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RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2011 - 6/12/2011 12:26:25 PM   
Rebel scum


Posts: 3483
Joined: 2/1/2006

quote:

ORIGINAL: rick_7

Errol Flynn's my favourite, though, no question.




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(in reply to rick_7)
Post #: 7591
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2011 - 6/12/2011 4:25:12 PM   
MOTH

 

Posts: 3479
Joined: 3/10/2005
From: Sittin' on the dock of the bay
Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2 (David Yates, 2011)
So that's that. After the aimless Part 1, Harry and friends quit faffing about in tents and got down to the business of destroying the Dark Lord Sauron - sorry, sorry- Voldemort. But since he is in possession of the One Ring - sorry, sorry - the Elder Wand, he won't go down easily, so the scene is set for an epic showdown at Helm's Deep - sorry, sorry - Hogwarts. Anwway, it's a rousing enough finale to the franchise, although for a film in which a shedload of people die (including some that were in the other films, i think), there was little sense of genuine loss or emotion. However, it was fitting that the best moment, that of the 'secret' of Harry and Voldemort's connection, was linked to the story of Snape, who has been the most interesting character throughout the series and who has been memorably played by Rickman. I liked that. Fiennes also delivers a quite scary and (literally) hissable villain and together these two gave the final film some much needed heft, whilst everyone else struggles to get screen time and make any sort of impact at all. As for the unlikely hero who finally saves the day, I couldn't quite get past the fact he was wearing a cardigan. I hate cardigans at the best times. In good-vs-evil battles to the death, they really have no place. (6/10)

< Message edited by MOTH -- 6/12/2011 4:26:39 PM >


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Post #: 7592
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2011 - 6/12/2011 4:38:03 PM   
rick_7


Posts: 6151
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: The internet
Nice write-up. I like your reviews, they're funny. Cardigans are great, though. I wore one quite a lot when I was four, and I have a zip-up hoodie that's quite cardigan-y now. I thought it was a really good film, probably the third best. I just dug out my review from the other month, because I am incredibly arrogant:

quote:

CINEMA: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 (David Yates, 2011) – I only just caught up with the series and missed them all at theatres, so I hopped on a train to see the last one on the big screen. In 3D. On my own. My first solo cinema trip ever, I think. I'm not sure it's as streamlined or as adept at juggling the disparate elements as Azkaban or The Order of the Phoenix, but it offers one excellent set-piece after another and considerable emotional clout thanks to Rowling's touching plotting and some fine work by Rickman, Maggie Smith and Ciaran Hinds. Asked to carry the piece, Radcliffe oscillates between profundity and am dram-level scowling – what a strange actor he is. Fiennes fiennally gets it right as Voldemort (though the way he holds his wand above his target has always been a ingenious little detail - nailing the character's arrogance, contempt and malice, and making him look that bit more threatening). For all its flaws, I've got a lot out of this series. Including a free poster. Go me. (3.5)


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(in reply to MOTH)
Post #: 7593
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2011 - 6/12/2011 4:54:55 PM   
MOTH

 

Posts: 3479
Joined: 3/10/2005
From: Sittin' on the dock of the bay
quote:

ORIGINAL: rick_7

Nice write-up. I like your reviews, they're funny. Cardigans are great, though. I wore one quite a lot when I was four, and I have a zip-up hoodie that's quite cardigan-y now. I thought it was a really good film, probably the third best. I just dug out my review from the other month, because I am incredibly arrogant:

quote:

CINEMA: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 (David Yates, 2011) – I only just caught up with the series and missed them all at theatres, so I hopped on a train to see the last one on the big screen. In 3D. On my own. My first solo cinema trip ever, I think. I'm not sure it's as streamlined or as adept at juggling the disparate elements as Azkaban or The Order of the Phoenix, but it offers one excellent set-piece after another and considerable emotional clout thanks to Rowling's touching plotting and some fine work by Rickman, Maggie Smith and Ciaran Hinds. Asked to carry the piece, Radcliffe oscillates between profundity and am dram-level scowling – what a strange actor he is. Fiennes fiennally gets it right as Voldemort (though the way he holds his wand above his target has always been a ingenious little detail - nailing the character's arrogance, contempt and malice, and making him look that bit more threatening). For all its flaws, I've got a lot out of this series. Including a free poster. Go me. (3.5)



Fiennally, heh heh *stores away for future use*.

I'd also go with it being 3rd best after the really very good Azkaban and the suprisingly dark Phoenix. The rest are much of a muchness. But the comparisons with LOTR are inevitable - near the end of the film, Mrs MOTH arrived home and after a quick glance at the telly wondered why I was watching LOTR. True story.

but on cardigans, we must differ. Hoodies do just about enough to avoid being in the same category, but only Starsky (or was it Hutch?) in the rain has ever worn a woolly cardigan and got away with it.

< Message edited by MOTH -- 6/12/2011 4:55:10 PM >


_____________________________

I've only gone and set up a blog! This week I've been mostly reviewing The Lego Movie and Wadjda. Click: The Fast Picture Show

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Post #: 7594
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2011 - 6/12/2011 11:56:58 PM   
MOTH

 

Posts: 3479
Joined: 3/10/2005
From: Sittin' on the dock of the bay
The Tree of Life (Terrence Malick, 2011)
"Are you there God? It's me, Terrence." What to make of this? On the one hand, it seems mean to criticise a film that is so obviously personal and heartfelt about its themes, especially given all the pretty pictures and delicate evocation of childhood memories. On the other hand, for long stretches, the film is, well, boring and feels rather preachy. And there is such a thing as too much choral music. If you're a parent, it might make you think about how you are influencing your children. If you have parents, it might make you think about how they influenced you. But then, you shouldn't really need a film to make you think about those things. For a film that strives to be about Life, the Universe and Everything, it was more a case of So Long, and Thanks for all the Tosh for me. Sorry, God. (5/10)

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Post #: 7595
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2011 - 7/12/2011 1:25:11 AM   
swordsandsandals


Posts: 12571
Joined: 6/1/2006
From: A magical forest

quote:

ORIGINAL: rick_7

quote:

ORIGINAL: swordsandsandals

Ooh, also

Tai Chi Master (1993, Yuen Woo Ping) - Not as good as Iron Monkey, but still ludicrously entertaining. Features the best kung fu move ever.

aka The Evil Cult, aka Lord of the Wu Tang, aka (easily the best title) Kung Fu Cult Master, with Richard Ng as a sort of annoying bat. I watched all those Li vehicles in sixth-form and that one's not bad. A few flashes of brilliance, though the story is all over the shop. Have you seen Fist of Legend and OUATIC I and II? And III, for that matter. I like the Shaolin Temple films too.

Iron Monkey is fantastic, as you say.



Going through a Yuen Woo Ping phase. Tonight I watched True Legend (an absolute mess, Yuen is apparently lost in a sea of awful CGI and bizarre structuring) and Wing Chun (more like it, with Yeoh be great and some classic rubbish Yuen comedy, but its still not as good as Iron Monkey. That said, the martial arts are still spectacular). So yeah, I'm not watching the films of a particular actor (although Donnie Yen may just be my actor of the year after stuff like this and the Ip Man films).

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quote:

ORIGINAL: Rawlinson

Swords is right about everything.



quote:

ORIGINAL: Hood_Man

Swords smells like bum.



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Post #: 7596
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2011 - 7/12/2011 3:25:03 AM   
Deviation


Posts: 27284
Joined: 2/6/2006
From: Enemies of Film HQ
quote:

ORIGINAL: MOTH

The Tree of Life (Terrence Malick, 2011)
"Are you there God? It's me, Terrence." What to make of this? On the one hand, it seems mean to criticise a film that is so obviously personal and heartfelt about its themes, especially given all the pretty pictures and delicate evocation of childhood memories. On the other hand, for long stretches, the film is, well, boring and feels rather preachy. And there is such a thing as too much choral music. If you're a parent, it might make you think about how you are influencing your children. If you have parents, it might make you think about how they influenced you. But then, you shouldn't really need a film to make you think about those things. For a film that strives to be about Life, the Universe and Everything, it was more a case of So Long, and Thanks for all the Tosh for me. Sorry, God. (5/10)


I just fell ill reading that.


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Dpp1978
There are certainly times where calling a person a cunt is not only reasonable, it is a gross understatement.

quote:


ORIGINAL: elab49
I really wish I could go down to see Privates

(in reply to MOTH)
Post #: 7597
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2011 - 7/12/2011 7:56:58 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 77709
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo
December list
1. Hugo (1st view, 2011, Martin Scorcese, 3D) - 5/5*
2. United 93 (3rd view, 2006, Paul Greengrass) - 4/5
3. Bruno (1st view, 2009, Larry Charles) - 4/5*
4. Wise Blood (2nd view, 1979, John Huston) - 3/5
5. Harold & Kumar Get the Munchies (1st view, 2004, Danny Leiner) - 3/5*
6. Marketa Lazarová (1st view, 1967, František Vláčil) - 3/5*
7. Anti-Clock (1st view, 1979, Jane Arden) - 3/5*
8. Jack Frost (1st view, 1998, Troy Miller) - 2/5*
9. The Brothers Solomon (1st view, 2007, Bob Odenkirk) - 2/5*
10. Purple Rain (1st view, 1984, Albert Magnoli) - 2/5*

Shorts
1. Ice Age: A Mammoth Christmas


9. Hugo (1st view, 2011, Martin Scorcese, 3D) - 5/5*
Getting one decent child performance a year is usually a hard task for Hollywood, having two great ones in a single film is unheard of. Ben Kingsley is at his best in years. The 3D was by far the best I've ever seen and the design and look of the film was superb (Dante Ferretti FTW!). Then we have Howard Shore's music, always a bonus. I could have done without the little subplots involving Richard Griffiths, Frances de la Tour and Emily Mortimer, but these were minor blips. A heartwarming and magical tale, a love letter to the early years of cinema combined with a fantastical adventure and Scorcese's obvious love for the material make this one of the very best films in recent years.

< Message edited by Gimli The Dwarf -- 31/12/2011 10:21:32 AM >


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Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

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Post #: 7598
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2011 - 7/12/2011 10:32:52 AM   
demoncleaner


Posts: 2388
Joined: 3/10/2005
From: Belfast
All About My Mother (Pedro Almodovar, 1999)

The end title card on this probably sums up the last-ditch quality of a film maker trying to reconcile the disparate indulgences of his current film into a cohesive story . When a piece of art breaks the fourth wall to tell you about its theme you know it’s probably been a rough day at the office for plot and story.  Here the post script mission statement announces Almodovar wanted to celebrate women; women with careers, women with vocation, glamourous women, women without glamour, with virtue, with ill-virtue, women with children,  and yes, even women with cocks gets a look in too!

The problem is nothing fits, every line, every relationship is fairly specious. If it really is all about my mother I suppose the central deally-o is that all these friendships actually extend to mothering in some regards, although the problem with that is that the bonds aren’t that palpable.  Copious use of interpersing title cards mark more passages in time than an adap of yer standard Russian novel, which all detracts from any real inference of relationships gestating.  A big thing is made of the All About Eve and Streetcar motifs without these actually carrying an important connotation for the rest of the story.  You know a character will at some point step in and understudy a role in the theatre production…and she does…and so what?  A woman who is an organ transplant co-ordinator will be put in an adverse position when her own son becomes donor…and so what?  These are ideas that that could carry a film on their own but are presented in almost 10 minute relay fashion where they end in fairly pedestrian fashion.  It’s a story teller extemporising loose ideas without any cogent result or invoking a memorable moment.

Disappointing. 

2/5

(in reply to Gimli The Dwarf)
Post #: 7599
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2011 - 7/12/2011 10:39:35 AM   
rick_7


Posts: 6151
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: The internet
quote:

ORIGINAL: MOTH

The Tree of Life (Terrence Malick, 2011)
"Are you there God? It's me, Terrence." What to make of this? On the one hand, it seems mean to criticise a film that is so obviously personal and heartfelt about its themes, especially given all the pretty pictures and delicate evocation of childhood memories. On the other hand, for long stretches, the film is, well, boring and feels rather preachy. And there is such a thing as too much choral music. If you're a parent, it might make you think about how you are influencing your children. If you have parents, it might make you think about how they influenced you. But then, you shouldn't really need a film to make you think about those things. For a film that strives to be about Life, the Universe and Everything, it was more a case of So Long, and Thanks for all the Tosh for me. Sorry, God. (5/10)



Disagree quite strongly with this. I think the central story is remarkably well-told and powerful, it's just the gargantuan, metaphysical noodlings that get a bit tiresome. Still, at least you apologised to God for your incorrect opinion.

_____________________________

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Blog: DJANGO! DUMBO! DESPICABLE ME 2! Plus: other stuff.

"Nothin's really been right since Sam the Lion died."

(in reply to Deviation)
Post #: 7600
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2011 - 7/12/2011 10:40:50 AM   
rick_7


Posts: 6151
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: The internet
quote:

ORIGINAL: swordsandsandals

Going through a Yuen Woo Ping phase. Tonight I watched True Legend (an absolute mess, Yuen is apparently lost in a sea of awful CGI and bizarre structuring) and Wing Chun (more like it, with Yeoh be great and some classic rubbish Yuen comedy, but its still not as good as Iron Monkey. That said, the martial arts are still spectacular). So yeah, I'm not watching the films of a particular actor (although Donnie Yen may just be my actor of the year after stuff like this and the Ip Man films).

When you get really excited during Yuen's films, do you start Woo Ping?

_____________________________

*Wendy Hiller fanboy*

Blog: DJANGO! DUMBO! DESPICABLE ME 2! Plus: other stuff.

"Nothin's really been right since Sam the Lion died."

(in reply to swordsandsandals)
Post #: 7601
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2011 - 7/12/2011 10:55:21 AM   
Harry Tuttle


Posts: 7993
Joined: 12/11/2005
From: Sometime in the future.

quote:

ORIGINAL: rick_7

quote:

ORIGINAL: swordsandsandals

Going through a Yuen Woo Ping phase. Tonight I watched True Legend (an absolute mess, Yuen is apparently lost in a sea of awful CGI and bizarre structuring) and Wing Chun (more like it, with Yeoh be great and some classic rubbish Yuen comedy, but its still not as good as Iron Monkey. That said, the martial arts are still spectacular). So yeah, I'm not watching the films of a particular actor (although Donnie Yen may just be my actor of the year after stuff like this and the Ip Man films).

When you get really excited during Yuen's films, do you start Woo Ping?


Groan

You can't go wrong with a bit of Iron Monkey, OUATIC or some Fong Sai Yuk.

_____________________________

Acting...Naturaaal

Your knowledge of scientific biological transmogrification is only outmatched by your zest for kung-fu treachery!

Blood Island. So called because it's the exact shape of some blood

(in reply to rick_7)
Post #: 7602
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2011 - 7/12/2011 11:26:10 AM   
MOTH

 

Posts: 3479
Joined: 3/10/2005
From: Sittin' on the dock of the bay

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation
I just fell ill reading that.


quote:

ORIGINAL: rick_7
Disagree quite strongly with this. I think the central story is remarkably well-told and powerful, it's just the gargantuan, metaphysical noodlings that get a bit tiresome.


It's the first film in a long while that i've felt rather guilty about not liking, if that makes sense. I wanted to like it, it certainly provides more food for thought than the average film and there were even moments I felt it was starting to touch my cold, black heart, but by the time we got to Sean Penn's beach walk , i'd had enough. Still, I might give it another chance in a year or so.


quote:

ORIGINAL: demoncleaner

All About My Mother (Pedro Almodovar, 1999)

The end title card on this probably sums up the last-ditch quality of a film maker trying to reconcile the disparate indulgences of his current film into a cohesive story . When a piece of art breaks the fourth wall to tell you about its theme you know it’s probably been a rough day at the office for plot and story. Here the post script mission statement announces Almodovar wanted to celebrate women; women with careers, women with vocation, glamourous women, women without glamour, with virtue, with ill-virtue, women with children, and yes, even women with cocks gets a look in too!

The problem is nothing fits, every line, every relationship is fairly specious. If it really is all about my mother I suppose the central deally-o is that all these friendships actually extend to mothering in some regards, although the problem with that is that the bonds aren’t that palpable. Copious use of interpersing title cards mark more passages in time than an adap of yer standard Russian novel, which all detracts from any real inference of relationships gestating. A big thing is made of the All About Eve and Streetcar motifs without these actually carrying an important connotation for the rest of the story. You know a character will at some point step in and understudy a role in the theatre production…and she does…and so what? A woman who is an organ transplant co-ordinator will be put in an adverse position when her own son becomes donor…and so what? These are ideas that that could carry a film on their own but are presented in almost 10 minute relay fashion where they end in fairly pedestrian fashion. It’s a story teller extemporising loose ideas without any cogent result or invoking a memorable moment.

Disappointing.

2/5


Oh no! Now that is a surprising review - i was under the impression everyone like this.

_____________________________

I've only gone and set up a blog! This week I've been mostly reviewing The Lego Movie and Wadjda. Click: The Fast Picture Show

(in reply to Deviation)
Post #: 7603
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2011 - 7/12/2011 11:29:10 AM   
matty_b


Posts: 14559
Joined: 19/10/2005
From: Outpost 31 calling McMurtle.
Abbott and Costello meet Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (Charles Lamont)

The "Meets" films in A&C's canon work so much better than their other films because they never, ever have any songs in them, and they're also very plot-driven, dropping the vaudeville sketches that loosely hold their other films together. They also play the horror aspects as straight-faced as any other Universal horror, and there's some genuine atmosphere and chills to be had amongst the tomfoolery and good gags here. It's a great mix and Boris Karloff makes for a fine Jekyll, playing him as a murderous sociopath, instead of the misguided scientist he's often portrayed as in other, more faithful, adaptations. (4)

_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Cool Breeze
Mattyb is a shining example of what the perfect Empire Forum member is.


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Post #: 7604
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2011 - 7/12/2011 1:03:44 PM   
Deviation


Posts: 27284
Joined: 2/6/2006
From: Enemies of Film HQ
You're forgiven MOTH, only because I've read a review that made me feel more ill than your review.

*plans a fatwa of condemnation on demoncleaner*


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Dpp1978
There are certainly times where calling a person a cunt is not only reasonable, it is a gross understatement.

quote:


ORIGINAL: elab49
I really wish I could go down to see Privates

(in reply to MOTH)
Post #: 7605
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2011 - 8/12/2011 4:42:37 PM   
matty_b


Posts: 14559
Joined: 19/10/2005
From: Outpost 31 calling McMurtle.
Wise Blood (John Huston)

A religious satire that drips with Southern Gothic sweat and sleaze, it feels like a forebearer of many a Coens film. Not just the prickly heat of the setting reminiscent of Blood Simple, but the focus on unlikeable and devious characters, other characters with physical tics and quirks, and random blackly-comic narrative asides - even in his old age Huston was as sprightly and surpising as ever. As the un-religious preacher trying to start a church up that doesn't believe in a holy saviour, Brad Dourif is a delight and his growing intensity is one of the funniest things in the film - his increasing rage at the mechanics that won't fix his knackered car had me hooting - and there's good support from the likes of Ned Beatty and Harry Dean Stanton. Like most films which have quirkiness as its main stock, the ending feels slightly random and more of a finish than a definite stop, but that's part of its charm, really - if a charm that I can imagine will leave some very cold. (4)

The Battle of Algiers (Gillo Pontecorvo)

A European army battles insurgents in a hostile Muslim country that they've invaded, and use various instruments of torture, including water-based techniques to extract information from captured terrorists. Meanwhile, the other fighters use the home territory to their advantage, hiding themselves amongst complicit civilians, while planning and carrying out bombing campaigns and other activites in their battle for freedom. Yes, it's an extremely unhappy coincidence that the central conflict at the heart of Pontecorvo's docu-drama still rings uncomfortably untrue, but that's mainly because it's a film that stretches far beyond the conflict it's nominally concerned with, to address the nature of war, invasion and conquest that we've seen for centuries. As Tim Robbins says in War of the Worlds (yeah, I know) history shows us that occupations always fail and The Battle of Algiers is a horrifying reminder of the cost of it. The much-vaunted sequence of Algerian women cutting their hair and wearing western fashions to blend in with the French women while they plant bombs in bars and cafes is deservedly vaunted, being a textbook exercise in how to build up tension in a stomach-churning tick-tock fashion, but Pontecorvo never blinks or shies away from the carnage. Equally affecting are the scenes of the running gun battles on the streets, captions calmly updating us on the time of day, as the streets run with the blood of both the army and the insurgents. Stylistically, it's influence is clear to this day, and you can trace its DNA running through the likes of The French Connection right through to the films of Paul Greengrass, blending with harsh realism with taut thriller film-making of the highest order. Jean Martin turns in a strong performance as Mathieu, the colonel in charge of quelling the rebellion, and it's clear that this is a man soaked in the blood of warfare, but with a quiet resolution about it. He's no butcher, just a man who may well be sickened by what he sees, but understands that he has a job to do. He's matched by Brahim Hadjadj as Ali, the young figurehead for the revolutionaries who calmly accepts the fate that he and his family, his friends and fellow revolutionaries, will surely fall to the longer they take their fight to the French. The fact that Pontecorvo doesn't side with either protagonist over the other is not a sign of fence-sitting, just an even-handed and intelligent facet to a distressing and incredible film. (5)

_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Cool Breeze
Mattyb is a shining example of what the perfect Empire Forum member is.


(in reply to Deviation)
Post #: 7606
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2011 - 8/12/2011 6:55:22 PM   
rick_7


Posts: 6151
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: The internet
quote:

ORIGINAL: matty_b

Wise Blood (John Huston)

A religious satire that drips with Southern Gothic sweat and sleaze, it feels like a forebearer of many a Coens film. Not just the prickly heat of the setting reminiscent of Blood Simple, but the focus on unlikeable and devious characters, other characters with physical tics and quirks, and random blackly-comic narrative asides - even in his old age Huston was as sprightly and surpising as ever. As the un-religious preacher trying to start a church up that doesn't believe in a holy saviour, Brad Dourif is a delight and his growing intensity is one of the funniest things in the film - his increasing rage at the mechanics that won't fix his knackered car had me hooting - and there's good support from the likes of Ned Beatty and Harry Dean Stanton. Like most films which have quirkiness as its main stock, the ending feels slightly random and more of a finish than a definite stop, but that's part of its charm, really - if a charm that I can imagine will leave some very cold. (4)

I'm a big fan of the ending - it's the only place the film can go, y'know, if it's going to be any good - and it's a movie that really has the courage of its convictions. In fact, I'm with impqueen on this one: a masterpiece on any terms. And Dourif is one of the most unsung actors out there - great in just about anything. He really has been in some dross.


_____________________________

*Wendy Hiller fanboy*

Blog: DJANGO! DUMBO! DESPICABLE ME 2! Plus: other stuff.

"Nothin's really been right since Sam the Lion died."

(in reply to matty_b)
Post #: 7607
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2011 - 8/12/2011 7:10:29 PM   
Rebel scum


Posts: 3483
Joined: 2/1/2006
WISE BLOOD SPOILERS

I'm with Matty on the ending-my problem with it was that the focus shifts from Dourif to the landlady, and if the idea was that he's atoning for his sins, I'd have liked to see a bit more development of it, instead of just the last ten minutes.

As a disclaimer, I still enjoyed the film.

_____________________________

"We are not safe! A dark menace rises to the east! Duckies go quack! Cows go moo! I want ice cream. Verily, will you two hobbits join my quest?"

(in reply to rick_7)
Post #: 7608
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2011 - 8/12/2011 7:11:08 PM   
matty_b


Posts: 14559
Joined: 19/10/2005
From: Outpost 31 calling McMurtle.
He's incredible, I just wish he had better roles.

_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Cool Breeze
Mattyb is a shining example of what the perfect Empire Forum member is.


(in reply to rick_7)
Post #: 7609
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2011 - 9/12/2011 2:34:27 AM   
demoncleaner


Posts: 2388
Joined: 3/10/2005
From: Belfast
quote:

ORIGINAL: matty_b

The Battle of Algiers (Gillo Pontecorvo)

A European army battles insurgents in a hostile Muslim country that they've invaded, and use various instruments of torture, including water-based techniques to extract information from captured terrorists. Meanwhile, the other fighters use the home territory to their advantage, hiding themselves amongst complicit civilians, while planning and carrying out bombing campaigns and other activites in their battle for freedom. Yes, it's an extremely unhappy coincidence that the central conflict at the heart of Pontecorvo's docu-drama still rings uncomfortably untrue, but that's mainly because it's a film that stretches far beyond the conflict it's nominally concerned with, to address the nature of war, invasion and conquest that we've seen for centuries. As Tim Robbins says in War of the Worlds (yeah, I know) history shows us that occupations always fail and The Battle of Algiers is a horrifying reminder of the cost of it. The much-vaunted sequence of Algerian women cutting their hair and wearing western fashions to blend in with the French women while they plant bombs in bars and cafes is deservedly vaunted, being a textbook exercise in how to build up tension in a stomach-churning tick-tock fashion, but Pontecorvo never blinks or shies away from the carnage. Equally affecting are the scenes of the running gun battles on the streets, captions calmly updating us on the time of day, as the streets run with the blood of both the army and the insurgents. Stylistically, it's influence is clear to this day, and you can trace its DNA running through the likes of The French Connection right through to the films of Paul Greengrass, blending with harsh realism with taut thriller film-making of the highest order. Jean Martin turns in a strong performance as Mathieu, the colonel in charge of quelling the rebellion, and it's clear that this is a man soaked in the blood of warfare, but with a quiet resolution about it. He's no butcher, just a man who may well be sickened by what he sees, but understands that he has a job to do. He's matched by Brahim Hadjadj as Ali, the young figurehead for the revolutionaries who calmly accepts the fate that he and his family, his friends and fellow revolutionaries, will surely fall to the longer they take their fight to the French. The fact that Pontecorvo doesn't side with either protagonist over the other is not a sign of fence-sitting, just an even-handed and intelligent facet to a distressing and incredible film. (5)


I'm not big on lists, and you can probably tell, but if I was staring down the barrell of the Angel's trumpet at the end of days and asked to go off on an island with Sue Lawley and questioned by an Arch-angel of the Lord what much needed distraction from Sue I would like to bring, I would probably bring Battle of Algiers.  Spielberg called Lawrence a miracle of a film (which it is) but this takes some beating.  People can talk about the neo-realists, blah-blah-blah but the idea that this twenty-something tennis-pro play-boy Pontecorvo could shift from being a materialistc prick, to sitting outside Parisien coffee shops listening to Sartre, listening to to Kadinsky; and go from there to want to direct; to direct; to going to Algiers and placing barricades back on the same streets something like 2/3 years after the actual colonnial presence.? To putting paratroopers back on the streets???  There's long telescopic shots of old arabic gentleman getting searched at those barricades, who didn't necessarily know this was fiction; there's something awful about the way they give up to it in this zen acceptance of repression.  And then there's the even-handedness as well...the head of the paratroopers (the French guy, the only professional actor in the piece) who conveys this idea "these aren't the enemy, these aren't terrorists...they're just people we work with" (that's not meant to be a quote, just paraphrasing the idea).

I think it's near perfect.  You get lovely, artistic, yet sickly propagandist films of this era like Soy Cuba (which I love) but Battle of Algiers kind of trumps the lot a) for its realism b) for its well meaning and c) for it's responsibility.  For all its grit it's not inciteful or spiteful.  A miracle of a film in that I can't imagine how it got made.  Fuck it, if all else fails for Andy Murray, there's another option for him.  Can't wait to see what he comes up with. 

< Message edited by demoncleaner -- 9/12/2011 2:39:29 AM >

(in reply to matty_b)
Post #: 7610
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2011 - 9/12/2011 8:55:28 AM   
matty_b


Posts: 14559
Joined: 19/10/2005
From: Outpost 31 calling McMurtle.
quote:

For all its grit it's not inciteful or spiteful.


That. Brilliant way of putting it.


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Cool Breeze
Mattyb is a shining example of what the perfect Empire Forum member is.


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RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2011 - 9/12/2011 11:54:39 AM   
matty_b


Posts: 14559
Joined: 19/10/2005
From: Outpost 31 calling McMurtle.
Requiem for a Village (David Gladwell)

A cross between a sex ed video, a "How we used to live" video aid for GCSE history and a lyrical exploration of memory, the ties between past and present and the sensual remembrances of youth, it has a unique and hazy atmosphere. The intercrossing of past and present timelines of village life leads to moments both memorable and slightly dull, and the whole thing feels like a forerunner for Malick's Tree Of Life. (3.5)


< Message edited by matty_b -- 9/12/2011 5:39:52 PM >


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Cool Breeze
Mattyb is a shining example of what the perfect Empire Forum member is.


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Post #: 7612
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2011 - 9/12/2011 10:03:31 PM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 77709
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo
I must say, I'm very surprised that no-one else here has seen Hugo.


_____________________________

So, sir, we let him have it right up! And I have to report, sir, he did not like it, sir.

Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

(in reply to matty_b)
Post #: 7613
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2011 - 9/12/2011 10:27:27 PM   
Beetlejuice!


Posts: 6763
Joined: 24/11/2005
quote:

ORIGINAL: Gimli The Dwarf

I must say, I'm very surprised that no-one else here has seen Hugo.



Just seen it tonight Gimli, considering giving it full marks. It's technically amazing but it really isn't a children's film as it seems to have been advertised. It's much more of a slow burner. Story stops and starts at times but it's all very sweet and it looks wonderful.

(in reply to Gimli The Dwarf)
Post #: 7614
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2011 - 9/12/2011 10:41:25 PM   
matty_b


Posts: 14559
Joined: 19/10/2005
From: Outpost 31 calling McMurtle.
Might be seeing it during the week.

Or, the likes of rawls and elab have probably seen it but just don't bother reviewing things anymore.

_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Cool Breeze
Mattyb is a shining example of what the perfect Empire Forum member is.


(in reply to Beetlejuice!)
Post #: 7615
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2011 - 10/12/2011 1:52:35 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
quote:

ORIGINAL: matty_b

Or, the likes of rawls and elab have probably seen it but just don't bother reviewing things anymore.


It's my number 6 of the year for the best of 2011 poll. Below four films technically released in 2010, so out of the 2011 releases I only like Tree of Life more.

I do still review things in this thread, but everyone ignores the reviews.

(in reply to matty_b)
Post #: 7616
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2011 - 10/12/2011 7:01:22 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 77709
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo

quote:

ORIGINAL: Beetlejuice!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Gimli The Dwarf

I must say, I'm very surprised that no-one else here has seen Hugo.



Just seen it tonight Gimli, considering giving it full marks. It's technically amazing but it really isn't a children's film as it seems to have been advertised. It's much more of a slow burner. Story stops and starts at times but it's all very sweet and it looks wonderful.


Give it top marks, you know you want to!


quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

I do still review things in this thread, but everyone ignores the reviews.




That's because we've never heard of the films you review


_____________________________

So, sir, we let him have it right up! And I have to report, sir, he did not like it, sir.

Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

(in reply to Beetlejuice!)
Post #: 7617
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2011 - 10/12/2011 7:15:57 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
I know, I shouldn't bother at all.

(in reply to Gimli The Dwarf)
Post #: 7618
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2011 - 10/12/2011 12:51:19 PM   
impqueen


Posts: 7474
Joined: 24/7/2006
quote:

ORIGINAL: Gimli The Dwarf

I must say, I'm very surprised that no-one else here has seen Hugo.



I saw it last Friday with my father. It was good.



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Yes, always.


(in reply to Gimli The Dwarf)
Post #: 7619
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2011 - 10/12/2011 12:59:51 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54587
Joined: 1/10/2005
quote:

ORIGINAL: matty_b

Might be seeing it during the week.

Or, the likes of rawls and elab have probably seen it but just don't bother reviewing things anymore.


It's unlikely I'd take time out to go see this one at the cinema as it doesn't really appeal to me - there also seem to be fewer 2D showings up here which automatically makes it a non-starter!

I might go see Arthur Christmas again though

The one I'm really trying to get time for is Nanni Moretti's Pope one which looks really good. Fingers crossed I might get some free time this week,


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Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to matty_b)
Post #: 7620
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