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RE: #60: There is no point saying this again!

 
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RE: #60: There is no point saying this again! - 22/12/2011 4:09:55 PM   
Piles


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60. You Have Killed Me
Writers: Morrissey (lyrics), Jesse Tobias (music).
Year of composition: 2006.
Appearances on official releases: Released as the first single from the album 'Ringleader of the Tormentors'.

Morrissey's joint highest charting single at #3, 'You Have Killed Me' was an effective first release from the 'Ringleader of the Tormentors' album. Not only was it catchy and perfect for the singles chart, but it also offered a flavour of what the album would be about. For all intents and purposes Morrissey's Roman album, 'Ringleaders' was continental in both style and lyrics, taking contributions from the likes of Ennio Morricone and an Italian children's choir, and no songs feel quite as indebted to that country as 'You Have Killed Me'. The lyrics of the track reference Italy's cinema, namely the likes of Pier Paolo Pasolini, Michelangelo Antonioni, Anna Magnani, and – in some live performances – Federico Fellini. These aren't reminders that Morrissey is a cultured boy just for the sake of it, but rather parallels drawn between these Italian artists and the singer's own life in the early 21st century. Songs like 'Dear God Please Help Me' and 'At Last I Am Born' point to a late sexual (re-)awakening, and the Italian cinema references – particularly the 'Pasolini is me, Accatone you'll be' line -back this up. 'Accatone' is a film about prostitution, and Pasolini's first feature, and this song is often said to be about virginity and the loss of innocence. The chorus, which is infinitely sing-able, returns to familiar Mozzerian territory of a lack of trust in love and waiting for the inevitable heartbreak, with the title chanted over and over again as if the singer is equating dependence on another human being with the big sleep. The music, by relative Morrissey newcomer Jesse Tobias, is all building tension and whining guitars, elevating to a fabulous crescendo, Morrissey wailing that 'there's no point saying this again' and that he forgives his apparent partner, another comment (in the same vein as 'Life is a Pigsty') that – despite knowledge that an inevitable and insufferable break-up is pending – a mere moment of love is probably worth it in the end.

Listen to the studio version here.
Listen to a live version here.


< Message edited by Piles -- 22/12/2011 4:10:30 PM >


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RE: #60: There is no point saying this again! - 22/12/2011 4:13:25 PM   
Rhubarb


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This is one of my personal favourites of his solo work.

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RE: #60: There is no point saying this again! - 22/12/2011 6:32:36 PM   
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Would you say it's too low?

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RE: #60: There is no point saying this again! - 22/12/2011 6:49:30 PM   
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quote:

ORIGINAL: paul_ie86

Would you say it's too low?


There is no point saying this again.

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RE: #60: There is no point saying this again! - 22/12/2011 8:16:17 PM   
Piles


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quote:

ORIGINAL: tommyjarvis


quote:

ORIGINAL: paul_ie86

Would you say it's too low?


There is no point saying this again.





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RE: #60: There is no point saying this again! - 22/12/2011 8:18:50 PM   
FritzlFan


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The last two should be in the top 20 bro

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RE: #60: There is no point saying this again! - 23/12/2011 8:08:07 AM   
matty_b


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That is also good.

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RE: #59: Why'd you think I let you get away with the th... - 28/12/2011 11:17:20 PM   
Piles


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59. I Like You
Writers: Morrissey (lyrics), Boz Boorer (music).
Year of composition: 2004.
Appearances on official releases: 'You are the Quarry'. Also appears on the live album 'Live at Earl's Court'.


There are a whole host of tracks that talk either explicitly or implicitly about Morrissey's relationship with Johnny Marr, and 'I Like You' is a late example of this. In fact, it may be the singer's most recent statement on the issue, as neither 'Ringleader of the Tormentors' or 'Years of Refusal' feature songs that overtly deliver with the theme that seems most personal and important to Morrissey. In 'I Like You', Moz talks about magistrates 'hiding their mistakes', and comments on his counterpart 'going through the same thing I had just about scraped through, surely nods toward the 1996 court case which Morrissey and Marr found themselves on the same side of. I don't think you could argue that there's anything romantic, let alone sexual, about the kind of affection expressed in 'I Like You'; if the song is about Marr, then it's Morrissey commenting on a deep respect and a rare friendship with one of the few people he felt comfortable accepting harsh criticism from ('why do you think I let you get away with the things you say to me?'). If it's not about Marr, the song could just as easily be taken as yet another re-iteration of Morrissey's late sexual re-awakening. Obviously, the album pre-dates 'Ringleader of the Tormenters', Moz's Roman album and the record seen as the confirmation of this re-awakening, but the song certainly tends to point towards tender feelings rarely felt by the singer. After many years of isolation and celibacy, he sees the admission that he 'likes' another human being to be 'shameful'. These feelings of self doubt and a general disdain for intimacy would be nothing new to Morrissey's oeuvre, but for him to come out and make the blunt admission that, despite all of his misgivings and mistrust of people, he has some sort of interpersonal feelings is quite revelatory. Musically, Boorer's guitar arrangement isn't exactly the most thrilling or original of his compositions, but it's a decent pop tune brought to life by some screeching keyboards and Morrissey's fantastic vocal performance; the moment when he launches into near-falsetto with 'you're not right in the head, and nor am I, and this is why…' is amongst the best on the album.

Listen to the studio version here.


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RE: #59: Why'd you think I let you get away with the th... - 29/12/2011 2:12:06 AM   
Rhubarb


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Too high

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RE: #59: Why'd you think I let you get away with the th... - 29/12/2011 10:35:26 AM   
matty_b


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Meh.

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RE: #58: In my bedroom in those ugly new houses... - 9/1/2012 7:08:44 PM   
Piles


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58. Paint a Vulgar Picture
Writers: Morrissey (lyrics), Johnny Marr (music).
Year of composition: 1987.
Appearances on official releases: ‘Strangeways, Here We Come’. Appropriately, this is one of the few Smiths tracks that hasn’t been re-issued, repackaged, repackaged…


The Smiths’ most epic and most scathing attack on the music industry, ‘Paint a Vulgar Picture’ is a five and a half minute assault on everything that The Smiths hated about working in pop. Although Morrissey claimed it wasn’t ‘at all’ about former record company Rough Trade, who The Smiths had recently heatedly fallen out with, subsequently moving to EMI. However, the constant references to Smiths tracks (‘Panic’ and ‘You Just Haven’t Earned It Yet, Baby’ are both name checked directly) and attacks on companies Moz publicly spoke against (MTV, BBC, and the BPI Awards, on which Morrissey famously said ‘The Brits are ghastly. I never would accept a Brit. It would be like Laurence Olivier being happy getting a TV Times award.’) suggest that’s not entirely true, there is at least a portion of autobiography here. The song, rather than a coherent narrative, is more a string of vignettes relating to the industry; the fans are labelled as saps from ‘those ugly new houses’, dancing their ‘legs down to the knees’, there’s a chance meeting at the record company meeting, and a dead star (which is spoken about more in a cut verse from an early demo, where Morrissey talks about his or her legacy being dragged through the mud). Many fans will point to the irony of one of Moz’s complaints being the need for record companies to ‘re-issue, repackage, repackage, re-valuate the songs’ (‘extra track and a tacky badge’), and it’s difficult to explain it (I’d go down the route of Morrissey’s re-issues being somewhat worthwhile because of the inclusion of previously unheard songs, extended cuts, and rare B-sides), but to cite this as a major negative for an otherwise astoundingly good song is ridiculous. As a scathing attack on the record industry, there is nothing better by Morrissey or any other artist; and God knows Moz would try, with the likes of ‘Why Don’t You Find Out For Yourself?’ and ‘You Know I Couldn’t Last’ being released down the years. Musically, it is one of the most interesting of all Marr’s creations, utilizing a bizarre but effective rotating key change progression, the guitarist’s tune rising and falling with Morrissey’s voice. Marr tried the effect out on any instrument he could get his hands on before settling on guitar, which benefits the track because of the sterling solo, which – despite coming at the expense of the quite brilliant extra verse – is amongst the best Marr moment on any Smiths song.

Listen to the studio version here
Listen to a live Morrissey solo version here.

< Message edited by Piles -- 9/1/2012 7:34:58 PM >


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RE: #58: In my bedroom in those ugly new houses... - 10/1/2012 12:18:29 AM   
tommyjarvis


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This could even be my favourite Smiths song. Great track, regardless of the irony (how many Smiths compilations have there been over the years?)

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RE: #58: In my bedroom in those ugly new houses... - 10/1/2012 10:56:02 AM   
matty_b


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Good song - not sure it's worthy of the acclaim you've poured on it, but I'll give it another listen, see if it improves somewhat.

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RE: #89: By Friday, life has killed me. - 12/1/2012 7:29:19 PM   
Piles


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57. I Have Forgiven Jesus
Writers: Morrissey (lyrics), Alain Whyte (music).
Year of composition: 2004.
Appearances on official releases: Released as a single from the album ‘You Are The Quarry’. Performed on the live CD ‘Live At Earl’s Court’ and the live DVD ‘Who Put the M in Manchester?’


Morrissey has spoken about his catholic upbringing many times, citing it as an almost entirely miserable experience. ‘I Have Forgiven Jesus’, Moz’s blasphemous ‘revenge’ against the church that caused him so much pain as a child, is basically a long letter of complaint. ‘Why did you give me so much desire?’ Morrissey warbles, before complaining that there’s ‘nowhere I can go, to offload this desire’, the singer basically pointing out the incredibly unfair nature of Catholicism and pretty much all religion; as humans we are filled with a yearning for carnal activity, but our creator has forbidden it. He offsets childish imagery (previously visited in Vauxhall and I’s ‘Used to Be A Sweet Boy’), such as discussing his old paper round and travelling through ‘hail and snow, just to moon you’, with the very real pains that this childhood has left with him through the week in adulthood. These rules and regulations, such as ignoring the instincts that were given to us because the person who gave them to us tells us to, are easy to adhere to as a ‘nice kid’ with a ‘nice paper round’, but all that’s left thirty years on is a rising sense that ‘Thursday is pathetic’. Clearly, although the title suggests forgiveness, the singer is more than a little bitter about one of the most influential and intrusive factors of his childhood. It’s a given that ‘I Have Forgiven Jesus’ is one of the strongest songs lyrically and vocally (the final gambit of ‘do you hate me?’ is absolutely sublime) on You Are the Quarry, but what is often overlooked is how fantastic it is musically. Most of Alain Whyte’s tracks build exquisitely from humble beginnings to a beautifully rapturous finale, and ‘I Have Forgiven Jesus’ is no exception, climaxing superbly whilst Moz angrily complains about being placed in ‘self-deprecating bones and skin’, before dropping off into silence, leaving the listener almost gasping for breath. It was an odd gamble to release this as a single, but it paid off, reaching the top 10 – ironically – in Christmas week.

Listen to the studio version, with Moz wearing catholic priest garb for the music video, here.
Listen to a version here.

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RE: #56: Is it wrong to want to live on your own? - 12/1/2012 8:52:46 PM   
Piles


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56. Sheila Take a Bow
Writers: Morrissey (lyrics), Johnny Marr (music).
Year of composition: 1987.
Appearances on official releases: Released as a single, also appears on the compilations ‘Louder Than Bombs’ and ‘The Sound of the Smiths’, as well as the Japanese release ‘Stop Me’.


A mishmash of various influences and muses, from ‘Hobson’s Choice’ and Shelagh Delaney to David Bowie and Mott the Hoople, ‘Sheila Take A Bow’ is one of the Smiths’ great tracks that almost never happened. Originally produced by John Porter, featuring Sandie Shaw backing vocals, and an odd synthy, mystical opening gambit, the demo (which still exists and can be found if you know where to look) has its own curious charm but would never have climbed as high in the charts as Stephen Street’s re-working. Although Marr later said that it wasn’t one of his favourites, it clearly was one of Britain’s; the track equalled ‘Heaven Knows I’m Miserable Now’ as the band’s highest charting single, reaching number 10 in the UK chart. Taking on Moz’s favourite playwright Shelagh Delaney (despite the change of spelling in the title), the giveaway being the lyrics asking ‘how can someone so young sing words so sad?’, Delaney’s sad words often evoking concern from her elders. It’s no coincidence that similar things have been said about Morrissey himself; the similarities between the singer and the playwright are more than likely responsible for the former’s admiration and affection for the latter. It’s also no surprise that this track was a successful single, with the lyrics taken at face value telling young Brits of Shelagh’s ilk to ‘boot the grime of this world in the crotch’ and to throw their homework into the fire, this upbeat, hedonistic message would doubtlessly have appealed to the young Britons miserably suffering through the Thatcher years. Musically, the refined, sitar-less Street version is quite fantastic, one of Marr’s more upbeat, boisterous pop tunes in the ‘Panic’/’Ask’ vein, it remains utterly Smiths-like despite its (realized) mainstream-crossover potential. Despite how excellent it is musically and lyrically, as well as its chart success, ‘Sheila Take A Bow’ brings with it a bitter edge; the April 1987 performances of it on ‘The Tube’ and ‘Top of the Pops’ (the latter of which was dubbed with the studio version when shown on television) were the band’s last in front of a live audience, and the cancelled video shoot was one of many contributing factors to the band’s impending demise. A great song, then, but marred by the negative contributions it made to the history of the group.

Listen to the studio, Stephen Street version here.
Listen to the studio, John Porter version here.
Listen to the live version (from The Tube) here.

< Message edited by Piles -- 13/1/2012 8:22:53 PM >


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RE: #56: Is it wrong to want to live on your own? - 13/1/2012 12:06:19 AM   
Rhubarb


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I like all three of the last lot.

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RE: #56: Is it wrong to want to live on your own? - 13/1/2012 9:29:57 AM   
matty_b


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Not so much a fan of IHFJ, but Sheila... is fantastic.

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RE: #55: Do you think you've made the right decision th... - 13/1/2012 4:16:55 PM   
Piles


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55. London
Writers: Morrissey (lyrics), Johnny Marr (music).
Year of composition: 1987.
Appearances on official releases: A B-side to ‘Shoplifters of the World Unite’, and also appears on the compilations ‘Louder Than Bombs’, ‘The World Won’t Listen’, and ‘The Sound of the Smiths’, as well as the live compilation ‘Rank’.


In 1987, Morrissey wrote three songs about the nation’s capital; ‘Is It Really So Strange?’, ‘Half a Person’, and this. Although ‘London’ does not have the wit of ‘Is It Really So Strange?’, or the heartbreaking look at dissatisfaction and lack of belonging that ‘Half a Person’ brings with it, it is the most scathing, the most impersonal, and potentially the best musically. Marr’s composition opens with guitar feedback, deliberately reminiscent of a train rolling into the station, before rifling through its runtime at a constant, rhythmic pace, again deliberately reminiscent of the locomotive rolling along its tracks. Finally, it concludes with its frenetic climax, Smith #5 Craig Gannon’s high picking contributing wonderfully to its energy and its effect; that of the protagonist’s life flying off the rails when he reaches London. The lyrics talk of a boy leaving his hometown, mainly focusing on the integral narrative point where he boards his train. ‘Smoke lingers round your fingers’, the song begins, quickly setting the scene before continuing quickly to the feelings of the protagonists. Whilst ‘Is It Really So Strange?’ and ‘Half a Person’ take the same central premise and discuss the leaver’s feelings of loneliness and alienation, ‘London’ talks about the ‘jealousy in the eyes of the ones who had to stay behind’, before briefly touching upon the slight conflict within the boy heading to the capital; ‘do you think you’ve made the right decision this time?’ It’s no co-incidence that this, the most impersonal and distanced of the three tracks, is written in second person, whilst ‘IIRSS’ and ‘HaP’ come directly from the singer’s point of view. Two versions of track exist; the studio version which you can hear on the ‘Shoplifters of the World Unite’ single, and a live version that the band performed during their last John Peel session; both versions are readily available and fantastic, the latter is superior, displaying incredible energy, a brilliantly free-wheeling vocal performance, and superb guitar work from Marr and Gannon.

Listen to the studio version here.
Listen to the live version from ‘Rank’ here.

< Message edited by Piles -- 13/1/2012 8:24:06 PM >


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RE: #54: Such bloody awful poetry... - 13/1/2012 8:20:33 PM   
Piles


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54. Frankly, Mr Shankly
Writers: Morrissey (lyrics), Johnny Marr (music).
Year of composition: 1985.
Appearances on official releases: Only appears as track two on ‘The Queen Is Dead’.


The Smiths are often cited as a miserable band who write miserable songs about miserable things, but one only has to listen to ‘Frankly, Mr Shankly’ to realize that Marr is capable of writing fun, vaudevillian music, and Morrissey is more than capable of writing fun, witty lyrics. A thinly veiled letter of resignation to Rough Trade Records and their founder Geoff Travis, ‘Frankly, Mr Shankly’ is made up of witty vignettes regarding a young man’s yearning for fame, which he holds up as more important then being ‘righteous or holy’ (any day, any day, any day). Travis is the main feature of Moz’s derision, particularly the lines ‘I didn’t realize that you wrote poetry, I didn’t realize you wrote such bloody awful poetry’, a comment on the Rough Trade owner attempting to form a bond with the singer by sharing his own penned verse, a story verified by Johnny Marr. The lyrics can often be confusing in their meaning – at times fame is placed as of paramount importance, at others the singer would feel ‘more fulfilled making Christmas cards with the mentally ill’ – but this is not a lack of focus. Rather, Moz himself has clarified it as depicting his own thoughts on his new-found fame. ‘Famous’ is still something he always wanted to be, and he still craved it maniacally, but there were times when he would crave the simpler things in life, things that he could no longer do whilst famous. The song also jumps around in terms of timescale; often it sounds like Morrissey is reflecting on his fame, but at other points it sounds like he’s dreaming of it whilst slaving through some menial job. Again, this is not a lack of focus, but rather a way in which the singer can give us both sides of the coin, resulting in the conclusion that fame is both something to be desired and undertaken with caution. Musically, the song is – as Marr pointed out – ‘vaudevillian’ in nature, and a trumpet section (which I quite like, really) was taken out because the guitarist figured that it turned the track into too much of a joke, but it’s already a light-hearted, humorous track anyway. My only problem with it is its positioning as track 2 on ‘The Queen Is Dead’, coming directly after the title track, which kind of robs the album of its initial pace. However, as a standalone track, it’s phenomenally witty and infinitely listenable, and miles better than the similarly toned ‘Some Girls Are Bigger Than Others’, a low note that the album unfortunately finishes on.

Listen to the studio version here.
Listen to the trumpet version here.
Listen to the live version here.

< Message edited by Piles -- 13/1/2012 8:21:09 PM >


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RE: #54: Such bloody awful poetry... - 13/1/2012 8:27:29 PM   
matty_b


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It's a bit throwaway, but all the better for it, really.

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RE: #54: Such bloody awful poetry... - 13/1/2012 8:33:13 PM   
Piles


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quote:

ORIGINAL: matty_b

It's a bit throwaway, but all the better for it, really.


I presume you mean Frankly...? Yeah, I agree, it's not as heavyweight as say the two songs either side of it on the album, but it's a great example of Moz's extraordinary wit and a good example of The Smiths not being miserable...

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RE: #54: Such bloody awful poetry... - 13/1/2012 8:50:34 PM   
matty_b


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Yeah. I mean, it follows on from one of their "important" songs on the album and seems a bit of a frivolity at first, but I can't imagine The Smiths without it.

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RE: #54: Such bloody awful poetry... - 13/1/2012 9:45:10 PM   
Rhubarb


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I like Frankly, Mr Shankly, I can relate to its workshy ethic, though it is the third weakest song on TQID

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RE: #54: Such bloody awful poetry... - 14/1/2012 10:05:32 AM   
Piles


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Rhubarb

I like Frankly, Mr Shankly, I can relate to its workshy ethic, though it is the third weakest song on TQID


I think if you judge the album as a bunch of individual songs it helps it. As I said in the blurb, it's weakened by the 'importance' of the two tracks around it on the album.

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RE: #54: Such bloody awful poetry... - 14/1/2012 11:20:59 AM   
Piles


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53. Girlfriend in a Coma
Writers: Morrissey (lyrics), Marr (music).
Year of composition: 1987.
Appearances on official releases: Released as a single from ‘Strangeways, Here We Come’, as well as appearing on the compilations ‘The Sound of The Smiths’ and the Japanese release ‘Stop Me’.


You only have to look through the list of films, plays, and novels that Morrissey is a fan of – the writings of Oscar Wilde, the works from the Kitchen Sink Realism movement, the films of Pasolini, David Lynch’s ‘The Elephant Man’ – to realize that the singer likes his fiction to have gritty, realistic settings and situations and larger than life characters who are more than a little in tune with the melodramatic. This basic premise has been rife in Morrissey’s work throughout his career, right from ‘Miserable Lie’ and ‘Pretty Girls Make Graves’ through to ‘The Father Who Must Be Killed’ and ‘Life Is A Pigsty’ (where Moz takes something as real as losing love, and adds lyrics like ‘you can shoot me or you can push me off a train!’), but there is no song as in tune with Moz’s melodramatic sensibilities as ‘Girlfriend In A Coma’. A soap opera set in a hospital word, ‘Girlfriend…’ tells the story of a man being torn apart by guilt and false hope, his girlfriend comatose by an unspecified accident that may or may not be his fault. The pangs of guilt stem from times when he ‘could have strangled her’, ironically and wittily setting the lyric off with the false hope that he ‘would hate anything to happen to her’. Flailing around asking staff if they think she’ll pull through, whispering last words, and looking back on the relationship’s troubled past, the protagonist here is conflicted between looking forward and hating what has happened beforehand, and the result is a story of an ostentatiously melodramatic man in a very real, very heartbreaking situation. This is all helped out by Marr’s composition, which offsets grandiose strings (to compliment the melodrama) with an upbeat, reggae-style tune that brilliant counters Moz’s warblings. The track’s primary musical influence is Bob and Marcia’s cover of ‘Young, Gifted, and Black’, an all-out reggae track that both singer and guitarist ‘absolutely adored’, and which the string section particularly owes a debt to. Although the original demo (linked below) is all-out reggae, the finished, single version is toned down, probably to cater more directly to The Smiths’ target audience. And it worked, too, ‘Girlfriend In A Coma’ reaching a not-to-be-sniffed-at posthumous #13.

Listen to the studio version here.
Listen to the ‘reggae’ demo version here.
Listen to a live Morrissey solo version here.

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Top 100 Moz Songs / Top 100 Films

(in reply to Piles)
Post #: 235
RE: #54: Such bloody awful poetry... - 14/1/2012 11:52:56 AM   
matty_b


Posts: 14563
Joined: 19/10/2005
From: Outpost 31 calling McMurtle.
Brilliant song.

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(in reply to Piles)
Post #: 236
RE: #52: I took strange pills... - 14/1/2012 11:56:59 AM   
Piles


Posts: 5545
Joined: 6/8/2007
From: Whalley Range


52. Late Night, Maudlin Street
Writers: Morrissey (lyrics), Stephen Street (music).
Year of composition: 1988.
Appearances on official releases: ‘Viva Hate’.


I’ve said many times during this list that many of the songs on ‘Viva Hate’, released just a few short months after the break-up of The Smiths, are either directly (i.e. ‘I Don’t Mind If You Forget Me’) or indirectly (i.e. ‘Alsatian Cousin’) about Johnny Marr, and ‘Late Night, Maudlin Street’ is yet another song that could be taken to be about the guitarist. ‘When I sleep / with that picture of you framed beside my bed / […] / But I think it’s you in my room, by the bed’, the lyrics go, a sentiment that was originally intended to be on the sleeve of ‘Last Night I Dreamt That Somebody Loved Me’, and given the close proximity between this song’s composition and the painful break-up the reading of this as yet another ‘Johnny song’ is certainly valid. Sandie Shaw, who visited Morrissey during the ‘Viva Hate’ sessions, recalls seeing Morrissey’s strained expression whilst recording the track, and claimed that ‘I cried, he cried’ when their eyes met. This, again, could be taken as a hint that Marr was a primary influence for the lyrics, given that Moz would still doubtlessly have been torn up at what he saw as a betrayal. However, many of the lyrics talk about a time before Morrissey and Marr had even met, and the singer has stated directly that the track is autobiographical. 1972 is given as the year, and the lyrics talk of a young Morrissey fearing the cold of winter, taking ‘strange pills’ (his flirtation with prescription drugs is well known), teenage loneliness, missing the last bus, and losing family members. Whether the framed picture beside Moz’s bed is in fact somebody he knew in a pre-Smiths time (which would make sense considering the rest of the song is set back in the early 70s), or whether he has shrouded the hints towards Marr with nostalgic tales of his childhood years is unknown, but what is clear is that the vocal performance on this track is better than anything else on the album (with perhaps the exception of ‘Everyday is Like Sunday). Whatever the proximity of the memories, Morrissey’s voice is strained and emotional, as if he’s literally battling through the lyrics. Street’s Joni Mitchell-inspired composition takes a back seat, the singer hardly allowing the music to surface amongst his painful memories, and as a result the track is one of the most heartbreaking renditions he has done on this or any other album. Whether about Marr or somebody else, ‘Late Night, Maudlin Street’ is an emotional, turbulent ride through the deep recesses of Morrissey’s mind.

Listen to the studio version here.
Listen to a live version here.

< Message edited by Piles -- 14/1/2012 11:58:29 AM >


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Top 100 Moz Songs / Top 100 Films

(in reply to Piles)
Post #: 237
RE: #54: Such bloody awful poetry... - 14/1/2012 2:19:44 PM   
Rhubarb


Posts: 24508
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: No Direction Home

quote:

ORIGINAL: Piles

53. Girlfriend in a Coma



Literal madness.

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quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan

You organisational skills sicken me, Rhubarb.



(in reply to Piles)
Post #: 238
RE: #54: Such bloody awful poetry... - 14/1/2012 2:19:59 PM   
Rhubarb


Posts: 24508
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: No Direction Home
LNMS is in a decent place though.

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WWLD?


quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan

You organisational skills sicken me, Rhubarb.



(in reply to Rhubarb)
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