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RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films

 
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RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 29/3/2012 12:34:45 PM   
chambanzi


Posts: 441
Joined: 31/8/2010
81. Toy Story (1995)

Director: John Lasseter



As a child I prided myself on my toys and their condition. Some got worn with time but that was through hours of playing with them. In my neighbourhood there was a nasty kid who used to break toys whether they were his own or someone else’s. Snapping their legs off and flushing them down the toilet were favourites of his. This kid had top of the range toys but for him it didn’t matter, they were there to be broken. Sid is a perfect caricature of this kid who makes for a terrifying villain. Andy is the average kid who loves all his toys, Woody the cowboy for sentimental value as his original favourite and Buzz as the hip, trendy new addition.
Toy Story 3 would plunge into Andy eventually letting go of his toys yet leaving them in the safety of a fellow toy enthusiast but the first Toy Story was largely about the different ways in which kids treat their toys depending on their character. Friendship was also a major theme, Woody’s jealousy of Buzz coming to usurp his position but their eventual friendship when faced with adversity being the driving force.

Buzz is arrogant, top of the range and does not believe he is a toy, his way of flying is simply ‘falling with style’ and it is not until he is roughed around a bit that he starts some serious self-reflection. Woody is the veteran toy, he has seen others come and go but has not seen anything as advanced as the space ranger whose multiple functions make his drawstring look like a piece of scrap.
A whole cast of colourful characters would accompany the duo in their later adventures but in this first film it is Woody and Buzz who solely go through the torment of Sid’s house. The other toys stay safely at home for this adventure, the clumsy dinosaur Rex, the sardonic Mr Potato Head, the sarcastic Hamm the pig and the generous Slinky dog. Andy’s room is a safe space; these characters live in harmony. Sid’s room is the dystopia; the toys there are all dark and mangled. Baby’s doll heads are put on top of metal spider legs and other toys are melted or limbless. However these toys are equally as helpful and kind once Woody and Buzz learn to not judge a book by its cover (a lesson that also helps them accept each other.)

Pretty much every toy imaginable makes an appearance; green army men, etch a sketch, a microphone and tape recorder toy, a radio controlled car, a piggy bank and a pair of binoculars. The toys use each other’s functions to form a unit e.g. the army men danger the downstairs in order to use the microphone to report on Andy’s birthday presents to the other toys upstairs.
A lot of thought went into this film but it was also technically innovative. It was the first film filmed entirely in CGI and it still looks good to this day. They improved the look of it in the third film but it still holds up regardless.
The voice talent is also impeccable with Tom Hanks providing much character to Woody and Tim Allen in a career-redeeming role as Buzz Lightyear. Don Rickles, John Ratzenberger, Jim Varney and Wallace Shawn also provide exceptional voice talent.
Despite children being the target audience this is also one for the adults to enjoy who can appreciate the wit of the many gags. There is also a dark touch that is prevalent in all the very best of films for children as Toy Story is about finding and using the good to overcome the unavoidable negative situations life throws at us.

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Post #: 151
RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 29/3/2012 3:08:32 PM   
chambanzi


Posts: 441
Joined: 31/8/2010
Here is the list so far which is available on my first post.
So far we have gone from Hong Kong police, rats with a passion for food, martial arts with Bruce Lee kicking some ass in 'Fist of Fury' to Tom Joad's search of the American Dream, James Woods' Videodrome hallucinations and the adventures of Woody and Buzz Lightyear. And the list is only going to get better

81. Toy Story (1995, John Lasseter)
82. The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962, John Ford)
83. All Quiet on the Western Front (1930, Lewis Milestone)
84. Burn After Reading (2008, Joel & Ethan Coen)
85. Videodrome (1983, David Cronenberg)
86. Winchester '73 (1950, Anthony Mann)
87. Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988, Robert Zemeckis)
88. The Grapes of Wrath (1940, John Ford)
89. Ace in the Hole (1951, Billy Wilder)
90. Ran (1985, Akira Kurosawa)

91. In Bruges (2008, Martin McDonagh)
92. Fist of Fury (1972, Lo Wei)
93. The African Queen (1951, John Huston)
94. Ratatouille (2007, Brad Bird, Jan Pinkava)
95. Being There (1979, Hal Ashby)
96. Nights Of Cabiria (1957, Federico Fellini)
97. Princess Mononoke (1997, Hayao Miyazaki)
98. The Browning Version (1951, Anthony Asquith)
99. The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976, Clint Eastwood)
100. Infernal Affairs (2002, Wai- keung Lau, Alan Mak)

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Post #: 152
RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 29/3/2012 8:58:01 PM   
MovieAddict247


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Toy Story is pretty damn good.

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RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 30/3/2012 1:57:40 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


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Toy Story

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Post #: 154
RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 2/4/2012 11:06:16 AM   
chambanzi


Posts: 441
Joined: 31/8/2010
80. Paris, Texas (1984)

Director: Wim Wenders



A lone man walks aimlessly through the desert with nothing but a dusty, red cap, a suit and a container of water.
Robby Muller’s exceptional cinematography captures this scene perfectly; the desert looks like it could have been taken straight out of ‘The Searchers.’
The striking visual imagery stays consistent throughout the entire film, if a film were to be merited solely on cinematography this film would be near the top of my list. Fortunately the film also holds up which is why it earns this position.

The lone man is revealed to be Travis (Harry Dean Stanton) and his brother Walt (Dean Stockwell) successfully manages to take him to his house in L.A after several escape attempts from Travis.
Travis is like a mute but occasionally slips into conversation. Through Walt’s attempts to learn about his brother the audience gains crucial information. Travis has a son who Walt and his wife are surrogate parents to. Feeling the urge to instill a sense of reality back into Travis, Walt shows a video in which Travis is seen happily laughing and joking with a beautiful woman. In the video Travis seems normal and not the distant, lonesome and strange man we have been introduced to.
This was his wife Jane and it is evident things did not work out well between the two of them.

Without warning Travis heads back to Texas (in search of his wife) taking his son evidently causing much despair to his brother. The movie becomes a road trip film between a dysfunctional father and son in which they bond along the way. Any road trip movie will reach an emotional climax and boy do viewers get that with Paris, Texas. This is a film about forgiveness, redemption and learning from past mistakes. Not a self-righteous, finger- pointing film, this is one with humanity. The beautiful settings (heightened by the cinematography) reflect the potential in Travis and Jane's relationship but the sparse, desert landscape mirrors lost souls and the broken dreams found in all of the great Western films.

Paris, Texas is perhaps one of the more unusual films on my list; difficult to discuss as there is a lot of ambiguity in the plot. It is more of a visual experience and does not seem to have restrictions or limitations regarding the plot i.e. Walt is set up as the potential protagonist yet is insignificant in the latter part of the film.
Harry Dean Stanton and Dean Stockwell are on top form and Nastassja Kinski (who plays Travis’ estranged wife) is excellent and obviously has inherited something of her Father’s on-screen presence.
Watch this one if you are in that unique mood for something completely different.



< Message edited by chambanzi -- 2/4/2012 11:40:27 AM >

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Post #: 155
RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 2/4/2012 9:29:18 PM   
chambanzi


Posts: 441
Joined: 31/8/2010
79. 12 Angry Men (1957)

Director: Sidney Lumet



There have been some amazing courtroom dramas whether made for television or the big screen. 12 Angry Men stands out though as it concerns the jury. One boy is accused of the murder of his father, it seems unanimous that he is guilty yet one man (Juror 8) opts for the seemingly incorrect choice, he is reluctant to send a potentially innocent man to death without at least discussing the facts. Some of the other Juror’s seem content in just believing what they see and don’t stop to think that they hold the fate of a (potentially innocent) man’s life.

The juror’s are not given names, their names and lives don’t matter. They simply need to make a decision. It does not take long for Juror 8 to convince the majority to analyse the case logically. Juror 8 is a lateral thinker guiding the others through each bit of evidence at a time.
Of course there are stubborn members of the jury who use their own prejudices and personal experiences to influence the decision of the case.

All of the tension comes within conversation and the only shifting around or change of scenery is the men standing up or walking to the other side of the room. There is no use for suspension of disbelief, the plot is very realistic and made to make the audience think as opposed to shocking them with a twist as seen in other courtroom drama’s such as ‘Witness for the Prosecution.’
The acting is superb and Henry Fonda plays the righteous juror with a lot of conviction, he may just be a number 8 but he influenced a life or death decision.
To find a man guilty you have to be certain beyond all reasonable doubt, things are not always as they seem in the real world therefore they should not be treated as such in the courtroom.

Ultimately the innocence of the boy is irrelevant, what is relevant is the power of reasoning, analysing a situation with no bias attached, faith in humanity and not wanting to speed up life without questioning things just to avoid missing something as mundane as a baseball game.

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Post #: 156
RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 2/4/2012 11:12:56 PM   
garvielloken


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Joined: 23/10/2011
Some really excellent picks in those last three Cham, especially Toy Story and 12 Angry Men. Great list so far.


quote:

ORIGINAL: chambanzi

84. Burn After Reading (2008, Joel & Ethan Coen)
90. Ran (1985, Akira Kurosawa)



These, on the other hand are the musings of a madman.

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RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 3/4/2012 8:47:05 AM   
MovieAddict247


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12 Angry Men - very, very, very good.


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RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 3/4/2012 9:12:56 AM   
matty_b


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Yeah, big fan of 12 Angry Men.

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RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 3/4/2012 11:37:04 AM   
chambanzi


Posts: 441
Joined: 31/8/2010
78. Before the Rain (1994)

Director: Milcho Manchevski



Before the Rain portrays the war in the Balkans, the conflict between the Macedonian’s Slavic and the Albanian’s as well as the Orthodox Christian’s and Muslim’s. Milcho Manchevski is himself a Macedonian and in his directorial debut he explores the circularity of this violence where one side would rather kill their own family than live in peace with the other. To correspond with this idea the plot itself is circular beginning where it ends (and vice versa.) A circle is unbreakable just like ancient blood feuds and circles crop up throughout the entire film to reinforce this. The film is divided into three parts; Words, Pictures and Faces. Words and Faces take place in a beautifully shot Macedonia whereas Pictures is set in London (where violence is also prevalent.) London was an interesting choice for the second part, this was used to hit home for a Western audience. Suddenly the conflict isn’t something you might catch a snippet of on television but something that leaks into your backyard and might affect you personally.

‘Words’ tells the story of a monk bound by an oath of silence that protects and harbours a runaway Albanian girl accused of the murder of a Christian.
‘Pictures’ depicts the love story between photojournalist Aleksandar (Rade Serbedzija a.k.a Boris the Blade) and his lover (Katrin Cartlidge) whereas ‘Faces’ deals with Aleksandar’s return to Macedonia.

Watching this film is a reminder of how modernised the West is and how far ahead we are. The Albanian’s in this film live much more primitively and the advancement of technology means nothing to them, they are still concerned with feuds that should be put to rest.
‘Before the Rain’ is a fitting name for the film, it is like the saying ‘Calm before the storm’ and we watch not for a happy ending but in anticipating of this storm erupting.The film offers no comfort or solution for the audience, it simply puts forward the facts in an elliptical timeline with a haze of images to stay with the audience such as beautiful Macedonian landscapes, a man viciously shooting a cat, fruit being picked, writing on a wall and a tortoise burning in a ring of fire.


< Message edited by chambanzi -- 3/4/2012 11:38:16 AM >

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RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 3/4/2012 11:48:26 AM   
chambanzi


Posts: 441
Joined: 31/8/2010
Glad to see some appreciation for 12 Angry Men. And yeah Burn After Reading seems like my most unpopular choice so far I can't help but love the film though.

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Post #: 161
RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 6/4/2012 12:40:19 AM   
chambanzi


Posts: 441
Joined: 31/8/2010
77. Eastern Promises (2007)

Director: David Cronenberg



Eastern Promises is a different breed of film to the sci-fi horrors Cronenberg was directing in the seventies, eighties and nineties. Naomi Watts plays Anne Khitorva, a midwife who finds a diary written in Russian on patient Tatiana who dies from a miscarriage. A non-diegetic voiceover from Tatiana allocates the film its structure via juxtaposing her account of London with the present time and ordeals of the characters. Tatiana’s diary leads Anne to the restaurant of Russian mafia boss Semyon (Armin Mueller Stahl.)
Watts is fantastic as always and Stahl is a frightening villain with those penetrating blue eyes. However Viggo Mortensen and Vincent Cassel steal the show as Semyon’s driver Nikolai and Semyon’s son Kirill.

Kirill is the shame of his father; he isn’t particularly tough or smart and harbours a secret desire for Nikolai. A key scene shows Kirill aggressively manipulating Nikolai into having sex in front of him to see if he is a ‘faggot,’ as he watches Nikolai get the job done we see an expression of disappointment on his face when it is confirmed his friend is heterosexual.
Cassel’s performance in this film is one of the finest I have ever seen and a major reason for my love of this film, I rate Cassell as one of the best actors working today believing he brings a real magnetism to his roles. The on screen chemistry between Mortensen and Cassell is off the chart, especially the way they act when Semyon is around with Nikolai playing the role of mediator.

A major character in the film is the city itself. Cronenberg portrays London in a way many foreign directors have failed to, realistically. The use of diegetic sound is exceptional, the hustle and bustle of London, the sound of transport, the snippets of conversation. Yet ultimately this is a side of London rarely shown, an Eastern European section rich in men who have their own code. Many people may obliviously walk past their area of business, which is fine provided they are minding their own.
When people make trouble they get their throat slit as seen in the visceral opening sequence. Once dead they get their teeth and fingertips cut off/out so they cannot be identified.
Of course it is impossible to mention violence and Eastern Promises without mentioning the infamous scene in the Turkish bath. A scene that Roger Ebert said would be studied in the future as an example of how to shoot a fight sequence. Despite receiving critical acclaim this film has been subject to some criticism that appears to be chiefly concerned around the twist ending. I am personally indifferent to the ending and tend not to get so bothered around plot, especially with a film such as this where an intangible yet strong emotional connection resonates with me.

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RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 6/4/2012 12:45:09 AM   
chambanzi


Posts: 441
Joined: 31/8/2010
If anyone flicking back through the list notices the pictures are completely different that is because I don't want my reviews to look out of date (until I've finished the list of course) and the darned pictures keep expiring. The trials and tribulations of being a computer novice

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RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 6/4/2012 9:33:51 AM   
matty_b


Posts: 14550
Joined: 19/10/2005
From: Outpost 31 calling McMurtle.
Eastern Promises is very good.

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RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 7/4/2012 11:48:46 PM   
chambanzi


Posts: 441
Joined: 31/8/2010
76. Some Like it Hot (1959)

Director: Billy Wilder



It is a regular occurrence to see ‘Some Like it Hot’ frequent the numerous lists compiled to determine the 'Best Comedy film of all time.' What makes the film so successful is the age- old joke of having men dressed as women combined with a mob story and a love angle involving the gorgeous Marilyn Monroe. Of course cross-dressing was a massive taboo during the fifties so this was a rare breed of comedy yet the film tackled these issues perfectly due to its light-hearted nature.
Tony Curtis and Jack Lemmon are on top form (particularly the latter) in a film that adds another feather in the cap of the fantastic Billy Wilder. This film is entirely different from the previously reviewed ‘Ace in the Hole’ showing the versatility of the director.

‘Some Like it Hot’ tells the story of Joe and Jerry who witness an infamous Prohibition shootout. Hunted by the mob the two disguise as women using their musical skills to join an all girl’s band. Ironically the two fall for the voluptuous ‘Sugar’ Kane but must resist their urges as they are dressed as women. Imagine being trapped on a train packed with attractive females and having to act as one of their own, sheer torture for even the most self-restrained of men.

Curtis is Joe a.k.a Josephine; he is the charmer and ladies man who schemes to seduce ‘Sugar’ Kane (Monroe) by mimicking Cary Grant. Jack Lemmon’s character Jerry a.k.a Daphne pulls the short straw and manages to seduce a seasoned, older man called Osgood.
Curtis and Lemmon show some great chemistry and their witty dialogue will keep the laughs coming. Without being clichéd this film is truly timeless as a modern audience can appreciate the majority of the jokes. The best recipe for a comedy is to feature loveable characters and that is where the film’s main strength comes from, as a viewer we are on the edge of our seat hoping the duo are not caught or found out by the girl’s or worse, the mob.

Of course it is the infamous final line that catapults this film into comedy stardom but the build up is one wacky ride.


< Message edited by chambanzi -- 7/4/2012 11:55:43 PM >

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RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 8/4/2012 8:15:37 AM   
MovieAddict247


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I always forget just how wonderfully funny Some Like it Hot is until I watch it again. Great film - every performance is spot on.

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RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 10/4/2012 12:58:08 AM   
chambanzi


Posts: 441
Joined: 31/8/2010
75. Annie Hall (1977)

Director: Woody Allen



A lot of people despise Woody Allen and it is not hard to see why. I view him as too self-aware to despise. He is the pretentious snob who mocks pretentious snobs. He is the Jew who plays up on the stereotypes. I would define his mentality as that of an ‘angry young man.’
Allen’s 'Manhattan' is a film very similar to this one albeit its strength derived from being a ‘city’ film in which Manhattan itself is the chief character. Annie Hall’s strength can be attributed to not only being technically sound but highly explorative.

Woody Allen is Alvy Singer, a comedian who meets the free-spirited Annie Hall and falls in love. Alvy seduces Annie with his intellect, conversation and confidence and it is precisely these faults he loathes in others possibly due to a deep-rooted insecurity such as the idea that if he won Annie in a certain way then similar men could do the same. Jealousy and paranoia are major themes but it is never clear whether the two are in love or just use each other to understand themselves.

Those who have seen the films of Bergman will see where Allen’s influences derive from due to the existentialist themes. Allen is a man obsessed with opposites, and apparently so is Alvy; life and death, love and sex, religion and atheism, Jews and Jew-haters. This love for opposites may very well exclaim his hypocritical character. To be theoretical, Alvy could make an argument against Annie using drugs but if it was for the purpose of a shared experience together he might cave in. Point being Alvy is a guy who likes to natter on and on which is his gift and his curse. He is a man who attracts and repels, agrees and disagrees and sometimes it is hard to keep track of which fence he sits on. The same could be said of the technical merits of the film, we have a simple narrative then the fourth wall is smashed apart (actively involving the viewer in the process.) We see the greys of New York then the bright cinematography of California. The present, the past and the imagined all merge into such a complex box of ideas that the very fact the film is named (so simply) after the female protagonist could be suggestive of nothing more than the idea that relationships are a mind-fuck.


< Message edited by chambanzi -- 10/4/2012 9:49:22 AM >

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RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 10/4/2012 10:18:48 AM   
matty_b


Posts: 14550
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Two more great films there, though neither is the director's best.

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RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 10/4/2012 11:17:31 AM   
MovieAddict247


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Annie Hall is great. It used to be my favourite Allen.

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RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 14/4/2012 10:45:36 AM   
chambanzi


Posts: 441
Joined: 31/8/2010
74. The Muppet Christmas Carol (1992)

Director: Brian Henson



Every good list needs a Christmas movie and ‘The Muppet Christmas Carol’ is my favourite. When I think Ebenezer Scrooge I think of Michael Caine walking down the snow covered streets of Victorian London accompanied by the Muppets singing ‘Oh there goes Mr Humbug, there goes Mr Grim.”
The Muppets are perfectly utilised to add comedy to the Dickens classic without sacrificing any of the tale’s emotion. Gonzo and Rizzo are the perfect narrating team and Kermit, as Bob Cratchit is an amazing masterstroke. The performance is as good as any actor’s, Kermit embodies the role to such a degree you forget he is simply a talking green frog.
Like all Muppet films there is a lot going on in the background or things you might not notice first time, one particular scene sees Beaker flip Scrooge the bird. That’s right when Cockney hard-man Caine leaves the room the ginger muppet defies him with a swift middle finger proving to the world that Beaker is the most badass muppet.

Caine’s performance as Scrooge is what sets this adaptation apart from other Muppet films. He doesn’t interact with the Muppets in order to gain a cheap laugh; instead he treats the story as seriously as any of the previous Scrooge’s. The dark touch prevalent in the Dickens novel is present here, neutralised somewhat by the Muppets but it is there.
This is a well- spirited film for children and adults alike where dark but necessary themes are touched upon yet disguised in all the colourful chaos.


< Message edited by chambanzi -- 27/5/2012 1:20:56 AM >

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RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 14/4/2012 10:47:22 AM   
matty_b


Posts: 14550
Joined: 19/10/2005
From: Outpost 31 calling McMurtle.
Gimli in 5, 4, 3...

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RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 14/4/2012 10:56:23 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 77555
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo
Awesome film!

_____________________________

So, sir, we let him have it right up! And I have to report, sir, he did not like it, sir.

Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

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Post #: 172
RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 14/4/2012 11:07:13 AM   
impqueen


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It ain’t just for Chrimbo either. I watched it in June last year, it was awesome.

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RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 14/4/2012 11:11:54 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


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But the big question is do people watch it horribly mutilated on DVD or via good ol VHS?


_____________________________

So, sir, we let him have it right up! And I have to report, sir, he did not like it, sir.

Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

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Post #: 174
RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 14/4/2012 11:19:21 AM   
impqueen


Posts: 7474
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I have both (I still have Hovis like memories of running down to the local shop to purchased it for my early Birthday) but my VHS player doesn't work. It's a pretty awful edit and I liked the song...

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Post #: 175
RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 14/4/2012 11:24:04 AM   
chambanzi


Posts: 441
Joined: 31/8/2010
VHS

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Post #: 176
RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 14/4/2012 11:38:28 AM   
garvielloken


Posts: 1186
Joined: 23/10/2011
Eastern Promises and Some Like it Hot are both brilliant.

Christmas Carol is easily the best Muppet film. Although I've no idea what the difference between dvd and vhs is. What am I missing?

_____________________________

Exactly six miles north of Skagg Mountain in the Valley of Pain, there lives an evil devilmonster. His name is Bingo Gas Station Motel Cheeseburger With A Side Of Aircraft Noise And You'll Be Gary Indiana.

Razzle them, dazzle them. Razzle dazzle them.



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Post #: 177
RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 14/4/2012 11:40:32 AM   
rawlinson

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: garvielloken


Christmas Carol is easily the best Muppet film. Although I've no idea what the difference between dvd and vhs is. What am I missing?


Kermit snaps and bitch-slaps Michael Caine.

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Post #: 178
RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 14/4/2012 11:40:43 AM   
chambanzi


Posts: 441
Joined: 31/8/2010
I'm not sure I just watch the VHS one I got given years ago.

(in reply to garvielloken)
Post #: 179
RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films - 14/4/2012 11:41:53 AM   
chambanzi


Posts: 441
Joined: 31/8/2010
quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson


quote:

ORIGINAL: garvielloken


Christmas Carol is easily the best Muppet film. Although I've no idea what the difference between dvd and vhs is. What am I missing?


Kermit snaps and bitch-slaps Michael Caine.



Harry Brown 2: Green Feet Elite

< Message edited by chambanzi -- 14/4/2012 11:42:08 AM >

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 180
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