Register  |   Log In  |  
Sign up to our weekly newsletter    
Follow us on   
Search   
Forum Home Register for Free! Log In Moderator Tickets FAQ Users Online

RE: A ABSOLUTE MASTERPIECE!

 
Logged in as: Guest
  Printable Version
All Forums >> [Film Forums] >> Film Reviews >> RE: A ABSOLUTE MASTERPIECE! Page: <<   < prev  1 [2] 3   next >   >>
Login
Message << Older Topic   Newer Topic >>
RE: A ABSOLUTE MASTERPIECE! - 20/1/2012 5:06:54 PM   
Wild about Wilder


Posts: 1662
Joined: 9/4/2010
From: Hertfordshire
FUCKING SCOUSERS!

(in reply to Qwerty Norris)
Post #: 31
RE: A ABSOLUTE MASTERPIECE! - 23/1/2012 9:38:43 AM   
Timon


Posts: 14588
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Bristol
A wonderful film and I was genuinely amused when, at the beginning, our cinema's screen shrunk in order to fit the aspect ratio.

Also, I'm sure it was because of the 1920s setting and there were scenes with Jean Dujardin tap dancing, but does anyone else think he looks very much like Gene Kelly? No, just me then...

_____________________________

"I put no stock in religion. By the word 'religion', I have seen the lunacy of fanatics of every denomination be called 'The Will of God'. Holiness is in right action and courage on behalf of those who cannot defend themselves."

Twitter: @timonsingh

(in reply to Wild about Wilder)
Post #: 32
RE: A ABSOLUTE MASTERPIECE! - 23/1/2012 9:53:01 AM   
Wild about Wilder


Posts: 1662
Joined: 9/4/2010
From: Hertfordshire
Thought the music really helped to make what is a very good film into a superb film along with the locations you just felt you were watching 1920's LA/Hollywood from the very first minute.
Exellent 4/5

(in reply to Timon)
Post #: 33
RE: A ABSOLUTE MASTERPIECE! - 23/1/2012 10:10:04 AM   
Timon


Posts: 14588
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Bristol
One thing that did pull me out of it was that the last 15 minutes just used the score from Vertigo.

Was that intentional, because that was all I could focus on for a while...

_____________________________

"I put no stock in religion. By the word 'religion', I have seen the lunacy of fanatics of every denomination be called 'The Will of God'. Holiness is in right action and courage on behalf of those who cannot defend themselves."

Twitter: @timonsingh

(in reply to Wild about Wilder)
Post #: 34
RE: A ABSOLUTE MASTERPIECE! - 23/1/2012 10:32:12 AM   
Gretzky


Posts: 307
Joined: 20/12/2005
quote:

ORIGINAL: Timon

A wonderful film and I was genuinely amused when, at the beginning, our cinema's screen shrunk in order to fit the aspect ratio.

Also, I'm sure it was because of the 1920s setting and there were scenes with Jean Dujardin tap dancing, but does anyone else think he looks very much like Gene Kelly? No, just me then...


Not just you. That was my exact thinking as soon as I saw him on screen - and helped me warm to him instantly.

As for your Vertigo question, I'm not sure if the director has yet mentioned his intention with using that music? Even following the controversy from Kim Novak's comments about it?


_____________________________

~ Formerly Ash_Boomstick
Female Film Fan




(in reply to Timon)
Post #: 35
RE: A ABSOLUTE MASTERPIECE! - 23/1/2012 10:42:08 AM   
adambatman82

 

Posts: 11156
Joined: 15/12/2005

quote:

ORIGINAL: Gretzky

quote:

ORIGINAL: Timon

A wonderful film and I was genuinely amused when, at the beginning, our cinema's screen shrunk in order to fit the aspect ratio.

Also, I'm sure it was because of the 1920s setting and there were scenes with Jean Dujardin tap dancing, but does anyone else think he looks very much like Gene Kelly? No, just me then...


Not just you. That was my exact thinking as soon as I saw him on screen - and helped me warm to him instantly.

As for your Vertigo question, I'm not sure if the director has yet mentioned his intention with using that music? Even following the controversy from Kim Novak's comments about it?



The Vertigo thing seems to be a combination of things. When I first saw the film I immediately assumed it was a case of temp-track perfection, and had never been intentional as far as the original vision went. Alas, when the Kim Novak Rape nonsense broke Hazanavicius did actually seem to be suggesting in his statement in response that the use of the music was designed as an homage to the Hitchcock film, and as a nod to the shared themes between that moment in The Artist and the third act of Vertigo.

Either way, I really liked the use of the music. It didn't take me out of the picture any further than any other section of the film, which, lets be honest, was hardly ground in reality anyway.

(in reply to Gretzky)
Post #: 36
RE: A ABSOLUTE MASTERPIECE! - 23/1/2012 10:42:17 AM   
Timon


Posts: 14588
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Bristol
Kim Novak?

*cue quick Google.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-16482624

"Emotionally disturbed" by the use of music eh? "A rape"?! Wowzer.

Very interesting.



_____________________________

"I put no stock in religion. By the word 'religion', I have seen the lunacy of fanatics of every denomination be called 'The Will of God'. Holiness is in right action and courage on behalf of those who cannot defend themselves."

Twitter: @timonsingh

(in reply to Gretzky)
Post #: 37
RE: A ABSOLUTE MASTERPIECE! - 23/1/2012 11:30:46 AM   
adambatman82

 

Posts: 11156
Joined: 15/12/2005

quote:

ORIGINAL: Timon
Also, I'm sure it was because of the 1920s setting and there were scenes with Jean Dujardin tap dancing, but does anyone else think he looks very much like Gene Kelly? No, just me then...


Douglas Fairbanks was my reference point, simply because he reacted to the coming of sound in a similar manner, and wore the same type of 'tache!

(in reply to Timon)
Post #: 38
RE: A ABSOLUTE MASTERPIECE! - 23/1/2012 11:37:44 AM   
Timon


Posts: 14588
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Bristol

quote:

ORIGINAL: adambatman82


quote:

ORIGINAL: Timon
Also, I'm sure it was because of the 1920s setting and there were scenes with Jean Dujardin tap dancing, but does anyone else think he looks very much like Gene Kelly? No, just me then...


Douglas Fairbanks was my reference point, simply because he reacted to the coming of sound in a similar manner, and wore the same type of 'tache!


And they used footage from the Mark of Zorro....


_____________________________

"I put no stock in religion. By the word 'religion', I have seen the lunacy of fanatics of every denomination be called 'The Will of God'. Holiness is in right action and courage on behalf of those who cannot defend themselves."

Twitter: @timonsingh

(in reply to adambatman82)
Post #: 39
A SIMPLE STORY....... - 23/1/2012 6:43:21 PM   
ROTGUT

 

Posts: 379
Joined: 14/7/2008
....often told. This resonated with me - not because it's a silent film - but because it's pure cinema. Just visual images and music - and yet the plot was still affecting. A man trying to conquer his own demons. And what style! I wish we could have seen more of George Valentin's Austin Powers/Adam Adamant styled adventurer glimpsed briefly in the opening minutes - and the damn dog should get an oscar for every minute you see him.
If all arthouse films were like this - you wouldn't hear any complaints from me. And I want to see a Peppy Miller movie!!!!
No doubt Hollywood will still give all the awards to the Clooney
wankfest come March - April time. This one should win if there's any justice. Four Stars!!!!

(in reply to Empire Admin)
Post #: 40
RE: A SIMPLE STORY....... - 26/1/2012 5:46:59 PM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 3998
Joined: 19/10/2005
Basically A Star Is Born meets Singing In The Rain, when you come down tp it, but turned into a wonderful tribute to silent movies, full of wonderful moments that are designed for maximum emotional impact, including some that nearly brought me to tears, so that after a while you don't miss the absence of dialogue.  Like Hugo, it's love of pure cinema is over every frame, though it falls a little short of that masterpiece, and there is though one dreadful sequence that almost ruins it, where Ludovic Bource's fantastic score is replaced by the 'scene d'amour' music from Vertigo, the music just not fitting at all. Overall though, a delight.
8.5/10


_____________________________

check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

(in reply to ROTGUT)
Post #: 41
RE: A SIMPLE STORY....... - 29/1/2012 8:24:30 PM   
film man aidy

 

Posts: 336
Joined: 8/3/2007
Loved it. A film definately deserving of the hype. And one to absolutely see at the cinema, if you can still find a showing. I did guess the content of the final scene during the third act, but when a film is this good - who cares?!
****1/2

Last films seen
The French Connection ****
French Connection 2  ***1/2
The Artist ****1/2
Cell 211 ***1/2

(in reply to Dr Lenera)
Post #: 42
A Beautifully Told Experiment In Film - 30/1/2012 4:09:08 PM   
blaud


Posts: 721
Joined: 13/12/2007
One of the most superbly charming films I have had the pleasure of seeing, The Artist is a wonderfully realized and expertly made slice of cinematic nostalgia. By throes tear jerking and brilliantly funny, the performances are perfect and the cinematography (many fail to appreciate that shooting for silent format is completely different to making a modern film) is classy and well-composed. The acting is suitably filled with mime and facial expressions, and lovable characters create a truly memorable tale of Hollywood blues. Ignore everything nay-sayers whine about; 'it's black and white', 'it's silent', 'we shouldn't be watching this in 2012...' etc. and just go enjoy it for what it is: an experiment that has worked immensely well.

(in reply to Empire Admin)
Post #: 43
- 30/1/2012 5:56:01 PM   
4legsgood

 

Posts: 2
Joined: 30/1/2012
I feel the point of this film has been missed. The film is basically about the transfer of power in the last century from Europe to the USA and how America subsequently executed that power. I'd contend that the gestation of it was the Iraq war. Bear with me. The film starts with George Valentin appearing in 2 movies - The Russian Affair and The German Affair. Two countries involved in the key momentous political events of the last century - the Russian revolution and World Wars I and II. The use of the device of a silent movie may well partly be a homage to Hollywood but its main point is to emphasise the determination of modern day USA to silence any voices with which it disagrees. This is the reason we suddenly hear George speak at the end, thereby revealing his nationality and also revealing the reason why he was prevented from becoming a star in the talking movies. It is a metaphor for the USA's bizarrely infantile dismissal of the French point of view on the Iraq war and its reaction to any voices of dissent from America’s. It is emphasised further by such scenes as when Napoleon demands a chair and an onset film hand sarcastically informs him that he’s not Napoleon he’s an extra – a clear reference to the passing of power from Europe to the USA. The film is not anti-American as such but anti the way America has allowed itself to be governed at the start of the new century. It is saying that there used to be good voices in America but they have been drowned out by the shrill voices of the Bushes, Cheyneys and the rest. This is detailed in Peppy’s behaviour to George. On her way up the stairs whilst George is on his way down, she gives him her number and is generally warm to him and consequently looks after him throughout the rest of the film. Similarly George is rescued from the burning house by an American policeman – possibly an acknowledgement to the USA’s role in World War II. The final clincher is that yes, George

(in reply to Empire Admin)
Post #: 44
Charming and Funny For Twenty Minutes... - 2/2/2012 5:23:04 AM   
Mr. Anderson

 

Posts: 10
Joined: 2/2/2012
The opening twenty minutes and the last ten minutes were entertaining and charming, but for me it ran out of steam in between and eventually found the music repetitive and boring. The acting's fantastic but it's a simple story that's been told a thousand times before, here it's just in black & white and without words. Don't understand the oscar buzz that's surrounding this and The Descendants? Oh, well, cant' win everybody round I suppose. Genuinely believe that War Horse & The Help are better movies. Just an opinion though.

(in reply to Empire Admin)
Post #: 45
RE: The Artist - 2/2/2012 1:32:56 PM   
m_er


Posts: 3966
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Istanpool
10/10 The Artist: exceptional homage to the silent era, it’s extraordinary, it’s amazing. It’s a thoroughly engaging and unique (these days) cinematic experience. It’s a mesmerizing masterpiece

_____________________________

WHOA. I don't believe what I'm hearing. Check out the BALLS on this kid. Hey Spider, this is for you.

My movies
http://www.imdb.com/mymovies/list?l=4044070

(in reply to Empire Admin)
Post #: 46
RE: - 9/2/2012 2:12:24 PM   
narmour

 

Posts: 40
Joined: 11/3/2011
quote:

ORIGINAL: 4legsgood

I feel the point of this film has been missed. The film is basically about the transfer of power in the last century from Europe to the USA and how America subsequently executed that power. I'd contend that the gestation of it was the Iraq war. Bear with me. The film starts with George Valentin appearing in 2 movies - The Russian Affair and The German Affair. Two countries involved in the key momentous political events of the last century - the Russian revolution and World Wars I and II. The use of the device of a silent movie may well partly be a homage to Hollywood but its main point is to emphasise the determination of modern day USA to silence any voices with which it disagrees. This is the reason we suddenly hear George speak at the end, thereby revealing his nationality and also revealing the reason why he was prevented from becoming a star in the talking movies. It is a metaphor for the USA's bizarrely infantile dismissal of the French point of view on the Iraq war and its reaction to any voices of dissent from America’s. It is emphasised further by such scenes as when Napoleon demands a chair and an onset film hand sarcastically informs him that he’s not Napoleon he’s an extra – a clear reference to the passing of power from Europe to the USA. The film is not anti-American as such but anti the way America has allowed itself to be governed at the start of the new century. It is saying that there used to be good voices in America but they have been drowned out by the shrill voices of the Bushes, Cheyneys and the rest. This is detailed in Peppy’s behaviour to George. On her way up the stairs whilst George is on his way down, she gives him her number and is generally warm to him and consequently looks after him throughout the rest of the film. Similarly George is rescued from the burning house by an American policeman – possibly an acknowledgement to the USA’s role in World War II. The final clincher is that yes, George


This is interesting but in my opinion, misguided. Fair enough if that's what you're interpreting it as but personally I think you're looking for subtleties that are just too subtle. The one point I would definitely disagree with you on is highlighted.... George's inability to shine in the era of the talkies was down to a combination of his own stubborn belief that the changes that were occurring weren't going to last, and of Hollywood's relentless attention deficit disorder which propels someone to mega stardom and then casts them aside cruelly as soon as someone younger, prettier and more interesting comes along.

The inference that he is French doesn't really hold up when you introduce the possibility that he could be French Canadian either.

(in reply to 4legsgood)
Post #: 47
RE: RE: - 9/2/2012 3:22:38 PM   
adambatman82

 

Posts: 11156
Joined: 15/12/2005

quote:

ORIGINAL: narmour

quote:

ORIGINAL: 4legsgood

I feel the point of this film has been missed. The film is basically about the transfer of power in the last century from Europe to the USA and how America subsequently executed that power. I'd contend that the gestation of it was the Iraq war. Bear with me. The film starts with George Valentin appearing in 2 movies - The Russian Affair and The German Affair. Two countries involved in the key momentous political events of the last century - the Russian revolution and World Wars I and II. The use of the device of a silent movie may well partly be a homage to Hollywood but its main point is to emphasise the determination of modern day USA to silence any voices with which it disagrees. This is the reason we suddenly hear George speak at the end, thereby revealing his nationality and also revealing the reason why he was prevented from becoming a star in the talking movies. It is a metaphor for the USA's bizarrely infantile dismissal of the French point of view on the Iraq war and its reaction to any voices of dissent from America’s. It is emphasised further by such scenes as when Napoleon demands a chair and an onset film hand sarcastically informs him that he’s not Napoleon he’s an extra – a clear reference to the passing of power from Europe to the USA. The film is not anti-American as such but anti the way America has allowed itself to be governed at the start of the new century. It is saying that there used to be good voices in America but they have been drowned out by the shrill voices of the Bushes, Cheyneys and the rest. This is detailed in Peppy’s behaviour to George. On her way up the stairs whilst George is on his way down, she gives him her number and is generally warm to him and consequently looks after him throughout the rest of the film. Similarly George is rescued from the burning house by an American policeman – possibly an acknowledgement to the USA’s role in World War II. The final clincher is that yes, George


This is interesting but in my opinion, misguided. Fair enough if that's what you're interpreting it as but personally I think you're looking for subtleties that are just too subtle. The one point I would definitely disagree with you on is highlighted.... George's inability to shine in the era of the talkies was down to a combination of his own stubborn belief that the changes that were occurring weren't going to last, and of Hollywood's relentless attention deficit disorder which propels someone to mega stardom and then casts them aside cruelly as soon as someone younger, prettier and more interesting comes along.

The inference that he is French doesn't really hold up when you introduce the possibility that he could be French Canadian either.


Not least because Jean Dujardin himself spoke out on that interpretation, insisting that that was not their intention at all.

The film closes on a George Valentin renascent, tap-dancing into the talkies with his beloved on his arm. The director asks, One more take? “With pleasure,” Valentin says, with all the relief of a star reborn. But the words come out “wiz pléjure”—no less charming for the thick French accent (au contraire) but a surprise that seems a pithy revelation, the mysterious weight on Valentin’s shoulders suddenly apparent in the unexpected pronunciation. Fans have taken the closing phrase as confessional, reason enough for Valentin’s reluctance to accept change, reading his downfall into those two words: the heavy Hollywood burden of an unshakable accent.

Not so fast. Dujardin says that wasn’t the intention at all. “We never thought of that,”


http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2012/01/15/the-artist-golden-globe-winner-jean-dujardin-on-its-surprise-ending.html

(in reply to narmour)
Post #: 48
RE: RE: - 9/2/2012 10:43:58 PM   
jrewing1000


Posts: 486
Joined: 23/11/2005
How can Empire review this without a single mention of Gene Kelly? The guy was practically impersonating him throughout the entire film!

Not a 5 star film for me, I felt that the energy / flair / innovation shown throughout the first third dropped off and the movie sagged in the middle.

Still a quality piece of work, just not the masterpiece I was expecting.

I think i'll just go and watch Singing In The Rain and get the real deal.

(in reply to adambatman82)
Post #: 49
RE: RE: - 18/2/2012 12:12:09 AM   
4legsgood

 

Posts: 2
Joined: 30/1/2012
Narmour, I appreciate your comments and especially the link. Part of my (lengthy!) missive was cut off due to space but I wanted to end by saying that the only way George was allowed back into the movies was by tap dancing. He was allowed back in when, and only when, he literally danced to America's tune. With regards to the link and Dujardin's comment, it isn't necessarily the case that a director would spell out to an actor what a film is about. They primarily want the actor to act as directed not interpret the film's meaning. I still believe that there are so many clues in this film that point to it being about post 9/11 USA and the way it closed its ears to the outside world. I mean why include a scene where an american insults Napoleon? It must be there for a reason. Also, the film was shot in black and white not only as an authentic nod to the era but as a reference to George Bush's comment "You're either with us or you're against us". In other words, the world is now black and white.

(in reply to narmour)
Post #: 50
RE: RE: - 18/2/2012 12:27:44 AM   
elab49


Posts: 54616
Joined: 1/10/2005
quote:

ORIGINAL: adambatman82

Not so fast. Dujardin says that wasn't the intention at all. "We never thought of that,”


http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2012/01/15/the-artist-golden-globe-winner-jean-dujardin-on-its-surprise-ending.html


Can he really be serious? Surrounded by so many US actors in a film set in Hollywood, about the transfer to talkies, it kind of seems the obvious interpretation. Can all the French talent behind the camera genuinely have missed that? It'd be remarkable insular if so.


_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to adambatman82)
Post #: 51
RE: RE: - 21/2/2012 10:59:56 PM   
threshold


Posts: 319
Joined: 26/10/2010
From: Sydney, Austraiia
A movie that has been the frontrunner of the Oscars for a long time is finally here. And sadly, it's not as extraordinary as it should've been.
Do not take that statement as a negative review. This movie’s enjoyable. It's just mildly overhyped.


This film has a series of delightful scenes that mostly involve dancing or a dog, but in between those scenes it’s often plodding along with a clichéd plot. Not that a clichéd plot is a bad thing, I’ve seen clichéd plot recreated to create quite brilliant movies. It’s just I’ve seen it all before, and it hasn’t been done in a new way. That’s the whole point of this movie. It’s just another movie that feels like it’s been found in some archive. I’m sure people would love the fact it’s purposely old, and that was the whole point, but I was hoping for something with a bit more substance for a lead Oscar runner.

The thing that makes this movie special is the fact it’s a silent movie that felt like it was lifted precisely from the 1920’s to be watched in the 2010’s. That’s its main attraction and main deterrent. During the movie there are lots of scenes where it feels like the movie should go at a faster pace. The wait for the subtitles to appear, some scenes laboured over what was happening for some ‘slower’ audiences, which I can see the intention, it’s just I was squirming in my seat for quite a while.


The person with the highest amount of talent showcased is the composer: Ludovic Bource, his music compensates for any amount of words. While he replays his tracks quite a bit (I swear he must’ve titled them whacky music, romantic music, fun music, dance music and sad music) the individual songs are so good. They complete the already strong tone created by the film. Every film has to have a good composer, especially one that has to be relied on for quite a bit.


This movie needs automatic respect for not having dialogue. It takes a whole lotta skill to show a story with only pantomime and music, and especially one about a man coping with the end of an era. And the two actors show complete charm, even if Jean Dujardin’s characters’ need to be loved felt a bit too realistic. Berenice Bejo is the highlight. She is the girl who slowly builds her way into Hollywood and becomes more famous than the person who inspired her to go there.

Sadly there are faults. The lack of dialogue is useful only for a few scenes (mainly to show off Bource’s considerable talent, and to make the dream sequence more effective) but then it becomes gratuitous and as much as a gimmick as 3D. No I take that back, Almost as much as a gimmick as 3D. Silence really hinders the storytelling in this movie. A normal scene goes for almost triple the amount of time it could if it did have dialogue. (Namely, the meeting of George and Peppy one the impressive stairs) I mean, it’s simply boring watching these characters have seemingly interesting conversations that we’re not a part of. And especially since the situations are relatively clichéd for a show-biz story; we’re just waiting for the subtitles to show dialogue that we can predict before it happens.


That sentence easily describes this movie. If you love old films and continually re-watch singing in the rain this movie is a must-watch. If you only know Singing in the Rain because of the parodies, perhaps you shouldn’t watch this. There are clear flaws in this movie that prevent it from being a clear classic, but it’s still a fun watch. (and admittedly, if you watched the trailer, you’ve watched the movie)


4/5

(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 52
RE: RE: - 24/2/2012 8:53:58 PM   
hampstead bandit

 

Posts: 381
Joined: 18/9/2009
saw this yesterday and thoroughly enjoyed it


*SPOILERS INCLUDED*









was puzzled when the cinema screen was reduced, following trailers, to fit the format of this "new / old" film, but did not notice after that...

did not miss the abscence of dialogue, the score was fantastic as were the visual images both creating an emotional impact, especially towards the end with his suicide bid

the dog added much humour, and the female actress playing the rising starlet was very "talented" to say the least, and somewhat easy on the eye ;)

simple story, but effective and time passed quickly.


great to see some veteran actors like John Goodman (studio boss) and James Cromwell (chaffeur) in the mix

one of the best moments for me? at the end where they do their tap dance routine, and he finally speaks...with a French accent!

was surprised to learn (in the final credits) how much post production i.e. digital composition was done on what at first glance "looks" like an old film?

4/5 from me.

< Message edited by hampstead bandit -- 24/2/2012 8:54:46 PM >

(in reply to threshold)
Post #: 53
the artist - 25/2/2012 6:47:01 PM   
andy peat

 

Posts: 7
Joined: 30/9/2005
seen it twice now.and i must say it is one of the best films i have ever seen.perfect directing acting script it is flawless.hope to see it again in the cinema and already ordered the dvd.

(in reply to Empire Admin)
Post #: 54
the artist - 25/2/2012 6:47:06 PM   
andy peat

 

Posts: 7
Joined: 30/9/2005
seen it twice now.and i must say it is one of the best films i have ever seen.perfect directing acting script it is flawless.hope to see it again in the cinema and already ordered the dvd.

(in reply to Empire Admin)
Post #: 55
RE: The Artist - 27/2/2012 1:48:14 PM   
pixelcat


Posts: 19
Joined: 20/2/2012
quote:

ORIGINAL: TrendMeUp

What a fantastic review.

The film was just gorgeous. So full of tiny moments that make your heart swell or your face light up. It really does capture the honest joys of cinema. I sincerely hope Dujardin bags himself an Oscar as he is so full of presence, grace, humility and tragedy throughout. Magnifique.



Looks like he did. Haven't seen the film myself. Waiting for a day when I need a feel good movie because it sounds like it...haha get the pun?

Anyway, even if I walk out feeling like it's been hyped to the nines, at least it's a brilliant concept. From what I have seen, the film looks very authentic. For those that have seen it, is it better to watch it at the cinema or on DVD?

(in reply to TrendMeUp)
Post #: 56
RE: The Artist - 27/2/2012 2:05:59 PM   
adambatman82

 

Posts: 11156
Joined: 15/12/2005

quote:

ORIGINAL: pixelcat

Anyway, even if I walk out feeling like it's been hyped to the nines, at least it's a brilliant concept. From what I have seen, the film looks very authentic. For those that have seen it, is it better to watch it at the cinema or on DVD?



I'd see it at the cinema.

(in reply to pixelcat)
Post #: 57
RE: The Artist - 1/3/2012 3:14:46 PM   
Jonnie_K


Posts: 18
Joined: 13/10/2011
 
great film

my lip reading skills are better than i thought. who needs words, spoken or written?


< Message edited by Jonnie_K -- 1/3/2012 3:15:24 PM >


_____________________________

PS3 CyberRipper_X *** Xbox360 JBlackdog

"if you see something move, shoot it, If it screams in german, shoot it again!" Brothers in Arms

(in reply to Empire Admin)
Post #: 58
RE: The Artist - 11/3/2012 10:38:54 AM   
Hungrymark

 

Posts: 50
Joined: 13/2/2006
I enjoyed The Artist but for me it wasn't quite the perfect film that many have written about. Dujardin and Bejo were very charming and easy on the eye and it was mostly well-performed throughout. The dog, especially, was terrific and there were some fine cameos/minor parts from the likes of Malcolm McDowell and John Goodman. Ludovic Bource's score was excellent. There were many sequences and jokes that made me smile (the hand-in-the-coat bit was a very well-played visual gag, and the tap-dancing scenes were full of flair) but I felt that the film sagged a bit in the middle. For me Dujardin doesn't quite have the charisma to pull off silent-movie acting that involves anything other than grinning in a charmingly-Gallic manner and moving his feet very quickly in time to music. There is also a fine-line between homage and cliche, with many touches in the film criss-crossing that line alarmingly, making some scenes almost entirely predictable. That said I thought it was worth the ticket and, although I wouldn't go to see it at the cinema again or buy the DVD, I would go out of my way to see it again on the telly.

(in reply to Jonnie_K)
Post #: 59
Emperor's New Clothes - 13/4/2012 10:14:42 AM   
ashy

 

Posts: 5
Joined: 28/7/2006
The dog was brilliant!!

Other than that, who cares?

(in reply to Empire Admin)
Post #: 60
Page:   <<   < prev  1 [2] 3   next >   >>
All Forums >> [Film Forums] >> Film Reviews >> RE: A ABSOLUTE MASTERPIECE! Page: <<   < prev  1 [2] 3   next >   >>
Jump to:





New Messages No New Messages
Hot Topic w/ New Messages Hot Topic w/o New Messages
Locked w/ New Messages Locked w/o New Messages
 Post New Thread
 Reply to Message
 Post New Poll
 Submit Vote
 Delete My Own Post
 Delete My Own Thread
 Rate Posts


 
Movie News  |  Empire Blog  |  Movie Reviews  |  Future Films  |  Features  |  Video Interviews  |  Image Gallery  |  Competitions  |  Forum  |  Magazine  |  Resources
 
Forum Software © ASPPlayground.NET Advanced Edition 2.4.5 ANSI

0.141