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RE: My Top 650 Films

 
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RE: My Top 650 Films - 31/7/2011 1:51:59 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 78780
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo
Good film.

_____________________________

So, sir, we let him have it right up! And I have to report, sir, he did not like it, sir.

Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 121
RE: My Top 650 Films - 31/7/2011 11:01:11 AM   
impqueen


Posts: 7474
Joined: 24/7/2006
L'armee des ombres is one of the best films ever made, a constant of my Top 50.

< Message edited by impqueen -- 2/8/2011 9:48:28 AM >


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Post #: 122
RE: My Top 650 Films - 31/7/2011 2:06:05 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 44908
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
Yeah, it's a regular in my own top 30.

(in reply to impqueen)
Post #: 123
RE: My Top 650 Films - 31/7/2011 2:20:18 PM   
Pigeon Army


Posts: 14612
Joined: 29/1/2006
From: Pixar HQ, George Lucas' Office.
Not my favourite Melville by a long shot (though that's because I would rather have a threesome with Alain Delon and Deviation's mum than with Lino Ventura and Deviation's mum), but still pretty great. Certainly, deserving of place in a list of 650 films.

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ORIGINAL: Rinc
She's supposed to be 13! I'd want her to be very attractive though


quote:

ORIGINAL: MonsterCat
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army
Stop being mean to Deviation

No.

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Post #: 124
RE: My Top 650 Films - 2/8/2011 9:40:39 AM   
matty_b


Posts: 14585
Joined: 19/10/2005
From: Outpost 31 calling McMurtle.
That Melville film sounds good and it's on this boxset - http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Jean-Pierre-Melville-Collection-DVD/dp/B001N4KBBU/ref=wl_it_dp_o?ie=UTF8&coliid=I1LFQTA1MYO417&colid=AL0VXKX5X38U

What are the rest of those films like?


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Post #: 125
RE: My Top 650 Films - 2/8/2011 2:04:39 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 44908
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
That's an absolutely fantastic set. Good price too. Snap it up.

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Post #: 126
RE: My Top 650 Films - 3/8/2011 10:36:47 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 44908
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
19.
Arsenic And Old Lace
(1944; Frank Capra)



Cast: Cary Grant, Josephine Hull, Jean Adair, Raymond Massey, Peter Lorre
Country: USA

Spoilers ahead

A drama critic and writer many a  book dismissing marriage, Mortimer Brewster (Grant), has finally fallen in love and gotten married to the girl next door, Elaine Harper (Priscilla Lane) He visits his elderly aunts and their brother Teddy (Who thinks he's Theodore Roosevelt), to tell them the good news. While there he makes an unsettling discovery, a corpse hidden in a window-seat. Believing it to be the work of Teddy, he tells his aunt that he will have to be sent to an asylum, only to be told the truth by his adorable but insane relatives, they murdered the man in the window-seat, and he wasn't the first. They've been poisoning lonely bachelors in an attempt to end what they feel is their misery and burying the bodies in the cellar. The arrival of Jonathan, Mortimer's more criminal, brother (Massey) creates further chaos. Jonathan is a psychotic gangster, on the run from the cops and trying to dispose of his latest corpse, and he's brought his alcoholic plastic surgeon (Lorre) along for the ride. Mortimer has to try and avoid being murdered by Jonathan while alerting the local cops to his danger, think of a way to cover up for his aunts and Teddy's activities, as well as keep Elaine away from danger, all the while worrying that the madness that afflicts the rest of his family will take a hold of him too.

Just reading that synopsis back to myself and it sounds like this is an incredibly dark film, more like a film Grant would have made with a director like Hitchcock rather than Capra. But don't be fooled, Arsenic is a classic farce and one of the funniest comedies ever to come out of Hollywood. Make no mistake, the humour is black and incredibly macabre, maybe surprisingly so when you consider the environment it would have been made in. Farces sometimes don't translate well to cinema, that kinetic energy that's needed to pull it off on stage can sometimes seem stilted and false on camera, thankfully Arsenic And Old Lace avoids that pitfall, thanks in no small part to the amazing cast.

Despite some critical negativity towards his performance, I always thought Grant commanded the show and the film just wouldn't work without his sheer manic energy. There's a shot late in the film where the house is in chaos and Grant, nearing breaking point just sits down on the stairs and takes it all in. This rare calm moment from Grant in this film, where the hysteria in his mind plays out across his face rather than his whole body, demonstrates not just why he was possibly the greatest comedic actor of all time, but why he was one of the most interesting and underrated actors ever to step in front of a camera.

That's not to knock any of the support, while I wish I could have seen the original stage actor, Boris Karloff, in the Jonathan role, Massey does some top-notch work. Lorre manages that peculiar trick of his of being both creepy and sympathetic, sometimes in the same moment. The strongest of the support performances come from the wonderful Josephine Hull and Jean Adair as his aunts, two gentle, sedate, charming women, who just happen to have poisoned numerous men and buried them in the basement.

Arsenic... has a huge place in my heart because it's the first Cary Grant film I ever saw. It started a lifelong love, not just of Grant's films, but of screwball comedy in general. I owe this film so much, and while I think there are greater Grant films and greater screwball comedies, Arsenic will always be among my favourite films.




< Message edited by rawlinson -- 17/8/2011 5:05:32 PM >

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Post #: 127
RE: My Top 650 Films - 3/8/2011 11:30:13 PM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 78780
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo
AWESOME!

_____________________________

So, sir, we let him have it right up! And I have to report, sir, he did not like it, sir.

Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 128
RE: My Top 650 Films - 10/8/2011 3:59:29 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 44908
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
20.
Ashes of Time
(1994; Wong Kar-wai)




Cast: Leslie Cheung, Maggie Cheung,Brigitte Lin, Tony Leung, Tony Leung, Jackie Cheung
Country: Hong Kong

Challenging In the Mood for Love as my favourite WKW film is this beautiful (loose, very loose) adaptation of the novel "The Eagle Shooting Heroes" Ashes of Time has been criticised a lot of the years for being confusing. I don't think it really is, I think it can become easy to lose track of who is who, especially when you have Brigitte Lin playing two characters, one who wants to kill the lover of their sibling and one who wants to kill their sibling for wanting to kill their lover, but careful viewing shouldn't be a chore. Leslie Cheung plays Feng Ouyang, a desert dweller who acts as an agent for various swordsmen. People with troubles come to him and he arranges protection, or a murder, or whatever they need.

This should have been a failure, when other Asian directors more traditionally associated with dramas than martial arts epics have turned to the genre the results have always struck me as hollow (Crouching Tiger, Hero, House of Daggers) but Ashes of Time is achingly beautiful, both in terms of visuals and emotional weight. WKW, as always, gives us characters in emotional turmoil. Everyone in the film, including Cheung, is troubled by a lost or unrequited love of some kind. They use Ouyang's services for revenge, or as a way to help forget. WKW also subverts the ideas traditionally associated with action cinema. The action sequences are stunning, but they never play out as you crisply as you might expect given the genre. If you're looking for traditional Hong Kong action, this really isn't the film for you. Even the very notion of the wandering swordsman as an icon of cool is torn apart. Here they're just lonely or bitter, the film is about the despair at the heart of these characters. It's a visually intoxicating work, so tactile that you can almost feel every motion in the fight scenes. But ultimately it's a film of grief and loss, of emotional isolation and the effects it can have on a life. Just a work of art.



< Message edited by rawlinson -- 17/8/2011 5:05:49 PM >

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Post #: 129
RE: My Top 650 Films - 10/8/2011 4:04:29 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 44908
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
21.
As I Was Moving Ahead Occasionally I Saw Brief Glimpses of Beauty
(2000; Jonas Mekas)



Country: USA

Mekas is one of the great figures in American avant-garde cinema. Director of a series of largely unknown masterpieces over the years, this is probably his finest achievement. This is basically an incredibly lengthy collection of the director's home movies. You see him document his marriage, his children, his daily life, his friends, and his unending quest to find moments of beauty in life. It's a declaration of love, and happiness, and another one of those great films about memory. It actually works as a visual journal of Mekas' life, if a five hour running time seems overlong, you have to remember that this isn't a narrative film, it's someone documenting years of their life. If you were to do the same would you be able to cram the precious moments into 90 minutes? It works best as a journal or diary, and a viewer might not be able to take it all in one go, it doesn't seem to follow any logic other than the rhythm that Mekas felt best accompanied the work, but I don't see that as a negative. It's one of the most intimate and moving films I've ever seen. Not for everyone, but those who do get it will absolutely adore it.

 

< Message edited by rawlinson -- 17/8/2011 5:06:06 PM >

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Post #: 130
RE: My Top 650 Films - 10/8/2011 5:45:31 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 78780
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo
I have Ashes of Time to watch. I generally find home movies to be dull and dreary, so a 5 hour long one might not be the thing for me

_____________________________

So, sir, we let him have it right up! And I have to report, sir, he did not like it, sir.

Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 131
RE: My Top 650 Films - 10/8/2011 7:16:14 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 44908
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
You should watch Ashes of Time asap. S'wonderful. 

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Post #: 132
RE: My Top 650 Films - 10/8/2011 7:16:44 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 44908
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
I really should have gone with 1000. I'm realising how much I left out and I'm weeping. 

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Post #: 133
RE: My Top 650 Films - 10/8/2011 7:57:11 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 78780
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo
Annoying, isn't it? I have a good 300/400 that I could quite easily swap any of into the bottom half of my list. And even after that lot, there's still god knows how many I still think deserve a mention. I give 4* to about half of what I watch, I want them all in a list.




_____________________________

So, sir, we let him have it right up! And I have to report, sir, he did not like it, sir.

Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 134
RE: My Top 650 Films - 11/8/2011 12:15:02 AM   
siegfried


Posts: 13582
Joined: 16/12/2007
From: Long ago and far away
I admire you guys just for doing it. Being the lazy sod that I am, I'd probably give up before I even got half way. Making the list would probably be the easiest part, but when it comes to actually sitting down and writing the reviews to go with the choices I just don't think I'd have the stickability. So keep up the good work, both of you. I'm following your lists with great interest.

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Post #: 135
RE: My Top 650 Films - 11/8/2011 4:34:30 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 44908
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
quote:

ORIGINAL: siegfried

I admire you guys just for doing it. Being the lazy sod that I am, I'd probably give up before I even got half way. Making the list would probably be the easiest part, but when it comes to actually sitting down and writing the reviews to go with the choices I just don't think I'd have the stickability. So keep up the good work, both of you. I'm following your lists with great interest.


Thanks As Gimli says, the main battle really is sticking to the films once you have your list sorted. Unless you write all the reviews before you even start posting. Otherwise the time it takes to get them written and online just prompts you to go back over the ones you left out and realise you shouldn't have.

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Post #: 136
RE: My Top 650 Films - 11/8/2011 6:00:08 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 78780
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo
It helps if you barely write anything at all, like in my current list But the only way I did the LOTR was by writing everything first, else it's still be going on.

_____________________________

So, sir, we let him have it right up! And I have to report, sir, he did not like it, sir.

Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 137
RE: My Top 650 Films - 11/8/2011 10:44:14 AM   
jackassfan

 

Posts: 2754
Joined: 1/10/2005
Out of the 21 films i have seen 11/21

Rating the last 6 that i have seen

Amer 4/10The Apartment 10/10Apocalypse Now 8/10The Apu Trilogy 8.5/10Army Of Shadows 9.5/10Arsenic And Old Lace 10/10

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Post #: 138
RE: My Top 650 Films - 13/8/2011 12:59:45 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 44908
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
quote:

ORIGINAL: Gimli The Dwarf

It helps if you barely write anything at all, like in my current list But the only way I did the LOTR was by writing everything first, else it's still be going on.


I'm thinking I might have to drop back on how much I'm writing in order to just tear through the list.

quote:

Rating the last 6 that i have seen

Amer 4/10The Apartment 10/10Apocalypse Now 8/10The Apu Trilogy 8.5/10Army Of Shadows 9.5/10Arsenic And Old Lace 10/10


Ouch, disliked Amer that much?

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Post #: 139
RE: My Top 650 Films - 13/8/2011 1:07:28 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 44908
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
22.
Assault on Precinct 13
(1976; John Carpenter)



Cast: Austin Stoker, Darwin Joston, Laurie Zimmer, Martin West
Country: USA


Spoilers ahead.

It's the last day for the old Anderson precinct, a small South Central Los Angeles police station. Lieutenant Ethan Bishop (Stoker) has been left in charge of the precinct during its last few hours. All the other cops have gone to their new post, except for a skeleton staff of officer Chaney and secretaries Leigh and Julie. They're expecting a quiet last day, but events conspire against them. A prison bus is forced to stop at the station to seek medical help for one of the prisoners. Among the convicts being transported is Napoleon Wilson (Joston), a highly intelligent killer. Meanwhile, one of the LA gangs has recently stolen a shipment of firearms. Following a exchange of fire with LAPD, the gangs swear vengeance against the city. A gang member shoots a little girl while buying an ice cream (still a shocking scene even now, although one that provoked stunned laughter the first time I saw it), her father kills the murderer and then finds himself hunted down by the gang members. He just happens to run to the Anderson precinct. The gang surround the precinct, cutting the phone lines and opening fire whenever someone steps outside. Soon, half of the small group will be dead and cop and convict will have to join forces to defeat the outside threat.

There's something distressing on a deeper level about this kind of film, when the gangs go wild, the police are supposed to protect the public, but what happens when the police are the ones being terrorised? Like many of Carpenter's films, it's essentially an ode to Rio Bravo, it also helps set many of the themes for future Carpenter's work, the heroes as morally ambiguous badasses, stuck in isolation and being stalked by a seemingly inhuman threat. It's as raw and gritty as they come, the rough edges betraying the low budget, but adding to the authenticity of the film. Despite it seeming like a modern day western, it's a film that fits perfectly alongside Carpenter's later horror work. The nihilism of the piece, the unrelenting enemy, it could be Night of the Living Dead in a police station. Carpenter makes excellent use of his limited locations, trapping the characters and creating an incredible sense of isolation and tension. Assault is a masterpiece of economy, the dialogue tells us just what we need to know to create strong characters. Anything that's unnecessary doesn't make the cut, with the script relying on behavioural tics to demonstrate character instead of lengthy speeches. The performances are better than you might expect from such low budget roots, with Stoker and Joston in particular turning in strong work. One of the best examples of what low budget cinema is capable of, and a masterpiece from the period when Carpenter was one of the greatest directors in the world.



< Message edited by rawlinson -- 17/8/2011 5:06:26 PM >

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Post #: 140
RE: My Top 650 Films - 13/8/2011 9:25:32 AM   
matty_b


Posts: 14585
Joined: 19/10/2005
From: Outpost 31 calling McMurtle.
Superb choice.

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Post #: 141
RE: My Top 650 Films - 13/8/2011 10:48:34 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 44908
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
quote:

ORIGINAL: matty_b

Superb choice.


It's on my list, of course it is.

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Post #: 142
RE: My Top 650 Films - 13/8/2011 10:51:39 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 44908
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
23.
L'atalante
(1934; Jean Vigo)




Cast: Michel Simon, Dita Parlo, Jean Daste, Gilles Margaritis
Country: France

Spoilers ahead

Jean (Daste) is captain of the L'Atalante, a canal barge. He's newly married to Juliette (Parlo), the film opens with them leaving the church and heading to Jean's boat and the couple honeymoon by taking a boat-ride to Paris, something that also doubles as work as they make a cargo delivery along the way. The crew are unhappy about a woman being on board, but the main conflict comes from Jean's jealousy when he sees Juliette talking to first mate Jules (Simon). In Paris, someone flirts with Juliette, leading to another fight. Unhappy with her marriage, the drudgery of the boat, and overwhelmed by the bright lights of Paris, Juliette leaves to explore the city. Heartbroken, Jean sails off without her, leaving Jules to find her to try and reunite the couple.

The plot isn't really up to much, I know, but the plot is simply the bones of the film and the realism is washed over in waves of dreamlike surrealism. What's important here is the haunting imagery and the understanding of humanity that Vigo displays. Vigo only made four films before he died, but he's one of the artform's most important voices, combining realism with poetic imagery in a way that's rarely been matched since. Vigo directed the film while knowing he was dying, working through the illness to pour his soul into the finished product and the end result remains unsettling even today. There's something languid and hypnotic about Vigo's work that helps create a somewhat magical air around the whole film. This is aided greatly by Boris Kaufman's haunting cinematography, L'Atalante is surely one of the most visually beautiful films ever made. But it's not just the visuals that make L'Atalante such a classic. It's also a greatly sensual film, one of the most genuinely erotic ever filmed, perfectly capturing the physicality of new love. And there's an understanding of symbolism that creates a great depth beneath the deceptively simple plot, something that reveals Vigo's great understanding of humanity.

Parlo and Daste make a believable and sympathetic couple and the nature of how a newly married couple have to adjust and compromise to each other is well captured by both, but this is Simon's show. In many ways Simon's Jules is actually the lead of the film and one of the greatest actors of all time gives one of the greatest performances of all time. He makes Jules into an incredibly complex figure. Almost taking a mothering role towards Jean at times and you can sense some form of sexual desire towards his captain as well as his new bride. But it's also Jules, a figure of great contradictions in himself, that helps keep balance in the film between femininity and masculinity. It's a mesmerizing turn.



< Message edited by rawlinson -- 17/8/2011 5:04:10 PM >

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Post #: 143
RE: My Top 650 Films - 13/8/2011 10:53:56 PM   
FritzlFan


Posts: 4793
Joined: 19/11/2008
From: Bristol
quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

23.
L'atalante
(1934; Jean Vigo)







Excellent choice.


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Miles Messervy 007

Child labour is necessary in the short term




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Post #: 144
RE: My Top 650 Films - 13/8/2011 11:01:42 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 44908
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.


I'm glad you approve.

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Post #: 145
RE: My Top 650 Films - 14/8/2011 9:18:16 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 44908
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
24.
Au hasard Balthazar
(1966; Robert Bresson)




Cast: Anne Wiazemsky, Walter Green, Francois Lafarge, Jean-Claude Guilbert
Country: France/Sweden

Spoilers ahead

A film about the life and death of a donkey isn't an obvious choice for one of the greatest films of all time, but over the last few years I've come to believe that it's not only Bresson's masterpiece, it's one of the greatest films in history. I'd go so far as to say it would take a heartless soul not to be moved by this beautiful yet despairing film. Balthazar is born into servitude and exploited for most of his days, taken from a kindly owner and subjected to various kinds of tortures and cruelties by later owners. It's a stark and cruel film, especially for what it says about people, how vile and wretched most of the characters are, and it depicts a hard world where Balthazar is subjected to the worst of humanity, most strikingly embodied in the brutal Gerard.

Much has been made of Balthazar's symbolical significance. Is he a symbol of innocence, of patience, of forgiveness, or the dangers of passive acceptance? Bresson saw donkeys as sensitive and thoughtful (although any Milne fan could tell you that) and you can see it as a pure and noble soul literally beaten down by an uncaring society. Many see it as a saint or Christ allegory, and there are a lot of clues to this, first off, he's a donkey. I'd like to think even the most secular of souls would understand the significance without being prompted with a rousing chorus of Little Donkey, the animal dies on a hill carrying the sins of mankind, he even gets called a saint. It's far more than a simple Christian allegory though, this is not Narnia and Bresson seems to see more despair in the world than C.S. Lewis. I think the viewer projects what he wants to see onto Balthazar. Speaking of Balthazar, what a performance, the donkey is front and centre and does incredible work, it's one of the best animal performances in cinema, and better than a lot of humans have proved capable of. Ultimately, it's a sad and disturbing portrait of humanity and it's incredibly difficult to watch at times, I've seen some of the most extreme films ever made, yet few upset me like Balthazar. It's a masterpiece, and that final scene will leave you speechless.



< Message edited by rawlinson -- 17/8/2011 5:03:50 PM >

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Post #: 146
RE: My Top 650 Films - 14/8/2011 9:35:46 PM   
MonsterCat


Posts: 7949
Joined: 24/3/2011
From: St. Albans, Hertfordshire
Fritzlfan, stop posting that gif. It's deeply disturbing and I've had actual nightmares about it.

_____________________________

"I am a writer, a doctor, a nuclear physicist and a theoretical philosopher. But above all, I am a man, a hopelessly inquisitive man, just like you."

Films watched in 2013

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Post #: 147
RE: My Top 650 Films - 14/8/2011 9:39:36 PM   
FritzlFan


Posts: 4793
Joined: 19/11/2008
From: Bristol


Sorry bro.



Edit - I haven't seen a single Bresson.


< Message edited by FritzlFan -- 14/8/2011 9:40:06 PM >


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Miles Messervy 007

Child labour is necessary in the short term




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Post #: 148
RE: My Top 650 Films - 14/8/2011 9:53:11 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 44908
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
Is it from Marquis?

(in reply to FritzlFan)
Post #: 149
RE: My Top 650 Films - 14/8/2011 9:56:27 PM   
FritzlFan


Posts: 4793
Joined: 19/11/2008
From: Bristol
It is, though I've not seen it.

It looks incredible. However, due to its hype and low budget, I assume it to be mediocre.


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Miles Messervy 007

Child labour is necessary in the short term




(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 150
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