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RE: 182. Homer's ALL NEW Top 300 Films. - 19/8/2012 2:01:37 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


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From: Central Park Zoo
I've seen the two Grindhouse films separately and liked them both but I do think they'd work better if watched as intended. Hobo Wiith A Shotgun was better than either though.

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RE: 182. Homer's ALL NEW Top 300 Films. - 19/8/2012 10:37:11 AM   
matty_b


Posts: 14446
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Death Proof was awful and really put me off Planet Terror.

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RE: 182. Homer's ALL NEW Top 300 Films. - 19/8/2012 4:51:49 PM   
homersimpson_esq


Posts: 20116
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Springfield
That's a real shame, because Planet Terror is huge fun. But it's the whole experience that makes the cut - I kinda hate that most peoples experience of this was as the separated version.

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RE: 182. Homer's ALL NEW Top 300 Films. - 19/8/2012 7:06:29 PM   
directorscut


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quote:

ORIGINAL: homersimpson_esq



5 Reasons I Love Blue Velvet
  1. The title song.
  2. The way it inverts the American dream.
  3. The bits where you go “wtf”. (All of it.)
  4. Dennis Hopper: the single scariest thing in a mask, bar none.
  5. It was the first film that I changed my opinion on completely after a rewatch. As such, it demonstrated far more clearly than someone saying, “obviously opinions change” that, obviously, opinions change. That paved the way for a far more significant about-face on film opinion from me.




You should be lynched for not including Dean Stockwell's miming of In Dreams on that list.

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RE: 182. Homer's ALL NEW Top 300 Films. - 19/8/2012 7:13:38 PM   
paul_ie86


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lol lynched

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Post #: 665
180. Homer's ALL NEW Top 300 Films. - 25/8/2012 3:51:24 PM   
homersimpson_esq


Posts: 20116
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Springfield


Mike Leigh has a unique way of working that he never explains, never talks about beyond the necessities. A way that involves improvisation and then strict adherence. What comes out at the end is often a film of naturalism and beauty that, while not necessarily intrinsically better than the traditional script/acting method, nevertheless ptoduces some phenomenal films. Of recent years, Another Year is one such film.


Simply following one family’s meet ups over the four seasons of the year, Leigh traces the trials and joys of a simple life. Tom (Jim Broadbent) and Gerri (Ruth Sheen) are a happily married couple living in London. He is a geologist (he would correct me on that), she a psychologist. On weekends they tend to their allotment. Theirs is a simple existence, impinged by friends and relatives who are as dysfunctional as Gerri and Tom are well-balanced and happy. Mary (a rather excellent Lesley Manville) is a broken, overly needy colleague of Gerri’s, with a predilection for coming over rather too often, and overstaying her welcome once arrived. Overcompensating for nerves, a fondness for alcohol, and a sad and bitter obsession with their son, Joe (Oliver Maltman), Mary is an ever-present burden to Gerri and Tom, one who becomes less tolerable as the year progresses. Joe, a 30-somethng singleton, is good-humoured and, like his parents, is well-balanced, despite the influences of Mary and their other relatives, like Ken (Peter Wight) and Ronnie (David Bradley).

What makes this film so notable is its simple observations of family life. The short-hand between Gerri and Tom – glances across a room, or silent utterings at the door – or the resigned way they acknowledge that their names are indeed Tom and Gerri, something that inevitably has followed them their whole lives. The observation is not lost that family life is interrupted by others: Tom, Gerri, and Joe, have the good life – not wealthy in money, but rich in spirit and humour. Pricking this bubble of simple perfection is, predominantly, Mary, an eternally overbearing and negative influence. Her trials become everyone’s trials. Her fickle nature, and duplicitousness is most in evidence at her interactions with Tom’s brother Ken, with whom there are clearly prior interactions involving his infatuation with her, but clearly not vice versa.

Ultimately, Another Year is a film of simplicity that through its simple nature betrays a complexity of modern human existence. Interpersonal interaction is fraught with the individuals’ needs and natures, and fractiousness threatens harmony at every level. It is perfectly observed, and perfectly acted. It does not tell an everlasting story, of timelessness and of classic nature. Instead, it is of its time and will become not relevant to future ages, but a pure slice of existence in 2010. The best temporally bound films do this: look at films from the 50s or 60s that perfectly evoke those decades. In two, three decades’ time, Another Year will become one of those films.

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RE: 180. Homer's ALL NEW Top 300 Films. - 25/8/2012 3:55:29 PM   
paul_ie86


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The final shot

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RE: 180. Homer's ALL NEW Top 300 Films. - 25/8/2012 3:59:36 PM   
homersimpson_esq


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From: Springfield
I know, right?

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179. Homer's ALL NEW Top 300 Films. - 25/8/2012 4:51:30 PM   
homersimpson_esq


Posts: 20116
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Springfield


L’Atalante was Vigo’s final film, and as with his previous films, is simple in structure. It depicts a newlywed couple who undertake a short voyage on the groom Jean’s titular barge. She gets fed up, sneaks off onshore. He gets mad and goes off. Pepe Jules goes to get her. Happy ending. (Simplistically speaking.) Accompanying them are a young cabin boy, and an eccentric second mate, who again is hilarious. Vigo clearly had a talent for comedy (who said the French were humourless?) and it is bittersweet to think what he could have achieved blessed with a longer life.

The film has a number of stand out moments, but much of the skill is in the detail. The angles at which scenes are shot, the way the camera moves, and the way the people move on camera. There is an intensity intensified by the claustrophobic setting on the barge itself. There is a wonderful scene where Pepe Jules is showing Juliette his cabin, and the treasures he has gathered from his multitudinous travels. The scene highlights the personalities of all three main characters: it shows Pepe Jules’ ‘gentle giant’ misunderstood nature; it shows Juliette’s tender and understanding nature. When Jean enters, enquiring sharply what Juliette is doing in the cabin, he describes Pepe Jules’ possessions as rubbish, and proceeds to destroy a sizeable portion of those objects. The contrast couldn’t be sharper, and gives a real insight into the characters. Pepe Jules gets the upper hand at the end of the scene when Jean sees a picture of a naked lady on the wall and asks who she is. ‘That’s me when I was younger’, Pepe Jules says without missing a beat.

The other two stand out scenes are the underwater sequence where Jean, in a fit of depression, has jumped overboard. He tumbles through the water, uncaring as to his fate but fascinated by the water. It’s a beautifully lyrical sequence, and serves to wake Jean up enough to realise what he is missing in his wife. The second of these stand out scenes is the most erotic scene where the two people involved are in different beds. Both writh, toss and turn, desperately alone, and desirous of the other, not just sexually, but for simple companionship. Their hands run across their torsos suggestively. There is real raw emotion in the scene, and is a natural precursor to the inevitable reunion.

Lyricism. Poeticism. Emotion, Humour. These are the ideals that seem to encapsulate Vigo’s limited output. He used the camera not just to show us what was happening, but it showed us a way to see what was happening. Our viewpoints are manipulated through his camerawork. While this is technically true of any film, the difference is that the camera here is more than a tool – it is a paintbrush, a pencil, a way to paint the picture Vigo has in his head. Naturally, there are limitations to our enjoyment. As I’ve said before, we can’t appreciate these films in the way they were intended, and we never can. We can never marvel like they did then. We can marvel in a different way as the added weight of hindsight colours our perspective of the films. We see these 1930s films through the eyes of the 2010s, and we see a very different film to that which Vigo may have made. Nevertheless, we cannot help but appreciate what Vigo did in L’Atalante.


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RE: 179. Homer's ALL NEW Top 300 Films. - 26/8/2012 12:07:18 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


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Another Year is excellent.

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178. Homer's ALL NEW Top 300 Films. - 1/9/2012 7:11:30 PM   
homersimpson_esq


Posts: 20116
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Springfield


Once upon a time, the name “Peter Jackson” was synonymous with cult Kiwi splatter films. His debut, Bad Taste, follows a couple of New Zealanders as they deal with aliens who want humans to be their next meal. Meet the Feebles is a bizarre perversion of The Muppets. Braindead is a classic gore horror where the hero memorably uses a lawnmower to dispatch the undead. So it was something of a departure for Jackson to choose, as his fourth film, the true story of two teenage girls in 1950s New Zealand whose destructive friendship ends in murder and misery.

Debut actors Melanie Lynskey and Kate Winslet star as Pauline and Juliet respectively. Pauline already retreats into her fantasy world of Mario Lanza and Orson Welles, and when the British Juliet arrives at the school they form an almost instant friendship. It begins innocently: the girls are fast friends, and share everything. They begin to create clay models representing the fantasy world they create together.

But things do not go to plan. Juliet, a sickly adolescent, becomes ill once again, and spends much of the summer in a care hospital, away from Pauline. The fantasy continues through role play letter exchanges, and their friendship never falters. But it is the world around them – the real world of consequences and truths – that begins to force the girls apart. Juliets parents split up, and it becomes clear that Juliet must leave. The friendship with Pauline has become her whole world by this point. The clay models have sprung to live, and so too have their fantasies: they live them out in person. It would be reductive and arguably insulting to label their friendship as sapphic. There is no eroticism in their relationship, no sexual intent. Indeed, their lustful focuses remain male: the aforementioned Mario Lanza to name but one. And yet their friendship is one that could arguably develop into such, and there are elements that are clearly intended to imply a burgeoning lesbian relationship. Certainly that is the fear of the parents who strive to keep the girls apart.

It is this decision both absolute in parental desire, and unavoidable through parental travel, that tears the girls apart. At all costs they must remain together, and the film takes on a darker, malevolent tone. Jackson builds up this relationship and forces us to empathise with the girls, to feel their feelings, and know their thoughts and desires. So when the final horrible act is done there is an intended blurring of moral certitude for the viewer.

Of course, Peter Jackson would return to horror one more time, in 1996′s Michael J. Fox film, The Frighteners (still holds up really well) before doing some films about a Ring, A Kong, and some distinctly average Bones. His post Lord of the Rings output has been miss-and-miss, and with him now tied up with three Hobbit films it may be some time before we get to see Jackson making films like this one again. This is where his focus needs to be. Smaller budget, innovative character-driven films that still maintain his own style – the clay model scenes are pure Jackson – while having that high quality. If Heavenly Creatures has passed you by – and it is 18 years old this year, so it may well have done – then see what “That LOTR Guy” was doing before he went to the Shire. Because it was something really rather special.


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RE: 178. Homer's ALL NEW Top 300 Films. - 1/9/2012 7:16:56 PM   
nomimalone


Posts: 2866
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Norn Iron
Brilliant choice, I love that film.

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RE: 178. Homer's ALL NEW Top 300 Films. - 1/9/2012 8:17:01 PM   
MovieAddict247


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Great film.

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RE: 178. Homer's ALL NEW Top 300 Films. - 1/9/2012 8:57:23 PM   
Rhubarb


Posts: 24507
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From: No Direction Home
Peter Jackson's best film.

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RE: 178. Homer's ALL NEW Top 300 Films. - 2/9/2012 12:23:18 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 77076
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo
quote:

ORIGINAL: Rhubarb

Peter Jackson's second best film.



Agreed.


_____________________________

So, sir, we let him have it right up! And I have to report, sir, he did not like it, sir.

Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

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Post #: 675
RE: 178. Homer's ALL NEW Top 300 Films. - 2/9/2012 1:21:32 AM   
Rhubarb


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From: No Direction Home
Surely you think its his fourth best film.

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RE: 178. Homer's ALL NEW Top 300 Films. - 2/9/2012 1:58:36 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 77076
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo
Lotr = 1 film!

_____________________________

So, sir, we let him have it right up! And I have to report, sir, he did not like it, sir.

Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

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Post #: 677
RE: 178. Homer's ALL NEW Top 300 Films. - 2/9/2012 12:34:31 PM   
chambanzi


Posts: 441
Joined: 31/8/2010
Another Year is a really good film and one that I had almost forgotten about despite it being fairly recent. It is probably my second favourite Leigh film.

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177. Homer's ALL NEW Top 300 Films. - 2/9/2012 9:47:43 PM   
homersimpson_esq


Posts: 20116
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Springfield


Once upon a time, Batman was considered camp and silly. That time was 1997. 30 or so years earlier, Batman was considered camp and silly. In between those dates, a film came along and made Batman serious. Some 11 years before Burton gave the cowl and cape to Michael Keaton, Richard Donner had made superhero films a real possibility with Superman: The Movie, but with the sequels to that film becoming somewhat silly by 1987 (Superman IV: The Quest for Peace) it was time for a new superhero. And a new superhero meant an old one, almost as established as Superman in American comic book lore.

Removing all memory of the 60s TV series – which has its own place in people’s hearts for its own special reasons – Burton went dark. Dark, but fun. If you had to point out one major difference between Burton’s “dark” take on Batman and Nolan’s (because one cannot discuss Batman now without some reference to the Dark Knight trilogy) it’s that Burton’s are fun, while Nolan’s are not. (That isn’t a criticism of Nolan’s films at all: they weren’t aiming for “fun”.) Burton’s has a cheeky wink behind the mask, a knowing smile scarred across its face. Danny Elfman gives this film what Hans Zimmer didn’t give Nolan’s films: a theme tune. Zimmer’s is all atmosphere, no tune. Elfman gives us both. The Batman theme is one of the greats.

Michael Keaton plays Wayne as an unwilling playboy, but one who wears his wealth naturally. His two roles are never seen as conflicting or as a burden, but simply who he is. Kim Basinger looks lovely and does exactly what is needed in being the damsel in distress. Jack Nicholson’s Joker is so personable, so brilliant that he risks overshadowing the titular character. Indeed that was something that, unchecked, would create a film more about the villains than the hero. Note, subsequent Batman films within this series fall foul to his more and more.

Batman was the film that changed the game. It solidified the work that Superman had done before it and said to the world, comic-book movies can be a valid film genre. Arguably that assertion has got us where we are today, with an over-saturated market, but it has also produced some memorable films. And, let’s be clear, a film is judged on its own merits, not the legacy it leaves. And those merits are superb: Batman remains, 23 years (really!?) later, a premiere example of genre film-making.


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RE: 177. Homer's ALL NEW Top 300 Films. - 2/9/2012 9:52:31 PM   
Rebel scum


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Heavenly Creatures is amazing.

Batman is good, solid fun, though I prefer Returns. For me Keaton is the best in the role.

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RE: 177. Homer's ALL NEW Top 300 Films. - 2/9/2012 10:53:05 PM   
SadFace

 

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Heavenly Creatures is definitely my favourite Peter Jackson film. With Braindead a close second.

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That's the most wrong I've ever seen someone be on this forum. And both Gimli and Elab post here.

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RE: 177. Homer's ALL NEW Top 300 Films. - 2/9/2012 10:55:20 PM   
MonsterCat


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From: St. Albans, Hertfordshire
I clearly remember seeing Batman at my now closed local Odeon.

Good times.

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RE: 177. Homer's ALL NEW Top 300 Films. - 6/9/2012 1:20:53 PM   
ElephantBoy

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: Rebel scum

Heavenly Creatures is amazing.

Batman is good, solid fun, though I prefer Returns. For me Keaton is the best in the role.

I agree. In its own way Heavenly Creatures is just as good as Jackson's best Rings films. Such a shame Lynskey has never had the career Winslett has because at least in that film she is just as good.

The more I see it the more I can take or leave Batman.

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176. Homer's ALL NEW Top 300 Films. - 15/9/2012 10:24:07 PM   
homersimpson_esq


Posts: 20116
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Springfield


Well, I'm going to get grief for this, so I may as well face the onslaught head on.

Avatar is flawed. The script is clunky and the acting occasionally questionable. Unfortunately these two things continue throughout the film, so they have gotten a lot of press. As have the complaints at the "unoriginal" story and the 3D. The fact that this is "Pocahontas in space" was never an issue. It's a good story, and it's told well; albeit with questionable script choices. The voiceover is as obvious as the one with which Blade Runner dispensed, and serves much the same superfluous purpose, and Unobtainium still makes me wince.

But these factors are not enough to detract from the whole. When I watched this on Blu-ray last year, for the first time since seeing it at the cinema, it changed my view of it. At the cinema I was impressed but left wanting. Hype had burned me, despite my efforts to not let it do so. Hailed as the next best thing, a tinge of disappointment was inevitable. Shorn of that weight of expectation, and with that third dimension removed (I never get the full effect of 3D because of an eye thing) Avatar was suddenly revealed as an actually quite wonderful film.

For both of you who haven't seen it, the film concerns military grunt Jake Sully who, having lost the use of his legs, is barely surviving. When his twin brother is killed, he must replace him in the avatar programme, an initiative which sees humans' consciousnesses implanted into alien bodies to better integrate into an indigenous people on a planet's moon on which the potential for future energy for Earth resides. As Jake gets to know the people, in particular Ney'tiri, he comes to see their side of the issue, and turns against his own people to fight for the Na'vi.

I am big on aesthetic beauty. If a film looks great, I can forgive a lot. This may, some will say, explain my love of this film. Because, whatever you say about it, Avatar looks phenomenal. I prefer it without the 3D as well. You can really focus on every perfect detail. The blues and greens shimmer, and the alien creatures are as razor sharp in clarity as their teeth and claws. The world is perfectly realised that when, part way through, almost the entire screen is CGI, you never notice. (It is in hindsight that one realises, upon consideration, not in the moment.) When Peter Jackson made Lord of the Rings he used a variety of techniques to create the various illusions. CGI was one weapon in a tremendous arsenal of effects. It meant that one could continue to marvel at how effects were achieved, rather than going "oh, it's just CGI". When he made King Kong he forgot this and only used CGI, and it didn't work. Somehow, however, Avatar does. It is a great big advertisement for how good CGI can be in maintaining that "magic of the movies".

James Cameron is an easy target. For making the two biggest grossing films of all time; for announcing two sequels to Avatar together, and now a potential prequel as well; for having a huge gap in his CV where he pursued other avenues. Actually that last can't really be target-worthy: it's a man chasing his dreams, and that is to be commended. But for all that, and ignoring the fact that Avatar is the biggest grossing film of all time (something has to be), he did make an astonishing film in Avatar. It's not the film that perhaps deserves that "biggest grossing" title, because of the aforementioned flaws, but by God it's good. It's old school "carry you away to a far off place" film-making that is a whole planetary system away from the likes of Another Year. It's big, it's bold...it's blue... Try and take it on its own merits because it is still a damned good film. If they can sort out that script problem, the next two could be very interesting indeed.    


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RE: 176. Homer's ALL NEW Top 300 Films. - 15/9/2012 10:30:57 PM   
matty_b


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RE: 176. Homer's ALL NEW Top 300 Films. - 15/9/2012 10:31:48 PM   
nomimalone


Posts: 2866
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Norn Iron
Oh, Homer.

I fell asleep in the cinema while watching Avatar and I have absolutely no desire to ever see it again. Just getting to the end was an ordeal. But hey, what do I know, Blade Runner bored me too!

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Post #: 686
RE: 176. Homer's ALL NEW Top 300 Films. - 15/9/2012 10:39:07 PM   
homersimpson_esq


Posts: 20116
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Springfield
quote:

ORIGINAL: nomimalone

Oh, Homer.

I fell asleep in the cinema while watching Avatar and I have absolutely no desire to ever see it again. Just getting to the end was an ordeal. But hey, what do I know, Blade Runner bored me too!





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Post #: 687
RE: 176. Homer's ALL NEW Top 300 Films. - 15/9/2012 10:42:36 PM   
MonsterCat


Posts: 7932
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From: St. Albans, Hertfordshire
I must be one of the very, very few people on the planet who hasn't seen Avatar yet. It just looks so... silly.

Also, I sorta agree with Nomi about Blade Runner.

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Post #: 688
RE: 176. Homer's ALL NEW Top 300 Films. - 15/9/2012 11:28:47 PM   
directorscut


Posts: 10597
Joined: 30/9/2005
It's an enjoyable film. Better than True Lies for sure. Say what you will about Cameron he knows how to pace a film (except True Lies) and make an action sequence.

The biggest problem with it is the lack of charisma and chemistry of the leads. They're no DiCaprio and Winslet and it's no surprise their careers haven't taken off in the same way since.

Speaking of which, I expect to see Titanic higher up on the list and it is clearly Cameron's best film and much better than Avatar.

< Message edited by directorscut -- 15/9/2012 11:29:55 PM >


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RE: 176. Homer's ALL NEW Top 300 Films. - 16/9/2012 12:31:54 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
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From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.

quote:

ORIGINAL: homersimpson_esq

James Cameron is an easy target. For making the two biggest grossing films of all time; for announcing two sequels to Avatar together, and now a potential prequel as well; for having a huge gap in his CV where he pursued other avenues.


For me he's an easy target because he hasn't had a decent idea for a film since he stole some from Harlan Ellison.

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