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RE: Piles' Top 100 of All-Time

 
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RE: Piles' Top 100 of All-Time - 7/8/2011 11:08:02 PM   
Incanus


Posts: 16000
Joined: 23/7/2008
From: Winterfell
Meanwhile, all interesting choices so far, keep up the good work!

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T h e 2 4 t h F r a m e . c o . u k

Cuiva Olorin
Narendur.
Tira nottolya
Tulta tuolya.
An mauya mahtie
Ter oiomornie
Ter ondicilyar
Mettanna.
Nurunna!

(in reply to Incanus)
Post #: 31
RE: Piles' Top 100 of All-Time - 7/8/2011 11:13:15 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
quote:

ORIGINAL: Incanus

quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

quote:

ORIGINAL: Piles

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rhubarb

I get the impression Tim just likes to watch.


No wonder he invites you and Lee round so often...







Who's Tim and Lee?



They sound oddly like children's entertainers.

(in reply to Incanus)
Post #: 32
RE: Piles' Top 100 of All-Time - 7/8/2011 11:14:47 PM   
Deviation


Posts: 27284
Joined: 2/6/2006
From: Enemies of Film HQ
I've seen My Winnipeg and The Piano Teache, they are amaze.

I've also seen The Trial, it's well good.


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Dpp1978
There are certainly times where calling a person a cunt is not only reasonable, it is a gross understatement.

quote:


ORIGINAL: elab49
I really wish I could go down to see Privates

(in reply to Piles)
Post #: 33
RE: Piles' Top 100 of All-Time - 7/8/2011 11:25:30 PM   
Rhubarb


Posts: 24508
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: No Direction Home

quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

quote:

ORIGINAL: Incanus

quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

quote:

ORIGINAL: Piles

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rhubarb

I get the impression Tim just likes to watch.


No wonder he invites you and Lee round so often...







Who's Tim and Lee?



They sound oddly like children's entertainers.




Is that a Euphemism?

_____________________________

Team Ginge
WWLD?


quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan

You organisational skills sicken me, Rhubarb.



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Post #: 34
RE: Piles' Top 100 of All-Time - 8/8/2011 12:21:12 AM   
Pigeon Army


Posts: 14612
Joined: 29/1/2006
From: Pixar HQ, George Lucas' Office.
Here we go for the hundredth time
Hand grenade pins in every line


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Rinc
She's supposed to be 13! I'd want her to be very attractive though


quote:

ORIGINAL: MonsterCat
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army
Stop being mean to Deviation

No.

(in reply to Rhubarb)
Post #: 35
RE: Piles' Top 100 of All-Time - 8/8/2011 1:08:38 AM   
Piles


Posts: 5545
Joined: 6/8/2007
From: Whalley Range


95. Stardust Memories (1980, Woody Allen, USA)

Sandy Bates (Woody Allen) is a film director who has gone against the grain and created a philosophical and apparently pretentious film that sits oddly against his 'early funny ones'. When invited to go to a festival of his own films, Bates begins to have flashbacks to an old flame (played by Charlotte Rampling) as well as startling revelations about his own life. The first thing that his the viewer whilst watching "Stardust Memories” is that it is overtly autobiographical film that is, contrary to popular belief, more self-aware than it is self-indulgent. Sandy is a clear on-screen incarnation of Allen; tired and fed up of constant references to his early funny films and becoming increasingly aware of the misery of the world around him. What's even more impressive is how open and honest Allen is being in this film about his private life as well as his professional one. In addition to this autobiographical side of the film, there's also the brilliantly constructed commentary on the creative process, as Allen's Sandy fights to get his latest film – a depressing and downbeat story in which everybody dies at the end – made without a tagged on 'Jazz Heaven' ending. There's certainly more than a little bit of an "Eight and a Half” influence here, with the black and white cinematography and the Italian jazz score being the most obvious indications. There are obvious similarities in the themes and the plot, which soon descends into a series of fantastical segments, including a wonderfully done alien landing sequence, which is hilarious as it is unexpected. Add the fact that it's also quite witty in its fragmented self-deconstruction, and what you have is both an enjoyable and profound experience, and also one of Allen's three best films.




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Post #: 36
RE: Piles' Top 100 of All-Time - 8/8/2011 1:10:01 AM   
Piles


Posts: 5545
Joined: 6/8/2007
From: Whalley Range


94. The Palm Beach Story (1942, Preston Sturges, USA)

Popular consensus would probably reveal that “Sullivan’s Travels” (1941) is Preston Sturges’ greatest film. One of four films robbed of the 1941 Best Picture by “How Green Was My Valley?”, Sturges’ film was a brilliant testament to the power of cinema whilst also damning it for its hypocrisies. I would recommend the ’41 film to just about anyone, but with the footnote that Preston Sturges has made better films, or at least one better one. “Palm Beach Story” stars Claudette Colbert and Joel McCrea as a married couple who break up before pairing off with a rich brother and sister combination. However, they soon find themselves drawn back to one another, and also discover a way to overcome their financial difficulties. I think the best thing about this film is how uproariously funny it is, a department which “Sullivan’s Travels” sometimes stumbles on in favour of social commentary (or at least filmic commentary). Claudette Colbert is obviously a well adept comic actress, winning the 1934 Best Actress for her brilliantly charming and witty performance in “It Happened One Night”, and here she exceeds herself as a snobbish but fundamentally pleasant girl wanting to make a better living for herself. Joel McCrea plays to suit as an inventor whose crackpot ideas never have any chance of taking off, and lets his physicality be the outset for his ever-growing frustration. Sturges writes brilliantly, and it often feels like a Wilder or – even better – a Lubitsch film in type. Are the words “even better than Sullivan’s Travels” enough to make you see this film, providing you haven’t already?




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Post #: 37
RE: Piles' Top 100 of All-Time - 8/8/2011 1:11:04 AM   
Piles


Posts: 5545
Joined: 6/8/2007
From: Whalley Range


93. Moolaade (2004, Ousmane Sembene, Senegal)

I’ve only seen two of Ousmane Sembene’s films; ‘Borom Sarret’, which tells the story of a cart driver in Dakar, and this, oft considered his masterpiece. Although I only have the one film to compare it against, if Sembene has made a better film than ‘Moolaade’ I’d be greatly surprised, because his 2004 effort is an important, thrilling story that addresses the subject of female circumcision. Colle is an intelligent, witty, and somewhat matriarchal figure in the village (somewhere in Burkina Faso) that the story is set, and when her daughter, Amasatou, is about to get married and undergo the traditional genital cutting she goes against the grain and opposes it, even when Amasatou herself requests the procedure in order to become more wed-able. Sembene’s film addresses its main theme from different aspects, but the main idea here is that the procedure is so ingrained in the society and the tradition of these people that the dangers are overlooked for no good reason at all. Amasatou is looked down upon by the villagers because she is ‘impure’, and even though Colle explains the physical dangers (possible fatality, possible infertility) and practical issues (sex is painful rather than pleasurable) the dangerous and seemingly pointless ‘traditions’ of religion and society are placed above safety and sanity, seemingly by both men and women. It’s certainly an important film, and I knew it would be before I begun watching it, but I was more surprised to see how thrilling it was. The first hour is a meditative and restrained discussion of the subject, whilst the climactic second hour is a tense, enthralling stand-off as Colle takes more girls into her protection against the practice, and the villagers become more and more hostile. Sembene uses this backdrop of violence and sexism to discuss the role of technology in the village, as well as the general theme of equality, but these discussions take a (rightful) backseat to the often shocking but always enthralling drama of the situation. Throw in some fantastic, stark visuals, and a brilliant central performance from Fatoumata Coulibaly, and it’s easy to see why this is oft hailed as Sembene’s finest work.




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Post #: 38
RE: Piles' Top 100 of All-Time - 8/8/2011 1:12:27 AM   
Piles


Posts: 5545
Joined: 6/8/2007
From: Whalley Range


92. Come and See (1985, Elim Klimov, Russia)

Has a film, not just a war film but any film, as troubling as "Come and See” ever been shot? If it has, I'm yet to see it, and I'm not sure I really want to, because Elem Klimov's masterpiece – that sits just on the verge of my top twenty – is a disturbing and challenging look at World War II. The story sees a young boy, Florya (Aleksei Kravchenko), thrust into the atrocities of the war in Belorussia. He's part of an unequipped Russian resistance movement and witnesses the horrors of war, losing his innocence and eventually his mind. Let's talk about Aleksei Kravchenko, who is hypnotizing as the lead. An inexperienced teenage actor, he manages to create a sense of childlike innocence at the film's beginning and, eventually, hysteria and terror in the film's climax. This truly is one of the greatest child turns, delving deep within himself and finding a performance miles more mature than his years. But it is Klimov who is the true star, creating some of the most memorable, shocking, and downright disturbing visuals of any film. His directional style is both angry and elegant, using both brute force and eloquence to communicate his point. In that way, then, it's similar to "Apocalypse Now” if I were to have to liken it to an American war film, in that it can flit willingly from the breath-takingly beautiful to the gut-wrenchingly horrific within an instant. It really is a shame that Elem Klimov decided to never make a film again after this one, citing that he "lost interested in making films” and that that "everything that was possible I felt I had already done”. It's a shame, because anything half as good as this one would have been appreciated, but I guess he would have always been remembered for this, one of the greatest war films that has ever been made.




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Post #: 39
RE: Piles' Top 100 of All-Time - 8/8/2011 1:13:32 AM   
Piles


Posts: 5545
Joined: 6/8/2007
From: Whalley Range


91. World on a Wire (1973, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Germany)

Preceding "The Matrix” by a full twenty six years, "World on a Wire” is a film about a computer generated 'other world' invented by Professor Volmer (Adrian Hoven) and his assistant Fred Stiller (Klauss Lowitsch). When Volmer suddenly dies, the full responsibility of the computer is left in Stiller's hands, who begins to have some kind of nervous breakdown; people disappear and nobody remembers them, he gets piercing headaches at random intervals, and he begins to believe that somebody is trying to kill him. Some strange hybrid between psychological thriller, science fiction, and neo-noir, "World on a Wire” is a film that clearly pitches hard science against things like philosophy, free-thinking, and art. It asks questions about what it takes to be human and philosophises on an idea that all human behaviour, even that in our real world, is to some extent programmed. It's really not as serious as all that, though, with Fassbinder clearly relishing playing around with his characters as if they, too, are in a computerized world created by the director himself. It's at times free-wheeling (some of the shots are actually stunning, the camera revolving around the room in 360 degree turns before resting on what is, apparently, important in the room), at times deadly focused (the constant shots of mirrors and reflections do wonders in highlighting the underlying themes as well as questioning perceptions), it's a psychologically arresting character study that, despite its great length – never meanders or spirals out of control. There's also a fantastic central performance, which – over the 200 minute length – delves deep into the human psyche and dredges up the full range of human emotion. Stiller is a man consumed by paranoia, perhaps founded paranoia but sensationalist nonetheless, but Klauss Lowitsch manages to keep his performance on the rails, melodramatic only when he's asked to be. Add a fine score (Fassbinder wonderfully – and quite subversively I guess – flits between, or even mixes, classical music and intermissive, noise-based, distortion) and some brilliantly innovative sequence, and what you have is a film that surely sits amongst the best science fiction ever put on celluloid.




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RE: Piles' Top 100 of All-Time - 8/8/2011 1:28:32 AM   
Deviation


Posts: 27284
Joined: 2/6/2006
From: Enemies of Film HQ
Moolade and Come and See are win. 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: Dpp1978
There are certainly times where calling a person a cunt is not only reasonable, it is a gross understatement.

quote:


ORIGINAL: elab49
I really wish I could go down to see Privates

(in reply to Piles)
Post #: 41
RE: Piles' Top 100 of All-Time - 8/8/2011 2:55:06 AM   
Pigeon Army


Posts: 14612
Joined: 29/1/2006
From: Pixar HQ, George Lucas' Office.
So far, so typical Piles.

I've only seen two on the list - The Trial is swell, though not even close to Welles' best films, and we've discussed The Piano Teacher before.


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Rinc
She's supposed to be 13! I'd want her to be very attractive though


quote:

ORIGINAL: MonsterCat
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army
Stop being mean to Deviation

No.

(in reply to Deviation)
Post #: 42
RE: Piles' Top 100 of All-Time - 8/8/2011 5:31:40 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 77555
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo

quote:

ORIGINAL: Piles

because Elem Klimov's masterpiece – that sits just on the verge of my top twenty –



Shouldn't it be higher than 92 then?

_____________________________

So, sir, we let him have it right up! And I have to report, sir, he did not like it, sir.

Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

(in reply to Piles)
Post #: 43
RE: Piles' Top 100 of All-Time - 8/8/2011 9:38:48 AM   
matty_b


Posts: 14550
Joined: 19/10/2005
From: Outpost 31 calling McMurtle.





The Palm Beach Story is great, btw.


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Cool Breeze
Mattyb is a shining example of what the perfect Empire Forum member is.


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Post #: 44
RE: Piles' Top 100 of All-Time - 8/8/2011 11:28:06 AM   
Piles


Posts: 5545
Joined: 6/8/2007
From: Whalley Range
quote:

ORIGINAL: Gimli The Dwarf


quote:

ORIGINAL: Piles

because Elem Klimov's masterpiece – that sits just on the verge of my top twenty –



Shouldn't it be higher than 92 then?


Hehe, that'll teach me to not re-read old reviews before posting. It was just outside the top 20 a long while back.


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Post #: 45
RE: Piles' Top 100 of All-Time - 10/8/2011 8:14:41 PM   
Piles


Posts: 5545
Joined: 6/8/2007
From: Whalley Range


90. Johnny Guitar (1954, Nicholas Ray, USA)

It’s odd that one of the top twenty westerns ever made would be so atypical of the genre, but I guess that’s just how films work. Johnny Guitar, a film where the two rugged strong leads are women and whose big confrontations take place inside rather than outside, with words taking the place of bullets, doesn’t exactly sound like a prime example of the genre. However, if you’re not simply looking for John Wayne shooting up some apaches, it is. The story is of Vienna (Crawford), who owns a big plot of land just outside of a major town and has built a saloon there. She wants to complete a town, but must first wait for a railway to be built through it in order for people to come and spend their well earned cash. However, when four men – including the Dancin’ Kid – who happen to be Vienna’s main customers are accused of murdering one of the townsfolk’s brother, the rest of the town quickly gather a vendetta against her. Just as Johnny ‘Guitar’ (Hayden, an old flame with a quick shot) arrives, the townspeople launch a full-scale attack on Vienna and her customers. It’s a very simple tale, where the heroes (if you can call them heroes... some of them are bank robbers and all of them are, eventually, murderers) wear pastel colours and the villains (if you can call them villains... their motives are half bigotry and half through mourning for dead relatives) wear black, and only one person speaks at a time and everybody waits their turn. It’s almost theatrical in its high drama, extended vocabulary, and words-over-action way of mind. When the action does come along, though, it’s certainly worth the wait. An opening fight between Johnny and one of the Dancin’ Kid’s thugs is comedically rewarding (especially coming after a quite brilliant but admittedly tense half hour opening scene that is all dialogue), whilst the climactic shoot out is both a refreshing change from the norm and brilliantly choreographed. It goes down between Vienna and lead lyncher Emma Small (McCambridge in an inspired turn, where she bullies people into confessions and takes it on her own back to deal out the punishments, almost to the point where we don’t know if her motives are out of grief her brother or simply a lust for revenge) in an girl-on-girl shoot out that, eventually, brings the boys into the action too. Add to this one of the finest western scenes, an uncharacteristically dark exchange at the hanging block where Emma shows her true, dark, brutal colours for the first time, and you have one of the best examples of the genre to date.




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Post #: 46
RE: Piles' Top 100 of All-Time - 10/8/2011 8:15:45 PM   
Piles


Posts: 5545
Joined: 6/8/2007
From: Whalley Range


89. Sleep Furiously (2009, Gideon Koppel, UK)

“Sleep Furiously” is a documentary about rural farm life in a small, sleepy, aging village somewhere in Wales. Koppel’s film, shot in the rural village where his parents (as refugees) found a home, is a moving and quite beautiful one that begins slow and doesn’t really pick up much pace through its slender runtime. Koppel uses his camera like a bystander, positioning it – completely still – and simply letting the action (I didn’t think I’d use the word action to describe this film) unfold in front of it. This, along with the amiable lack of narration, creates the effect that we are outsiders, looking in on a lifestyle that most of us will never fully appreciate or understand. We are given snippets of real life rather than propaganda or opinion, and it’s something quite wonderful to watch. When documentaries so often feel it necessary to say something big about something important, it’s refreshing that a film like “Sleep Furiously” can say something big about life and people without ever needing to load up on cliché or self-important opinion. The film is at its best when it simply captures the landscapes and the people of the small village. There’s certainly a tonal influence of Abbas Kiarostami, particularly his films “Where Is the Friend’s Home?” and “the Wind Will Carry Us”, in the shots of the rolling hills, the standstill camera, and the gentile humour. There’s something strangely hypnotic about watching a van slowly run up the side of one of Wales’ beautiful hills, and the film is full of such shots. The most hypnotic and moving moment in the whole film is certainly of this ilk, accompanied by an inspiring performance from the village’s own choir. The film’s general message is that there is no need to rush, and that happiness can occur when you let life swallow you up and pass you by. In this village, they leave the fighting to the animals, and the only time when they look even close to sorrowful is when they’re confronted by unavoidable conflict. The final shot of the farmhouse’s unused materials being put to auction as they become antiques is a masterstroke, and the sequence involving the stuffed owl, serves a purpose in that they show that everything has a death but nothing ever becomes obsolete, even if they become simply aesthetic artefacts of times gone by. Both aesthetically and artistically, ‘Sleep Furiously’ is an absolute gem.




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Post #: 47
RE: Piles' Top 100 of All-Time - 10/8/2011 8:17:12 PM   
Piles


Posts: 5545
Joined: 6/8/2007
From: Whalley Range


88. A Scene at the Sea (1991, Takeshi Kitano, Japan)

Shigeru (Kurodo Maki) is a young deaf man who works for a trash disposal company. One day, he finds a broken surfboard, decides to fix it, and takes up surfing. Slowly but surely, he gets better on his board, and becomes closer to his apparent girlfriend (Hiroko Oshima). The first thing that hits you whilst watching "A Scene at the Sea” is how different it is to the rest of Kitano's output. Granted, I'd only seen three of his before I watched this film, but "Hana-bi”, "Violent Cop”, and "Zatoichi” are all gloriously violent films that must have got through gallons of theatrical blood. What's more, "Violent Cop” and "Hana-bi”, like – I've come to understand – the majority of the rest of his films, are at heart gangsters and cop films. "A Scene at the Sea”, on the other hand, is not brutal, violent, and doesn't play host to any villains or policemen (beyond a couple of non-speaking roles. Instead, it is the simple story of friendship and love, and also surfing. It's an honest and realistic story of personal growth, and the importance of human relationships. The relationship between the deaf Shigeru and the seemingly mute Takato is beautifully drawn; slowly manufactured over two hours with no dialogue and hardly any emotion either. Shigeru and Takato do not need to hear each other or even talk to each other, they understand each other in silence. Although it's different in content, then, it's not particularly different in directional style or tone; it's still a slow, methodical, and minimalist tale, and Kitano's framing of landscapes is as good here as it is in "Zatoichi” or "Hana-bi”. The performances, too, are quite brilliant, with Kurodo Maki clearly filling in for a younger version of Kitano himself (who, I believe, doesn't appear in this film). The script is superb (even the 'comic relief' characters are likeable, which isn't exactly a guarantee), and the score – the first collaboration between Kitano and Joe Hisaishi – is beautifully emotive. "A Scene at the Sea” is probably Kitano's very  best, or at least the best that I've seen.




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Post #: 48
RE: Piles' Top 100 of All-Time - 10/8/2011 8:18:31 PM   
Piles


Posts: 5545
Joined: 6/8/2007
From: Whalley Range


87. McCabe and Mrs Miller (1971, Robert Altman, USA)

McCabe (Warren Beatty) is a charismatic but somewhat unintelligent gambler who arrives in a North-Western town with ambitions of building a whorehouse. Mrs Miller (Julie Christie) is an experienced former Madam who arrives shortly afterwards and offers her experience and business acumen to McCabe, in exchange for a cut of the profits. The brothel prospers, but before long a large corporation arrives (ostensibly to claim the town’s mining deposits) with intentions of buying out McCabe & Mrs Miller. This western, which just so happens to be Robert Altman’s best film (for my money, anyway), is as grim and as unforgiving as westerns get, and the main purpose of it is to show some of the harsher realities of the old west in all of their ‘glory’. Too many of these films (mainly made a decade or so before this one) present the west as an era for gunslinging heroes who go on romantic adventures, but here we’re shown the other side of the coin; prostitution, ruthless budding capitalism, and inevitable violence. Altman washes away the romanticism and glamour and all that remains is the harsh, sometimes brutal truth. We do get a shootout (as genre convention almost guarantees), but here it’s a strategic, restrained battle, conducted mostly in silence on a slow-laced hill, the serenity of the setting impended only by the occasional gun shot and the occasional blood spill. What makes it truly unconventional, though, is that our purported ‘hero’ is quite plainly terrified of his pursuers, another manner in which Altman aims to show the truth of the time. The idea of heroes, it seems, is just as much of a myth as the romanticism of the adventures we see in countless Wayne westerns. Beautifully framed by Altman with some fantastic, sometimes haunting music (mostly by Leonard Cohen), and with two towering central performances from Beatty and Christie, “McCabe & Mrs Miller” is one of the very best ‘westerns’ ever made – even if it barely fits in with the rest of the films from its genre.




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Post #: 49
RE: Piles' Top 100 of All-Time - 10/8/2011 8:19:40 PM   
Piles


Posts: 5545
Joined: 6/8/2007
From: Whalley Range


86. Rear Window (1954, Alfred Hitchcock, USA)

It’s only when I come to write this review that I realize that “Rear Window” is the only Alfred Hitchcock film that I’ve included within this top 100. It’s odd, because there’s probably close to a dozen of his films that were in contention (“Psycho”, “Strangers on a Train”, and “Vertigo” to name but three), but if I was going to include only one of the great man’s pictures I’m glad it’s this one, because “Rear Window” is absolutely his masterpiece. It tells the story of a bedridden photographer (played by James Stewart) who begins to watch his neighbors and suspect one of them of murder. With the aid of his glamorous girlfriend (Grace Kelly), he takes his investigations further, never fully sure if his suspicions are right or if his enclosed, bedridden nature has left him paranoid. Hitchcock has always suffered from accusations of finding some sort of glee in the voyeurism of filmmaking, and “Rear Window” is probably the best case study for such an accusation. His lead character is enclosed, mostly alone, and plainly bored, and his first inclination is to lean towards spying through the windows of his disparate bunch of neighbors (yearning for some sort of human contact or just interested in the romanticism of spying, I don’t know) – a budding musician, a practicing dancer, a lonely old lady, and a potential murder, amongst others. That Hitchcock’s own camera never leaves the apartment gives the eerie impression that we’re sitting alongside Stewart’s Jeffries, the director probably hinting at how his audience is finding the voyeurism as thrilling as his main character. What’s most appealing about the film, though, is Hitchcock’s ability to drum up so much tension, peril, and drama from such a basic premise. Without leaving a single room (but zooming into others, obviously), Hitchcock racks of the tension to fever pitch, until his quite incredible climax, which only involves two men but is as exciting and as thrilling as any of his other, much more convoluted finales. Throw in a brilliant Stewart performance (you could easily argue that he’s better in “Vertigo”, and you’d probably be right), Robert Burks’ simple but excellent cinematography, and Franz Waxman’s tense, haunting score, and what you have is Hitchcock’s masterpiece.




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RE: Piles' Top 100 of All-Time - 10/8/2011 8:25:54 PM   
FritzlFan


Posts: 4793
Joined: 19/11/2008
From: Bristol
Great choices at 87 & 86 bro

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Post #: 51
RE: Piles' Top 100 of All-Time - 10/8/2011 8:34:12 PM   
Piles


Posts: 5545
Joined: 6/8/2007
From: Whalley Range
quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan

Great choices at 87 & 86 bro


Cheers bro. Your praise feels good man.


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Post #: 52
RE: Piles' Top 100 of All-Time - 10/8/2011 8:37:32 PM   
impqueen


Posts: 7474
Joined: 24/7/2006
The Trial - Welles is always brilliant even "lesser" works such as The Stranger are generally far more watchable than most films, The Trial is a fantastic film and a hundred times better than The Stanger. I'm particularly fond of Perkins' performance, a great film.

Le Plaisir - A good film but not my favourite Ophuls.

My Winnipeg - I enjoyed this but I didn't fall in love with it, it certainly deserves a rewatch though.

Stardust Memories - I've never been enamoured with Allen however I do like Stardust an awful lot.

The Palm Beach Story - I have a hazy memory of this so it needs a rewatch though being a Sturges film it's no doubt brilliant.

Moolaade - Only seen it once, it was excellent, though I prefer Xala.

Come and See - Yep, once one of my all time favourite films but I really have no desire to ever watch it again.

World on a Wire - Never Seen, Really Want to it sounds grand.

Johnny Guitar - I actually wooted out loud at seeing this, I usually can not stand Crawford but here she and the cast are superb, Ray is an underrated filmmaker.

Sleep Furiously - "‘Sleep Furiously’ is an absolute gem." Yep.

A Scene at the Sea - Not Seen.

McCabe and Mrs Miller - Wonderful film, really glad you praised both lead performances.

Rear Window - Class.

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(in reply to Piles)
Post #: 53
RE: Piles' Top 100 of All-Time - 10/8/2011 8:42:01 PM   
Piles


Posts: 5545
Joined: 6/8/2007
From: Whalley Range
Cheers for the comment impqueen, glad you like most of the films on the list so far.

quote:

ORIGINAL: impqueen

Le Plaisir - A good film but not my favourite Ophuls.


May I ask what is? I think I've seen 5 of his (The Reckless Moment, La Ronde, Madame de..., Letters from an Unknown Woman, and this) and I think Le Plaisir is my favourite.


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Top 100 Moz Songs / Top 100 Films

(in reply to impqueen)
Post #: 54
RE: Piles' Top 100 of All-Time - 10/8/2011 8:53:16 PM   
impqueen


Posts: 7474
Joined: 24/7/2006
quote:

ORIGINAL: Piles

Cheers for the comment impqueen, glad you like most of the films on the list so far.

quote:

ORIGINAL: impqueen

Le Plaisir - A good film but not my favourite Ophuls.


May I ask what is? I think I've seen 5 of his (The Reckless Moment, La Ronde, Madame de..., Letters from an Unknown Woman, and this) and I think Le Plaisir is my favourite.



I really love Lola Montès, Madame de..., Letters From an Unknown Woman and Caught I also quite like La Ronde and Liebelei though not as much. I have a massive amount of love and a lot of admiration for The Reckless Moment and though there isn't too much difference between them, Moment appeals and is one of my Top 100 Films.

< Message edited by impqueen -- 10/8/2011 8:54:28 PM >


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(in reply to Piles)
Post #: 55
RE: Piles' Top 100 of All-Time - 10/8/2011 8:56:59 PM   
swordsandsandals


Posts: 12571
Joined: 6/1/2006
From: A magical forest
This list is pretentious.

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quote:

ORIGINAL: Rawlinson

Swords is right about everything.



quote:

ORIGINAL: Hood_Man

Swords smells like bum.



(in reply to impqueen)
Post #: 56
RE: Piles' Top 100 of All-Time - 10/8/2011 9:07:11 PM   
Piles


Posts: 5545
Joined: 6/8/2007
From: Whalley Range
quote:

ORIGINAL: swordsandsandals

This list is pretentious.


Great input bro.


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Top 100 Moz Songs / Top 100 Films

(in reply to swordsandsandals)
Post #: 57
RE: Piles' Top 100 of All-Time - 10/8/2011 9:08:53 PM   
Piles


Posts: 5545
Joined: 6/8/2007
From: Whalley Range
quote:

ORIGINAL: impqueen

quote:

ORIGINAL: Piles

Cheers for the comment impqueen, glad you like most of the films on the list so far.

quote:

ORIGINAL: impqueen

Le Plaisir - A good film but not my favourite Ophuls.


May I ask what is? I think I've seen 5 of his (The Reckless Moment, La Ronde, Madame de..., Letters from an Unknown Woman, and this) and I think Le Plaisir is my favourite.



I really love Lola Montès, Madame de..., Letters From an Unknown Woman and Caught I also quite like La Ronde and Liebelei though not as much. I have a massive amount of love and a lot of admiration for The Reckless Moment and though there isn't too much difference between them, Moment appeals and is one of my Top 100 Films.


I've been meaning to see Lola Montes for a while, I've had it ready to watch for a long time. I'm looking forward to it, the standard of his that I've seen so far has been quite high.


_____________________________

Top 100 Moz Songs / Top 100 Films

(in reply to impqueen)
Post #: 58
RE: Piles' Top 100 of All-Time - 10/8/2011 9:59:27 PM   
Olaf


Posts: 23695
Joined: 26/2/2007
From: 41°N 93°W
I am just posting in this thread to say that I watched World On A Wire after reading the review here (it's been sitting on my hard drive for about ten months). Really rather brilliant, so cheers son.

of the others I watched recently, I've been watching a few more Sturges films on recommendation of the boy Miles and The Palm Beach Story is a great little film. I still think Hail The Conquering Hero is his best though (one of my favourite films ever pretty much), and probably Sullivan's Travels as well. I also watched Welles's The Trial about a fortnight ago, which is also rather excellent.


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(in reply to Incanus)
Post #: 59
RE: Piles' Top 100 of All-Time - 10/8/2011 10:12:41 PM   
Piles


Posts: 5545
Joined: 6/8/2007
From: Whalley Range
quote:

ORIGINAL: Olaf

I am just posting in this thread to say that I watched World On A Wire after reading the review here (it's been sitting on my hard drive for about ten months). Really rather brilliant, so cheers son.

of the others I watched recently, I've been watching a few more Sturges films on recommendation of the boy Miles and The Palm Beach Story is a great little film. I still think Hail The Conquering Hero is his best though (one of my favourite films ever pretty much), and probably Sullivan's Travels as well. I also watched Welles's The Trial about a fortnight ago, which is also rather excellent.



Glad you liked World on a Wire. (I say that like I had some sort of part in making it).

Hail the Conquering Hero, I'm unsure about. I liked it but I definitely found it to be weaker Sturges if I'm honest. Sullivan's Travels is amazing though, just missed out on my 100.


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Top 100 Moz Songs / Top 100 Films

(in reply to Olaf)
Post #: 60
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