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RE: The Empire Forum's 50 GREATEST CRIME MOVIES - 6/8/2012 8:10:10 PM   
Beetlejuice!


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24. The Asphalt Jungle (1950)
 
 
Classic heist-gone-wrong film noir directed by John Huston and notable for an early appearance by Marilyn Monroe.
 
1950 was a hell of a year for noirs. It's interesting, mostly riveting, features solid directing (obviously) and superb acting. There is an odd flaw which I find in Huston's work where once it starts coming closer to the third act, the pacing of the film seems to slow down more than it should, but it hits back stronger with an incredible finale. - Deviation
 
It has that zingy hard-boiled dialogue that's always fun to listen to, and the cast is solid. But I found it hard to care about any of the characters, and when that happens my interest in a film starts to falter. Not a bad film by any means, but I just found it very hard to be fully engaged with it. - MonsterCat
 
A hard edged classic crime film. Certainly an influence on many modern crime movies. - Beetlejuice!

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RE: The Empire Forum's 50 GREATEST CRIME MOVIES - 6/8/2012 8:14:51 PM   
Beetlejuice!


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23. Miller's Crossing (1990)
 
 
The Coen brothers present a complex gangster drama set during the Prohibition era in an unnamed American city. Albert Finney, Gabriel Byrne and Marcia Gay Harden star.
 
A violent, enthralling ride through the double- and triple-crosses of gang warfare, with a tour de force performance by Albert Finney. - Pigeon Army
 
My favourite Coen next to Big Lebowski. - culliford
 
Some interesting ideas, but the set design, excellent as it is, becomes too distracting and sinks the ship. The acting is good, but neither the characters nor the plot manage to interest me. - Dantes Inferno

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Post #: 32
RE: The Empire Forum's 50 GREATEST CRIME MOVIES - 6/8/2012 9:45:21 PM   
Beetlejuice!


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22. Once Upon a Time in America (1984)
 
 
A truly magnificent piece of cinema. Brutal, elegaic and utterly compelling, Sergio Leone's sombre epic is one of the finest commentaries on the birth pangs of modern America.
 
The cast are perfect with one exception, Elizabeth McGovern. She's just not up to the demands of the part and her teenage counterpart (a young Jennifer Connelly) gives a more memorable performance. In fact it's her that I always see as Deborah in my head, not McGovern. De Niro does his best work outside of a Scorsese film and James Woods would never be this good again. - rawlinson
 
Always found this to be a tough watch to be honest. - MonsterCat
 
I dont know if its Leones best - its certainly up there. - bobbyperu

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Post #: 33
RE: The Empire Forum's 50 GREATEST CRIME MOVIES - 6/8/2012 9:47:21 PM   
MonsterCat


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FYI, I'm expecting royalties for my quotes.

_____________________________

"I am a writer, a doctor, a nuclear physicist and a theoretical philosopher. But above all, I am a man, a hopelessly inquisitive man, just like you."

Films watched in 2013

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RE: The Empire Forum's 50 GREATEST CRIME MOVIES - 6/8/2012 9:56:00 PM   
Beetlejuice!


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quote:

ORIGINAL: MonsterCat

FYI, I'm expecting royalties for my quotes.


All contributors will receive 8% of all profits made from this thread

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Post #: 35
RE: The Empire Forum's 50 GREATEST CRIME MOVIES - 6/8/2012 10:05:08 PM   
Beetlejuice!


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21. Nine Queens (2000)
 
 
Fabian Bielinsky's directorial debut is an electrifying crime thriller that deserves to join the ranks as a classic of the genre.
 
To be honest I found it all a little predictable but it's likeable and performed well. - Beetlejuice!
 
Beilinsky's feature debut is an assured twisty turny tale of conmen and their methods. - elab49
 
 
 

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Post #: 36
RE: The Empire Forum's 50 GREATEST CRIME MOVIES - 8/8/2012 9:21:30 PM   
Beetlejuice!


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20. The Killing (1956)
 
 
Tightly plotted heist-goes-wrong thriller with which established the reputation of legendary director Stanley Kubrick.
 
The Killing is definitely a film of two halves. In the first, it's a fairly standard, occasionally interesting crime film that only really comes to life with the interactions between George, a bookie who just wants his wife to love him, and said wife, the biggest cunt on earth. Every other character is one-note and uninteresting, with several characters receiving very little background or motivation beyond money at all. The one really notable thing about the first half is the spectacular lighting and photography, but this is Kubrick, and I'd expect nothing less. Once the second half rolls around and we see the heist play out, however, it becomes a great film. The way it's shown-seeing one member of the crew do their job, before cutting back to see another do theirs and so on-works really well, especially since we see other characters' actions affect the overall crime without it cutting between everyone and becoming a jumbled mess. We even see other characters in the middle of enacting their plans while the scene is ostensibly focussing on someone else, which really adds to the connectivity and makes the 20-minute scene one of the best heist scenes in cinema. The aftermath, while feeling a mite rushed, is also fantastic, adding up to a second half that really deserves a better first half than it got. Still a decent film overall, but far from Kubrick's best. - Rebel scum
 
A lesser Kubrick film, but a lot of fun all the same. Characters are thinly written, but it's a tight and fast moving little crime flick, with some sharp dialogue delivered at a machine gun pace by a really solid cast. Really liked the dialogue between George and his sassy wife, Sherry. - MonsterCat
 
Best film noir ever! And also Kubrick's best film. Great bunch of characters in this slick, thrilling crime caper. Brilliant. - Beetlejuice!

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Post #: 37
RE: The Empire Forum's 50 GREATEST CRIME MOVIES - 8/8/2012 10:07:28 PM   
Beetlejuice!


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19. Fargo (1996)
 
 
Smart, stylish, frozen Midwestern noir from the Coen brothers.
 
Steve Buscemi and Peter Stormare are two of the most memorable film villains, I can’t help liking Buscemi no matter what he is in and Stormare has a strange magnetism where you want to see more of him. Fargo’s strength is that you can watch it repeatedly. I get irritated when you watch a film once and are wowed but you know you can no longer return to it because you have been emotionally invested in the plot but aside from that there is nothing to return to. Fargo has so much to revisit, whether it is witty jokes you may have missed or background details. It is boldly original and a luxury to watch. - chambanzi
 
This is easily the Coens finest movie. The cast are uniformly excellent, with McDormand giving one of the greatest leading female performances of all time. Buscemi and Macy are perfect in creepy support. The film has a whimsical black humour that sits perfectly alongside the dark crime tale. An absolute gem of a movie and I can't get enough of it.  - Beetlejuice!
 
Throughout their mass body of work, the Coens has still mostly stuck to only two genres (noirish crime and screwball comedy), with Fargo being the only film of them to successfully blend the two. It is alternatively funny and thrilling, never seeming to make up its mind of what genre it really wants to be, and somehow managing come out of the other as something fantastic. It's one of the few movies with an identity of its own, with the best Scandinavian representative in American films this side of The Thing. - Dantes Inferno

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Post #: 38
RE: The Empire Forum's 50 GREATEST CRIME MOVIES - 8/8/2012 10:17:36 PM   
Beetlejuice!


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18. Touch of Evil (1958)
 
 
Another Orson Welles masterpiece. The big man stars as a corpulent US cop, facing off against Charlton Heston's Mexican narcotics officer over the border and over murder, corruption and abduction.
 
Touch of Evil is a decent plot and a great performance let down by the lead pair and a lack of focus. Said plot is tight, well-written and genuinely intriguing when it picks up, the opening epic one-shot showing off a standard that the film does at times struggle to match up to. - Rebel scum
 
The film's complicated history and the numerous re-edits that have appeared over the years means that Touch of Evil has reached a near mythical status for some fans, with many even claiming it as Welles finest work. I wouldn't go that far, some of the characters are underdeveloped and Quinlan at times dominates the screen to the detriment of the other actors (But you can't really expect much else with Heston as the other lead figure) But even if some of the parts let it down a little, the whole is a work of genius with memorable sequences like Leigh's terror as Grandi's gang invades her motel or the justly famous opening tracking sequence rightly being regarded as some of the finest Welles ever filmed. - rawlinson
 
Brilliant film, with an insanely good Welles in the lead. - TheGodfather

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Post #: 39
RE: The Empire Forum's 50 GREATEST CRIME MOVIES - 12/8/2012 8:19:08 PM   
Beetlejuice!


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17. Dirty Harry (1971)
 
 
Legendary - and much imitated - police thriller that turned Clint Eastwood into a superstar. The politics are debatable but no one can deny it's an action classic.
 
I watched all the sequels for the first time last year, and I kind of love them all, warts and all. But this first film is a bonafide stone cold classic. It has an unbelievably cool soundtrack, a great lead, and a fair few classic lines. It epitomises 70s American cinema, and captured the zeitgeist at the time when the killer who inspired the film was still running around the city. I have a lot of love for serial killer stories - I think that makes me a little bit crazy - and this story in particular is fascinating. - homersimpson_esq
 
The best of the lot. - matty_b
 
Iconic role for Eastwood in this gritty crime film. - Beetlejuice!

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Post #: 40
RE: The Empire Forum's 50 GREATEST CRIME MOVIES - 12/8/2012 8:28:41 PM   
Beetlejuice!


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16. The Dark Knight (2008)
 
 
The Joker and Batman battle for the soul of civilisation. A dark and disturbing comic book movie from Christopher Nolan dominated by the last complete performance from Heath Ledger.
 
The Dark Knight is way better than Batman Begins. That's mainly down to Ledger, I think. I had forgotten just how good he was in this, especially once the Joker is taken to MCU. The chase in this wasn't really all that thrilling on this watch although again Ledger saves it at the end. - paul_ie86
 
A collection of ideas many of which are very good, but it does have flaws and never always feels like a complete whole. - ElephantBoy
 
Wasn't the best film of all time - hell I'm not even sure if its the best Batman film of all time! But it is better than Begins, which is enough. A solid enjoyable crime film, which although long, never feels too long. - Rhubarb

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Post #: 41
RE: The Empire Forum's 50 GREATEST CRIME MOVIES - 12/8/2012 8:37:23 PM   
Beetlejuice!


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15. Reservoir Dogs (1992)
 
 
Quentin Tarantino's groundbreaking bloody heist movie. Undeniably brutal, it's also very funny, the killing interspersed with sardonic asides.
 
Though clearly hugely influenced by his cinematic idols, Tarantino created a rather original piece with Reservoir Dogs rather than a fapping session over his influences as he has fell victim to of late. This, his debut, gave Hollywood a jolt of life, inspiring many present-day film makers, though whether this is necessarily a good thing or not is debatable. Reservoir Dogs gave Tarantino his own style of film making, one which relied heavily on its scripting and dialogue rather than the plot or the action. Whatever you think of the man's talent in the director's chair, it is difficult to refute his talents in enacting the writing processes. - fritzlfan
 
A decent and groundbreaking debut from Tarantino. Smart, but a touch shaky at times, but with stunning performances from all the cast, who needs to complain? - blaud
 
QT's indie heist movie was great and had brilliant performances .(including a rather creepy one from Michael Madsen) But I was a tiny bit disapointed. But who cares when it has one of the greatest twists of all time! - jamdodge1

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RE: The Empire Forum's 50 GREATEST CRIME MOVIES - 12/8/2012 9:39:50 PM   
Beetlejuice!


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14. The Usual Suspects (1995)
 
 
When a crippled criminal survives a massacre he's brought in for questioning, then proceeds to tell the most remarkable of underworld tales.
 
The Usual Suspects is a genuine cult classic. After seeing it the first time and buying the VHS on the day it came out (didn't have one of those new fangled DVD player thingies at the time, too expensive) I must have played it to everyone I could, friends, family, workmates and I used to love seeing their reaction at the end. I also got into the habbit of watching the film and never taking my eyes off Spacey. If you've not done so before please do this, just watch him & forget everything else, it's a brilliant experience, you suddenly notice all these brief facial tics, smirks, rolls of eyes etc that let you know he's spinning a yarn the whole time (but that you never spotted the first time you watched) it's a masterclass in film acting. - Discodez
 
Rarely has "head-scratching" and "cool" been proper adjectives for a movie, but both are certainly a lock for me when reviewing The Usual Suspects. Twisting, funny, thrilling; it is a key movie in the crime-renaissance of the 90's that should be watched by anyone. Hell, even my mum loves it! - Dantes Inferno
 
I still love this – the story of five criminals (Kevin Spacey, Gabriel Byrne, Steven Baldwin, Kevin Pollack, and Benicio del Toro) who come together by "coincidence" and decide to take on a job together, but end up on a twisting road towards almost certain death - a lot, no matter how many mistakes there are in it. Sure, there are moments of hamminess in the acting, the script doesn't always hold up under the pressure of clichés, and Singer's input – although impressive – is clearly that of a debutant. But, I have to say, this is still one of the most entertaining crime films ever made. But what sets it apart is that it also has something going on upstairs. It's winding plot and clever characterisation makes "the Usual Suspects" worth watching again and again and again, and the little moments that you may have missed the first time all come clear on the second. The acting is still sublime, particularly from Kevin Spacey, whose mysterious, smart, and smarmy Verbal Kint is one of the greatest cinematic creations that America produced in the 1990s. Benicio del Toro puts in solid work in a character that was clearly only ever created to die, and the rest of the suspects – Pollack, Byrne, Baldwin – put in what are either career bests or very close to that. Also look out for Pete Postlethwaite, who has never been better than as the stoic faced lawyer Kobayashi. But what's best is the twist, which holds up time and time again. Even if I have seen this film over ten times, I still find the goose bumps appearing in the final montage, and watching it with friends who have never seen it before (like the person I watched it with tonight) is a thoroughly rewarding and pleasing experience. One of the very best film of the last twenty years. - Piles

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Post #: 43
RE: The Empire Forum's 50 GREATEST CRIME MOVIES - 12/8/2012 9:47:42 PM   
Beetlejuice!


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13. Jackie Brown (1997)
 
 
Blaxploitation star Pam Grier is Jackie Brown, ageing, desperate, sexy and sassy. Quentin Tarantino is the smart director. A cool combination.
 
Tarantino's lazily paced crime tale is a joy to revisit with these likeable characterizations. - Beetlejuice!
 
There's an interesting theory that says in an alternate universe, Jackie Brown was a hit and therefore Tarantino didn't retreat into making juvenile junk like Death Proof as a form of comfort and instead forged a career making more mature stuff like his adaptation of Leonard's novel. While I can appreciate any universe that is free from the likes of Kill Bill, that's not to say that Jackie Brown is a forgotten or overlooked masterpiece - it isn't. It certainly is a more mature approach from Tarantino - deaths aren't played for cheap yucks and there's genuine heart and emotion between Pam Grier's air stewardess and Robert Forster's bondsman - yet he still can't help himself from indulging in his chat-heavy tendencies in a story that doesn't really need it. It's a story that should be drum-tight, with the narrative pieces clicking together sharply, but it's laboured, heavy, bloated and for the first 90 minutes pretty shapeless - more than once I had to ask myself just where the hell the film was going, and not in the good, unpredictable way. There's little kinetic energy to the film, and it's only really buoyed by the range of strong performances across the board. As mentioned before, Grier and Forster give genuine feeling to the film, Samuel L. Jackson's gun dealer feels genuinely threatening rather than cartoonish and this might be the last time De Niro actually looked like he was trying as a schlubby ex-con caught in the middle of a sting between Jackson, Grier and the cops. By the time the sting comes together, Tarantino flitting between different character viewpoints and back and forth in time, the film noticeably perks up and you get a feeling of how Jackie Brown should have been - snappy, smart and witty and with a pay-off between two characters that, after some boiling unspoken tension, explodes in a moment both genuinely shocking and blackly comic with the line of dialogue that underlines it. But I'll be darned if I can remember much of interest in the slog that is the previous 90 minutes. Maybe we're better off in this universe after all. - matty_b
 
My favourite Tarantino by some way. - DCMaximo

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Post #: 44
RE: The Empire Forum's 50 GREATEST CRIME MOVIES - 12/8/2012 11:00:08 PM   
Beetlejuice!


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12. Rififi (1955)
 
 
Tough-as-nails 50s French heist movie that proves that not all the best crooks are American.
 
Rifififfifififififi is great, the heist bit in the middle is so bold and briliant, but whats even bolder is that its the centrepiece and we see the aftermath of the heist. - Rhubarb
 
Influential 1955 heist movie from Jules Dassin. I actually enjoyed this more than Melville's Bob le Flambeur from the following year, and certainly more than the handful of French New Wave films I've seen to date. - Gram123
 
Quite possibly the most inspired piece of film-making I have yet viewed, and one of the all time great film noir thrillers. Little can be said for the heist movies which attempt to imitate this masterpiece of suspense and atmospheric drama, save for the fact that none come close to this. - Deanstuff

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RE: The Empire Forum's 50 GREATEST CRIME MOVIES - 13/8/2012 12:06:06 AM   
Beetlejuice!


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11. Double Indemnity (1944)
 
 
Film noir at its blackest with director-screenwriter Wilder's heady cocktail of corruption, and deceit. Classy.
 
One of the accepted classics of film noir, Double Indemnity could almost be seen as the archetypal film of the genre. A seedy, murderous atmosphere, a sultry femme fatale, an anti-hero who's a schmuck in way over his head and a dogged investigator who is the film's closest thing to a moral compass. There's something slightly unreal about Double Indemnity, it takes place in a shadowland where people are stylish but rotten. Like most film noir, it runs the risk of becoming ridiculous. In order to believe in the premise everyone involved has to commit, or it just comes off as game-playing and posturing. Luckily you can always believe in Wilder, even when he's at his most acidly satirical. There's an oppressive darkness to Double Indemnity, but there's also the same black-hearted gallows humour that was in most of Wilder's best work. - rawlinson
 
Something about this felt disappointing, maybe the rather dull build up to the murder, that after the brilliant opening credits and a clever way to tell the plot using a Dictaphone, it falls on a less interesting note as Neff tries to sell a claim to Dietrichson's husband and until the murder itself is started in action and it becomes incredibly tense. The characters which are not interesting till the murder occurs, however once the murder does happen, the film becomes tense, twisted and sordid, fantastic cinematography, a decent soundtrack, some great performances with a memorable script and a great ending. - Deviation
 
I generally don't like film noirs a great deal. I love this. - Gimli The Dwarf

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Post #: 46
RE: The Empire Forum's 50 GREATEST CRIME MOVIES - 13/8/2012 12:13:11 AM   
Beetlejuice!


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10. Pulp Fiction (1994)
 
 
Tarantino pushed storytelling to its limit to create this movie of interconnected stories, starring Bruce Willis, Samuel L Jackson, John Travolta and Uma Thurman.
 
I have always found Pulp Fiction to contain the best and worst of Tarantino. The best (the film sings when travolta and jackson are on screen together) and the worst (the sag in the middle part of the movie in the gold watch when bruce escapes after the fight) though Willis good performance makes up for it as well. Too long, too overindulgent (thankfully tarantino has stopped casting himself in movies, in a good cast like this he sticks out like a sore thumb) and it always mystifies me why its so praised. Each to their own I suppose. One thing I did notice in this rewatch, which was my first time seeing it on HD, how good the cinematography is and rewatching this and other tarantino films such as Kill Bill on bluray has really given me a new appreciation for the look of his films, of which Robert Richardsons work on Inglorious Basterds is my favourite. - MartinBlank76
 
Tarantino's razor-sharp dialogue can still draw blood 18 years (FUCKING HELL) later. The mind-bending structure is still fresh and new, and the characters memorable and fun. It's a classic for a reason. Whatever your thoughts on Tarantino's recent offerings (I still like Death Proof, screw you) there is no mistaking that Pulp Fiction is a great, great film. - homersimpson_esq
 
Brilliant in most of its bits, not brilliant in the others. - matty_b

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RE: The Empire Forum's 50 GREATEST CRIME MOVIES - 13/8/2012 12:21:47 AM   
Beetlejuice!


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9. Out of the Past (1947)
 
 
PI Robert Mitchum pursues quarry Jane Greer while gangster Kirk Douglas waits in the shadows in this cunningly constructed, atmospheric noir classic.
 
Frequently referred to as the greatest smoking movie of all time and regarded as one of the greatest and most definitive in the film noir cannon, ‘Out of the Past’ is essential viewing. What is most remarkable about the film is its range in both storytelling (delving into the past while sustaining present time) but also its range geographically whether the location be California, New York or Acapulco. - chambanzi
 
Without a doubt one of the best film noirs I've ever seen, with some wonderfully hard boiled dialogue, excellent locations and three terrific performances from the stars. - Beetlejuice!
 
I've never particularly rated the film or the performances. - elab49

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Post #: 48
RE: The Empire Forum's 50 GREATEST CRIME MOVIES - 13/8/2012 12:30:13 AM   
Beetlejuice!


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8. City of God (2002)
 
 
Impressive portrayal of the cycle of violence among the poor, young criminals in the slums of Rio De Janeiro. Based in reality, it features the all-out gang war that took place in the early 1980s.
 
One of my favourite films. - scarface666brooksy!!!
 
um, does anyone not like this film? - swordsandsandals
 
One of the greatest films of all time. a masterpiece. - shawshank prisoner

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Post #: 49
RE: The Empire Forum's 50 GREATEST CRIME MOVIES - 13/8/2012 12:35:06 AM   
Beetlejuice!


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7. L.A. Confidential (1997)
 
 
Brilliant adaptation of James Ellroy's detective novel about three cops confronting corrupt businessmen, sleazy journalists and assorted trash in 1950s LA.
 
Not quite an ensemble-type film – where the numbers of stars becomes ridiculous – but a core group of incredibly skilled actors. Kim Basinger doesn’t embarrass herself alongside them either. Before Crowe really hit the mainstream, this is a quietly superb performance, injected with bursts of energy, like winding up a music player. As he sparks against Pearce, the tension is absolute. Spacey’s laconic older cop has some surprising moments, but Spacey is the viola to Pearce and Crowe’s violins. - homersimpson_esq
 
It’s one of my Top 30 Films, practically perfect in every way. - impqueen
 
It's easily in the top 5 films of the '90s and was criminally overlooked at the Oscars thanks to that bloody ship. - Beetlejuice!

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Post #: 50
RE: The Empire Forum's 50 GREATEST CRIME MOVIES - 13/8/2012 11:43:15 AM   
Beetlejuice!


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6. White Heat (1949)
 
 
It was only when Cagney hit middle age that he revealed his true self: a malignant baby who had somehow got hold of a sharp suit and a loaded revolver. Walsh's classic gangster melodrama is the star'.
 
Only my 3rd favourite Cagney film, but what a great film it is. A twist on Cagney's usual gangsters and criminals, with Cody Jarrett being deeply mentally unstable. - DCMaximo
 
One of the greatest examples of the genre. It's a fast paced film and the cruelty and amorality on display puts lesser gangster films (I'm looking at you De Palma) to shame. But it doesn't matter if you watch it for Cagney, if you watch it for the iconic moments, or if you watch it to see the greatest film from Warner's superb series of movies, just be sure to watch it. - rawlinson

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Post #: 51
RE: The Empire Forum's 50 GREATEST CRIME MOVIES - 13/8/2012 11:48:59 AM   
Beetlejuice!


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5. The Ladykillers (1955)
 
 
A star-studded cast is led by sinister Alec Guinness in this vintage slice of Ealing Comedy. A gang of thieves get more trouble than they bargained for when they rent rooms in the home of an old lady.
 
Far better than the remake... - Gram123
 
A classic Ealing gem. - Beetlejuice!
 
The Ladykillers is a riot, a hilarious, twisted black comedy that ranks along the greatest comedy films the world has to offer. - rawlinson
 

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Post #: 52
RE: The Empire Forum's 50 GREATEST CRIME MOVIES - 13/8/2012 1:14:16 PM   
Beetlejuice!


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4. The Roaring Twenties (1939)
 
 
Essential gangster thriller following the fortunes of three fellas - Cagney, Lynne and Bogart - who return to American from the First World War.
 
The best pairing of Cagney and Bogart. - DCMaximo
 
Gladys George is wonderfully funny and sharp in her role as Panama Smith. Her line deliveries are a treat for the ears, every word projected with a snap and a twang. There is no trace of 1930s mannerism in her speech, instead the easy flowing chatter of a professional hostess. And yet, despite her extravagant front-of-house persona, each scene between her and Cagney is a masterclass in naturalism and understatement, culminating in one of the most heart-breaking final scenes in the gangster genre. Particularly fitting is her response to the cop's question "How were you hooked up with him?", a final recognition of their long, complicated relationship - "I'll never figure it out.". She then gets to deliver the final punch, one of the best last lines in film history. Which I think is a fitting reward. - TheDudeAbides
 
Isn't just a Warner's Gangster Film, its a great movie. - Rhubarb


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Post #: 53
RE: The Empire Forum's 50 GREATEST CRIME MOVIES - 13/8/2012 2:22:20 PM   
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3. The Godfather Part II (1974)
 
 
With the second instalment of the Mafia trilogy, Francis Ford Coppola weaves the characters from The Godfather into a deeply personal film that betters the original for pathos and sheer epic grandeur.
 
Better than the first. - Harry Tuttle
 
Not as good as the first. It misses Caan. It doesn't miss Brando. Cazale is amazing. - matty_b
 
As far as The Godfather goes, every cool kid prefers part II to the original, and for good reason, as it has become the archetypical sequel, the one that every follow-up in Hollywood hopes it can match. That its copycats frequently fail to live up to it, is just another testament to the power of Francis Ford Coppola, who here crafted a film more than worthy of its original, and who justifiably took home the award for Best Director at the 1975 Oscars. Some might say that Chinatown was the best film from 1974, but in my opinion, not even that film's haunting final line can compete with the silence that closes Coppola's masterpiece. It is perfectly understandable how some people can prefer the original, but to me, there is not a moment's doubt which one I like best. Okay, maybe a moment, but not much more. The Godfather, Part II is a more powerful film than the original. It is bigger, more complex, more hard-hitting, and least but not least, it's better. - rawlinson

(in reply to Beetlejuice!)
Post #: 54
RE: The Empire Forum's 50 GREATEST CRIME MOVIES - 13/8/2012 2:25:28 PM   
Beetlejuice!


Posts: 6760
Joined: 24/11/2005
2. Goodfellas (1990)
 
 
Based on Nicholas Pileggi's book Wiseguy, Martin Scorsese's Goodfellas is a wry, violent, and exhilarating film about the life of Henry Hill, an aspiring criminal who ends up in the FBI's witness protection program after testifying against his former partners.
 
I've seen quite a few criticisms of Goodfellas over the years, where it's essentially labelled as too slick and superficial for its own good, but surely that's the point? The lifestyle of the gangsters as reported by both Henry and Karen Hill is attractive to them because of its slickness and the superficial rewards that it offers them. If anything, Scorsese should be lauded for keeping his nerve and not letting the film turn into a "crime is bad, mmkay?" lesson by the end, when everything unravels for them. His control of the material is marvellous with several amazing bits - the shooting of Spider, most of Tommy's scenes, the freezeframes - and spot-on performances throughout. It's mammothly entertaining. - matty_b
 
Goodfellas was an instant classic and is the most revered of Scorsese’s films about organised crime. Everything is top notch, the performances, the setting, the script and the style. That long tracking shot through the bar is surely one of cinema’s most famous and who could forget the infamous ‘How am I funny?’ scene. - chambanzi
 
Definately not my favourite Scorsese, but so watchable. - MovieAddict247

(in reply to Beetlejuice!)
Post #: 55
RE: The Empire Forum's 50 GREATEST CRIME MOVIES - 13/8/2012 2:41:28 PM   
Beetlejuice!


Posts: 6760
Joined: 24/11/2005
1. The Godfather (1972)
 
 
The son of a Mafia Don struggles to become a legit businessman in this first part of the classic saga directed by Francis Ford Coppola. Stars Al Pacino, Marlon Brando, James Caan and Robert Duvall.
 
I'm a fan, I must admit. - MovieAddict247
 
What a perfect film this is. The story, characters and acting are of course spectacular. But what about the music? Nino's Rota is one of the best ever written, and has produced not one, but three memorable themes (including the Waltz, "Speak Softly Love" and Michael's theme). "Haunting" would be an understatement. Gordon Willis' cinematography has also become legendary, almost to the point where people started joking that his work in this film introduced the color black to cinema (okay, not true, but it was a good line). Still, his use of darkness in this film is not to be joked around with, as it truly shows how effective underexposure can be. The set design of the film is also marvelous, and the fact that the executives tried to convince Coppola to film in a modern day-setting just shows how stupid some people really are. With all these praises being worthy of the film, one might wonder if it is actually easier to find flaws with the films. Think again. This is one of the few perfect movies ever made. People talk of Citizen Kane being the best movie ever made, but it is easy to forget the movie that is always chasing its tail. That film is The Godfather. When someone said that every film-fan should see this movie, that person was not joking. Watch it, enjoy it, or await your fate. They are still waiting by the tollbooth. - Dantes Inferno
 
The production values reek of class, Coppola's relatively conservative direction is key to laying out the complexities of the mob machinations that occur throughout the film, he had a perfect storm of young acting talent coming through at exactly the right time for the Corleone brothers and there are so many "good bits" that it feels like a 'best of The Godfather' at times. Greatly entertaining. - matty_b
 
Pure cinematic enjoyment from start to finish. - TheGodfather
 
The best film ever. Perfection on celluloid. - 007_Bond_007

(in reply to Beetlejuice!)
Post #: 56
RE: The Empire Forum's 50 GREATEST CRIME MOVIES - 13/8/2012 2:50:06 PM   
Beetlejuice!


Posts: 6760
Joined: 24/11/2005
The Forum's 50 Greatest Crime Movies
 
  1. The Godfather (1972)
  2. Goodfellas (1990)
  3. The Godfather Part II (1974)
  4. The Roaring Twenties (1939)
  5. The Ladykillers (1955)
  6. White Heat (1949)
  7. L.A. Confidential (1997)
  8. City of God (2002)
  9. Out of the Past (1947)
  10. Pulp Fiction (1994)
  11. Double Indemnity (1944)
  12. Rififi (1955)
  13. Jackie Brown (1997)
  14. The Usual Suspects (1995)
  15. Reservoir Dogs (1992)
  16. The Dark Knight (2008)
  17. Dirty Harry (1971)
  18. Touch of Evil (1958)
  19. Fargo (1996)
  20. The Killing (1956)
  21. Nine Queens (2000)
  22. Once Upon a Time in America (1984)
  23. Miller's Crossing (1990)
  24. The Asphalt Jungle (1950)
  25. Public Enemy (1931)
  26. Dog Day Afternoon (1975)
  27. Infernal Affairs (2002)
  28. The Sting (1973)
  29. The French Connection (1971)
  30. O Brother, Where Art Thou? (2000)
  31. Mean Streets  (1973)
  32. Blood Simple (1984)
  33. A Better Tomorrow (1986)
  34. U-Turn (1997)
  35. Heat (1995)
  36. Casino (1995)
  37. The Untouchables (1987)
  38. Badlands (1973)
  39. The Killer (1989)
  40. Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai (1999)
  41. Shallow Grave (1994)
  42. Ocean's Eleven (2001)
  43. Bonnie and Clyde (1967)
  44. The Departed (2006)
  45. Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels (1998)
  46. Before the Devil Knows You're Dead (2007)
  47. Grosse Pointe Blank (1997)
  48. American Gangster (2007)
  49. Natural Born Killers (1994)
  50. True Romance (1993)

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