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RE: Cult Countdown - 2/5/2012 4:16:48 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.




Edward Parker (Arlen) is shipwrecked in the South Seas and rescued by a freighter delivering supplies to an island owned by the mysterious Dr. Moreau. Parker finds himself stranded on the island and forced to turn to Moreau (Laughton) for shelter. Parker hears strange noises in the night, eventually running into the natives of the island, animal-men created by Moreau. Moreau rescues Parker from them and then orders the Sayer of the Law (Lugosi) to repeat the rule about violence. The Doctor has been creating animal-human hybrids in his "house of pain". Moreau's most successful experiment has been Lota, the panther-woman (Burke). She's so human that Moreau wants her and Parker to mate, when Parker's fiancee arrives on the island he knows he needs to find a way to escape.

The parallels with Frankenstein and the general theme of man playing God is obvious, as is the one of primitive sexuality vs repression. Just as interesting in this is the way Laughton's performance, especially his manner of dress, brings to mind colonial overtones. You could easily see Laughton's character as a slave-owner in a British colony as a mad scientist on a secluded island. Moreau is a brutal master and the horrific finale in the house of pain sees him getting fitting punishment from the creations he has tortured and abused. The fact that Moreau creates his hybrids through surgery rather than genetics, so you have some idea of the revenge being extracted, adds an even nastier edge. So nasty in fact that it was banned three time by the BBFC and took over 25 years before it was cleared for viewing.

It's a honestly creepy effort and despite Wells' own reported dislike of the film, it remains not only the finest Moreau film, but possibly the finest Wells adaptation for cinema.

- Rawlinson



< Message edited by rawlinson -- 15/5/2012 1:45:29 PM >

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 31
RE: Cult Countdown - 4/5/2012 10:43:33 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.






Life in a small coastal town is in upheaval, plans for a new factory are upsetting people, it's time for the big annual festival and a race of half man half fish people are attacking a small coastal town, killing the animals and men, and raping the women. Now, that may make this film sound crass, warped and exploitative. And it is. Enjoy.

- Rawlinson



Horror icons Barbara Steele and Vincent Price come together in Roger Corman's retelling of the Poe classic. Price plays Nicholas Medina, son of an infamous Spanish Inquisition torturer. His brother-in-law, Francis Barnard (A miscast John Kerr) travels to his castle to find out the reason for the sudden death of his sister, Elizabeth (Steele) Nicholas is unwilling to explain, but the castle's doctor reveals the truth of Nicholas' father (including that he tortured Nicholas' mother to death in front of the child) and shows Francis the torture chamber, revealing that Elizabeth had become obsessed with the chamber and died by locking herself in the Iron Maiden. Nicholas has come to believe that Elizabeth's ghost is haunting the castle and as the hauntings increase, Nicholas approaches the edge of insanity and takes on his father's lust for torture.

Made following the success of Corman's House of Usher adaptation, The Pit and the Pendulum is the second in the long line of classic AIP Poe adaptations. The Corman/Poe films were gothic masterpieces, visually astonishing, filled with incredible costumes and sets and usually topped off by an insane Price performance. The script by the great Richard Matheson obviously makes many alterations to the Poe story (only really adapting it in the film's final 30 minutes) but Matheson doesn't do the story a disservice, making the screenplay complex and intelligent. The film may seem a slow-burn at first, but Matheson and Corman slowly crank up the tension before letting loose in the mind-blowing finale. It's difficult to care about the bland Kerr, but Price is always a blast to watch and he gives one of his finest performances here as the tormented Nicholas. Those who dismiss Corman as a dealer in low-budget schlock need to take the time to watch these Poe adaptations, and this is a good place to start.

- Rawlinson



Unman... is another one of those films that make you realise how deeply weird British cinema actually was in the 60s and 70s. David Hemmings plays a teacher assigned to an all-boy school after the disappearance of his predecessor. The boys tell him that they murdered the old teacher, and intimidate him until the boys are the ones running the class and putting both Hemmings and his wife (Carolyn Seymour) in danger. A thoughtful and frightening film, where the quiet moments often seem to be the most threatening. The film captures that sense of mistrust and lingering dread that was so common in British horror cinema at the time and uses it to create a classic mystery where you can't be really be sure if the boys are as dangerous as they seem, or just manipulating a situation for their own benefit. It reminds me of Would You Kill a Child? in the way that it takes people who wouldn't be a problem as individuals and makes you understand how dangerous they can be when working as one, especially if they have you isolated. One of the most interesting aspects of the film is the way the boys keep up their outward politeness, even while blackmailing and intimidating others. The school is a secluded world, and while it seems ready to embrace something more dangerous, the old rituals still have great importance. It's a fascinating film, anchored by first rate performances from Hemmings and Seymour.

- Rawlinson

< Message edited by rawlinson -- 15/5/2012 1:49:45 PM >

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 32
RE: Cult Countdown - 6/5/2012 12:29:45 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.


In the 1970s, Staten Island was home to the Willowbrook Institute for mentally handicapped children. Following reports of abuse and neglect at the institute (including a piece of investigative journalism that won a Peabody award for Geraldo Rivera) the institute was gradually shut down, the building left to decay and fester on the small island that acted as the rubbish dump for New York. Many of the former patients and guards, uncertain of what to do following the closures, came back to live in the ruins of the old institution. Andre Rand, a former orderly, was one of the many camping in the grounds in the late 80s when a young girl with Down Syndrome, Jennifer Schweiger, went missing. Following one of the largest civilian manhunts in history, Jennifer's body was found in a shallow grave near Rand's campsite. Rand had previous convictions for child molestation and was also the chief suspect in the disappearance of several other children in the area. For many he seemed to fit perfectly. The perp-walk photos of Rand were enough to seal his guilt in their mind. A drooling, Satanic mess, he looked like a killer of children. There was a lot of circumstantial evidence, but little actual physical evidence to tie him to the crimes. Was he actually guilty? He certainly seemed to be a physical manifestation of the Cropsey figure that plagued the nightmares of children in the tri-state area.

The directors, Joshua Zeman and Barbara Brancaccio, grew up in Staten Island but didn't meet until later in life, they bonded over memories of the Cropsey legend and of the Rand case. When they discovered that Rand was going to stand trial again for an old crime, Zeman and Brancaccio decided to revisit the case, and Staten Island's murky past. Through the eyes of the directors, Staten Island becomes the kind of world we're used to seeing through the pages of a pulp novel, where the land itself has become so neglected and corrupted that it seems to infect the people. Everytime we think we've hit the seedy bottom of Staten Island, we find another layer of dirt to claw through. That's not to say that the film is mere muck-raking, it's a sensitive and thought-provoking look at an area that had become a dumping ground, both for human waste and human beings. Society hid what it was ashamed of on Staten Island, from the secrets people throw away in their garbage, to the neglect of the vulnerable children in Willowbrook. Staten Island was becoming rotten. But then, a young girl disappears and 5000 residents turn out to search for her. The cynical side of me feels that it was a way of trying to release themselves from the guilt they felt over the neglect that went on under their noses. But part of me hopes it was a human instinct to do something good and right, to help someone who was lost and desperately needed that help. Unlike many documentaries where it becomes more about the director than the story, Zeman and Brancaccio know just how much to involve themselves. This is a story that needed to feel personal and pair inject enough of themselves to do that, but they also know when to stand back and let those who were involved first-hand to have their voices be heard.

One of the most interesting aspects of the film is the examination of how much of the trial of Rand was influenced by the need to solve the case as opposed to definitive evidence of Rand's guilt. There is a strong case to make that he was railroaded. The area where the body was discovered was searched once and nothing was found, only a second search found the girl, in ground so shallow that her hand was sticking out of the earth. It feels as if Rand may have been a convenient scapegoat, a mentally disturbed man with previous abuse convictions who they could lay the blame on and help calm a worried population, especially when America was at the height of the Satanic abuse panic. But then you see images of Rand, and he unsettles you. He reminds me of the insanity of a Manson, someone who crawls under your skin to the extent that you can never be comfortable in how you feel about the man.

I know some critics expressed disappointment that this was more about Rand than about the specific Cropsey legend. But I think that's part of the point, the legend attached itself to this man for the film-makers. In some ways it feels like the act of story-telling was used to cushion the harshness of the reality when they were children and this whole film is stripping away the scary story to see the truth and the tragedy of Staten Island.

Cropsey is an unsettling experience, atmospheric and disturbing, with the ability to haunt your dreams. It's often compared to a real-life Blair Witch Project, I can understand why and for fans of that kind of approach there will be much to appreciate here. In many ways the film feels like the camp-fire scary tale and it's great viewing for horror fans on that level. But, rightfully, you can never escape the real-life aspect, and the film doesn't want you to escape it. This was a tragedy that rocked a community, children did disappear, and lives were changed forever. The film is remarkably balanced when you consider how close both directors were to the events chronicled. It could easily have presented the belief that Rand was guilty, regardless of the lack of concrete evidence, or it could have presented the police and the residents of engaging in little more than a witch-hunt. It does neither, instead it allows you a unique insight into a community troubled by its sins and it gives everyone who takes part in the film a chance to have their voices heard. Cropsey may be a small film, but its importance is gigantic.

- Rawlinson









< Message edited by rawlinson -- 15/5/2012 1:50:31 PM >

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 33
RE: Cult Countdown - 8/5/2012 2:26:46 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
393. Eaten Alive



(1977; Tobe Hooper)
Highest Vote: Gimli the Dwarf

393. Last House on Dead End Street



(1977; Roger Michael Watkins)
Highest Vote: Rawlinson

Films like Last House on Dead End Street almost make me regret the improvements in technology. This is the kind of film that should be watched on a dodgy bootleg video, not a sparkly dvd or blu-ray disc. And that was its fate for a long time, it was only available on 10th generation videos. Until 2000, nobody even knew who actually directed the film. The film seemed to vanish for a number of reasons. First was the alleged friction between Watkins and the studio. The film was shot in 1972, under the title The Cuckoo Clocks of Hell, with a 3 hour+ running time. The distributors got hold of it, slashed it down to less than half the running time, and released it in 77 under the title 'The Funhouse'. It was then retitled again, to Last House on Dead End Street, no doubt to bring to mind the Wes Craven classic. The other reason it disappeared from view for so long is down to how grim a viewing experience it is.

Terry Hawkins (Director Watkins) has just been released from jail. He has some camera skills and he's hired by local pornographers to make some unique films. Terry's hatred of society and desire to teach a lesson to 'the man' lead to him hiring a crew of fellow degenerates and kidnapping, torturing and killing people for snuff films.Watkins has said he was high during most of the making, the film had a budget of $3,800. $3,000 went on drugs. The film itself was heavily inspired by the Manson Massacre and the rumours that they'd shot their own snuff films. Last House on Dead End Street was actually named as a possible snuff film a lot over the years, mainly because so little was known about the film. Until Watkins admitted he was the 'Victor Janos' who was supposed to have directed the film. Depressing, but brilliant, this is one of the sleaziest, vilest, most nihilistic and decadent films I've ever seen. How many other films you can think of where a character is forced to fellate a deer hoof? They really don't make them like this anymore, and maybe we should be glad of that.

- Rawlinson

393. Lawn Dogs



(1997; John Duigan)
Highest Vote: MovieAddict247

393. Scanners



(1981; David Cronenberg)
Highest Vote: Evil Bill

393. Theatre of Blood



(1973; Douglas Hickox)
Highest Vote: hubu_phonk/Rebenectomy

393. Waxworks



(1924; Paul Leni)
Highest Vote: WifeofRaw

< Message edited by rawlinson -- 15/5/2012 1:51:43 PM >

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 34
RE: Cult Countdown - 8/5/2012 2:58:39 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
392. THX 1138



(1971; George Lucas)
Highest Vote: MovieAddict247

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 35
RE: Cult Countdown - 13/5/2012 3:05:54 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
387. Beetlejuice



(1988; Tim Burton)
Highest Vote: MovieAddict247

387. The Changeling



(1980; Peter Medak)
Highest Vote: WifeofRaw

387. Hated: GG Allin And The Murder Junkies



(1994 Todd Philips)
Highest Vote: Garvielloken

387. The Point



(1971; Fred Wolf)
Highest Vote: hubu_phonk/Rebenectomy

387. Tommy



(1975; Ken Russell)
Highest Vote: Gimli The Dwarf

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 36
RE: Cult Countdown - 15/5/2012 2:05:09 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
383. A Better Tomorrow



(1986; John Woo)
Highest Vote: Harry Tuttle

383. Black Book



(2006; Paul Verhoeven)
Highest Vote: Rebel Scum

383. Haxan: Witchcraft Through the Ages



(1922; Benjamin Christensen)
Highest Vote: WifeofRaw

383. Who Framed Roger Rabbit?



(1988; Robert Zemeckis)
Highest Vote: MovieAddict247

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 37
RE: Cult Countdown - 15/5/2012 2:16:25 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
377. Bonnie's Kids



(1973; Arthur Marks)
Highest Vote: Rawlinson

377. Dog Day Afternoon



(1975; Sidney Lumet)
Highest Vote: Harry Tuttle

377. The Embryo Hunts In Secret



(1966; Koji Wakamatsu)
Highest Vote: Garvielloken

377. Rumble Fish



(1983; Francis Ford Coppola)
Highest Vote: MovieAddict247

377. Shaun of the Dead



(2004; Edgar Wright)
Highest Vote: Rebel Scum

377. Skeletons



(2010; Nick Whitfield)
Highest Vote: Impqueen

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 38
RE: Cult Countdown - 16/5/2012 7:46:08 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
374. Late Night Shopping



(2001; Saul Metzstein)

374. Marketa Lazarova



(1967; Frantisek Vlacil)

374. Parents



(1989; Bob Balaban)

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 39
RE: Cult Countdown - 16/5/2012 7:56:24 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
373. Let the Right One In



(2008; Tomas Alfredson)

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 40
RE: Cult Countdown - 18/5/2012 10:20:36 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
370. Buffalo 66



(1998; Vince Gallo)

370. The Life Aquatic



(2004; Wes Anderson)

370. Mars Attacks



(1996; Tim Burton)

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 41
RE: Cult Countdown - 18/5/2012 10:52:39 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
365. Bunman: The Untold Story



(1992; Herman Yau)

365. La jetee



(1962; Chris Marker)

365. Krull



(1983; Peter Yates)

365. Once Upon a Time in America



(1984; Sergio Leone)

365. Strictly Ballroom



(1992; Baz Luhrmann)

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 42
RE: Cult Countdown - 18/5/2012 11:57:30 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
360. The Company of Wolves



(1984; Neil Jordan)

360. Hanna D.: The Girl from Vondel Park



(1984; Rino Di Silvestro)

360. Laputa: Castle in the Sky



(1986; Hayao Miyazaki)

360. Strange Days



(1995; Kathryn Bigelow)

360. What a Carve Up!



(1961; Pat Jackson)

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 43
RE: Cult Countdown - 20/5/2012 12:49:34 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
359. House



(1977; Nobuhiko Obayashi)

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 44
RE: Cult Countdown - 20/5/2012 12:53:10 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
353. Cry Baby



(1990; John Waters)

353. The Day Of The Beast



(1995; Alex de la Iglesia)

353. Gringo



(1984; Lech Kowalski)

353. Murder By Death



(1976; Robert Moore)

353. Rolling Thunder



(1977; John Flynn)

353. Wise Blood



(1979; John Huston)

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 45
RE: Cult Countdown - 20/5/2012 5:46:54 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
347. A bout de souffle



(1960; Jean-luc Godard)

347. F For Fake



(1974; Orson Welles)

347. The Mist



(2007; Frank Darabont)

347. Pan's Labyrinth



(2006; Guillermo Del Toro)

347. Repulsion



(1965; Roman Polanski)

347. Scarface



(1983; Brian De Palma)

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 46
RE: Cult Countdown - 20/5/2012 5:50:46 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
346. What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?



(1962; Robert Aldrich)

< Message edited by rawlinson -- 20/5/2012 5:51:08 PM >

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 47
RE: Cult Countdown - 20/5/2012 6:01:48 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
343. Forced Entry



(1972; Shaun Costello)

343. Quick Change



(1990; Howard Franklin, Bill Murray)

343. Scorpio Rising



(1964; Kenneth Anger)

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 48
RE: Cult Countdown - 20/5/2012 6:10:27 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
340. Brother from Another Planet



(1984; John Sayles)

340. Ponyo



(2008; Hayao Miyazaki)

340. Wild At Heart



(1990; David Lynch)

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 49
RE: Cult Countdown - 20/5/2012 6:25:32 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
335. Hairspray



(1988; John Waters)

335. I Saw the Devil



(2010; Kim Ji-woon)

335. Jabberwocky



(1977; Terry Gilliam)

335. Over the Edge



(1979; Jonathan Kaplan)

335. A Page of Madness



(1926; Teinosuke Kinugusa)

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 50
RE: Cult Countdown - 21/5/2012 12:24:39 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
333. Southern Comfort



(1981; Walter Hill)

333. The World's Greatest Sinner



(1962; Timothy Carey)

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 51
RE: Cult Countdown - 21/5/2012 12:28:05 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
332. Deadbeat At Dawn



(1988; Jim Van Bebber)

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 52
RE: Cult Countdown - 21/5/2012 1:33:41 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
325. Alphaville



(1965; Jean-luc Godard)

325. The Borrower Arrietty



(2010; Hiromasa Yonebayashi)

325. City Of The Living Dead



(1980; Lucio Fulci)

325. Frightmare



(1974; Pete Walker)

325. Phantom of the Opera



(1988; Al Guest, Jean Mathieson)

325. Them!



(1954; Gordon Douglas)

325. The Toxic Avenger



(1984; Lloyd Kaufman)

< Message edited by rawlinson -- 22/5/2012 1:50:29 PM >

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 53
RE: Cult Countdown - 21/5/2012 2:29:50 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
322. Enter the Dragon



(1973; Robert Clouse)

322. Leningrad Cowboys Go America



(1989; Aki Kaurismaki)

322. Wisconsin Death Trip



(1999; James Marsh)

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 54
RE: Cult Countdown - 21/5/2012 4:29:55 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
320. Heavy Metal



(1981; Gerald Potterton)

320. Pets



(1974; Raphael Nussbaum)

< Message edited by rawlinson -- 21/5/2012 4:30:47 PM >

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 55
RE: Cult Countdown - 21/5/2012 4:33:27 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
319. Matango: Attack of the Mushroom People



(1963; Ishiro Honda)

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 56
RE: Cult Countdown - 21/5/2012 4:48:24 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
317. End of Days



(1999; Peter Hyams)

317. Sisters



(1973; Brian De Palma)

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 57
RE: Cult Countdown - 21/5/2012 4:59:44 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
315. The Devil in Miss Jones



(1973; Gerard Damiano)

315. Tenebrae



(1982; Dario Argento)

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 58
RE: Cult Countdown - 21/5/2012 7:11:28 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
312. Even Dwarfs Start Small



(1970; Werner Herzog)

312. The Hudsucker Proxy



(1994; Joel Coen, Ethan Coen)

312. Vampyres



(1974; Jose Larraz)

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 59
RE: Cult Countdown - 21/5/2012 7:31:47 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
308. The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert



(1994; Stephan Elliott)

308. American History X



(1998; Tony Kaye)

308. The Castle of Cagliostro



(1979; Hayao Miyazaki)

308. Mad Max



(1979; George Miller)

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 60
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