friend and AA sponsor Shanks (a superb Gary Lewis) and he makes a special effort to try and rescue a young couple, Liam and Sabine, from drug addiction and debt. He starts a relationship with their health worker, Sarah (Louise Goodall, easily the equal of Lewis) and for once luck seems to be on his side, until he finds out just how desperate a situation Liam and Sabine are actually in. Joe is forced into a course of action that could endanger his sobriety, his relationship and even his life. My Name Is Joe alternates between being hilariously funny and heart-breakingly bleak with Mullan giving possibly the best male lead performance of the 1990s.

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Post #: 455
RE: 1990s Top 100 - 27/9/2012 9:44:59 AM   
rawlinson

 

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From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
18. Quick Change



Director: Howard Franklin, Bill Murray
Year: 1990

Bill Murray and Howard Franklin teamed up to direct this inventive dark comedy, Murray plays Grimm, a frustrated city planner who wants nothing more than to get away from New York. He's grown to hate the city and plans to fund his getaway by robbing a bank. He comes up with the perfect plan for a heist, he dresses as a clown, walks into a bank, pulls a gun, locks everyone in the vault, and then begins negotiations with the police. Leading the police response is Rotzinger (Jason Robards) a decent but determined long serving cop. Murray makes outlandish demands, including a helicopter and a monster truck. In return he releases three hostages, himself (now without the clown outfit), his best friend (Quaid) and his girlfriend (Davis). With the stolen cash taped to their bodies, the three make their way to the airport, and that's where things start to fall apart. Roadworks block the path to the hospital, forcing them to take unfamiliar roads where they lose their way. They get robbed and lose everything (except for the money still taped to their bodies). They nearly get killed. They lose their car. They get a taxi only to discover the driver can't speak a work of English. They also manage to have a run-in with some gangsters, and all the time Robards (who has now figured out what happened) is hot on their trail.

Quick Change is another one of those films, like After Hours and The Out-of-Towners before it, that views New York as some kind of living nightmare. A town where it's easier to rob a bank than get a taxi. New York is often regarded as a near mythical place in cinema, think of Woody Allen's loveletter to New York in Manhattan. These films seem to regard New York as an unfriendly place that's out to get the unwary, or as in this case, even the most prepared.

Even though Murray's character in films was usually the cynic, Quick Change is quite possibly his most cynical and acerbic work at that point. He'd always been a rebellious figure in a world that largely made sense. Here he's trying to be a rebel only to find out that the environment is rebelling against him. Murray's performance was the finest in his career up until this point, the leader of the trio, constantly frustrated by a city that's conspiring against him. In a year where Kevin Costner managed to get acting and directing Oscar nominations, it's even more of a crime to think that The Academy didn't nominate Murray, or anyone else from this film. Although it's not as if it's the only time where The Academy would screw over a great Bill Murray performance for a lesser work from another actor. While it's true that Geena Davis isn't given a lot to work with, but she manages to refine her character and turn in work that was at least the equal of her performance that actually won her an Oscar. Quaid is fine as the dumb best friend, but the great Jason Robards steals the show in the supporting cast.

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Post #: 456
RE: 1990s Top 100 - 27/9/2012 9:46:38 AM   
rawlinson

 

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From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
17. Careful



Director: Guy Maddin
Year: 1992

Maddin's films really do come across as relics from the silent era. Careful is shot in the style of early German cinema with the backdrop of painted mountains and archways being especially reminiscent of The Cabinet Of Dr. Caligari. But it's quite difficult to honestly compare a Guy Maddin film to anything other than other Guy Maddin films. He creates worlds that are entirely his and completely immerses the viewer in them. In addition to the artificial sets, the film also creates its world through startling use of colour and the purposely stilted dialogue and performances. This highly stylized but beautiful film manages to cram incest, betrayal, murder, a school for butlers, and blinding by cuckoo clock into a surreal, whimsical and dreamlike world.

The plots of Maddin's films tend to be quite melodramatic and Careful is certainly no exception. The film is situated in a remote village in the Alps where the risk of avalanches is so high that people are terrified of sudden and loud noises. This leads to life in the village being based on a system of complete propriety. People are raised to live a life of restraint where emotions are stifled in order to avoid the risk of creating a noise that could cause an avalanche.

Three brothers live with their mother in this subdued and repressed world. One of the brothers has an erotic dream about his mother and proceeds to drug her with a love potion before mutilating himself in punishment and then throwing himself off the mountain. Another brother challenges the local aristocrat who loves his mother to a duel. While the third is imprisoned in an attic and visited by the ghost of his blind father.

It's easy to dismiss Maddin's films for being too weird or inaccessible, but the melodrama of the plots and the artificial landscapes combine to create something that's funny, moving and incredibly human. For all his theatricality, Maddin manages to create films that speak to me every bit as much as the more realistic films of a director like Cassavetes.

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Post #: 457
RE: 1990s Top 100 - 27/9/2012 9:47:52 AM   
rawlinson

 

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16. My Own Private Idaho



Director: Gus Van Sant
Year: 1991

Loosely adapted from Shakespeare's Henry plays, Van Sant tells the story of two gay hustlers, Mike (River Phoenix) and Scott (Keanu Reeves). Mike is a narcoleptic, desperately missing his mother. Scott comes from a privileged family and doesn't really need to hustle. The two embark on a journey to find Mike's mother. Keanu is Keanu and his performance drags the film down, but River Phoenix is a revelation, and his death robbed the world of one of its great actors.

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Post #: 458
RE: 1990s Top 100 - 27/9/2012 9:49:29 AM   
rawlinson

 

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From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
15. To Sleep with Anger



Director: Charles Burnett
Year: 1990

Gideon (Butler) lives with his family in a wealthy L.A. suburb. Gideon and his wife (Alice) are deeply religious and try to instill the same values in their children. One day, an old friend from the South, Harry (Glover) arrives on their doorstep to stay for a while. Harry is and he doesn't want to leave. Harry sets the family at war, and even appears to curse Gideon into a coma. Does Harry have some dark magical powers, is he maybe even The Devil?

African-American cinema was going through one of its most exciting periods when Burnett released To Sleep With Anger. It was a year after Spike Lee caused controversy with Do The Right Thing and Boyz N The Hood was just around the corner. Then it all went wrong. The films that came in their wake didn't aspire to be angry like Spike Lee, nor did they have any interest in middle class black life like Burnett. Instead, they took the gangster elements of Boyz N The Hood, neglected the human drama, and a wave of increasingly dull gangster-lite dramas flooded the rental shops. Lee was never to make a film with the same kind of power again, and Burnett slipped into relative obscurity.

To Sleep With Anger didn't even get to make the impact of Do The Right Thing or Boyz N The Hood. It had some acclaim, it won Indy Spirit awards for Burnett (directing and script), Glover and Sheryl Lee Ralph. But that didn't equal the widespread acclaim the film deserves, not even Danny Glover, fresh off Lethal Weapon 2, could get this film a wide audience. It's a real shame because it's Burnett's best film and Glover's greatest performance. It's a real treat to see Glover get hold of a script that really allows him the chance to act. Glover plays Harry as a brooding but charming and pleasant man. Demonic but charismatic. It's the kind of performance that should have won Glover an Oscar nomination at the very least.

The use of folklore is strong in this film, but Burnett drags that folklore out of its familiar environments and sets it firmly in modern day America. Religion is deeply important to Gideon, so is superstition, and it seems as if the loss of a charm early in the film could be responsible for Harry's appearance. There is the possibility that Harry really is The Devil. There's certainly something otherworldly about him, and Harry is a familiar nickname for The Devil. He arrives in a religious family and tests their faith, he also tests their loyalty to each other. But he's just as likely to be an incarnation of The Trickster. A mischievious spirit who appears in many world religions. The Trickster can be malicious or benign, but he's mostly interested in balance. He forces the family to confront buried resentments, even if he goes about it in a malevolent fashion.

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Post #: 459
RE: 1990s Top 100 - 27/9/2012 9:51:00 AM   
rawlinson

 

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From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
14. Porco Rosso



Director: Hayao Miyazaki
Year: 1992

Porco Rosso is one of Miyazaki's most frequently underrated films. It doesn't have the epic scale of the likes of Mononoke or the sweetness of a Totoro, so it's often regarded as a lesser entry. But for me it's always been one of his finer films.

The crimson pig of the title is Marco, an Italian flying ace in pre-WW2 Italy. So ashamed by the rise of fascism in his native country, along with a sense of survivor's guilt following the deaths of many of his squadron, he cursed himself to become a humanoid pig. He now lives on a private island, taking on cases battling air pirates. Frustrated with constantly being beaten, the pirates hire a cocky American pirate who thinks he can defeat Marco. After a sneak attack leaves Marco grounded, he has to seek the help of old friend to repair his plane, and he gains the services of a talented young mechanic, Fio, along the way as he seeks a return fight with Curtis.

Miyazaki puts great effort into the evocation of the period and it's one of the only of his films to recreate a specific time and place. The breathtaking animation is among the finest of Miyazaki's work, especially in some of the aerial battles and Marco's daring return to the air, flying his plane down a series of canals. But the real joy of the film is in the bonds between the characters. The friendship that develops between Marco and Fio is surprisingly touching and the would-be romance with Gina, the beautiful owner of a pilot's bar is unexpectedly complex.

Critics have called the film naive, but ultimately the film is a fairytale with all of the simplicity that comes with it. You can watch it on the level of a fairytale. You can watch it as a display of the beauty that Miyazaki finds in humanity. And also the cruelty that we can be capable of. Or you can see just see it as an old-fashioned mixture of romance and wartime espionage that puts Casablanca in the shade. Whatever you take from Porco Rosso, it's one of Miyazaki's most accomplished works, even if it's not always treated as such.

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Post #: 460
RE: 1990s Top 100 - 27/9/2012 9:52:22 AM   
rawlinson

 

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From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
13. Satantango



Director: Bela Tarr
Year: 1994

Satantango deals with the near collapse of a collective farm and the return to the community of the mysterious and manipulative Irimias. An extraordinary film that many dismiss without even attempting to watch it. I think Satantango is a film that's often treated unfairly because of its reputation. I can understand why some would be put off by this epic piece of cinema, but focusing on its length always strikes me as a strange move. A film can be 3 hours long and fly by if you're enjoying it, while an 80 minute film can feel like an eternity. Focusing on the length beforehand seems often to be a way of prejudicing yourself against the film. If cinema can provide people with an immersive experience, why does that experience so often get talked up as being about the spectacle of a Star Wars or a Lord of the Rings? Why can't something equally immersive, but less bombastic be just as exciting and relevant? If you're talking about sheer experience, there's few films that can match up to Satantango. Why can't a film that's about the politics and ethics of life, a film that creates such a vivid picture of a community, that's shot through with humour and insight into humanity be seen as just as much of an important experience as a spaceship flying overhead? That's not to say the escapism and sheer spectacle of cinema isn't important, but why isn't something quieter but more thoughtful seen as equally important to a wider audience? Satantango is an amazing, essential piece of cinema. Don't let you yourself get distracted by the reputation.

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Post #: 461
RE: 1990s Top 100 - 27/9/2012 9:54:09 AM   
rawlinson

 

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Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
12. The Wrong Trousers/A Close Shave



Director: Nick Park
Year: 1993 - 1995

The Wrong Trousers

The film begins on Gromit's birthday. But because of the huge pile of unpaid bills, Gromit's presents consist of a new collar and a pair of robotic trousers. The trousers are big robotic creations and they're intended to be used to take Gromit for walks. Wallace decides the only way to make money is to rent out a room. Their lodger is a sinister penguin. The penguin first takes over Gromit's bedroom and then Wallace's attention. Feeling pushed out, Gromit leaves home. When Gromit leaves, the mysterious penguin begins to make some alterations on the robotic trousers. While looking for a place to stay, Gromit stumbles across the penguin's true identity, Feathers McGraw - wanted criminal. Meanwhile Feathers has trapped Wallace in the modified robotic trousers and has plans to steal a diamond. It's up to Gromit to save the day in a frantic and thrilling battle with Feathers that culminates in a hair-raising ride along a model train set.

The claymation animation is sharper than A Grand Day Out and the inventions seem more high-tech as well, from the trapdoor that drops Wallace out of his bed to the trousers themselves. The emotional depth of the characters is also improved from A Grand Day Out and the scene with Gromit leaving is actually quite moving. This was the short where Wallace and Gromit became national icons and it wasn't just the smoothing out of the rough edges that make this work so well, it's Park refining his characters and capturing the qualities and quirks that make them so beloved. It's difficult to imagine Wallace & Gromit being created in any other country because there's something about them that feels uniquely British. In many ways that eccentric Britishness makes them feel like refugees from an Ealing film and I think that's partly what's so appealing about them. They feel timeless, but not dated or antiquated. The Wrong Trousers is the peak of their glories, but that's not to say what came later was in any way bad. There's not a Wallace & Gromit outing that's anything less than a five star classic, but this is the one of the most exciting and funny animations ever created.

A Close Shave

In the third outing for the dynamic duo, Wallace and Gromit have started a window cleaning business. One of their clients is a wool shop owned by Wendolene Ramsbottom. Wallace finds himself attracted to Wendolene but he's unaware that her wool comes from a sheep-rustling ring that's led by her malevolent dog, Preston. The short opens with one of the kidnapped sheep escaping from Preston's lorry into Wallace & Gromit's house. The sheep causes havoc in the house but is adopted and named Shaun. Wallace and Wendolene get closer and he finds out that her father was also an inventor. Preston, who is actually a robot invented by Wendolene's father frames Gromit for the sheep thefts, but with the aid of Wallace and the sheep, Gromit makes a jailbreak and sets out to stop Preston before he turns the stolen sheep into dog food.

With A Close Shave, Aardman expanded the world of Wallace & Gromit even further. They feel more integrated into their environment than in previous shorts, they introduced a more deadly villain and Wendolene became only the second speaking character in the series, with vocal duty going to Anne Reid. Of course the greatest addition to the W & G universe was little Shaun, he stole the show here and he would go on to his own hilarious television series. What's so wonderful about Nick Park's creations is that every second of the films feel like they're made with absolute love and respect both of the characters and of the audience.

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Post #: 462
RE: 1990s Top 100 - 27/9/2012 9:55:35 AM   
rawlinson

 

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Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
11. Crumb



Director : Terry Zwigoff
Year: 1994

This critically acclaimed documentary examines the bizarre life and work of Robert Crumb. For those unfortunate enough to have never encountered the work of Crumb, he's a near legendary comic book artist who was first acclaimed as part of the 'underground' scene of the late 60s. His breakthrough came from his Fritz The Cat and Keep On Truckin' cartoons, but the man seems unhappy with his most famous work or at least with the way they entered the mainstream. His disdain for the film of Fritz The Cat is legendary, and he makes clear that he dislikes the fact that Keep On Truckin' has been reused over the years without any payment going his way. But is there more to Crumb than just the weird sex that people associate with his cartoons? Was that question even worth asking?

I'll just start off by saying that Crumb is either completely reckless or incredibly honest. For a man who seems so publicity shy, he's willing to completely expose himself on camera here. He makes no attempt to hide the darker side of his personality. But then he's been exposing himself on paper for decades, so what difference does a camera make? His comics have been criticised over the years and both his critics and supporters are interviewed in this documentary. His critics think he is both racist and sexist, while his supporters have claimed that it's simply a case of extreme social criticism.

So what's true? I think there is an element of parody and social critique in his work, in fact I think it makes up a large part of his work. But there's also an undeniable sense of anger in his cartoons. But I don't think he's racist or sexist. With the racism, I think he's merely taking a viewpoint and exploding it until it's as in your face as it can possibly be. Race would have been a huge issue through Crumb's formative years, and I think he's playing with the racial attitudes he came into contact with. As for the sexism, his comics do have a warped view of women and they show what some call misogyny, but I always thought of it as misanthropy. Crumb doesn't hate women, he hates everyone, himself included. If anything I think his sexism is a misguided awe of women. His women are usually strong and dominant and his men are snivelling and weak. It's a bizarre form of respect that's been filtered through a damaged mind. Crumb's view of sex takes up a large part of the documentary, he himself admits to having a lot of anger towards women. His former lovers that agreed to be interviewed seem to have fairly positive memories of this odd little man.

So is the fact that Crumb is a damaged man a reasonable excuse for some of the attitudes that he displays in his work? The film reveals that Crumb suffered trauma as a child from various sources, from his tyrant of a father, from his seemingly uninterested mother, from the neglect by girls his age. He was a geeky teenager who felt that women were unattainable. But when he actually let out his fantasies on paper, they became interested in him.

The film depicts Robert Crumb as a man tormented by his demons. We spend a lot of time thinking of him as this strange individual but when we meet his brothers, we realise that Robert was the normal one in the family. The exploration of Charles and Maxon is actually frightening. Charles appears to be an incredibly gifted artist, and possibly the man that inspired Robert to start drawing. But he suffered some kind of breakdown and lived in a back bedroom of his mother's house, surrounded by old books and barely able to function. The interview with Charles makes for the most tragic part of the film, he's an obviously talented and intelligent man, and seeing him in such circumstances is close to heartbreaking. You can only wonder at how insightful, and disturbing, a documentary on Charles would have been. The interview with Maxon is less enlightning. He's obviously just as damaged as Charles, and just as talented an artist, but he's somehow more withdrawn and he refuses to reveal too much of himself on camera.

So the film leaves us with questions. Does great art come from a life of torture? Why did Robert escape the madness to become such an icon while his brothers live life in such despair? Were his comics his therapy and was his success the reason he can live a normal life? Is he just a racist and a sexist or is his work social criticism? For all of his honesty on camera, these questions remain frustratingly unanswered. Part of me longs for a follow-up documentary to see how he's doing these days, but part of me is worried that the despair in this film would be too overwhelming if Zwigoff ever revisited it. Crumb is a unique portrait of a unique man.

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Post #: 463
RE: 1990s Top 100 - 27/9/2012 9:55:47 AM   
matty_b


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Ashes of Time is pretty good.

The Straight Story is wonderful.

Haven't seen Quick Change in ages, but remember liking it.

My Own Private Idaho is OK.

The Wrong Trousers/A Close Shave are both amazing.

< Message edited by matty_b -- 27/9/2012 9:56:14 AM >


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Post #: 464
RE: 1990s Top 100 - 27/9/2012 9:56:48 AM   
rawlinson

 

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From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
10. Whisper of the Heart



Director: Yoshifumi Kondo
Year: 1995

This charming animation from the great Ghibli Studio is, in an unusual move for the studio, a love story. It focuses on Shizuku, a bookish 14 year old girl experiencing her first love. She notices all her library books have been previously checked out by the same person, a boy named Seiki. A creative girl, Shizuku is writing a song for the school graduation. At the school library she forgets her lyric book one day and returns to find it only to discover it being read by a boy who annoys her in every way possible, including teasing her about her song. Next day she sees a large cat who seems to ride public transportation on his own, intrigued, she follows it to an antique shop where she sees a statue of a cat who the shopowner informs her is called The Baron. She also discovers the annoying boy from school lives there. It turns out he's the mysterious Seiki and they gradually begin a friendship that turns into a love affair. When he tells her he's leaving to study in Italy, she becomes inspired to write a story for him, based on the legend of The Baron.

And it's that simple really. A schooltime love story. So what makes it such a strong film? The authenticity. I know that may seem a strange word to use in relation to an animated movie, but this feels more real than the majority of live action teen movies. It's a sweet joyous tale that has a universal appeal because it all feels so true. Even though it's not going to be your life it's still true as someone's life and that's what makes this authentic, the feeling that you could be watching the feelings and emotions of genuine teenagers. The characters ring true all the way through, which raises the question of why are live action teen movies often so underwhelming and unrealistic? Also, can you think of many modern teen films that treat female characters with as much respect as this one?

One of the key themes of Whisper... is the importance of creativity. Shizuku is a budding songwriter, Seiki a musician. The shopowner is a storyteller and a musician and his tales are a huge influence on Shizuku's own story. The film finds great joy in allowing its characters a chance to express themselves in scenes like the group sing along in the workshop and Shizuku finds release in their free-spirited nature. True, the basic message of the importance of following your dreams is a little simplistic, but the heart of the story is with the characters rather than the plot. While Whisper Of The Heart is a wonderful film, it also leaves me feeling disappointed, not through any flaws of the film, but because the untimely death of the director robbed us of more like this. But if his cinematic legacy was to be this one film, then it's a legacy to be treasured.

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 465
RE: 1990s Top 100 - 27/9/2012 9:58:19 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
9. A Scene at the Sea



Director: Takeshi Kitano
Year: 1991

Best known in the West for his Yakuza films, in Japan Takeshi Kitano rose to fame as a comedian and there were initially worries about 'Beat' Takeshi being taken seriously as a dramatic actor. That's why A Scene at the Sea must have been a bewildering film in both Asia and the West. It was only Kitano's third film as a director, and his first two offerings had been Yakuza films, so a film about a deaf and dumb teenager learning to surf must have been an incredible surprise to audiences.

Shigeru is a deaf and dumb teenager who works as a dustman. One day on his rounds he finds a discarded surfboard and suddenly finds himself drawn to the ocean. Accompanied by his devoted girlfriend, Takako, Shigeru struggles for respect at first and is mocked by the local surfers, gradually winning their respect through his dedication to the sport. It sounds like a million teen movies, doesn't it? But there's so much more to it than that rather slight plot description can tell you, A Scene at the Sea has as much depth and hidden surprises as the ocean that Shigeru loves so much.

Kitano's films, even at their most violent have a still and meditative quality, none more so than A Scene at the Sea. The literal translation of the Japanese title is That Summer, A Most Quiet Ocean, and that title is infinitely more fitting to this beautiful little film. It gives you this memory of an idyllic summer without ever resorting to cheap sentiment. Kitano provides us with the ocean and the beach and the characters make themselves known to us through their actions, both in the ocean and out of it.

In this deeply lyrical film, Kitano strips away the storytelling and the dialogue to create a minimalistic masterpiece. The film is virtually wordless, both Shigeru and Takako are deaf mutes and Kitano puts us firmly into his world, letting us experience some of Shigeru's heartbreak when he misses his first contest when he's unable to hear the announcement for his category. What little dialogue there is almost takes you out of the film, nearly breaking the spell that Kitano has placed us under.

A Scene at the Sea is probably the most delicate and romantic of Kitano's films, the relationship between Shigeru and Takako carries the emotional weight of the film, and the unconditional love they show each other gives a powerful emotional core to this funny, moving and honest film.

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Post #: 466
RE: 1990s Top 100 - 27/9/2012 9:59:28 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
8. Goodfellas



Director: Martin Scorsese
Year: 1990

This technically dazzling film from Scorsese chronicles the rise and fall of mobster Henry Hill. We follow him from his early days where he drops out of school to run errands for the local mobster, through his rise in the ranks and his eventual downfall. Ray Liotta plays the adult Hill, and turns in a performance he hasn't matched since. How he didn't use the momentum from the film to become a bigger star is a mystery. De Niro does his usual exceptional work as older gangster Jimmy, but walking away with the show (and the Oscar) is Joe Pesci as the psychotic little ball of rage, Tommy. The film manages to capture how attractive the Mafia lifestyle can sometime seem, as well as the paranoid, violent reality. "As far back as I can remember, I always wanted to be a gangster," Damn right, Marty.

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Post #: 467
RE: 1990s Top 100 - 27/9/2012 10:00:27 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
7. Hedd Wyn



Director: Paul Turner
Year: 1992

Hedd Wyn won the Bafta for best foreign language film in its year and it was nominated for the Oscar, which makes its relatively unknown status even more of a shock and a shame. The film is a biopic of legendary Welsh poet Ellis Evans, who used the Bardic name of Hedd Wyn (Garmon) Hedd Wyn contrasts Evans' peaceful life on his farm home in Trawsfynydd with his time in the trenches, leading up to his death at the battle of Passchendaele in World War One. The film opens with Evans lying dying in no man's land, using flashbacks to show his pre-war life. Evans loved women and poetry and spent his days dreaming of winning a Chair in the National Eisteddfod, and seeking inspiration from his muse, Arianrhod, the Celtic moon Goddess. Evans desires to stay out of the war and not even accusations of cowardice can convince him to enlist, but eventually the draft board forces his parents to send one of the children to the army and he is the oldest son. While in the trenches, suffering through the dehumanisation of the army, he uses his every free moment to work on his poem, Yr Arwr, begging his unwilling commander to submit the poem to the Eisteddfod for him.

It's no great spoiler, it's a historical fact, to reveal that Evans won the Chair posthumously, one of the film's most heart-rending moments is the delivery of the black clothed chair to his parents. The film isn't about suspense or surprises, even if you're unfamiliar with the man, the film opens with Evans dying in a battlefield. What it's about is contrasts in life. Contrasts between the Welsh and the English, between war and peace, between farm life and the trenches. It's also about the human spirit and how we're able to create great beauty even in the harshest of times and the most despairing of places. The film is beautiful to look at, there's no flashy cinematography, but it helps create the kind of quiet grace that the tale deserves. Huw Garmon is superb as Evans, he should have been an Oscar nominee and he should have had a more successful career than he has. Hedd Wyn deserves to take its place among not just the great war films, but among the great tributes to the human spirit.

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Post #: 468
RE: 1990s Top 100 - 27/9/2012 10:02:17 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
6. Singapore Sling



Director: Nikos Nikoladis
Year: 1990

A detective searching for his missing lover, Laura, traces her to a strange country mansion. Laura's last known whereabouts were working there for the perverse mother and daughter who inhabit the place. Mommy and her not so little girl get their kicks from kinky and violent sex, our hero thinks they killed Laura, but the ladies have the upper hand. But is Laura really dead? Are the women really mother and daughter? What the hell exactly is going on? Singapore Sling takes its inspiration from Preminger's Laura and then improves it by adding a general air of insanity and lots of kinky sex. This has vomit, golden showers, masturbation with fruit, sex with a mummy, incest, murder, madness, you feel soiled after this film, and it feels really good. There's some astonishing imagery, and not just from the bodily fluids flying across the screen. Add in a few amazing performances, Michele Valley reciting her dialogue in two languages is memorable, but Meredyth Herold should have won every award going, even best sound effects. She is so wild that it takes time to even come close to adjusting to the rhythm of her performance. One of the best examples of film noir ever made.

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Post #: 469
RE: 1990s Top 100 - 27/9/2012 10:03:33 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
5. Peppermint Candy



Director: Lee Chang-dong
Year: 1999

Peppermint Candy is an achingly poignant tale of a young man's loss of innocence, filtered through two decades of South Korean political turmoil. It uses those turmultous years to show the devastating effect the troubles of a nation, with especial relevance given to the Kwangju massacre of 1980, can have on the individual.

The film opens with Yong-ho breaking up the reunion of a group of old colleagues. Yong-ho is unable to fit in with the celebration and after turning belligerent he climbs onto a nearby railway bridge and leaps in front of a train, screaming about going back. Trains are a running theme in the film, they're a way of showing time passing, stopping and reversing. Footage of trains running in reverse is used to link the moments in time, capturing the natural link between the progress of a train and the passing of time without it seeming like a cliche. The reverse motion actually suggesting a life that will never reached the dreamed of destination with great skill.

The film then unfolds in reverse chronology. Over a period of 20 years, we witness the events that have led him to his suicidal state. Just a few days earlier he was a victim of the Asian economic crisis and had lost all of his money, he finds out an old girlfriend is dying in hospital. We see the breakdown of his marriage, the events in his previous career as a policeman that lead to the loss of his soul and finally we meet him as a sensitive young man, unaware of how the world will break him. The film's skillful handling of Yong-ho takes him from being a rather unpleasant character to one we feel a great deal of sympathy for.

The episodes are often rather ordinary, but they all give a deeper insight into Yong-ho, each time revealing a little more of the man and undercutting what we thought we knew. We're shown how he is degraded and broken over time, losing his idealism as his country becomes darker. The little moments are important though as they make Yong-ho who he is, it's telling that for all the darker themes in the film, the titles comes from the sweets given to Yong-ho by his first love. The shift from innocence to brutality and callousness is heartbreaking and the film works far better than similar themed movies like Irreversible and Memento (although that's not to say they're not great films in their own right) as this feels more painful, more broken somehow. It's aided by the emotionally draining lead performance from Sol Kyung-gu, an incredible piece of acting that should have lifted the actor to the same levels of cult popularity as some of his contemporaries. We end on a shattering note of the young Yong-ho dreaming of a future we know he'll never achieve. It's a damning verdict on the recent history of Korea, and one of the finest films to come out of the recent wave of South Korean cinema. The director, Lee Chang-dong, has made a handful of films that deserve to be recognised as modern classics, and this is his finest work to date.

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Post #: 470
RE: 1990s Top 100 - 27/9/2012 10:04:31 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
4. Only Yesterday



Director: Isao Takahata
Year: 1991

Isao Takahata seems to be the neglected man in Studio Ghibli, his films display every bit as much brilliance as those of his partner, Hayao Miyazaki, but while Miyazaki has received international acclaim (and even an Oscar) Takahata's films still seem somewhat unknown. Grave of the Fireflies has picked up the reputation it deserves, but a surprising number of people who revere that film still don't seem to know Pom Poko, My Neighbours the Yamadas or Only Yesterday. Maybe it's because the films are on a smaller scale in comparison. Certainly a film like Spirited Away is an easier sell than Grave of the Fireflies, people aren't usually keen to have their heart ripped out. But you have to think that some of it still comes out of a prejudice against animation, or a desire to view it as something simply for children. As acclaimed as Grave of the Fireflies is, I've still seen plenty of people mark it down because it was animated and not as good as a 'real' film. And I think that if Only Yesterday had been a live action film then it would be regarded as a masterpiece and hailed as one of the most subtle and intelligent depictions of memory and regret ever made.

Our lead character is Taeko, we meet her in two distinct time periods, as an adult in her mid 20s in the early 1980s, and as a child of around ten in the 1960s. In the present day, Taeko is an office worker preparing to leave for her summer holiday to the Japanese countryside to help pick the safflower harvest. On her way to the countryside she slips in and out of memories of her childhood self, remembering the small events that helped her to grow into the person she becomes, the joys, the disappointments and the minor incidents that can seem earth-shattering to a child. Taeko is a character who struggles with self-expression, she's a curious child who knows exactly what she wants, but the few moments that she has are stifled, by her family, by friends, by expectations, even her chance of becoming an actor is taken away from her by her rigid father. This suffocation leads her to be unable to express her true desires as an adult. The two points in time intertwine and comment on each other so we can see the woman in the girl and the girl in the woman. The slips in time don't feel like nostalgia solely for the sake of nostalgia, the world wasn't always better then, she was often alone and unhappy as a child, but it also doesn't create artificial misery. The film slips so easily between these time periods that you don't always notice at first. The biggest tip-off is the differing animation styles, Taeko's adult world is drawn in bolder colours, while the younger world is a place of softer watercolours. It's an exquisite way of detailing the past and the often hazy business of memories. Only Yesterday gives you a more psychologically complex portrayal of a character than most live action films can manage.

It saddens me to think that this depiction of Japanese life, which I would honestly rank alongside the best of Ozu and Naruse for honest realism, is neglected. Life in the country isn't softened by the beauty of nature, when Taeko goes to work there it is hard work, work that lasts long hours for very little reward. There's no sense of Takahata spoon-feeding you anything, we're never told this is bad/this is good, we're allowed to see the character finding out for herself. As a child she sees her dreams crushed by the harshness of life around her, we see her realise how her own fear and desire to fit in costs her a potentially rewarding friendship, we even see the value of life's small moments, like the disappointing first taste of pineapple. The ghost of her young self haunts her until she is able to make the decisions about what she really wants and when she does, that final moment of redemption never feels forced or sentimental. This is a poignant and insightful film and a thing of rare beauty. While Only Yesterday is fine as a title, the Japanese title actually translates as Memories of Falling Teardrops, a far more reflective and poetic title for one of the most poetic and graceful of all films.

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Post #: 471
RE: 1990s Top 100 - 27/9/2012 10:05:20 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
3. Groundhog Day



Director: Harold Ramis
Year: 1993

Phil Connors (Murray) is a Pittsburgh weatherman who every year journeys to the small town of Punxsutawney to cover the Groundhog Day festival. Phil treats the assignment with a mixture of boredom and contempt, something that grows after they're snowed in and forced to spend the night in town. When Phil wakes up the following morning it's Groundhog Day again, and he's the only one in town that seems to know this. Every morning he wakes up only to find the same events repeating themselves over and over again. No matter what he does, including killing himself, every morning he wakes up to Groundhog Day. Phil alternates between finding this empowering by using his knowledge of events to manipulate things and people, to suicidal despair. Finally Phil realises that what he really wants is the perfect day with his producer Rita (MacDowell).

What could have easily been a one-note joke is turned into the greatest comedy film of the 90s, in fact there's only one film from the 90s as a whole that I rate higher. I think it's because it's because Ramis and Murray find so many different ways to play various scenes and scenarios. The scene where an endless variety of dates with Rita are played out, as Phil tries to find the right information and right lines to have the perfect day with her is an incredible example of the art of repetition to create comedy. There's also something incredibly touching about the film and you really believe in it, despite the fantastical nature of the plot.

Murray shows what a strong actor he is, making his redemption here far more believable than the one in Scrooged. His gradual attempts to change his ways and re-examine his priorities are subtle and Murray underplays beautifully. It's easy to see this film as the transition phase between his more sarcastic persona of the 80s and the slightly downbeat indie icon he became in the late 90s. Murray is one of my favourite actors of all time, he became a hero figure to me with the release of Ghostbusters and I can watch him in absolutely anything he does, but he has never been better, or shown greater range, than he does in Groundhog Day. It's not easy to like MacDowell as an actress, but she does her best work here, providing a strong foil for Murray, even if you never quite get past the feeling that he's way too good for her. There's also good support from Chris Elliott and Stephen Toblowsky.

I think there's something very profound about the film. There's a good reason why Ramis has received letters from people of a variety of religions claiming that he managed to capture everything they believe. I don't see the film as a religious one, but I think there's a great spiritual element and I think that's part of what makes it such a beloved film, there's something very pure beneath the one-liners. The events of the film are never explained, and I think it's all the better for it, especially given the idea of a voodoo curse that was in an earlier draft of the script. Groundhog Day is one of those little gems that deserves every bit of popularity and acclaim it gets.

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Post #: 472
RE: 1990s Top 100 - 27/9/2012 10:06:11 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
2. Naked



Director: Mike Leigh
Year: 1993

The film opens with what's either a rape or rough sex gone wrong in a Manchester alley. Johnny (Thewlis) is chased off by the girl and he steals a car and heads for the house of his ex-girlfriend Louise (Sharp) in London. Johnny is intelligent and eloquent, but something has warped his view of the world and he confronts it with reckless and violent abandon. When he arrives at Louise's he first seduces her flatmate, Sophie (Cartlidge) before spending the day wandering among London's forgotten. Johnny spouts his nihilistic philosophy to anyone willing to listen, and even to those who aren't. Possibly the film's most memorable scene takes place during this trawl of the streets when he spends time with a lonely night watchman. All the while Louise's landlord, the psychotic upper-class Jeremy, spends the film raping and abusing those around him. Johnny receives a violent beating and heads back to Louise's flat, but after a confrontation with Jeremy he's left to wander in the world again.

Mike Leigh's fame had really come from bittersweet, often bleak, black comedies. At times, in something like Abigail's Party, they approached real darkness, but he'd never been more brutal or confrontational as he was here. This is a critique of Thatcher's Britain through the viewpoint of an isolated and alienated character raging at the society. Johnny has obviously some kind of behavioural problems or personality disorder, but he's also highly intelligent, something that feeds his despair about the world as he's smart enough to realise just how trapped he is. Johnny is a man who hates the culture around him but his reference-heavy speech shows he's incapable of escaping it. As much as some of Johnny's actions are repellent and as misanthropic (rather than misogynistic as he's often accused of) as he is, there's something attractive, even likable, about him. To Leigh's credit, he never condemns Johnny for any of his actions. Even the opening rape might not be a rape, Johnny approaches the consensual sex with Sophie in the same violent way as he does in the opening scene, so there's the possibility that it was a consensual sex session that got a lot rougher than the woman was expecting. Certainly Johnny does nothing to endear himself to women, but he doesn't endear himself to men either. He seems incapable of interacting with people other than through sarcasm and abuse and I think it does a great disservice to the film to reduce it simply to gender issues, there's far more to this film than sexism, and even if there is misogyny in the character that's something different from there being misogyny in the film's viewpoint. And Thewlis gives the performance of his life, which makes it even more of a shame that he's never had another role on anywhere near the same level, even in his other work with Leigh. The film's real hate is saved for Jeremy, who is a loathsome sadist. We expect a big confrontation between Jeremy and Johnny, but instead we get something anti-climactic, as if this was never where Leigh was interested in taking us. Some people read the film as Jeremy being what Johnny would have been if Johnny was born into a different class, but I think Leigh is more interested in how they're different than in how they're similar.

Naked is also Leigh's most visually impressive film, filled with stark imagery on a level that Leigh hadn't captured before or since. It's also his most angry and passionate film. It's been noted that the characters here are without any kind of family unit, something rare in Leigh's work, and the sense of isolation and despair that comes from these people is palpable. The cast are excellent, but of course nobody can come close to Thewlis, and like so many of the truly great performances, Oscar completely ignored him. Never mind, because this is a performance of rare insight, courage and ferociousness. Naked is a difficult film, but so many of the best are.

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Post #: 473
RE: 1990s Top 100 - 27/9/2012 10:07:06 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
1. A Brighter Summer Day



Director: Edward Yang
Year: 1991

A Brighter Summer Day is an explosive film looking at the instability of Taiwan in the early 60s. The film's main focus is the youth gangs that take over Taipei in a battle for territory and respect. But then Yang expands the scope to show how the Nationalist government that had fled Communist rule in China took power in Taiwan and created an atmosphere of fear, Yang shows this through the effect on the individual, namely a 14 year old boy named S'ir and his family.

S'ir becomes friends with Ming, her boyfriend is another gang member, Honey, who is currently in hiding on suspicion of murder. S'ir's friendship with Ming lands him in trouble, but he's saved by the return of Honey, but soon after Honey is found dead and a confrontation with the rival gang is beckoning. S'ir is also having trouble in other areas of his life, he's having problems in school, something his father ineffectually tries to clear up, and things only get worse when his father is interrogated by the secret police because of his friends on the mainland. S'ir's love for Ming, combined with the pressure over his father's arrest, leads to a tragic confrontation with Ming.

Yang depicts a country trying to distance itself from its past and looking to embrace something new as Taiwan searches for its own identity. This upheaval leads to many of the youths embracing adopted cultures such as American music. The title of the song is from Are You Lonesome Tonight?, people hang out in pool halls and perform American music whenever they can. The youths are looking for something new to cling to in the fact of an uncertain home country. This uncertainty is what leads to the creation of the gangs as well, it gives the kids someplace to feel they belong. This sense of dislocation is one of the film's key themes, objects from other cultures invade lives and any sense of patriotism is dwindling, all signs that the old order is being swept away. When S'ir gets in trouble at school, his father tries to argue for him but fails, demonstrating the fading influence of this once powerful man. Even the street gangs have no real power or control, they're merely tolerated until they step too far out of line.

There seems to be a trend among Asian films of the last two decades to try and combine the personal and the political and A Brighter Summer Day is one of the finest examples of a film taking the huge theme and distilling it through the turmoil it can cause for the individual. Events in the film are spurred because of the political context, even the final tragedy has to be seen as S'ir snapping because of the pressure on his father. This is an extraordinarily ambitious project from Yang, the film is four hours long and includes a cast of over 100 amateur performers with multiple intricate plot threads. Yang's direction is masterful, it manages to take on an epic scope and still make the film feel intimate and personal, and most impressive of all, the individual is never lost to the sweeping scale. The film could easily have been indulgent, but instead it's a sublime work of art.

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Post #: 474
RE: 1990s Top 100 - 27/9/2012 10:08:18 AM   
elab49


Posts: 54670
Joined: 1/10/2005
quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

6. Singapore Sling
Singapore Sling takes its inspiration from Preminger's Laura and then improves it


You need help.

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Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

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Post #: 475
RE: 1990s Top 100 - 27/9/2012 10:08:49 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
Have you seen it? Isn't it amazing?

(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 476
RE: 1990s Top 100 - 27/9/2012 10:08:49 AM   
elab49


Posts: 54670
Joined: 1/10/2005
Fab top 5. Brilliant list

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quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

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Post #: 477
RE: 1990s Top 100 - 27/9/2012 10:09:01 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
Thanks.

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Post #: 478
RE: 1990s Top 100 - 27/9/2012 10:10:38 AM   
elab49


Posts: 54670
Joined: 1/10/2005
quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

Have you seen it? Isn't it amazing?


I've not. I looked it up when Fernetcontinica posted about it but it didn't exactly shoot to the top of my watch list.

_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 479
RE: 1990s Top 100 - 27/9/2012 10:17:38 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
quote:

This has vomit, golden showers, masturbation with fruit, sex with a mummy, incest, murder, madness,


Is it wrong that I can't understand why anyone would not want to see this film?

(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 480
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