Register  |   Log In  |  
Sign up to our weekly newsletter    
Follow us on   
Search   
Forum Home Register for Free! Log In Moderator Tickets FAQ Users Online

RE: Should Liam Stacey have gone to prison?

 
Logged in as: Guest
  Printable Version
All Forums >> [On Another Note...] >> News and Hot Topics >> RE: Should Liam Stacey have gone to prison? Page: <<   < prev  2 3 4 5 [6]
Login
Message << Older Topic   Newer Topic >>
RE: Should Liam Stacey have gone to prison? - 31/7/2012 12:33:36 PM   
Ref


Posts: 7461
Joined: 5/10/2005
From: Leicester

quote:

ORIGINAL: gunstar

quote:

What a perverse way of reading that particular right. He wasn't expressing his right to a free opinion, he was being a nasty little shit for the sake of it and he should be held accountable.


In that case, around about two thirds of twitter users need arresting.

I look at it like this: If you're going to use a public and open forum to self-publicise, you have to be prepared for some hugely wanky comments from idiots. They are the public after all (a lot of them anyway).

I do believe it is a question of free speech, and in no way a perverse arguement. As elab pointed out a bit earlier, there are no definite boundaries and I worry about this 'malicious communication' easily being used as a way of getting people to stop saying something (and not just vile abuse.)

The kid's a mouthy arsehole. You arrest every single one of them and then you might as well turn the whole country into a floating prison ship. 


Yes, but in this case that twat threatened to kill not one, but two people. Hurling abuse is one thing, but to threaten violence is another thing entirely.


_____________________________

Viewers of a nervous disposition may be interested to know that your television is off and I am speaking to you from inside your head...

Hugh Dennis, Mock the Week

Icon created by the talented JaD

(in reply to gunstar)
Post #: 151
RE: Should Liam Stacey have gone to prison? - 31/7/2012 12:53:10 PM   
gunstar


Posts: 962
Joined: 11/3/2006
From: Star Lite Star Bright Trailer Park
quote:

ORIGINAL: Ref


quote:

ORIGINAL: gunstar

quote:

What a perverse way of reading that particular right. He wasn't expressing his right to a free opinion, he was being a nasty little shit for the sake of it and he should be held accountable.


In that case, around about two thirds of twitter users need arresting.

I look at it like this: If you're going to use a public and open forum to self-publicise, you have to be prepared for some hugely wanky comments from idiots. They are the public after all (a lot of them anyway).

I do believe it is a question of free speech, and in no way a perverse arguement. As elab pointed out a bit earlier, there are no definite boundaries and I worry about this 'malicious communication' easily being used as a way of getting people to stop saying something (and not just vile abuse.)

The kid's a mouthy arsehole. You arrest every single one of them and then you might as well turn the whole country into a floating prison ship. 


Yes, but in this case that twat threatened to kill not one, but two people. Hurling abuse is one thing, but to threaten violence is another thing entirely.



Doesn't it all come under the heading 'being an internet git' though. Admittedly, I haven't read his other tweets (don't ever intend to either, horrible little cock) but talking shit and intending to carry out the things that take you two seconds to tap out on a keyboard are different things, no?

Maybe it's just me. I don't really take anything to heart that is communicated to me over the internet, especially by someone I don't know (which is, in itself rare, as I try to be selective with that type of thing) whereas if someone is standing in front of me, I may be a little more worried.

Twitter as a medium allows communication with all facets of the public and, unfortunately, this type of nasty, petty abuse is part and parcel of that type of communication. I think it's the price you pay for utilising that medium. Doesn't make it right, but it is one of the dangers of allowing a bunch of strangers access to you.

The worry I have is where does it stop. Does it start by banning abuse, then what? Ban criticism? Ban any other viewpoint? As mentioned before, there is a block button. I'd like to think self-regulation is the way forward. 

_____________________________

'We can take these Deadites! We can take them.....with science."

"We'll get 'em. We'll throw the book at them. Assault and kidnapping. Assault with a gun and a bourbon and a sports car."

"Falcon! Grab my ankles!"

(in reply to Ref)
Post #: 152
RE: Should Liam Stacey have gone to prison? - 31/7/2012 1:51:31 PM   
Chief


Posts: 7779
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Banshee
Just to play Devil's advocate, what about all the Justin Bieber hate that goes on? There's a lot of jokes about killing him, even in these forums, should that be tackled?

I'm sure there are plenty of other celebrity targets that have taken their fare share of pelters via Twitter, either directly or indirectly, where does the line get drawn?

(in reply to Ref)
Post #: 153
RE: Should Liam Stacey have gone to prison? - 31/7/2012 2:45:49 PM   
kathryn2

 

Posts: 1513
Joined: 24/4/2006

quote:

ORIGINAL: Chief

Just to play Devil's advocate, what about all the Justin Bieber hate that goes on? There's a lot of jokes about killing him, even in these forums, should that be tackled?

I'm sure there are plenty of other celebrity targets that have taken their fare share of pelters via Twitter, either directly or indirectly, where does the line get drawn?


I believe the line gets drawn legally when the messages are actually sent to the individual the comments are made about, and are detailed and realistic enough to be menacing rather than humorous hyperbole or actually just insulting. Calling someone nasty, non-racist names is ok, telling someone they're a failure or a dissapointment is ok, being insensitive is ok, legally speaking.

It's wise to steer clear of death threats and bomb threats, even if you think the intent is clearly humorous, because of the sheer hassle of proving in court that it was humour and not malicious, but it can be done. Threatening to drown Tom Daley in the pool is obviously not humorous or hyperbolic, though, and neither is threatening to shove a knife down someone's throat.

(in reply to Chief)
Post #: 154
RE: Should Liam Stacey have gone to prison? - 31/7/2012 2:47:46 PM   
sharkboy


Posts: 6295
Joined: 26/9/2005
From: Belfast
The trouble with dismissing every threat as the rantings of an "internet git" is that every now and again those same gits make good on their threats.  And yes, I'll wager (to paraphrase the scene from 12 Angry Men) that on the vast majority of occasions, "I'll kill you" is uttered in the heat of the moment but never meant literally.  But until they investigated, did the police know that this was a 17-yr old oik rather than, say, a stalker with a penchant for violence and a history of psychotic incidents?  Once a complaint is made, are they not obliged to investigate the threat and determine whether or not the law has been broken?  That's not to say it'll ever make it to court or do anything other than give a teenage boy a very rude awakening into actions and their consequences, while sating those who expressed their surprise and moral indignation at the actions of a teenage boy.  As I said earlier, my concern is at the uneven application of the law.  While quick to jump if the trending tweet makes it as far as the news pages, the reaction of the police is often conspicuous by its absence.  It's not the first death threat issued over Twitter - hell, i'd be surprised if it's the first death threat Tom Daley's received over Twitter! - and often the block button is the best solution, but if nothing else, maybe this case will make some think twice before being such a dick online?

"Freedom of expression" is a strange argument to make in support of this case IMO.  It's practically never absolute (certainly not in the UK) - if it was, why would we need the BBFC?  Or libel/slander laws?  Or what would prevent people from committing perjury?  You don't have the freedom to defame or perjure.  You don't have the freedom to watch whatever you want at the cinema without it first being judged appropriate for you.  You don't have the freedom to ignore patents or copyright.  And you don't have the freedom to be offensive or threatening (in writing at least) - the Malicious Communications Act 1988 put a stop to that.  The thing that saddens me most about this case isn't the perceived threat to our liberties, it is the fact that we now feel it necessary to legislate for common decency.  And to think I used to laugh at Bill Hicks when he made that observation about California...


_____________________________

WWLD?

Every time we think we have measured our capacity to meet a challenge, we look up and we're reminded that that capacity may well be limitless

I left in love, in laughter, and in truth and wherever truth, love and laughter abide, I am there in spirit.

(in reply to Chief)
Post #: 155
RE: Should Liam Stacey have gone to prison? - 31/7/2012 4:41:24 PM   
kathryn2

 

Posts: 1513
Joined: 24/4/2006

quote:

ORIGINAL: sharkboy

The trouble with dismissing every threat as the rantings of an "internet git" is that every now and again those same gits make good on their threats.  And yes, I'll wager (to paraphrase the scene from 12 Angry Men) that on the vast majority of occasions, "I'll kill you" is uttered in the heat of the moment but never meant literally.  But until they investigated, did the police know that this was a 17-yr old oik rather than, say, a stalker with a penchant for violence and a history of psychotic incidents?  Once a complaint is made, are they not obliged to investigate the threat and determine whether or not the law has been broken?  That's not to say it'll ever make it to court or do anything other than give a teenage boy a very rude awakening into actions and their consequences, while sating those who expressed their surprise and moral indignation at the actions of a teenage boy. 


There have certainly been cases where stalkers have attacked people that they contacted or tracked via social media.
It is certainly very worrying - I know of one guy who was spamming certain atheists with abusive and threatening messages for years, and eventually started turning up at atheist events. When an online campaign eventually got the police to take some action he was diagnosed with mental health problems and drug and alcohol addiction - it could have got very scary indeed.

I'm not sure why this case wouldn't make it to court, it's a pretty open-and-shut case, surely? Malicious communications all over the place, if you look at his timeline yesterday's threats were not isolated incidents.


quote:

As I said earlier, my concern is at the uneven application of the law.  While quick to jump if the trending tweet makes it as far as the news pages, the reaction of the police is often conspicuous by its absence.  It's not the first death threat issued over Twitter - hell, i'd be surprised if it's the first death threat Tom Daley's received over Twitter! - and often the block button is the best solution, but if nothing else, maybe this case will make some think twice before being such a dick online?


The police can only follow up reports, and very many people don't understand that death threats sent over Twitter are breaking the law, or that the police can take action. Hopefully high-profile cases like this will lead to enough publicity that people will report such threats more, and the malicious idiots will think twice before making them.

(in reply to sharkboy)
Post #: 156
RE: Should Liam Stacey have gone to prison? - 31/7/2012 6:50:57 PM   
kumar


Posts: 5231
Joined: 2/10/2005

Olly Riley. Wow. I had a quick search of his past stuff (im not on twitter and I really dont see the point still) but they are really bad. While im sure he wont go to jail I think after this he will have learned a valuable lesson. You say shit like that and you can expect a witch hunt sooner or later, regardless if it is against someone in the public domain or not,

_____________________________

"Darth Silas - I love Craig as Bond too. Genius. "- Jackmansgirl 15/7/2008

Last films watched:

The Road - 4/5
Chronicle - 4/5
Twilight Breaking Dawn p1 - 1/5
Warrior - 5/5
Super 8 - 5/5
Paranormal Activity 3 - 3/5
MI 4 - 2/5

(in reply to Harley Quinn)
Post #: 157
RE: Should Liam Stacey have gone to prison? - 1/8/2012 7:57:17 PM   
Saltire


Posts: 1974
Joined: 5/7/2011
From: Dundee
Twitter just doesn't appeal to me because of idiots like these who can't string a sentence together at the best of times so come away spouting vile profanities, racist remarks and nasty comments as in the Daley incident.

However, in the Daley incident, I don't think the guy should've got arrested for it; what he said was inexcusable, but arrestable?

(in reply to Harley Quinn)
Post #: 158
RE: Should Liam Stacey have gone to prison? - 1/8/2012 8:07:13 PM   
adambatman82

 

Posts: 11156
Joined: 15/12/2005

quote:

ORIGINAL: Saltire

Twitter just doesn't appeal to me because of idiots like these who can't string a sentence together at the best of times so come away spouting vile profanities, racist remarks and nasty comments as in the Daley incident.


That's not how twitter works. You only see tweets from people whose accounts you follow.

(in reply to Saltire)
Post #: 159
RE: Should Liam Stacey have gone to prison? - 1/8/2012 9:01:35 PM   
homersimpson_esq


Posts: 20120
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Springfield
quote:

ORIGINAL: adambatman82


quote:

ORIGINAL: Saltire

Twitter just doesn't appeal to me because of idiots like these who can't string a sentence together at the best of times so come away spouting vile profanities, racist remarks and nasty comments as in the Daley incident.


That's not how twitter works. You only see tweets from people whose accounts you follow.


And if people mention you, you can see those too. Which is how Daley saw the tweets from Riley. Obviously you just block the account but that doesn't change that Daley saw the tweets before he could block the account...


_____________________________

That deep-browed Homer ruled as his demesne.


Bristol Bad Film Club
A place where movie fans can come and behold some of the most awful films ever put to celluloid.

(in reply to adambatman82)
Post #: 160
RE: Should Liam Stacey have gone to prison? - 1/8/2012 9:43:54 PM   
Ref


Posts: 7461
Joined: 5/10/2005
From: Leicester
And he threatened to kill at least two people in a very violent manner.

_____________________________

Viewers of a nervous disposition may be interested to know that your television is off and I am speaking to you from inside your head...

Hugh Dennis, Mock the Week

Icon created by the talented JaD

(in reply to homersimpson_esq)
Post #: 161
RE: Should Liam Stacey have gone to prison? - 1/8/2012 9:59:20 PM   
homersimpson_esq


Posts: 20120
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Springfield
quote:

ORIGINAL: Ref

And he threatened to kill at least two people in a very violent manner.


As opposed to threatening to kill people in a soft and cuddly manner...?


_____________________________

That deep-browed Homer ruled as his demesne.


Bristol Bad Film Club
A place where movie fans can come and behold some of the most awful films ever put to celluloid.

(in reply to Ref)
Post #: 162
RE: Should Liam Stacey have gone to prison? - 1/8/2012 10:07:22 PM   
steffols


Posts: 7689
Joined: 3/10/2005
From: Jungleland

quote:

ORIGINAL: homersimpson_esq

quote:

ORIGINAL: adambatman82


quote:

ORIGINAL: Saltire

Twitter just doesn't appeal to me because of idiots like these who can't string a sentence together at the best of times so come away spouting vile profanities, racist remarks and nasty comments as in the Daley incident.


That's not how twitter works. You only see tweets from people whose accounts you follow.


And if people mention you, you can see those too. Which is how Daley saw the tweets from Riley. Obviously you just block the account but that doesn't change that Daley saw the tweets before he could block the account...



I don't think just blocking the person is the answer. If we block them, then yes we can't see them but this kid was spouting vile for a while before he targeted Daley, why wasn't he brought to Twitters attention sooner? And if he had, why wasn't anything done? If this kid walked the streets spouting this sort of crap, he wouldn't last five minutes.

Telling people to block the person is basically letting them win. Trolling has been quite a hot issue this year and it needs to begin to be taken more seriously. Arseholes like this need to learn that just because they have the protection of a computer, doesn't mean they are invincible and can say whatever they like.


_____________________________

It's midnight in Manhattan, this is no time to get cute, it's a mad dog's promenade,
So walk tall, or baby don't walk at all.

(in reply to homersimpson_esq)
Post #: 163
RE: Should Liam Stacey have gone to prison? - 1/8/2012 10:19:24 PM   
homersimpson_esq


Posts: 20120
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Springfield
Someone on Twitter was saying, quite rightly, this isn't trolling - this is bullying. It's aimed, by name, at one individual. I forget the good point this person made, Paulie was RTing it, so he might be able to tell us...

_____________________________

That deep-browed Homer ruled as his demesne.


Bristol Bad Film Club
A place where movie fans can come and behold some of the most awful films ever put to celluloid.

(in reply to steffols)
Post #: 164
RE: Should Liam Stacey have gone to prison? - 1/8/2012 11:05:22 PM   
Rebenectomy


Posts: 5629
Joined: 20/1/2008
From: 10-0-11-0-0 by 0-2
Yeah, the misunderstanding of what constitutes Trolling (basically being a wind up merchant and spouting rubbish in order to get a reaction) lies mainly with the media who heard the term, didn't quite understand it, and applied it to any online harassment and bullying.

_____________________________

Body Hair Beautiful: An Armpits for August Special
http://www.lipstogetherandblow.com/2013/07/body-beautiful.html

(in reply to homersimpson_esq)
Post #: 165
RE: Should Liam Stacey have gone to prison? - 1/8/2012 11:10:46 PM   
steffols


Posts: 7689
Joined: 3/10/2005
From: Jungleland
I think it works as a good all round word for this sort of thing? It's a bit different from bullying but sort of lies in the same sort of area as harassment. Taking Riley as an example, his main concern was getting a reaction from Tom Daley, clearly by the amount of @replies he wrote to him in a short space of time.

< Message edited by steffols -- 1/8/2012 11:15:12 PM >


_____________________________

It's midnight in Manhattan, this is no time to get cute, it's a mad dog's promenade,
So walk tall, or baby don't walk at all.

(in reply to Rebenectomy)
Post #: 166
RE: Should Liam Stacey have gone to prison? - 1/8/2012 11:26:46 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54675
Joined: 1/10/2005
I'd say one person tweeting crap at another person is harrassment - the first one - rather than bullying. Bullying, I think, needs to be more widespread or involve some kind of relationship. A few people crowding out the feed would be a group of bullies. But a single person on Twitter - not in real life - posting crap? Harassment - which is pretty much trolling. Or is that getting a bit pointlessly technical?

I just think bullying involves power of some kind - either as a group or physical or something.


_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to steffols)
Post #: 167
RE: Should Liam Stacey have gone to prison? - 1/8/2012 11:45:52 PM   
paul_ie86


Posts: 11422
Joined: 4/1/2007
From: Chelsea Hotel #2

quote:

ORIGINAL: homersimpson_esq

Someone on Twitter was saying, quite rightly, this isn't trolling - this is bullying. It's aimed, by name, at one individual. I forget the good point this person made, Paulie was RTing it, so he might be able to tell us...


https://twitter.com/tkingdoll/status/230329877507760128
https://twitter.com/tkingdoll/status/230330085679452160

_____________________________

My Group Project's facebook page. Please like

(in reply to homersimpson_esq)
Post #: 168
RE: Should Liam Stacey have gone to prison? - 1/8/2012 11:54:07 PM   
Hood_Man


Posts: 12192
Joined: 30/9/2005
"Troll" is becoming a blanket term isn't it? If someone calls this guy is a troll we still know what they mean by it, especially when he's done everything for attention.

My gut feeling is that we shouldn't police the internet to the extent that saying rude things becomes a punishable offence, but I guess when it comes to this example when someone says things of such ferocity (death threats etc), or things that would get them in a lot of trouble if said out in the open, then they should be punished in some way.

I don't see why that would lead to millions of convictions though, I'd assume that just like in the real world these things need to be witnessed and/or reported for action to be taken? *sends up DPP signal*

(in reply to steffols)
Post #: 169
RE: Should Liam Stacey have gone to prison? - 3/8/2012 2:31:08 AM   
Dpp1978


Posts: 1168
Joined: 2/4/2006

quote:

ORIGINAL: Hood_Man

"Troll" is becoming a blanket term isn't it? If someone calls this guy is a troll we still know what they mean by it, especially when he's done everything for attention.

My gut feeling is that we shouldn't police the internet to the extent that saying rude things becomes a punishable offence, but I guess when it comes to this example when someone says things of such ferocity (death threats etc), or things that would get them in a lot of trouble if said out in the open, then they should be punished in some way.

I don't see why that would lead to millions of convictions though, I'd assume that just like in the real world these things need to be witnessed and/or reported for action to be taken? *sends up DPP signal*


To be honest I think obsessing over what to call it is pointless. The only term which has any legal teeth is harassment, and where it occurs there is more than one Act which can bite.

Before I go any further there is something I feel should be addressed. Internet trolling is a colloquial term which, as far as I can gather, refers to any number of anti-social acts carried out, predominantly if not exclusively, on the internet. They may or may not amount to harassment depending on the degree to which they cause harm. It can be relatively harmless, such as posting nonsense to invoke a reaction; something akin to a small child acting up to get attention from the grown ups: or it can cause real hurt such as in the cases above which are, by any reasonable standard, so spiteful and ignorant that it is right that the criminal law has been brought to bear. It is a term so wide and relatively undefined that its use probably hinders the debate more than advances it.

Bullying is likely to amount to harassment of one kind or another.

Under the Public Order Act, causing "harassment, alarm or distress" by words or actions ,whether by intent or otherwise, in a public place is a criminal offence. From the Liam Stacey case we can surmise that for the purposes of this act any public or semi public: internet fora; blogging site; social networking site etc. is considered a public place.

There is a separate offence under the Protection from Harassment Act. It states that any person who undertakes a course of action which amounts to harassment of another, and the person undertaking it knows or ought to have known his actions would amount to harassment, commits an offence. A course of conduct merely means more than one instance of harassing behaviour directed towards the same subject.

This was primarily aimed at combating stalkers, but has been more widely applied. It applies whether the behaviour is conducted face to face or from a distance, so is certainly applicable to online harassment.

I don't have a problem with these cases being treated harshly if and when they are brought to the attention of the Police. The law has been slow in keeping pace with the social advances that the internet had brought.

People are using the internet to forge very real friendships without ever meeting. People are building meaningful communities based solely on internet communications. The sad fact of human nature is that wherever people congregate, physically or virtually (I apologise for the tired cliché), there is always at least one who wants to spoil it for everyone else. When this behaviour goes too far in the real world the law is there to provide relief.

Why should things be treated less seriously when they go wrong over the internet?

As long it is only cases where there has been real wrongdoing that are pursued: as opposed to silly jokes being prosecuted on spuriously constructed charges under only vaguely applicable laws (such as the Chambers case where common sense prevailed albeit belatedly), I see little reason for concern.

(in reply to Hood_Man)
Post #: 170
RE: Should Liam Stacey have gone to prison? - 4/8/2012 12:26:55 PM   
ChickMagnet

 

Posts: 1765
Joined: 19/5/2008
From: Salford
I don't think the kid who got warned for his tweets to Tom Daley has learnt. He's back on twitter with the same account, already claimed he's going to knock Tom Daley out.

(in reply to Dpp1978)
Post #: 171
RE: Should Liam Stacey have gone to prison? - 4/8/2012 12:42:27 PM   
sanchia


Posts: 18338
Joined: 3/1/2006
From: Norwich
I do get the impression he is a hammer rather than a chisel.

_____________________________

Nothing to see here.



(in reply to ChickMagnet)
Post #: 172
RE: Should Liam Stacey have gone to prison? - 4/8/2012 1:25:34 PM   
homersimpson_esq


Posts: 20120
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Springfield
quote:

ORIGINAL: sanchia

I do get the impression he is a hammer rather than a chisel.


Either way, he's a tool.


_____________________________

That deep-browed Homer ruled as his demesne.


Bristol Bad Film Club
A place where movie fans can come and behold some of the most awful films ever put to celluloid.

(in reply to sanchia)
Post #: 173
RE: Should Liam Stacey have gone to prison? - 4/8/2012 1:29:38 PM   
sanchia


Posts: 18338
Joined: 3/1/2006
From: Norwich
Definitely not the sharpest though.

_____________________________

Nothing to see here.



(in reply to homersimpson_esq)
Post #: 174
RE: Should Liam Stacey have gone to prison? - 4/8/2012 11:59:38 PM   
Saltire


Posts: 1974
Joined: 5/7/2011
From: Dundee

quote:

ORIGINAL: adambatman82


quote:

ORIGINAL: Saltire

Twitter just doesn't appeal to me because of idiots like these who can't string a sentence together at the best of times so come away spouting vile profanities, racist remarks and nasty comments as in the Daley incident.


That's not how twitter works. You only see tweets from people whose accounts you follow.


Fair enough, I didn't know that, but it seems to me even if your semi-famous, your on a hiding to nothing on it, it just seems to bring out the worst in people from what I've heard.

(in reply to adambatman82)
Post #: 175
RE: Should Liam Stacey have gone to prison? - 5/8/2012 12:34:23 AM   
homersimpson_esq


Posts: 20120
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Springfield
quote:

ORIGINAL: Saltire


quote:

ORIGINAL: adambatman82


quote:

ORIGINAL: Saltire

Twitter just doesn't appeal to me because of idiots like these who can't string a sentence together at the best of times so come away spouting vile profanities, racist remarks and nasty comments as in the Daley incident.


That's not how twitter works. You only see tweets from people whose accounts you follow.


Fair enough, I didn't know that, but it seems to me even if your semi-famous, your on a hiding to nothing on it, it just seems to bring out the worst in people from what I've heard.


Twitter also brings out the best in people.

There are many examples of when Twitter has been used to spread the word of charities, raise thousands in a way that was impossible without it.

It's a great viral tool.


_____________________________

That deep-browed Homer ruled as his demesne.


Bristol Bad Film Club
A place where movie fans can come and behold some of the most awful films ever put to celluloid.

(in reply to Saltire)
Post #: 176
RE: Should Liam Stacey have gone to prison? - 5/8/2012 12:36:05 AM   
Hood_Man


Posts: 12192
Joined: 30/9/2005
Twitter is a fantastic People's News Network. I remember the night of the London riots, information on what parts of London to avoid and what was going on was appearing on there, sometimes half an hour or longer before the news channels got hold of it.

(in reply to homersimpson_esq)
Post #: 177
Page:   <<   < prev  2 3 4 5 [6]
All Forums >> [On Another Note...] >> News and Hot Topics >> RE: Should Liam Stacey have gone to prison? Page: <<   < prev  2 3 4 5 [6]
Jump to:





New Messages No New Messages
Hot Topic w/ New Messages Hot Topic w/o New Messages
Locked w/ New Messages Locked w/o New Messages
 Post New Thread
 Reply to Message
 Post New Poll
 Submit Vote
 Delete My Own Post
 Delete My Own Thread
 Rate Posts


 
Movie News  |  Empire Blog  |  Movie Reviews  |  Future Films  |  Features  |  Video Interviews  |  Image Gallery  |  Competitions  |  Forum  |  Magazine  |  Resources
 
Forum Software © ASPPlayground.NET Advanced Edition 2.4.5 ANSI

0.140