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RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films

 
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RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 14/4/2012 11:44:03 AM   
garvielloken


Posts: 1189
Joined: 23/10/2011

quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson


quote:

ORIGINAL: garvielloken


Christmas Carol is easily the best Muppet film. Although I've no idea what the difference between dvd and vhs is. What am I missing?


Kermit snaps and bitch-slaps Michael Caine.





_____________________________

Exactly six miles north of Skagg Mountain in the Valley of Pain, there lives an evil devilmonster. His name is Bingo Gas Station Motel Cheeseburger With A Side Of Aircraft Noise And You'll Be Gary Indiana.

Razzle them, dazzle them. Razzle dazzle them.



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Post #: 181
RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 14/4/2012 11:46:25 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
How much better would the film have been if at one point Caine turned to Dr. Bunsen and said "You know, I'd almost forgotten what your eyes looked like. Still the same. Pissholes in the snow."

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Post #: 182
RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 14/4/2012 11:57:43 AM   
MovieAddict247


Posts: 3751
Joined: 5/6/2009
Muppets Christmas Carol is one of the greatest films ever - fab fab fab choice.


quote:

ORIGINAL: Gimli The Dwarf

But the big question is do people watch it horribly mutilated on DVD or via good ol VHS?



I have the VHS (it's on it's last legs, but I'd never get rid of it) - but I have always fastforwarded the Love is Gone or whatever that drip of a song is anyway.



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Post #: 183
RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 14/4/2012 12:00:19 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
quote:

ORIGINAL: MovieAddict247


I have the VHS (it's on it's last legs, but I'd never get rid of it) - but I have always fastforwarded the Love is Gone or whatever that drip of a song is anyway.



Yeah, fairly awful song, and it drags the film to a crawl.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tfI_N0vyxaI

Actually, probably unfair of me to say it drags the film to a crawl. I haven't seen it except on dvd in years. Certainly manages to bore the hell out of me in the clips though.

< Message edited by rawlinson -- 14/4/2012 12:05:13 PM >

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Post #: 184
RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 14/4/2012 12:05:40 PM   
garvielloken


Posts: 1189
Joined: 23/10/2011
Still not as bad as Caine dancing.



_____________________________

Exactly six miles north of Skagg Mountain in the Valley of Pain, there lives an evil devilmonster. His name is Bingo Gas Station Motel Cheeseburger With A Side Of Aircraft Noise And You'll Be Gary Indiana.

Razzle them, dazzle them. Razzle dazzle them.



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Post #: 185
RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 14/4/2012 12:15:18 PM   
chambanzi


Posts: 441
Joined: 31/8/2010

quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

How much better would the film have been if at one point Caine turned to Dr. Bunsen and said "You know, I'd almost forgotten what your eyes looked like. Still the same. Pissholes in the snow."


Hahaha!


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Post #: 186
RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 14/4/2012 12:17:57 PM   
chambanzi


Posts: 441
Joined: 31/8/2010
73. Die Hard (1988)

Director: John McTiernan



If there existed a competition to determine the most quoted film of all time Die Hard would be it (with Home Alone 1 and 2 as a close second.)
John McTiernan and John McClane is a Mcking awesome combination and Die Hard is a Mctastic film (I’ll stop doing that now.)

Die Hard is pure masculinity, a woman wants a divorce from her husband and how can he prove he is worthy? By single-handedly killing a building full of baddies and cracking out jests such as “No fucking shit lady does it sound like I’m ordering a pizza?”
Hans Gruber and his gang of menacing villains all look like one ethnically balanced group of cool as fuck badasses and its fun watching them get shot to pieces one by one. Outside the building we also follow the Los Angeles police and the media as they try to gain control of the situation, my favourite ‘outside’ character is Dwayne T. Robinson who is an absolute bell end in need of a breath mint.

Alan Rickman is amazing as Hans Gruber, both humorous and terrifying. Bruce Willis is on top form as the bastard we all love and seeing the two come face to face is the payoff we receive. I haven’t been a fan of any of the other Die Hard films; I think this one just worked because so much happened in a small amount of space. You can watch this film as an action, as a comedy or criticise it as anti-feminist. Whatever you are after you will find, there is a lot to talk about and I would have preferred to just list my favourite quotes than review the film. Yipee Ki Yay Motherfucker is the one everybody remembers and it shadows some of the other excellent quotes. I always enjoyed seeing McLane looking worse for wear in a stuffy ventilation shaft repeating his wife’s invite “Come to the coast, we’ll get together, have a few laughs.”

While the film is set during the Christmas Holiday’s and is surprisingly festive the Muppets is still my favourite Christmas flick as I don’t find this image a good representation of what a good Christmas film should involve.




< Message edited by chambanzi -- 14/4/2012 10:45:42 PM >

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Post #: 187
RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 14/4/2012 12:20:50 PM   
garvielloken


Posts: 1189
Joined: 23/10/2011
Great choice. Best Christmas film ever.

_____________________________

Exactly six miles north of Skagg Mountain in the Valley of Pain, there lives an evil devilmonster. His name is Bingo Gas Station Motel Cheeseburger With A Side Of Aircraft Noise And You'll Be Gary Indiana.

Razzle them, dazzle them. Razzle dazzle them.



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Post #: 188
RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 14/4/2012 12:21:08 PM   
MovieAddict247


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Joined: 5/6/2009
Great, great film - one of the finest action films ever made. Good review too.

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Post #: 189
RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 15/4/2012 1:27:49 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 78128
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo

quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

quote:

ORIGINAL: MovieAddict247


I have the VHS (it's on it's last legs, but I'd never get rid of it) - but I have always fastforwarded the Love is Gone or whatever that drip of a song is anyway.



Yeah, fairly awful song, and it drags the film to a crawl.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tfI_N0vyxaI

Actually, probably unfair of me to say it drags the film to a crawl. I haven't seen it except on dvd in years. Certainly manages to bore the hell out of me in the clips though.


It's essential though! And it makes no sense that Rizzo just bursts into tears now.


Die Hard's ace, but not as good a Christmas Film as Muppets




_____________________________

So, sir, we let him have it right up! And I have to report, sir, he did not like it, sir.

Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

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Post #: 190
RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 15/4/2012 5:20:38 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
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From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
I need to watch it again.

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Post #: 191
RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 15/4/2012 3:06:45 PM   
chambanzi


Posts: 441
Joined: 31/8/2010
72. For A Few Dollars More (1965)

Director: Sergio Leone



Spaghetti Western was meant to be a derogatory term yet the sub-genre produced some of the best films within the genre, thus upon reflection the coined term is one of affection. Sergio Leone was the pioneer of the Spaghetti Western largely for his ‘Dollars Trilogy.’ For A Few Dollars More is generally overlooked within this set of films and that is a real shame because it has aged the best of the three. The cinematography is a visual feast; a faint blue-sky backdrop layered with distant hills, dark orange sand, white buildings, dry green plants, dull gravestones and pistol toting men in hats.
Lee Van Cleef has never been better in a role that steals the show but what sets this Western apart is an appearance by Klaus Kinski as the Hunchback. Eastwood, Van Cleef and Kinski starring in the same scene is the film equivalent to seeing The Travelling Wilburys perform on stage.

The story involves two bounty hunters who join forces to track down El Indio and his gang of vagabonds. El Indio spends half the film high as a kite and is psychologically disturbed. He carries the infamous musical pocket watch, when the music stops the shootout begins. The watch contains a picture of a woman who had committed suicide while being raped by the brutal Indio. Therefore he and his gang are worthy adversaries for the duo of bounty hunters, I dislike films with awesome protagonists placed against weak antagonists who are underdeveloped characteristically. A strong villain is a requirement when you see what Manco (Eastwood) and Colonel Douglas Mortimer are capable of. They are men who assert their authority wherever they head whether it is Manco staring his target in the eyes while ruining their card game or it is Mortimer striking a match on the back of Klaus Kinski’s crazed hunchback (the intensity and hatred in Kinski’s face during that scene is insane.)
Point being this is a world where men can smell out fear and once detected they will shoot you dead. Manco and Mortimer are men who never show fear, they both put themselves into the most compromising of situations where any second you expect them to get gunned down but their enemies are unable to kill out of a mixture of respect and dread. On a side note Mortimer wears the black hat, usually reserved for the villain but in the case of this film donned by its anti-hero.

Ennio Morricone’s score is as always, noble and divine aiding the story to mythic status. Words cannot describe the man’s talent and when such a score is combined with shady mercenaries ripping off ‘WANTED’ posters and smoking on their pipes you know this is the coolest film you will ever watch.


< Message edited by chambanzi -- 15/4/2012 3:09:59 PM >

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RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 15/4/2012 4:10:48 PM   
chambanzi


Posts: 441
Joined: 31/8/2010
71. Psycho (1960)

Director: Alfred Hitchcock



Spoilers

Alfred Hitchcock broke the conventions of film in 1960 when he directed Psycho. Viewers were accustomed to the idea of safe space on-screen and when protagonist Marion Crane was killed off halfway through the film in a place as intimate and personal as the shower the audience, who had become so absorbed in her story involving the stolen money, were left speechless. The moral dilemma of the stolen money became irrelevant and the only character left for them to follow was the mysterious Norman Bates. Still reeling from the shock of this complete change in pace, the audience would watch Bates clean up the mess and dispose of the car constantly alert and frightened of that old lady in that iconic and terrifying house. What is worse the audience watched in trepidation no longer trusting Hitchcock after he broke the barriers of safe space so unceremoniously leaving them in the hands of the untrustworthy Bates.

This is one of those rare films that left a mark on not only the way people would watch films but also the way in which they would be directed. Hitchcock was the master of suspense and the sixties was the best time to unleash a cross-dressing villain upon the cinema- goers. Allegedly this was the film that stopped my Grandfather taking my Grandmother to the cinema after she rose from her seat, clapped her hands to her face and let out an old fashioned scream. She was not alone. Of course a modern day audience is de-sensitised to this stuff but boy does the film still pack a punch. Its weird but the scene that scares me the most is when Marion buys the new car and spots the cop standing on the opposite side of the street staring at her. The irony is that had he arrested her she would have been fine. Yet each time I watch the film I root for her to escape even if the Bates Motel is the final location. That is how much Hitchcock could get into a viewer’s psyche; Marion’s guilt and paranoia that everyone is watching her can be felt, she did something wrong by stealing the money. There is also a subconscious feeling that the protagonist was murdered because she broke the rules by committing an indecent act. She was promiscuous and sexual wearing just a bra whilst in bed with her lover at the beginning of the movie and she stole as a means of securing her future with this man. This is not the way a leading lady should act so she was stabbed to death.

Norman Bates is a Mummy’s boy; he cares for his Mother and knows she would not approve of this rebellious girl. She steals, she has sex and she runs from the police. This is why she must die for she is a sexual manipulator. It is with this wavelength of thinking that makes it interesting Norman chooses to kill her when she showers as he sees her body naked. He must kill off the temptation or betray his broken hearted, deceased Mother. So he becomes the Mother but the absurdity is he wants to love Marion and there lies the duality of his character.
Preserving the Mother’s corpse just like his stuffed animals is Norman’s most creepy obsession and these character traits were apparently based on the murderer Ed Gein. These insane people have always existed but Hollywood was not ready to address these issues head on at this point in time, everything had to be cloaked in ambiguity. Hitchcock went full on with this film and that is why people are still talking about it.


< Message edited by chambanzi -- 15/4/2012 7:28:47 PM >

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RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 15/4/2012 4:18:37 PM   
matty_b


Posts: 14582
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From: Outpost 31 calling McMurtle.
Two excellent choices there.

The couple before that are pretty darn good as well.

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RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 15/4/2012 8:50:54 PM   
MovieAddict247


Posts: 3751
Joined: 5/6/2009

quote:

ORIGINAL: chambanzi

Ennio Morricone’s score is as always, noble and divine aiding the story to mythic status. Words cannot describe the man’s talent and when such a score is combined with shady mercenaries ripping off ‘WANTED’ posters and smoking on their pipes you know this is the coolest film you will ever watch.



Completely agree - Morricone is a genius, and you're right, its the music that really makes Leone's Westerns that extra bit special. Mythic is a good word for it.

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RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 22/4/2012 3:07:23 PM   
chambanzi


Posts: 441
Joined: 31/8/2010
70. Rumble Fish (1983)

Director: Francis Ford Coppola



If you asked a modern audience to conjure an image of Mickey Rourke they would think of a broken down, beast of a man with only the faintest trace of sensitivity and beauty. Yet in Rumble Fish Mickey is a completely different actor to films such as ‘The Wrestler.’ Rourke plays the role of the Motorcycle Kid, an old gang leader who has returned to California. Here Rourke is handsome, charming and softly spoken while still maintaining the presence of a tough bastard but in an understated way.

Matt Dillon plays his younger brother, the current gang leader Rusty James. The Motorcycle Kid is something of a legend amongst the current gang, one of those founding members who everyone wants to emulate despite only knowing him by reputation and not as a friend.
Of course when the Motorcycle Kid returns he is not an advocate of violence confusing Rusty further (think 'American History X'.)
Matt Dillon performs his role very realistically, the mixed up kid who has spent his life trying to be tough like his brother only to have his brother return and have the nerve to discourage his behaviour.
Despite differences in physical appearance Rourke and Dillon are believable as brothers and the most touching scene shares the two having a heart to heart when the Motorcycle Kid tells Rusty the story of why he does not like to be left alone.

The film is shot entirely in black and white except for the fish that fascinate the Motorcycle Kid. The fish are of course a metaphor for the contained lives of teenagers unable to break from their environment. The camera shots in this film are effective in regards to the insight they provide into how the characters are feeling or the dynamics between them (whether they are distant, close etc.) One particular scene where this can be acknowledged is when the two brothers meet their alcoholic father (Dennis Hopper) who breaks into sentimentality in a very abstract way (which is pretty much how I would describe the film.)
Rumble Fish is a film for those concerned with characters as opposed to a fully developed storyline and is certainly not one of the film titles to pop up in the majority of movie-watchers heads when they hear the name ‘Francis Ford Coppola.’

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Post #: 196
RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 22/4/2012 3:10:26 PM   
MovieAddict247


Posts: 3751
Joined: 5/6/2009
Nice to see Rumble Fish on here. Rourke was once so good looking. Matt Dillon wasn't bad either.

quote:

ORIGINAL: chambanzi

[One particular scene where this can be acknowledged is when the two brothers meet their alcoholic father (Dennis Hopper) who breaks into sentimentality in a very abstract way (which is pretty much how I would describe the film.)



Nice bit of review. It's a really hypnotic film.

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RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 22/4/2012 3:15:59 PM   
chambanzi


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Joined: 31/8/2010
Hypnotic is definitely the word I was searching for when doing that write up. Rourke's character feels like someone out of a dream capable of turning violent but mainly staying in a gentle state.
I love Dillon and Hopper in this film too and it is funny seeing a young Nicolas Cage but he is Coppola's nephew so not too surprising.

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Post #: 198
RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 25/4/2012 9:21:52 PM   
chambanzi


Posts: 441
Joined: 31/8/2010
69. Laputa: Castle in the Sky (1986)

Director: Hayao Miyazaki



Miyazaki is a master at creating worlds and the city of Laputa is as fine an example as any. The abandoned yet beautifully vegetated city is the desired destination of Pazu, a humble miner boy whose father had taken a picture of the fabled floating city. When he catches Sheeta falling from the sky the two embark on a quest to find Laputa involving being chased across a railway bridge by pirates in one of the most thrilling animated sequences I can recall.
The key to finding Laputa is the pendant Sheeta owns and this is what the villain Muska is after. The one advantage of watching the English dub is Mark Hamill as the voice of Muska. Hamill is not only Luke Skywalker but also one of animation’s finest voice actors, as anyone who watches animated Batman will tell you.

What sets Laputa apart from other Miyazaki films is the presence of an actual villain. Muska is Ghibli’s badass, lacking in the ambiguity of the common Ghibli antagonist. Laputa is similar to Mononoke in that it is an eco-fable, Miyazaki strongly pushes environmental themes but not enough to intoxicate the viewer or turn the film into an awareness campaign. This is a very complete film that will live on as a classic tale where a lot of similar live action films will fail. I enjoy Star Wars as much as the next man but look back on it and it has dated faster than a loaf of bread. Laputa still looks exceptional and always will. The medium of animation has allowed sequences to be filmed that would have been impossible at the time and that only CGI today could achieve (and we all know Laputa’s animation looks better than any CGI don’t we.)

This is certainly not one of Miyazaki’s more famous efforts; I like to compare the film to the actual location of Laputa, a hidden jewel buried in the resume of Miyazaki. To those who haven’t seen the film it comes with a highly recommended seal from me regardless of your position on animation. In fact this is one of the films that really spurred my interest in the subject.

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RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 25/4/2012 9:46:50 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
I love Rumble Fish. I wish FFC had gone on to adapt all the Hinton novels. And Laputa is incredible.

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Post #: 200
RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 25/4/2012 9:53:20 PM   
chambanzi


Posts: 441
Joined: 31/8/2010
What did you think of The Outsiders?

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RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 25/4/2012 9:58:16 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
I like it, but it does lose something in comparison to Rumble Fish, probably because it doesn't have as strong a visual style. I wish he'd done That Was Then... This Is Now, Tex and Taming The Star Runner as well. I know they have been adapted, but I'd have liked them to exist as part of the same universe as the Coppola adaptations.

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Post #: 202
RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 4/5/2012 11:46:14 PM   
chambanzi


Posts: 441
Joined: 31/8/2010
68. 3:10 to Yuma (2007)

Director: James Mangold



3:10 to Yuma is an excellent Western brimming with powerhouse performances. Russell Crowe is quite obviously excellent as the villainous Ben Wade who at times has the anti-hero presence of an iconic figure such as Robin Hood yet at other times is dangerous and menacing. Christian Bale shines in an understated performance as ranchman Dan Evans and his on screen chemistry with his son (portrayed by Logan Lerman) is both believable and gripping. The son character is actually likeable too, not like many films where they turn him into a spoilt brat who you can’t side with (Terminator 2 anyone?)
Ben Wade supports this excellent cast as the memorable, psychotic Charlie Pace who is not without any admirable traits; his loyalty to Wade is almost endearing. He reminds me very much of Vincent Cassel’s character in Eastern Promises, a repressed homosexual who is both frightening yet with the ability to garner sympathy.

Many film fans claimed this was not a unique Western and was simply a remake. If you hadn’t guessed by now I am a fan of the Western genre and I consider this to be one of the best. It has fantastic character development, amazing characters, excellent costume design and setting, a suspenseful storyline and most importantly is a film I could easily watch again and again. Literally what more could one desire from a Western?
In fact 3:10 to Yuma scores where a lot of older Western’s would fail, for one the issues tackled are not out-dated nor are there themes of a prejudiced nature. Seeing this film was such a breath of fresh air for me and it really helped to revitalise the Western. There seems to be a wide range of criticism involving the ending, audiences often fixate on issues like that way too frequently. Not only is the ending fine as it is but the whole film is one hell of a cinematic experience and one hell of a ride whether it is a chase upon horseback or scenes of tense negotiation.

Not only is this a great Western and a film about fatherhood and masculinity but it is also a great example of a ‘battle of wits’ and it is impossible to tell what tricks the characters have hidden up their sleeves. Here is a film that made me really appreciate Bale. Here he is not an American psycho or a skinny, creepy insomniac but an average-Joe with integrity who, despite many failings, acts for all the right reasons. And he is just as good without the intense method acting.
And only Crowe could have a villain who draws pictures of birds yet remains badass.

< Message edited by chambanzi -- 4/5/2012 11:50:42 PM >

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RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 5/5/2012 6:09:29 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 78128
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo
Not a film that often makes such lists but a great choice. I love it.

_____________________________

So, sir, we let him have it right up! And I have to report, sir, he did not like it, sir.

Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

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RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 5/5/2012 9:21:46 PM   
ElephantBoy

 

Posts: 8788
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Great to see Rumble Fish get some priase on such a list, it is an overlooked gem and one of FFC finest.

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Post #: 205
RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 6/5/2012 12:36:28 AM   
chambanzi


Posts: 441
Joined: 31/8/2010
67. Yojimbo (1961)

Director: Akira Kurosawa



The samurai film that inspired ‘Fistful of Dollars’ and possibly Kurosawa’s most accessible film. It was the first film I saw by him and not only did it blow ‘Fistful of Dollars’ out of the water but it raised the bar on my expectations of what an action film should deliver. Every slash of the sword is met with a harsh, flesh-cutting sound effect, far reserved from the choreographic fight sequences audiences were accustomed to. Toshiro Mifune is the deadly Sanjuro who would give ‘The Man With No Name’ a run for his money. The very best of Kurosawa’s regulars star in this film including a menacing performance from ‘Harakiri’s’ Tatsuya Nakadai as a gun-wielding thug, his weapon a ‘fuck you’ gesture to the traditional sword of Sanjuro.

A widescreen frame captures the scope of a town controlled by two gangs (one either side) and Sanjuro walks about meddling in their affairs and ultimately making his own plan. Yojimbo is very much a dark comedy, certainly the wittiest Kurosawa film as far as I’m concerned but lets not forget the term ‘dark’ if one is to consider such imagery as a dog with a hand in its mouth.

Similar to 'Die Hard', a lot of Yojimbo’s thrills come from the fact that the action happens in a very closed yet efficiently organised space. The town itself looks beautiful and Yojimbo is a key example of how stylish black and white films are. Tones and colour contrasts help to make every frame look like a drawing.
All of this and more make Yojimbo an enjoyable film to revisit time and time, it is the Asian Western.
On a side note Kurosawa stated that ‘The Glass Key’ was a major inspiration for Yojimbo, if anyone has not seen that particular film noir I highly recommend it and Alan Ladd plays the same sort of tough son of a bitch role as Mifune.


< Message edited by chambanzi -- 6/5/2012 12:39:15 AM >

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RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 6/5/2012 1:19:54 AM   
chambanzi


Posts: 441
Joined: 31/8/2010
66. A Man Escaped (1956)

Director: Robert Bresson



The Nazi’s imprison a member of the French resistance and you can tell me what happens next because you have read the title of this film. He escapes. This film is about seeing how he escapes. Simplicity is the key of the title and the film does not overly challenge you, what you see is a man acting in desperation. A Man Escaped does not acknowledge that it is a movie; the audience are like a fly on the wall watching this man formulate his plan. This is not a film aiming for the cinematic grandiosity of ‘The Shawshank Redemption.’
The actor’s are not famous and there is no grand soundtrack. Sound effects such as footsteps, cell doors and outside noises are used to establish a sense of place. Tension is unbearable despite the giveaway title. The prison is an unsafe place but it is also mundane. Prison life is ultimately boring and not the complete riot fest many Hollywood films would have you believe.

Andre Devigny is a man of faith, he has the hope to escape jail but rather than wallow in self- pity and wait for something to happen he must work. Fortunately he is a practical man, good with his hands and therefore able to manipulate the few items he has within his reach in order to boost his chances of escape. Often we watch on the edge of our seat terrified a guard will walk in on him as he works away. We don’t know much about Andre and we don’t learn much, all we need to know is that he is a fighter and solely for this reason we side with him. Andre does not speak much but he is very observant and uses his wits and initiative and that is enough information to tell us that he is intelligent.

Robert Bresson inspired many directors and it is not hard to see why. His direction seems as effortlessly effective as Andre’s escape plan. If you enjoy prison movies you must see this one. After watching this film you will possess a feeling close to the intellectual exhaustion of having read a book instead of having sat there hearing a script being read out. This is a film that involves you to the point of feeling like you are the one escaping, yet at the same time the film completely distances itself from its audience as if it is an old documentary intent on following the raw facts.



< Message edited by chambanzi -- 27/5/2012 1:19:50 AM >

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Post #: 207
RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 7/5/2012 11:34:04 AM   
chambanzi


Posts: 441
Joined: 31/8/2010
65. Fargo (1996)

Directors: Joel and Ethan Coen



An excellent ransom film by the Coen’s complete with their trademark circumstantial coincidences, larger than life characters and black comedy. William H Macy shines as Jerry Lundegaard who hires two criminals to kidnap his wife in order to gain money from her wealthy father. However all goes tits up and every character, situation and location is swirled together in a typical Coen mix up. This film reflects America, a place where money talks and seedy men can be hired. Even the title Fargo is a freezing cold location in North Dakota.

This is perhaps one of the most beautiful films to be set in a snowy location. There is something very cinematic about seeing red blood dripping over pure, white snow and many of the locations take place in typical horror movie settings.
Everybody who has seen this film remembers the infamous wood chipper scene that seems like an event fresh out of folktale. It is the Coen’s ability to merge these insane happenings with the mundane. For example the final scene sees Marge (Frances McDormand) discuss with her husband how his photo has been selected to be on a postcard. After a day dealing with murder this is not a normal conversation and as is the case in every Coen film the characters remind me of residents of Springfield.

Steve Buscemi and Peter Stormare are two of the most memorable film villains, I can’t help liking Buscemi no matter what he is in and Stormare has a strange magnetism where you want to see more of him. Like the majority of films on this list Fargo’s strength is that you can watch it repeatedly. I get irritated when you watch a film once and are wowed but you know you can no longer return to it because you have been emotionally invested in the plot but aside from that there is nothing to return to. Fargo has so much to revisit, whether it is witty jokes you may have missed or background details. It is boldly original and a luxury to watch.

(in reply to chambanzi)
Post #: 208
RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 7/5/2012 11:49:29 AM   
matty_b


Posts: 14582
Joined: 19/10/2005
From: Outpost 31 calling McMurtle.
I love Fargo.

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Post #: 209
RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 7/5/2012 2:17:00 PM   
MovieAddict247


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Joined: 5/6/2009
I've only seen Fargo once, but really enjoyed it. The story about the woman who died allegedly trying to find the money is interesting too.

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