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Will Rgirvan44 ever write his massive Prometheus review?

 
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Will Rgirvan44 ever write his massive Prometheus review? - 18/6/2012 8:32:35 PM   
Deviation


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From: Enemies of Film HQ
He's been mentioning it for some time and the delays have been worse than WWZ. So the questions are, will he ever write it? Did he forget? Is he afraid people might disagree with him? Is he just really lazy? Is it because he had a life? Is it because he likes to keep us waiting? Is it because he prefers to hang around with Polish women (an altogether very sympathetic action)? Is he because he's too busy watching some B or Z-grade movies forgotten even by the Christian God? Is it because he's Scottish? Is it because he wants to see it 987 times while its still in theatres? Is it because he's just having a laugh at our expense? Is he Lars von Trier? Is he really just a bastard? Is he secretly Wolverine's and Alien:Resurrection greatest fan? Is he a Cylon? Did a facehugger impregnate him? Is he just swooning over Charlize Theron like a 13 year old girl swooning over Johnny Depp again? So many questions...

< Message edited by Deviation -- 18/6/2012 8:33:54 PM >


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There are certainly times where calling a person a cunt is not only reasonable, it is a gross understatement.

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RE: Will Rgirvan44 ever write his massive Prometheus re... - 18/6/2012 8:35:08 PM   
Hood_Man


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Come on GIrv, ecosystems have evolved, died out, turned into fossil fuels and been burnt into black, acrid smoke that kill seagulls and plant life in less time.

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RE: Will Rgirvan44 ever write his massive Prometheus re... - 18/6/2012 9:06:03 PM   
superdan


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I wonder if he liked it.

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RE: Will Rgirvan44 ever write his massive Prometheus re... - 18/6/2012 10:00:45 PM   
Rhubarb


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Homer finished his sci-fi list faster.

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You organisational skills sicken me, Rhubarb.



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RE: Will Rgirvan44 ever write his massive Prometheus re... - 18/6/2012 10:21:27 PM   
Darth Marenghi

 

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Rgirvan is really a pen-name of George RR Martin.

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RE: Will Rgirvan44 ever write his massive Prometheus re... - 18/6/2012 10:45:07 PM   
homersimpson_esq


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Rhubarb

Homer finished his sci-fi list faster.





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RE: Will Rgirvan44 ever write his massive Prometheus re... - 18/6/2012 10:50:06 PM   
Olaf


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Darth Marenghi

Rgirvan is really a pen-name of George RR Martin.


George RRGirvan.

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RE: Will Rgirvan44 ever write his massive Prometheus re... - 19/6/2012 2:34:24 AM   
Spaldron


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Imagine how long it'll be after the Directors Cut comes out...

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RE: Will Rgirvan44 ever write his massive Prometheus re... - 19/6/2012 3:07:18 AM   
FritzlFan


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This man get fired

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RE: Will Rgirvan44 ever write his massive Prometheus re... - 21/6/2012 1:05:24 AM   
Rhubarb


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Yeah.

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quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan

You organisational skills sicken me, Rhubarb.


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RE: Will Rgirvan44 ever write his massive Prometheus re... - 21/6/2012 1:30:39 AM   
Spaldron


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Bo

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RE: Will Rgirvan44 ever write his massive Prometheus re... - 21/6/2012 1:43:26 AM   
Shifty Bench

 

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Selecta!

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RE: Will Rgirvan44 ever write his massive Prometheus re... - 21/6/2012 1:44:17 AM   
Rhubarb


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Cha'mone.

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quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan

You organisational skills sicken me, Rhubarb.



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RE: Will Rgirvan44 ever write his massive Prometheus re... - 21/6/2012 1:50:57 AM   
Spaldron


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Zing.

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RE: Will Rgirvan44 ever write his massive Prometheus re... - 21/6/2012 4:27:44 PM   
Scruffybobby

 

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If this thread isn't at 20 pages within 24 hours of Girv's review I'll be very disappointed.

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RE: Will Rgirvan44 ever write his massive Prometheus re... - 5/7/2012 12:37:31 AM   
Spaldron


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So Girv writes an essay length review for The Amazing Spiderman the day after its release and here we are a month after Prometheus and still..........nothing?!

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RE: Will Rgirvan44 ever write his massive Prometheus re... - 6/7/2012 1:16:21 AM   
Deviation


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Spaldron

So Girv writes an essay length review for The Amazing Spiderman the day after its release and here we are a month after Prometheus and still..........nothing?!


A bigger bastard then Jake Sully, though I have reports that he was really passionate about Amazing Spiderman, you could feel his emotions from here. Hateful emotions.

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There are certainly times where calling a person a cunt is not only reasonable, it is a gross understatement.

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RE: Will Rgirvan44 ever write his massive Prometheus re... - 7/7/2012 8:43:06 PM   
Olaf


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I went to see Spider-Man this evening, it wasn't *that* bad.

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RE: Will Rgirvan44 ever write his massive Prometheus re... - 7/7/2012 8:53:32 PM   
directorscut


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I expect Rgirvan's Prometheus essay to be similar to this: http://blogs.wylfing.net/coronas/the-matrix-revolutions-explained/

If not, I will be disappoint.

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RE: Will Rgirvan44 ever write his massive Prometheus re... - 7/7/2012 9:00:43 PM   
superdan


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Olaf

I went to see Spider-Man this evening, it wasn't *that* bad.


Still pretty weak tho.

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RE: Will Rgirvan44 ever write his massive Prometheus re... - 7/7/2012 9:40:18 PM   
OPEN YOUR EYES

 

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Rgirvan44 Prometheus review below:

It was ok.


< Message edited by OPEN YOUR EYES -- 7/7/2012 9:56:30 PM >

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RE: Will Rgirvan44 ever write his massive Prometheus re... - 8/7/2012 12:54:05 AM   
Darth Marenghi

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: Olaf

I went to see Spider-Man this evening, it wasn't *that* bad.


Yeah, I think RG is perhaps something of a lone maverick on this one - though his review was excellent.

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RE: Will Rgirvan44 ever write his massive Prometheus re... - 8/7/2012 1:25:32 AM   
Olaf


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I wasn't a huge fan of it to be honest, though it had moments (my affection for the character makes me lean towards a solid 3/5, though I know that probably closer to the lower end of three stars at most). I think RG covers most of the issues I had with it, though I want to confront him about the things I think he was off the mark about. FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT

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RE: Will Rgirvan44 ever write his massive Prometheus re... - 8/7/2012 11:09:22 AM   
Scruffybobby

 

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I'm just off to see Spidey now.

Looking to forward to reading the epic review when I come back. Hopefully it will keep me going until the Prometheus review finally emerges


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RE: Will Rgirvan44 ever write his massive Prometheus re... - 9/8/2012 6:56:58 PM   
Kilo_T_Mortal


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Did this happen? i've been away for a while.

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RE: Will Rgirvan44 ever write his massive Prometheus re... - 9/8/2012 11:06:03 PM   
Rgirvan44


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Introduction
As a well-known (on these forums at least) Alien and Ridley Scott fan boy, it goes without saying that Prometheus was my most anticipated blockbuster for many, many years. I have watched the Alien series more times than is healthy. I was one of those silly people who paid 80 quid for the Alien DVD boxset when it was first released in 2003. I own all the Dark Horse Comics. As I type this I am wearing a Weyland-Yutani t-shirt.

Yes, my love for the franchise goes some way. But I do have limits. For twenty years now the series has not been in particularly rude heath. Through the aforementioned comic books, the video games and children’s action figures (I am not lying - check here -http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e33APFt-ft8) the power of the Alien has been weakened considerably.



The malaise really started in Aliens. Whereas in the first one the Starbeast was truly something out of nightmares, it was reduced to a bug in the Cameron film. And while Aliens is a fantastic movie, the series never brought back to sheer biomechanical sexual terror of HR Giger’s original creation.

I consider Alien Resurrection to be an awful film, and could write a lot more about its failings. But I won’t. The less said about the AVP films the better. Once you have an Alien swimming in a high school pool you have pretty much wrung out any horror which still resided. I am a discerning fan, rather than one who is blinded by loyalty to the big ol’ penis head.

Likewise with Ridley Scott, I love many of his films, but I am also more than capable of criticising him when required. Robin Hood is a total waste of a film, albeit a good looking one, leaving me feeling frustrated at all the talent going into something so bland and uninteresting.

When the Alien Prequels were initially announced with a different director I was apprehensive. Why did it need to be a Prequel? There was a huge chunk of time between the events of Alien 3 and Alien Resurrection that had been left unexplored.

Then something happened. An announcement was made that the two Alien prequels had been transformed into Prometheus, a movie which would only have a few strands connecting it to the main series, and directed by the main man himself.



The first script, by Jon Spaits, which contained the usual chestbursters and assorted tropes of the series, was jettisoned and Lost showrunner Damon Lindelof entered the frame, taking out the Alien, and reformed what the film was about.

Myself, and many others guessed that this meant that it would be about the Space Jockey’s, and excitement grew. The first sci-fi film from Scott since Blade Runner, which wouldn’t fall victim to the trap so many prequels do, of rehashing what had already been done (hello Thing remake), and opening up the Alien universe without directly impacting on it. An Alien movie without the Alien was a brilliant move. As a fan of HP Lovecraft I recognised what was going on here – a grand mythology was about to be built, into which Alien and its sequels could be slotted.

The Hype Train
Speculation mounted. The mystery of what exactly Prometheus was became the main focus of debate on websites across the internet. The secrecy of the film was unparalleled in recent times. Rumours grew of massive sets under construction with a distinct Alien look. Fans took images of futuristic vehicles bearing the familiar markings of the Weyland Company.

It was only in December, and the launch of the first trailer, that people realised what Prometheus was going to be – the Space Jockey ship, similar in design to the one seen in Alien, made fan boy minds explode. The editing of the trailer specially recalled that of the first Alien trailer. It was an exciting time just before the festive season hit.



From then the hype snowballed under what was a pretty great marketing campaign from Fox. The TED speech, where we saw Guy Pearce announce himself as a character called Peter Weyland, gained widespread acclaim. Likewise a viral video about the android David, played by Michael Fassbender, and with a distinct 1970s aesthetic, built the hype to heights unheard of in recent times. This was going to be a hard science fiction film we were assured, full of big questions and uncompromising in its horror as the characters searched for God.



But as ever, trailer after trailer hit, and people became concerned that the film was telling us too much. There was a feeling of being beaten down by it all. Yet the hype didn’t diminish. And then it was announced that it would be an R.

For months people were worried that Fox would cut the film down to a PG13 to secure greater box office. Alien Vs Predator, which despite popular thinking, was always designed to be a PG13, had been a pretty big success when it was released in 2004. A fear grew that Prometheus, an Alien film with no traditional Alien in it, would be granted a lower rating, and thus be compromised.

The R rating told fans – don’t worry, this film is what was intended to be released, it is safe to go the cinema and watch it.

First Viewing
Thus on June 1st Prometheus was released in the United Kingdom, a full week before the United States.

I went to a midnight screening, in 3D IMAX, at the Edinburgh Cineworld. There was a queue, and you could sense real excitement in the audience. After twenty years, maybe the Alien franchise was about to be given some dignity by a master filmmaker.

Two hours later and some change (the seven minute Spider-Man trailer baffling us all), and the audience reaction to my mind was confused. People didn’t know what to make of it. Some were perhaps disappointed that the film didn’t throw an Alien into the mix, despite time and again claims that it wouldn’t happen. Others were surprised that the trailers revealed so much. And perhaps the majority who just flat out disliked it.

On the way home with a friend I had managed to drag along, and who only had a vague memory of Alien, we discussed the film, and that thing happened where each of us started asking questions about what certain scenes meant and why characters behaved the way they did. This was summed up quite nicely in the video from the boys at redlettermedia - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-x1YuvUQFJ0

I went to bed that night not quite knowing what to make of it all. The fan boy in me which was thrilled to see an Alien style movie, was in conflict with the side of my brain which kept saying “but what about…?”

Needless to say it wasn’t going to be the only time I would see the film, and indeed I have watched it quite a number of times since that screening. More times than I perhaps want to admit here. Thank goodness for an Unlimited Card is what I say. Like the characters I think I am searching for a meaning to what I saw.

It is now more than a month since the film was released. It has been debated, scrutinised, dissected, attacked, defended and has created the most interesting blockbuster film discussion in some time. You only need to see that Prometheus has the third largest thread ever in Film Reviews, and is likely to become the second biggest by the time the comments finally die out.

Nearly everyone has put a review forward, but I have struggled to formulate my opinion, and as you can tell in this, I am still struggling. The fan boy shades have fallen off to an extent, and I think it is sometimes healthy to take a step back and review away from the hype and subsequent fallout. I think my review will be even handed but I really want to get under the skin of the film because I do think it has something to say, the problems are very much in the delivery.

So that is a prelude (I did say that this was going to be a lengthy review – you are already at the 1,300 word mark so congrats for getting this far) over. Let’s get to the nitty gritty of the actual film.

P O M E T H E U S R E V I E W

Origins

At its heart Prometheus is very simple. Explorers go off to the stars, encounter something strange and foreign on the surface, crew members get infected, and one lone survivor emerges at the end. It is the template on which Alien was built, and which has been ripped off in countless films since then.

Even the idea of the mankind being influenced by an alien race is not some new notion. 2001: A Space Odyssey was explicit about this concept, and it has been used ever since, in TV shows such as Battlestar Galatica, to films like Mission to Mars. The idea isn’t even new to the Alien franchise. Paul WS Anderson was quoting Erich von Däniken, the sham academic who claims that an alien race helped with the development of mankind, during the making of AVP.

But really, the key piece of work to keep in mind in all of this is HP Lovecraft’s classic horror novella At The Mountains of Madness. I won’t go into the plot in any detail due to the already huge word count. But it should be noted that Del Toro, who has longed to adapt the book, now thinks it will never happen due to the number of similarities that Prometheus shares with it. If you have never read it, do yourself a favour and pick it up. It is still a gripping read.

The other thing Prometheus owes a great debt, is Mario Bava’s 1960s sci-fi film Planet of the Vampires. Not only does it have a strangely similar style, the plot isn’t too far off the mark from what we saw in cinemas last month. The full trailer can be seen here - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IknItrag-Yg

Yes, it is cheesy and the model work leaves a lot to be desired, but you can see the, ahem, DNA of both Alien and Prometheus within it. If you enjoy pre-2001 science fiction, you might have fun.

In terms of its visual design Scott took a lot from the unproduced Dune film. In particular the temple with the image of a face on it, is a direct lift from Giger’s artwork. The film also lifted much of what had been cut from the original Alien script by Dan O’Bannon. In the first draft the crew don’t just discover a spaceship, they find a pyramid for instance.

A whole other article could be devoted to these seeds, but this gives you a feel for where the film was coming from, and what its parentage was.
Sowing the Seeds of Life

The film opens with a shot of a planet. Is it Earth? I think we are meant to presume so, but it doesn’t really matter. As the camera swoops over the still new world, empty glens and clear skies give the sense of a lifeless, yet beautiful planet.

The music here is suitably grand as we see a robbed alien, with distinct human features, standing over a huge waterfall. In the background a circular spaceship glides away into the cosmos. The alien opens a cup and drinks its contents. He is serene until he begins to be ripped apart from the inside. The chemical reaction to the contents of the cup reduces him to nothing as he slides into the water and disintegrates. As the credits play we see the chemical sludge that is left over mutate and joins with other pieces of DNA, creating the building blocks of life.

This is a simply beautiful sequence. It is epic in a way very few science fiction films are nowadays. Combined with the music and the framing of the character the message is that this is the type of film that they don’t make any more. The simplicity of the scene carries much more weight than if we saw a spaceship creating life.

This opening scene is a big clue to the wider story of Prometheus, and should be kept in mind when the question about why we were created is posed. As for the Engineer as they are subsequently called in the film. I think it is clear this is a ceremonial duty. He drinks the liquid knowing fully what would happen, and also knowing he would sire a race. Whether this is our race or something else out there, is really up to you to decide.

Interestingly we are told by the android David later on that “Sometimes to create we must first destroy.”

I liked that Prometheus isn’t saying explicitly that the Space Jockey race helped mankind build the remarkable buildings that are scattered around the planet. I like that it is more focused on genetic engineering. It still allows humanity to have genuine accomplishments of its own accord.

How Green is My Valley


We then zoom into the future, and the Isle of Skye and the internationally famous The Old Man of Storr rock formation. There, a team of archaeologists lead by Elizabeth Shaw and Charlie Holloway discover cave paintings thousands of years old. On the painting a tall being points towards a series of dots presumably in the sky. Holloway and Shaw take each other’s hands, a nice little character moment even when feeling awe at history and the layers that have yet to be discovered. Scott shoots like a painter.

Those rock formations have been used many a time, even in films such as The Wicker Man, yet we feel a connection between the island and the primordial world that where the Engineer sacrificed himself. It was also nice that they acknowledged it was set in Scotland. So many films use the locations but don’t acknowledge the country (looking at you Dark Knight Rises).

In Space…

The film suddenly takes us in into deepest darkest space. In what was an interesting shot we see what we presume to be the research vessel Prometheus shooting through a star field from a far distance. So far in fact that it almost looks like a shooting star. Due to filmmaking techniques, the relative speeds of space ships always seems slow. This is something left over from Star Wars when the Star Destroyers lumbered across the screen given a sense of scale to proceedings. In reality they would be moving at superfast speeds and take forever to slow down.

It was nice that even though it was a single shot, it gave us a clue at the true speed these ships would travel at.

On-board we encounter David, and it is clear from the outset that he is an android. The movements Fassbender puts into the character have both elegance and a certain robot quality. He is oh so very nearly human but not quite there yet. He patrols the empty ship, and perhaps as part of his programme makes decisions on his own. He expresses an enjoyment of Lawrence of Arabia. He dyes his hair and talks like Peter O’Toole. A simple machine would not require such distractions. A sense of time passing and of boredom would not factor into things. It is an interesting series of moments, which suggest artificial intelligence goes beyond simple command/obey instructions.

In many ways he is a cinematic relation to that other David, from Steven Spielberg’s brilliant A.I. They are both machines which have pre-set rules, but within those rules still find a way to express themselves.

I also really liked the little dig at Alien Resurrection here. If you ever watch the Making Of for that film (more entertaining than the film itself!) you will remember that the scene where Weaver throws a basketball into the basket from behind. Well she did it for real, to the amazement of cast and crew. This is a funny clip - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FF44YvDVP8Y . In Prometheus they have Fassbender on a bike making the shot. Whether it was done for real (it certainly looks real) is up for debate, but it is clearly a cheeky reference to that film.

Dream Sequences Always Suck


Now we hit the first snag of the film. David is seen to be snooping into the dreams of a cryosleeping Shaw. We are thrown back to the past in an undisclosed African nation. Shaw as a young girl observes a burial ritual. Her father (played by Patrick Wilson) watches over her. They discuss life and death and the concept of paradise. Shaw’s mother, already dead, flashes briefly over the dream sequence (allowing for the usual cameo from Ridley Scott’s wife). We learn that Shaw is a Christian, and a key exchange is given;

Shaw's Father: Everyone has their own word; heaven, paradise. Whatever it's called, it's someplace beautiful.
Shaw: How do you know it's beautiful?
Shaw's Father: Cause that's what I choose to believe.

The dream then shuts down. A few questions pop up from this scene. The idea of “that’s what I choose to believe” plays throughout the film and is a really ill fit for a character who is supposed to be a leading scientist. Choosing to believe VS objective analysis, and continual testing of theories, is right at the heart of the Creationist debate.

That the script tries to meld these two diametrically opposed viewpoints and input them both into Shaw is a real flaw in the film. Science isn’t about belief, and her repeating the mantra of belief over evidence is a flaw that is difficult to overcome. And at the same time it is possible to be Christian and an objective scientist at the same time.

Why did they hire Patrick Wilson? I suspect that if there is a sequel, the actor may be required to appear in the film. While the character is already dead prior to the events of Prometheus I could see a Contact style scenario play out in any sequel.

Wake up…

The Prometheus finally arrives at its destination – a moon orbiting a gas giant called LV-223 (which is different from LV-426). Interesting note to make – in the scriptment for Avatar Cameron called the ship which brought Sully to Pandora, Prometheus. That planet also orbited a gas giant.

The 16 human crew members are woken up from their sleep. In an interesting spin on hyper sleep we see them throwing up, in desperate need of liquids, and being barely able to move. Their muscles weakened in suspended animation. In the other Alien films, and similar movies, the effects tend to resemble that of a bad hangover. It seems like Scott read up on the possible realities of the science before embarking on the picture.

The scene is a nice moment, showing the humans for the fragile beings that they are, and the sense of excitement they have at what they are about to find.

The one contrast to note of course is that of Charlize Theron’s Meredith Vickers, the Company figure on-board who manages to wake herself up, and do press ups to warm up the frozen muscles. Some have interpreted this scene as a sign that she may be an android. I saw it more that she was driven, and clearly in a degree of pain which she wasn’t going to reveal to anyone as that would suggest weakness.

The rest of the characters we are going to get to know are introduced in the next scene, as the crew all sit down for breakfast.

The problem here is that characters such as the geologist Fifield and biologist Milburn are clearly meeting for the first time, long after the flight to the stars began. How would something like that work? They must have all be awake with each other before going into cryo-sleep, right? Did they just silently undress in front of each other before hitting the sack for the trip? Even David has to introduce himself to Shaw, likely to make sure that the audience is clear on the idea that he is an android. It is all very clunky.

Lindelof could have looked closer to home for inspiration to write these scenes more effectively. Both Alien and Aliens use the waking up and breakfast scenes to both establish the characters while at the same time developing their relationships.

The one shining moment from this scene is when Vickers encounters the captain of the ship, Janek, smoking a cigar and putting up a crappy looking Christmas tree. We get a lot of information about this guy with minimal need for exposition, and it helps bathe what has been up to now quite a grand film, with a little humanity. We are reminded that as much as these people are explorers, home comforts play a large part in their lives.

Concentrate. Here’s the science bit

Further exposition ahoy! Our perky little band of scientists converges into the ships gymnasium for the mission brief. The two pilots, Chance and Ravel, who along with Janek, feel like they would be most at home with the crew from Alien, are given their only bit of personality when they make a bet over whether the mission is about terra forming – that is, the transformation of a dead planet into a habitual one.

Vickers comments that she is pleased to see the people she personally hired, and explains her role of Company overseer to those that she is meeting for the first time. So yet again, we wonder exactly how this expedition was set up, and exactly how the crew spoke to one another before departure.

But all of this goes out of the window because OMG A LINK TO ALIEN as the team is shown a hologram recording of Peter Weyland, the hundred year plus billionaire (trillionaire?) founder of the Weyland (later to be Weyland-Yutani) Corporation, from a base on Mars. This scene is notable for a number of reasons.

Firstly the music cue that appears when Weyland turns up is the opening theme from Alien. Secondly the Company slogan “Building Better Worlds” appears. This slogan first appeared in the film Aliens, thus a direct nod to the Cameron film in made. This is all catnip to the Alien fans, and is one of the few scenes to broaden out the universe of Prometheus.

Peter Weyland is played by Guy Pearce in old man makeup which is only vaguely successful. The performance, of an old English aristocrat, is good enough, but you do sit there wondering why they didn’t just get an older actor. Indeed it is now understood that Ridley Scott initially wanted Max Von Sydow to play Weyland. What could have been?

Weyland gives a vague speech about the voyage being a quest to discover the great questions of where mankind came from, and why we exist. He also makes reference to David as his creation, a son he would never have, albeit one without a soul. A creator in search of his own creator.

Following this hologram we get a more in-depth presentation from Shaw and Holloway who show that cultures spread across the world and time, each have a symbol of a giant figure point to a pattern of circles. Those circles correspond to a star system, where a habitable planet is known to exist.

They further explain that they believe that the race they expect to find on this planet (which they called Engineers, because no one would have a clue what Space Jockey meant) created life on Earth. Quite how they make this leap is never really explained, and when challenged on the statement by Milburn, Shaw says that it is what she “chooses to believe”.

Are you kidding me? This is supposed to be a scientist. She has some evidence of alien contact, but presents nothing to back up a claim that they created us. Now we know that of course she will be right, because this is a movie, but it makes her character look stupid when she comes out with statements like that. Show me the beef!

Corporate Takeover

We next encounter Shaw and Holloway as they meet with Vickers in her private lifeboat which comes equipped with all the things needed for survival should the ship come under trouble. There is a medical pod, air to last two years, communication equipment…and a grand piano. Presumably even if lost in space you need to have a hobby to while away the time. Also vodka.

It is in here that we get to know about Vickers a little. In direct contradiction to the comments given by Peter Weyland, she lets Shaw and Holloway know that it is her ship, and they will follow her instructions. It is mentioned that the Prometheus cost a trillion dollars to build. Now, I know that this is some eighty years into the future, but I doubt a trillion dollars would be small beans even at that point. Again we are left wondering – who knew about this ship, was it launched with fanfare, or was it top secret?

Mind you as we will discover later, maybe Vickers is just bad with math.

The scene gives Vickers some character and sets her aside from other Company people we have seen in the previous Alien films. Her actual interest in alien races and bio-weapons doesn’t seem particularly high. Indeed she is explicit in her request that if turns out the Engineers do exist that no direct contact be made with them.

In a strange moment, when quizzed by Shaw why they are even there, Vickers responds because Weyland was superstitious and wanted a “true believer” on board.

This is never really referred to again for the rest of the film, but the super close up shot of the cross Shaw wears (which was owned by her father) hammers the point home.

You know, Alien 3 managed to throw in some Christian elements but use some interesting imagery to back it up. As you may have noticed this contradiction in Shaw is one of the key bugbears of mine when it comes to the film.

Planetfall

After what was quite a short time the crew make a descent to the planet’s surface. While it is a bit of a bumpy ride, it doesn’t feel nearly as risky as the similar landing made in Alien. On the other hand it is beautiful. The Prometheus, a large ship, is framed as a tiny jet stream first against the planet itself, and then against the mountains and clouds as it moved towards land. We are constantly reminded how small and insignificant this ship is when compared to grandeur of creation. After a mildly rocky couple of scenes, Ridley Scott reminds you why he is considered one of the great visualists of modern day cinema. Each shot feels like it could have been taken from a pulpy 1950s sci-fi cover, and you feel like this is a place where gods once roamed.


< Message edited by Rgirvan44 -- 9/8/2012 11:08:07 PM >


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(in reply to Kilo_T_Mortal)
Post #: 26
RE: Will Rgirvan44 ever write his massive Prometheus re... - 9/8/2012 11:08:01 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
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tl; dr

(in reply to Rgirvan44)
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RE: Will Rgirvan44 ever write his massive Prometheus re... - 9/8/2012 11:09:03 PM   
Rgirvan44


Posts: 19037
Joined: 10/3/2006
From: Punishment Park
This is only part one by the way. There is like...another 10,000 words coming. But just wanted to prove I am actually writing the damn thing.

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It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to, than I have ever known.


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RE: Will Rgirvan44 ever write his massive Prometheus re... - 9/8/2012 11:11:04 PM   
elab49


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Joined: 1/10/2005
I have a long weekend from tomorrow - I'll save this to take me through that. 

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(in reply to Rgirvan44)
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RE: Will Rgirvan44 ever write his massive Prometheus re... - 9/8/2012 11:13:02 PM   
Rgirvan44


Posts: 19037
Joined: 10/3/2006
From: Punishment Park
Will add more pictures in as well. Just annoying - everytime I format it jumps back to the top which is a pain when you are writing these posts.

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It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to, than I have ever known.


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