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Submarine - 18/3/2011 7:11:26 PM   
Empire Admin

 

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Submarine - 18/3/2011 7:11:27 PM   
R W

 

Posts: 352
Joined: 23/6/2006
Director/Screenwriter: Richard Ayoade
Starring: Craig Roberts, Yasmin Paige, Noah Taylor, Sally Hawkins, Paddy Considine

Synopsis
Oliver Tate (Roberts) is a fifteen-year-old boy who has two objectives: To lose his virginity before his next birthday, and to stop his mother (Hawkins) from leaving his father (Taylor) for her mystic (Considine).

Review
Years before his feature-length debut, my only knowledge towards Richard Ayoade was his performance as the ultra-nerdy Moss from the Channel 4 sitcom The IT Crowd which I am not a big fan of, but on the basis of seeing a few episodes, the character of Moss was indeed funny. Although he will perhaps be most remembered for the aforementioned sitcom, with Submarine he has done something greater.

Based on the novel by Joe Dunthorne, this is a comical coming-of-age story of a boy who is best described as being… a bit off. Although his thorough narration says that he is an important figure, in reality he is awkward and unpopular, despite succeeding at dating a pyromaniac.

One of the pleasures of the film is that many people can have different views towards the character of Oliver Tate, in as much as that his methods of communicating make him an uncomfortable presence. To show a more positive side of Tate, he imagines his own life as being a movie as beautifully displayed in the early romantic sequences that are shown in the form of a Super 8 film.

After directing TV and music videos (for me personally he directed a fabulous music video of Heads Will Roll by the Yeah Yeah Yeahs), Ayoade applies various cinematic styles to his first film as director, such as using different film formats. In terms of using other techniques on a small budget, there are quick cuts, moving still images and visual voiceovers, so it shows that Ayoade is achieving technical astonishment.

With a comedy background, Ayoade puts his deadpan sense of humour on screen as the life of Oliver Tate is a hilarious life to experience. As played by newcomer Craig Roberts, Oliver’s blank expressions and out-of-place persona makes him an irresistible comic presence. However, there is a strong level of drama during the course of the film as the protagonist realises his own flaws and how he isolates himself from others including his girlfriend and parents, in which the story takes a tragic turn.

With Submarine being strictly told through its protagonist, Ayoade could’ve explored more of the interiors of the supporting cast, particularly Yasmin Paige as the pyromaniac love interest who indeed shines as being open-hearted but tough. As for the adults, Noah Taylor and Sally Hawkins are terrific at being the boring married couple who have no physical contact with each other, while Paddy Considine is in scene-chewing fashion as the mullet-wearing philosopher with his bullshit way of life.

Verdict
While it may not be for everyone or indeed containing any submarines, Richard Ayoade clearly has a cinematic voice with his hilarious but moving coming-of-age story. One handjob gag and you’re sold! 

< Message edited by R W -- 18/3/2011 7:12:42 PM >

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Post #: 2
RE: Submarine - 19/3/2011 1:16:46 AM   
adambatman82

 

Posts: 11156
Joined: 15/12/2005
Here's a copy and paste of my review. I absolutely adored it. Having taken my wife to a Dreyer film on our second date I could totally relate to Oliver Tate (she fell asleep).

From the mind of debutant filmmaker Richard Ayoade comes Submarine, the tale of Oliver Tate, a neurotic 15 year old boy with a penchant for the Nouvelle Vague. Set on the less than idyllic shores of Barry Island Submarine sees Oliver “coming of age”, as he falls in love for the first time, watches his parents marriage fall apart and attempts to figure out exactly what his place in the universe is.
The standard by-line for many coming-of-age dramas usually revolves around familial ties. Richard Ayoade’s Submarine is no different, with the surprisingly intricate (from a content and emotional point of view) plot built around Oliver’s relationship with his parents, Oliver’s relationship with Jordana, and Jordana’s relationship with her parents (further extended to include Oliver’s relationship with Jordana AND her parents). The anti-romance attitude sported by Jordana, which sees the pair take a date in an industrial park, is informed by the precedent set within their own lives, or at least from an aspired towards precedent that may or may not be true. It’s within these instances that we are reminded of the youthful nature of the pair, the joys of youth as it were. For all its mawkishness and bitterness Submarine is a celebration of youth, of naivety and of what it means to not be fully developed.

Ayoade exhibits a great understanding of the mechanics of film. His use of stylistic technique, while hugely referential is never smug. The film is a celestial experience for the most part, with Oliver a hyper-priveleged figure within the narrative structure of the work, and stylistically the film follows that line of thought. Super 8 footage pops up when Oliver reminisces, and iris shots punctuate especially significant moments for the narrator, seemingly being summoned and willed on by him. Oliver controls the film, in turn allowing Ayoade to dissect the very form of cinema, without once, miraculously, feeling contrived. Ayoade’s script, adapted from the novel by Joe Dunthorne is note-perfect. In one particularly memorable exchange, Oliver’s dad compares his depressed state as akin to being trapped underwater, only for Oliver to respond with pitch perfect timing “Is that why you became a marine biologist?“.
Craig Roberts leads a solid line up of performances. Recalling the wide-eyed Bud Cort, Roberts narrates and features in almost every sequence of the film. Fellow newcomer Yasmin Page reminds of a young Gemma Arterton, although with a quirk thus far unseen from the older actress. Noah Taylor is a second tier highlight, as the manic depressive father, and warning vision of Oliver Tate, with Sally Hawkins impressive as Oliver’s mother. Rounding out the core cast is Paddy Considine, as Graham, the childhood sweetheart of Oliver’s mother turned hokey community hall psychic. It’s often forgotten just how great a comedian Considine is.

The film is packed with references to the Nouvelle Vague and the French cinema of the 1960’s. From the opening titles, a mixture of colours and specific spacing ala Jean-Luc Godard, to Jordana’s bob cut, recalling Anna Karina, as well as an even earlier icon of French cinema, and perhaps the ultimate femme fetale, Irma Vep (from Louis Feuillade’s Les Vampires (1915). Posters of Melville’s La Samourai and Le Cercle Rouge adorn the walls of Oliver’s bedroom, as does a painting of a scene from Rohmer’s My Night At Mauds, and a score heavily reminiscent of Georges Delerue fills the air. Elsewhere on the soundtrack, and breaking from the Gallic strand somewhat, we have original music from Alex Turner, recalling Cat Stevens work on Ashby’s Harold And Maude, and Simon & Garfunkel’s score to that most notable of coming of age flicks, The Graduate. Both films inform the visual tone of the film too, not just the audio tracks (both films were produced in the wake of the Nouvelle Vague too though). Narratively the film recalls Bandé Apart, with the bond-through-mischief plotline running clear through both pictures. Many films and filmmakers have previously fallen at the first hurdle when it comes to mimicing the very particular style of the Nouvelle Vague (the legions of Wes Anderson imitators out there are proof of this), but Submarine does genuinely pull it off.

Ultimately, the film does play out like the most sincere and legitimate English language tribute to the work of François Truffaut seen in recent memory. Not only does Truffaut’s Baisers Voles provide the clearest stylistic influence behind the film, but Submarine’s key location of Barry Island beach makes the perfect stand-in for the iconic location of the final moments of The 400 Blows, with that location in itself providing enough subtext to fill a small island. Of course the Antoine Doinel Cycle is one of the definitive cinematic coming-of-age sagas, with the sprawling, decade long story of Truffaut’s best known character one of the great feats of the cinema.

A Scott Pilgrim Vs. The World for that very particular subgenre of society that grew up taking girls to see Dreyer flicks for dates, and with Eric Rohmer paintings above their beds, Submarine is an utter joy, and comes highly recommended.

(in reply to R W)
Post #: 3
RE: Submarine - 19/3/2011 9:48:39 AM   
Wild about Wilder


Posts: 1674
Joined: 9/4/2010
From: Hertfordshire
Don't talk to me about this my World of Cine is not showing it in there 15 screens just like they didn't show A Company Of Men, BUT THEY'LL FUCKING STILL SHOW BIG MOMMAS LIKE FATHER LIKE SON! .
So just sent of a long email to them not that it'll do any good wouldn't mind so much if they didn't have posters up for both & they showed Submarine trailer Thursday & that it's spotlighted in there poxy magazine. Left them with this quote at the end can only think you are not showin such a well received movie because it's BRITISH!

(in reply to adambatman82)
Post #: 4
RE: Submarine - 20/3/2011 3:37:42 PM   
nhassell


Posts: 237
Joined: 23/8/2009
My local Cineworld (8 screens) actually has it on! 4 performances a day (bet it'll only be on for a week, though). I do have a local Arthouse cinema, which has it on, as well. Was very excited for this, so popped along to Cienworld to see it yesterday afternoon. I cannot believe I am saying this, but, in my personal opinion, it was damn near perfect. From the cinematography, to the soundtrack, the acting, everything. One of this years best.

_____________________________

This Is The End - ***
Man Of Steel - ***
The Great Gatsby - ***
Iron Man 3 - ***
Evil Dead - ***

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Post #: 5
RE: Submarine - 22/3/2011 3:51:12 PM   
Wild about Wilder


Posts: 1674
Joined: 9/4/2010
From: Hertfordshire
Well i'm well happy now because as of Friday WE ARE GETTING IT TOO!
Don't know if it's due to the fact myself & other people e-mailed them in complaint or maybe it did well in the weekend box-office which I haven't seen yet. Saying that BLOODY Big Mommas House's still there all day next week?

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Post #: 6
RE: Submarine - 22/3/2011 5:03:30 PM   
adambatman82

 

Posts: 11156
Joined: 15/12/2005

quote:

ORIGINAL: Wild about Wilder

Well i'm well happy now because as of Friday WE ARE GETTING IT TOO!
Don't know if it's due to the fact myself & other people e-mailed them in complaint or maybe it did well in the weekend box-office which I haven't seen yet. Saying that BLOODY Big Mommas House's still there all day next week?


It's expanding to double the number of screens. It's box office was great, for the number of screens it was on, and the profile of the release. It came in at number 13 with £219,000, on 60 screens.

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Post #: 7
RE: Submarine - 26/3/2011 11:21:02 PM   
Schimchs


Posts: 141
Joined: 22/8/2010
I've just seen this today.

A very good film, probably one of the best I've seen in a while - and another one of the rare breed of films that (for me) didn't have any weak or slow moments in it.

There were some really inspired moments of comedy merit, and some nice subtle jokes - such as the aforementioned 4th wall breaking. The leads were spot on, with a special nod to Paddy Considine's haircut.

Here's looking forward to more from Moss !

_____________________________

"When we get to twenty tell me, I'm gonna throw up"

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Post #: 8
RE: Submarine - 27/3/2011 9:19:58 AM   
hatebox

 

Posts: 942
Joined: 14/2/2008
Starts off brilliantly, to the point where I thought this could be the best British film since Trainspotting, but after about 45 minutes it sadly becomes the quirky, quaint and slightly annoying coming of age text I feared it would be. It did the comedy a lot better than the drama, and the second half is mostly the latter. 

4 stars, just a pity it wasn't 5.

< Message edited by hatebox -- 27/3/2011 9:23:26 AM >

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Post #: 9
RE: Submarine - 27/3/2011 10:12:30 PM   
jrewing1000


Posts: 486
Joined: 23/11/2005
Saw this today. Really enjoyed it.

Wes Anderson is the clear influence on Richard Ayoade's directing style, but he delivers a more stylistic, european approach. I loved the whirlwind pace and artistic flair. For a debut feature, this was superb.

The stylistic approach loses intensity towards the final third, I would have liked to have seen the fresh ideas - montages, jump cuts, visual flourishes, maintained right to the very end. But this is a small quibble.

I can't wait to see what Ayoade does next.

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Post #: 10
RE: Submarine - 27/3/2011 10:27:44 PM   
adambatman82

 

Posts: 11156
Joined: 15/12/2005

quote:

ORIGINAL: jrewing1000

Saw this today. Really enjoyed it.

Wes Anderson is the clear influence on Richard Ayoade's directing style, but he delivers a more stylistic, european approach. I loved the whirlwind pace and artistic flair. For a debut feature, this was superb.



Do you not think thats a bit unfair? I don't think Anderson was an influence, but that Ayoade and Anderson share the same influences (Hal Ashby, Francois Truffaut, Eric Rohmer).

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Post #: 11
Submarine - 28/3/2011 12:34:58 PM   
robbycripwell86

 

Posts: 4
Joined: 23/10/2005
Fantatic film, great to see lots of new (and some more established) british talent on show. Frustrating that I had to travel a bit to see it as my local cinema wasn't showing it, but completely worth it

http://thegoodreview.co.uk/2011/03/submarine/

< Message edited by robbycripwell86 -- 28/3/2011 12:35:47 PM >

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RE: Submarine - 28/3/2011 5:03:14 PM   
ktmurphy

 

Posts: 2
Joined: 5/3/2011
Saw this yesterday. Thought there was a really strong Wes Anderson influence throughout. Enjoyed the first two thirds better than the last, just because I felt that Oliver's various imagined scenes such as the schoolyard grief at his untimely demise (death of a saint), and his picturing of what his parents break up would actually look like (cold and civilised) were the funniest things in it, and these tailed off towards the end.

Brilliantly acted throughout. Loved the painfully true to life depictions of the schoolyard. Not sure I'd see it again given the chance, as the end felt slightly cloying and too drawn out for me.

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RE: Submarine - 30/3/2011 1:07:44 PM   
Wild about Wilder


Posts: 1674
Joined: 9/4/2010
From: Hertfordshire
I enjoyed it a lot sort of reminded me of Garden State a little, really like the lead i've seen him in Being/Becoming Human & seems to have a natural dry wit about him. A solid  8/10

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Post #: 14
Thank you Richard... - 10/4/2011 12:25:42 PM   
IJustWantToBeAHero

 

Posts: 5
Joined: 24/3/2010
Submarine is artistically beautiful, stylishly cool, flooded with pitch perfect dry humor, genuinely touching in it's modest drama, and above all perfectly captures adolescence...It is a pity that so many will dismiss this film under the umbrella of "quirky, arty, indie etc." it is an unmissable directorial debut from Mr. Ayoade...

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It's just one of those films you just need to see......... - 29/5/2011 1:52:09 AM   
giallo

 

Posts: 7
Joined: 29/5/2011
From: Rotherham
I'm writing this out very late after seeing Submarine when it came out.
I can't remeber for such a long time, a film so stylish, hypnotic and emotive as this. this is a film that has something I just cannot put my finger on! I yearn to see it again!, I feel I need to show it to everyone I know!
Yasmin Paige's performance is spellbinding you find yourself impatiently waiting for what she says and does next. An example would be The "kiss me" taunts that are cruel yet so funny and well delivered in such a way that puts across the angst of the character and the fact she enjoys being a bit of a cow to Craig Roberts Oliver but only because she's too afraid to drop the hardend act for a boy she is reluctantly falling in love for.
On the subjet of Roberts, his narrative and dry coyness gives the film an innocnece it tries to hide.
Superb, essential and again it's needs to be seen and again, it's just one of those films.


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It's just one of those films you just need to see......... - 29/5/2011 1:52:10 AM   
giallo

 

Posts: 7
Joined: 29/5/2011
From: Rotherham
I'm writing this out very late after seeing Submarine when it came out.
I can't remeber for such a long time, a film so stylish, hypnotic and emotive as this. this is a film that has something I just cannot put my finger on! I yearn to see it again!, I feel I need to show it to everyone I know!
Yasmin Paige's performance is spellbinding you find yourself impatiently waiting for what she says and does next. An example would be The "kiss me" taunts that are cruel yet so funny and well delivered in such a way that puts across the angst of the character and the fact she enjoys being a bit of a cow to Craig Roberts Oliver but only because she's too afraid to drop the hardend act for a boy she is reluctantly falling in love for.
On the subjet of Roberts, his narrative and dry coyness gives the film an innocnece it tries to hide.
Superb, essential and again it's needs to be seen and again, it's just one of those films.


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Post #: 17
Brilliant Up There With The Best Of 2011 - 9/7/2011 3:25:22 PM   
Bighousewill

 

Posts: 244
Joined: 5/12/2009
Brilliant is not an overstatement this film is a joy it is clever and funny and full of delightful nuance it will definitely make you laugh. The acting is brilliant Craig Roberts's Oliver Tate is simply one of the most subtly funny and intelligent characters I have ever seen in film I love how he likes to imagine things like memories being in super 8 and how he analyses things in general but he is also growing up. Don't wait for this to be shown on telly on Film4 just rent it now heck buy it for keeps just see it it's brilliant.

< Message edited by Bighousewill -- 9/7/2011 3:27:15 PM >

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brilliant yet subtle - 11/10/2011 11:32:38 AM   
brunobonisiol

 

Posts: 1
Joined: 11/10/2011
saw it yesterday and feel like celebrating it. maybe it's not a masterpiece, it's just a honestly great movie. fair enough. brainy and light at the same time. it moves on a tight rope between comedy and drama in such a subtle way that, yes, this is poetry. monsieur Ayoade, chapeau!

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Yelloubmarine - 1/12/2011 4:56:01 PM   
Friendsknew

 

Posts: 5
Joined: 1/12/2011
Englands got so many great filmmakers at the moment.
This along with Shame, Black Biscuit, Weekend, Tyrannosaurus.
You know why that is ?
Because of the lack of funds filmmakers have had to simplify their movies and go back to the core of human feelings.
Simple, profound, and funny. A real winner.

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Post #: 20
Cool, quirky and refreshingly unique... - 2/6/2012 12:10:48 AM   
trainedasninja


Posts: 206
Joined: 25/5/2011
From: Kidderminster
Submarine, soundtracked by the brilliant sounds of Alex Turner, is a perfect choice for many indie loving cinema goers and has appeal to many others. It is the story of a unordinary teenager juggling romance and saving his parents marriage told with humour, impressively artistic visuals and heart.

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Post #: 21
Brilliant - 12/11/2012 11:11:07 PM   
Coyleone


Posts: 569
Joined: 13/10/2008
Submarine was just brilliant, and completely took me by surprise. It wears it's influences on it's sleeve and is proud to show them off. people say Wes Anderson is Ayoade's main influence, but to me it felt like the french new wave films of the 60's. He films Yasmin Paige like Godard filmed Anna Karina, and it's beautiful to watch. Another huge telling of Ayoade's influences include the Le Samourai and Passion Of Joan Of Arc posters seen in the background of some scenes. I loved the artistic style and was totally taken back by it, maybe partially because I wasn't expecting it, but it was so well done. The acting and dialogue was top notch throughout, and the direction is stunning for the majority. It's touching and funny, and I Loved it.

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Post #: 22
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