Register  |   Log In  |  
Sign up to our weekly newsletter    
Follow us on   
Search   
Forum Home Register for Free! Log In Moderator Tickets FAQ Users Online

Hugo

 
Logged in as: Guest
  Printable Version
All Forums >> [Film Forums] >> Film Reviews >> Hugo Page: [1] 2   next >   >>
Login
Message << Older Topic   Newer Topic >>
Hugo - 25/11/2011 1:07:36 PM   
Empire Admin

 

Posts: 29784
Joined: 29/6/2005
Post your comments on this article
Post #: 1
2D Version? - 25/11/2011 1:07:36 PM   
Tyler Soze

 

Posts: 9
Joined: 1/9/2008
I hope there is a 2D version released. I have no intention of taking a third of the light and colour out of this!!

(in reply to Empire Admin)
Post #: 2
RE: Hugo - 25/11/2011 1:26:34 PM   
jmebaby25

 

Posts: 272
Joined: 28/6/2006
From: Manchester
Hmmm..

The film itself doesn't interest me at all, but I am intrigued to hear how Scorsese handles the 3D. I've not seen a single 3D film (Avatar included) which has challenged my distaste for the technology.

Strangely, Newman doesn't really go into any detail as to whether the 3D we'll see here is any different from how we've seen it before.



_____________________________

I make the world wide web a little prettier.
www.hoylandwebdesign.com

(in reply to Empire Admin)
Post #: 3
RE: Hugo - 26/11/2011 6:30:05 PM   
demoncleaner


Posts: 2391
Joined: 3/10/2005
From: Belfast
Ok, cool, I sort of didn't want to see this until DVD, but sort of feel I had to...I am now pleasantly piqued, I love when that happens.  Ok, cool 

(in reply to Empire Admin)
Post #: 4
- 26/11/2011 6:55:27 PM   
cradleofcivilization

 

Posts: 9
Joined: 26/9/2010
Kim Newman 5 stars? Well, that's next Saturday evening sorted then!

(in reply to Empire Admin)
Post #: 5
RE: - 27/11/2011 9:32:19 PM   
Herr Schnitzel

 

Posts: 205
Joined: 1/2/2009
quote:

ORIGINAL: Tyler Soze

I hope there is a 2D version released. I have no intention of taking a third of the light and colour out of this!!



...and Scorsese was obviously a silly fool when he didn't realise this, while he carefully designed the entire film to work at its best in 3D.

I just came back from a preview with a Q&A with Scorsese (he looks like the old man in Pixar's Up now). I haven't been a huge fan of Scorsese's films over the last couple of decades, but I liked this a lot better than many of his other recent films. It's still too long and massively overproduced for what is a rather slight story, but it looks and sounds gorgeous, the two child actors are excellent and everything that deals with the real Georges Melies is genuinely magical for any real film buff. The thirteen year old I took with me got a little bored, but then his favourite film right now is Shogun Assassin.

I'm a bit of a 3D agnostic, but the 3D here absolutely blew me away and Scorsese uses it better than maybe even Cameron did in Avatar. Every sequence is thought through in terms of how to use perspective for maximum impact and to make the make the frame dynamic for the format. You can also clearly see that this has been shot for 3D instead of being a post-conversion job, the difference is like night and day. Anybody who turns up their nose at the 3D version is going to seriously miss out.


< Message edited by Herr Schnitzel -- 28/11/2011 12:34:10 AM >

(in reply to cradleofcivilization)
Post #: 6
- 28/11/2011 10:47:04 PM   
bobbyperu

 

Posts: 498
Joined: 21/10/2007
This is Empires first 5***** for a Scorsese film since "Casino" back in 95 - Lets hope there right -

(in reply to Empire Admin)
Post #: 7
RE: - 2/12/2011 4:29:21 PM   
tjf00

 

Posts: 20
Joined: 3/11/2007
*minor spoilers*

I love Scorsese films - he is the one director I would see whatever the reviews. He has brought both glossy and grim underworlds of crime to the screen with expert skill but his films are generally fairly brutal. In contrast, Hugo is U rated! I never thought Scorsese would make such a beautiful film. Without a hint of violence or any real menace at all (Baron-Cohen's comedy villain is given a soft side and redemptive arc) he has created one of his finest films. The 3D brings the world alive and works a treat, at least as good as Avatar, because it draws parallels with Melies' own pioneering method. The film transports you back to a time when cinema was about magic and marvel and makes the audience wish they could have experienced those first images. The story is surprisingly simple and human, with no need for conspiracy theories or twists. The performances were excellent, particularly from Butterfield and Kingsley. If anything, Moretz is the weaker casting link, seeming a little too old (probably thanks to her other roles) to portray such childish excitement. The set design is particularly beautiful and, despite the mostly English cast, evokes Paris wonderfully (the little romantic subplot is wonderfully reminiscent of Amelie). A great film - probably most suited to children over around 8 who are beginning to discover the magic of cinema for themselves, and of course their parents. I hope that the Academy can see past the children's fantasy label and recognise that it represents cinema and movie making at its very finest and shows a master of his craft continuing to challenge himself to take new directions.

< Message edited by tjf00 -- 2/12/2011 4:30:42 PM >

(in reply to bobbyperu)
Post #: 8
RE: The 3D - 2/12/2011 7:14:53 PM   
Bighousewill

 

Posts: 244
Joined: 5/12/2009
I feel like I have missed out on the 3D version but I did see a digital 2D version this afternoon and it is obvious which bits are 3D and most of that is in the opening sequence the rest of the film settles into traditional 2D, examples being the normal scenes in the narrative however it is still a spectacle in 2D. I still think that the 3D must have been great but once you've seen one decent 3D film you've seen them all it's merely a novelty.

(in reply to Herr Schnitzel)
Post #: 9
RE: The 3D - 2/12/2011 10:01:11 PM   
Herr Schnitzel

 

Posts: 205
Joined: 1/2/2009

quote:

ORIGINAL: Bighousewill

I feel like I have missed out on the 3D version but I did see a digital 2D version this afternoon and it is obvious which bits are 3D and most of that is in the opening sequence the rest of the film settles into traditional 2D, examples being the normal scenes in the narrative however it is still a spectacle in 2D. I still think that the 3D must have been great but once you've seen one decent 3D film you've seen them all it's merely a novelty.



Because of the way Scorsese uses depth and perspective, the film never "settles" into 2D. It doesn't just have a few 3D bits, it uses the medium to its full advantage throughout.

(in reply to Bighousewill)
Post #: 10
RE: The 3D - 2/12/2011 10:57:12 PM   
adambatman82

 

Posts: 11156
Joined: 15/12/2005
quote:

ORIGINAL: Bighousewill

I feel like I have missed out on the 3D version but I did see a digital 2D version this afternoon and it is obvious which bits are 3D and most of that is in the opening sequence the rest of the film settles into traditional 2D, examples being the normal scenes in the narrative however it is still a spectacle in 2D. I still think that the 3D must have been great but once you've seen one decent 3D film you've seen them all it's merely a novelty.


I saw the film in both 3D and 2D today, and while the 3D was great I have to admit that I preferred it in 2D, simply because it allowed me to focus without the distraction that 3D always brings with it. Don't get me wrong, it was amazing to see the likes of Intolerance and Safety Last! rendered in 3D, but the headache that it brings with it just isn't.

It was by far the best use of 3D I've ever seen tho.

< Message edited by adambatman82 -- 2/12/2011 11:08:45 PM >

(in reply to Bighousewill)
Post #: 11
Amazing - 3/12/2011 7:55:02 PM   
jamestaylor

 

Posts: 1
Joined: 3/12/2011
I took my ten year old son to see this today and we were both completely enraptured- a wonderful film from a master and someone who's in complete control of his medium, brilliant acting and beautifully edited. My son didn't move for two hours- quite an achievement !

(in reply to Empire Admin)
Post #: 12
RE: Amazing - 3/12/2011 10:45:40 PM   
azzman1984


Posts: 468
Joined: 24/1/2011
From: Coventry
I watched it last night with my mate and his family and i just loved it, the 3D really suits the movie, the story was great and the performances were awesome.

It's a really good film and i hope more people will see it.

(in reply to jamestaylor)
Post #: 13
RE: RE: - 5/12/2011 10:25:51 AM   
sharkboy


Posts: 6286
Joined: 26/9/2005
From: Belfast
quote:

ORIGINAL: Herr Schnitzel

I'm a bit of a 3D agnostic, but the 3D here absolutely blew me away and Scorsese uses it better than maybe even Cameron did in Avatar. Every sequence is thought through in terms of how to use perspective for maximum impact and to make the make the frame dynamic for the format. You can also clearly see that this has been shot for 3D instead of being a post-conversion job, the difference is like night and day. Anybody who turns up their nose at the 3D version is going to seriously miss out.



Definitely this.  Scorsese has finally made me think that this 3D lark might have something to it after all.  His use of the technique is simply jaw-dropping, from Hugo looking through the clock face over Paris by night to the sweeping view through the clock's mechanism and down the central clock tower.  This isn't gimmicky 3D where something inevitably comes out of the screen at you, this is 3D used as it should be.

As for the movie itself, well, despite a bit of a slow opening 20 minutes it soon picked up its pace and in the end was easily worthy of the 5 stars that Mr Newman gave it.  It's a movie for cinephiles and the young at heart, so if you qualify for both these descriptions, you'll love it as much as I did!

_____________________________

WWLD?

Every time we think we have measured our capacity to meet a challenge, we look up and we're reminded that that capacity may well be limitless

I left in love, in laughter, and in truth and wherever truth, love and laughter abide, I am there in spirit.

(in reply to Herr Schnitzel)
Post #: 14
FLASHMAN - 5/12/2011 1:32:04 PM   
Frank Comiskey

 

Posts: 140
Joined: 16/1/2008
This is a magnificent fairytale for film critics & archivists, but unless you are a child from Chelsea or Knightsbridge with a name like Sebastian or Allegra, this is hard going.

One could easily imagine Marty reading the story sitting in a saphia-tinted bedroom, while good people like Barry Norman & Robert A Harris innocently lie wide-eyed beside each other in a four-poster, with their chins just poking out from under a Georges Melie duvet.

The majority of the kids at my screening expected visual trickery, and when it became clear that wasn't happening, started to shuffle after 30 minutes; frankly, me too. After an hour, the public started to clog the exits.

Sure, the sets, photography, editing, performances and direction were utterly beautiful, but, alas, way too little fun for the kids, which the damn thing was principally for.......................

(in reply to Empire Admin)
Post #: 15
RE: FLASHMAN - 5/12/2011 8:52:43 PM   
azzman1984


Posts: 468
Joined: 24/1/2011
From: Coventry
When i went to the Friday night showing of Hugo, there was only 8 people in the entire cinema watching the film which is a shame really because i was expected the place to be packed out.

(in reply to Frank Comiskey)
Post #: 16
RE: FLASHMAN - 6/12/2011 7:12:40 PM   
Spectre


Posts: 1724
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: The Tannhauser Gate
Unfortunately I can see this losing out at the box office because there is a lot more overtly child friendly films on release at the moment. I am going to try and get there on Friday. The choice as to whether I see it in 2D or 3D will largely be determined on which show time gives me enough time to drive to the Warwick Arts Centre for 'Deep Blue Sea' after, though!

Usually it would definitely be the 2D version, but I am intrigued as to how Scorsese has made use of 3D.


< Message edited by Spectre -- 6/12/2011 7:13:29 PM >

(in reply to azzman1984)
Post #: 17
RE: FLASHMAN - 7/12/2011 1:05:14 PM   
Wild about Wilder


Posts: 1657
Joined: 9/4/2010
From: Hertfordshire
Although I liked it a lot don't think i'd give it 5 stars mainly due to Sacha Baron Cohen's arsing about, someone should say to him "Sacha sometimes less is more" plus how'd he get his name 2nd billing above the fantastic performances of Asa & Chloe whose English accent was terrific?

< Message edited by Wild about Wilder -- 8/12/2011 12:22:18 PM >

(in reply to Spectre)
Post #: 18
RE: FLASHMAN - 7/12/2011 2:29:42 PM   
Filmfan 2


Posts: 1049
Joined: 30/9/2005
I enjoyed this, but was often frequently removed from the story by the heavy-handedness of the 3D. Yes, there were some clever shots (the focus-pull on the dangling watch, for one) but this is the first 3D film I've watched where the 3D has ruined the movie a bit.

_____________________________

I am not drinkin' any fuckin' Merlot!

"All I wanted me was a piece of cornbread, you motherfuckers!"

Defender of all things Batman Begins


(in reply to Wild about Wilder)
Post #: 19
RE:CineMagic - 7/12/2011 3:35:21 PM   
Spaldron


Posts: 10485
Joined: 6/10/2006
From: Chair
Disagree with Filmfan 2, I didn't mind the 3D at all and thought it was done with care and subtlety. Unfortunately it doesn't add anything to the story or characters so in effect it makes the 3D pointless. I'd happily see this again in 2D as the film itself was magical, one of Scorsese's best in recent years. A great homage to early silent cinema "where dreams are made" with a great ensemble cast and exceptional performances by the young Asa Butterfield as Hugo and Ben Kingsley as George Melies. Makes you want to watch A Trip To The Moon all over again. 4/5

_____________________________

And I heard a voice in the midst of the four beasts
And I looked and behold, a pale horse
And his name that sat on him was Death
And Hell followed with him.

(in reply to Filmfan 2)
Post #: 20
RE: RE:CineMagic - 7/12/2011 3:45:41 PM   
Rgirvan44


Posts: 19049
Joined: 10/3/2006
From: Punishment Park
Not such a fan of this movie. For one thing, it was way too long, yet at the same time, it felt undercooked. I appreciated the subtext of the effects that the war had on the older people, but the sense of fun and adventure felt...distant I suppose.

The flashbacks to the "birth of cinema" were all nicely done, but I never felt any emotion. It was made with clockwork percision, yet with all of the passion of the mechanical man drawing the Moon.

As for the 3D - I loathed it. There were times where it simply didn't work. Images crushed into each other, the shimmer from the robot looked horrible in 3D, and it made for a jarring mess.

It may sound like I hated the film. I didn't. But I didn't come out feeling a wonderful joy for early cinema.

The thing is Scorsese had already made this film - with his documentary, A Personal Journey Through American Movies - clearly the foundations of which are built into Hugo.

Three stars.


_____________________________

It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to, than I have ever known.


(in reply to Spaldron)
Post #: 21
RE: RE:CineMagic - 7/12/2011 3:54:24 PM   
Spaldron


Posts: 10485
Joined: 6/10/2006
From: Chair

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rgirvan44

Not such a fan of this movie. For one thing, it was way too long,


It was only 2 hours I think.
quote:


The thing is Scorsese had already made this film - with his documentary, A Personal Journey Through American Movies - clearly the foundations of which are built into Hugo.


I've not seen this, is it on dvd? Have you seen Scorsese's documentaries on the Blues? They're excellent.


_____________________________

And I heard a voice in the midst of the four beasts
And I looked and behold, a pale horse
And his name that sat on him was Death
And Hell followed with him.

(in reply to Rgirvan44)
Post #: 22
RE: RE:CineMagic - 7/12/2011 3:58:10 PM   
Rgirvan44


Posts: 19049
Joined: 10/3/2006
From: Punishment Park
There it is http://www.amazon.co.uk/Personal-Journey-Scorsese-Through-American/dp/B00004TBTF

It is basically a four hour lecture by Marty about movies. It is amazing.


_____________________________

It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to, than I have ever known.


(in reply to Spaldron)
Post #: 23
RE: RE:CineMagic - 8/12/2011 3:31:25 PM   
talpacino


Posts: 3685
Joined: 15/11/2005
From: The Royal County
quote:

ORIGINAL: Rgirvan44

Not such a fan of this movie. For one thing, it was way too long, yet at the same time, it felt undercooked. I appreciated the subtext of the effects that the war had on the older people, but the sense of fun and adventure felt...distant I suppose.

The flashbacks to the "birth of cinema" were all nicely done, but I never felt any emotion. It was made with clockwork percision, yet with all of the passion of the mechanical man drawing the Moon.

As for the 3D - I loathed it. There were times where it simply didn't work. Images crushed into each other, the shimmer from the robot looked horrible in 3D, and it made for a jarring mess.

It may sound like I hated the film. I didn't. But I didn't come out feeling a wonderful joy for early cinema.

The thing is Scorsese had already made this film - with his documentary, A Personal Journey Through American Movies - clearly the foundations of which are built into Hugo.

Three stars.



I wonder sometimes is it down to the particular cinema how well the 3D works. I thought it looked pretty great in the showing we went to and worked really well and I'm usually not a massive fan.

I loved the film anyway. Not not quite a five star but it is very good.

_____________________________

Currahee!

It's a different film. It's a very different film! It's a different shark!

Suppose I shot ya..How'd that be?


(in reply to Rgirvan44)
Post #: 24
RE: RE:CineMagic - 11/12/2011 11:16:27 AM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 3980
Joined: 19/10/2005
  Hugo Cabret is a young boy living with his father, a master clockmaker who took him to see all sorts of films, in a Paris railway station in the early 1930s.  When Hugoís father dies in a museum fire, Hugo is taken away by his uncle, an alcoholic watchmaker who is responsible for maintaining the clocks in the railway station. His uncle teaches him to take care of the clocks and disappears. Hugo lives between the walls of the train station, maintaining the clocks, stealing food and working on his fatherís most ambitious project: a broken automatum.  The grumpy old owner of the toy store catches him stealing and takes away Hugoís blueprints for the automaton.  Hugo enlists the manís goddaughter Isabelle to help him retrieve the manual and find the robotís missing key, while introducing her to the world of the moviesÖÖÖ..


Hugo is a gift from Martin Scorsese to true film lovers.  I donít mean folks who just like to go to the pictures once a week and see the latest release, or folks who have amassed a huge DVD collection, etc.  No, I mean people who are totally in love with the cinema and care deeply about it, as an art form, as a source of wonderful entertainment and as the greatest escape from the trials and tribulations of the real world there can be.  Much has been made about Hugo being a kidís movie that will bore most kids.  I suppose thatís partially true, considering how children today are force fed a diet of lightning paced entertainment filled with fart gags.  Thatís not to say thereís anything wrong with that sort of movie, but thatís almost all there is these days, with little room for the slower, more thoughtful kind of childrenís movie that used to fill cinemas decades ago.  I do think that intelligent kids will at least find Hugo interesting, and perhaps itís the type of movie that kids should maybe see with their parents rather than their mates.  Sadly, in part due to a dreadful trailer, Hugo looks like it is flopping big time at the box office.  Thats a real shame, because I think itís the finest film of the year.

Right from the very beginning, Hugo is pure magic, with the camera taking us, in stunning 3D and without a cut [or at least it seems like there are no cuts] from an aerial view of Paris to the inside of the station clock tower.  You notice I said the words ďstunningĒ and ď3DĒ, in the same sentence, me, who is constantly moaning about the pointlessness of the process in his reviews on this very website.  Well, the sequence is stunning, swooping around the station in an exhilarating manner, with the people not looking like cardboard cut outs for once.  I donít think that they employed a different kind of 3D to anyone else though, the scene just somehow works.  There is less showing off after this bit, but Marty constantly finds ways to shoot things from different angles and emphasise depth and perspective, really using 3D better than any other filmmaker.  I would say at least half the shots in this movie are interesting in some way, and virtually every cinematic technique seems to be used to help give Hugo the feel of a dream, yet itís never Ďin your faceí and often itís the simplest things that stand out.  In one scene, Hugo is on the railway track, oblivious to the train hurtling towards him.  Finally Hugo turns, and to register his fear, we have quick three static shots of the front of the train, each one closer to the screen.  You may say that Scorsese has made better films, but in my opinion none that better shows his mastery of movie making.

The story is utterly beguiling; I suppose you could call the pace at which it is told slow, but I didnít find it that way.  Itís just the right pace for the tale, and actually to me it moved reasonably fast, but thatís maybe because I was so caught up in it!  A sense that this is going to be a typical story about a boy who has to fend for himself in a tough world goes away almost immediately, with, instead of Dickensian grit and darkness, the station being shot in bright, vibrant colours and it all looking quite clean and pleasant, even the grimy parts!  Totally unrealistic, but very pleasing and even appropriate, because, after all, this is a kind of fairy tale.  For a while, the movie progresses as a kind of mystery, with Hugo and Isabelle making a terrific team.  She is thrilled to be going on an adventure for the first time in her previously boring life, while Hugo doesnít see much of a big deal about the things they are getting up to, and then Hugo takes her to the see a movie for the first time.  One shot of her face, in total awe, shows the wonder of cinema better than in almost every other film, and helps link Hugo, in a way, to Cinema Paradiso, that other wonderful movie that is in love with the act of seeing movies, though of course without the tragic love story!

There is romance in Hugo though, with two subplots of the Ďwill they, wonít theyí kind taking place in the station, and they are very touching without being cloying. One scene, of the Station Inspector completely at a loss with what to say or do when visiting the object of his affections, flower seller Lisette, manages to be very sweet, very funny, and a little painful in the way that most of us can relate to!  The  Inspector is played by Sacha Baron Cohen, so heís a mostly comic character, but like many of the great comic characters, has a certain sadness to him.  Some have said that the slapstick sequences that usually involve him chasing Hugo all over the place are out of place; I feel they are perfectly placed light interludes.  Way back when he played a certain person called Ali G, I was convinced he was a comic genius and I still think that.  Watching him in Hugo, he would be absolutely perfect for the role of Inspector Clouseau if they ever decide to make another one.  Of course most of Hugo is from Hugoís point of view, even giving us a terrifying feel of what it might be like for a child to be trampled on, and so itís right that certain things appear a little exaggurated, or slowed down [there's a wonderful bit where loose notes blow slowly and magically around a room].

Of course Hugo really takes flight once we know who the toy shop owner is, the magician-turned-filmmaker George Melies, who stunned audiences of the early 20th century audiences with fantastical visions and special effects.  The movie has constantly been about people who are in some way incomplete and need to find meaning to their lives, but now it becomes not only about someone getting their life back, but also becomes a love letter to not so much cinema but the history of cinema. Scorsese whets our appetite with a two minute montage of well known faces and scenes from silent movies, then shows us a glorified flashback to the making of one of George Meliesí films, and for ten minutes or so this critic was in Heaven.  What true film fanatic wouldnít want to travel back in time to the set of one of the earliest films?  Scorsese allows us, for a few priceless moments, to do this. We see a dragon operated by wires, cast members battling other cast members who are suppose to be skeletons, sea goddesses, and other amazing sights, all in a glass set.  After this, we have a rather conventional climactic chase and a vertiginous climax, and some may say that the film doesnít need these, but Scorsese is trying to entertain after all as well, and the true climax of the movie is afterwards anyway, where the story resolves itself in the only way it can and we are present at an event which probably happened.

Criticisms of all this being too Ďeducationalí seem ridiculous to me, though itís typical of the world we live in now, where Ďlearningí is of less and less interest.  Whatís wrong with teaching viewers, especially young ones, about the pioneers of the cinema?  Hugo gently attacks the ignorance many people [people who in my opinion are not true film fans] have about old movies, fools who wonít watch them because they consider them Ďboringí, and even if everything else about it were rubbish, I would love it for doing that alone!  Fortunately, almost everything about Hugo is brilliant, from the amazing performance of Asa Butterfield as our young hero, who is able to express so much with a glance, to the almost omnipresent score by Howard Shore, who shows a pleasing light touch and which constantly adds its own commentary on events.  In the end though, this is Scorseseís film, and it may not contain a single swear word, or scene of violence, but might be the most personal movie he has ever made, itís major themes of film preservation and never forgetting filmís past being ones that are obviously close to his heart, and ones that should be close to the heart of everyone who has become obsessed by the greatest art form of the 20th century.  Truly heart warming in the best possible way, itís a masterpiece and Scorseseís best movie for a very very long time.
Rating:9.5/10



_____________________________

check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

(in reply to talpacino)
Post #: 25
not really for kids - 11/12/2011 5:19:59 PM   
tysmuse

 

Posts: 384
Joined: 24/9/2007
It's ok. About an hour too long, at least.

(in reply to Empire Admin)
Post #: 26
5 stars...honestly? - 12/12/2011 1:17:50 PM   
spideed2

 

Posts: 117
Joined: 20/1/2006
Its handsomely shot and the second half is engaing, but by god the first half is spirit crushingly dull.

Add to that, the lead charcater is a rude, unlikeable, little brat and colour me thoroughly dissapointed.

It is ok to say you didnt like a Scorcese film you know? ;)


(in reply to Empire Admin)
Post #: 27
RE: 5 stars...honestly? - 13/12/2011 4:07:36 PM   
Hood_Man


Posts: 12183
Joined: 30/9/2005
It takes a while to get going, and was perhaps a little bit disjointed too. I was wondering toward the end whether this film was about the boy Hugo or the man Georges MťliŤs


But... it's still a very sweet, charming and adorable little film, and I left with a big smile on my face

(in reply to spideed2)
Post #: 28
Hugo - 14/12/2011 5:17:50 PM   
Sue Scott

 

Posts: 2
Joined: 12/10/2005
Unexpectedly affecting in character and affectionate in setting, Hugo was gripping, entrancing and amusing by turns. All the characters were believable, bar Sacha Baron Cohen and made you care about their dreams and desires. He was a caricature, which played more rigidly would have been a a more believable and sympathetic role. Paris was a dream, the station a grand setting for a simple story and the pathos was just enough. The tribute to cinema was very well done and constantly referred to with little snippets and homages throughout the film. Unexpectedly directed by Martin Scorsese - we didn't know he had it in him!

(in reply to Empire Admin)
Post #: 29
Hugo Review - 26/12/2011 12:23:18 PM   
Ramone87

 

Posts: 70
Joined: 24/12/2011

I really wanted to love Sorcese's first forray into fantasy but I unfortunately I did'nt. On some levels it worked great and on other's it failed. First and formost the main child actor failed to convince, leaving me hard pushed to find empathy towards him, even in one scene nearly being killed by a train, his pained;
'trying so hard to be scared look' failed to convince!! Other characters, Ben Kingsly as a mean shop owner and Baron Cohen as a nasty gaurd, were slightly better but their performances felt somewhat forced.

Visually it was good, for the first time Scorcese dwells in 3D and the fantasy genre; here he over piles the screen with visual flourishes everywhere to the point where things do get sickly sweet at times. The opening 'catch me if you can sequence' is far too long; so many scenes could have done with trimming to speed up the plot and creat some genuine tension as we go through well trodden kid friendships, father-son relationships about guilt and a longing for personal redemption.

Some interesting scenes about the birth of cinema, Georges Méliès’ 1902 masterpiece, A Trip To The Moon being re-created were fascinating however; but belong in an eduacational movie and serve as awkward filler. Not a masterpiece as so many have hinted at!!

A good if somewhat dissapointing 3 stars.

(in reply to Empire Admin)
Post #: 30
Page:   [1] 2   next >   >>
All Forums >> [Film Forums] >> Film Reviews >> Hugo Page: [1] 2   next >   >>
Jump to:





New Messages No New Messages
Hot Topic w/ New Messages Hot Topic w/o New Messages
Locked w/ New Messages Locked w/o New Messages
 Post New Thread
 Reply to Message
 Post New Poll
 Submit Vote
 Delete My Own Post
 Delete My Own Thread
 Rate Posts


Movie News††|††Empire Blog††|††Movie Reviews††|††Future Films††|††Features††|††Video Interviews††|††Image Gallery††|††Competitions††|††Forum††|††Magazine††|††Resources
Forum Software © ASPPlayground.NET Advanced Edition 2.4.5 ANSI

0.109