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The Empire Forum's Top 100 Actors: The Final Results

 
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The Empire Forum's Top 100 Actors: The Final Results - 2/10/2010 5:23:27 PM   
Sugarman Treacle


Posts: 7191
Joined: 1/12/2008
The Empire Forum's Top 100 Actors: The Results

After two months of collecting votes, it's time to wrap it up. With a total of 23 lists and 205 actors I have the final results. 104 actors made it to the list and were listed after how many points and votes they managed to get. The lowest score any actor got was only one single point and vote. The highest one managed to get 209 points and 12 votes. I will not tell you who though - you'll have to wait and see for yourself! When it comes to the amount of actors making it to the lists... the reason I chose to have 104 actors instead of 100 is that seven on the very bottom on the list landed on the same amount of points and votes, which made it inpossible to exlude any of them.

In order to make the list more foreseeable, here's a summary of the list (this will constantly be updated)

Page 3

1. James Stewart
2. Robert De Niro
3. Jack Nicholson
4. Daniel Day-Lewis
5. Jack Lemmon (1925-2001)
6. Al Pacino
7. Cary Grant (1904-1986)

Page 2

8. Alec Guinness (1914-2000)
9. Orson Welles (1915-1985)
10. Paul Newman (1925-2008)
11. James Cagney (1899-1986)
12. Takashi Shimura (1905-1982)
13. Klaus Kinski (1926-1991)
14. Tony Leung Chiu Wai
15. Kevin Spacey
16. Brad Pitt
17. Toshiro Mifune (1920-1997)
18. Philip Seymour Hoffman (1967)
19. Henry Fonda (1905-1982)
20. Gene Hackman
20. Robert Mitchum (1917-1997)
22. Bill Murray
23. Leonardo Dicaprio
24. Marlon Brando (1924-2004)
25. Charlie Chaplin (1889-1977)
26. Willem Dafoe
27. William Powell (1892-1984)
28. Michael Caine
29. Johnny Depp
30. Tom Hanks
31. Gabriel Byrne
32. Steve Buscemi 
32. Peter O'Toole
34. Humphrey Bogart (1899-1957)
35. Buster Keaton (1895-1966)
36. Spencer Tracy (1900-1967)
37. Robert Duvall
37. Harvey Keitel
39. Harrison Ford
40. Jean-Pierre Léaud
40. Walter Matthau (1920-2000)
40. Kang-ho Song

Page 1

43. Ralph Fiennes
44. Gary Oldman
44. Gregory Peck (1916-2003)
46. Mark Ruffalo
47. Christian Bale
48. Ben Johnson (1918-1996)
49. Dustin Hoffman
50. Samuel L. Jackson 
50. Ian McKellen
50. Alastair Sim (1900-1976)
53. Sean Connery
54. Ed Harris
55. Jim Carrey
55. Choi Min-Sik
57. Christopher Walken
58. John Cazale (1935-1978)
58. Jean Gabin (1904-1976)
58. Max von Sydow
61. David Thewlis
62. Brendan Gleeson
62. Jason Robards (1922-2000)
62. Harry Dean Stanton
65. John Malkovich
66. Tom Courtenay
66. Joe Pesci
68. Tom Cruise
68. Kurt Russell
70. John Mills (1908-2005)
71. Nicolas Cage
72. Nathan Fillion
72. Lee Tracy (1898-1968)
74. Claude Rains (1889-1967)
75. Chow Yun-Fat
75. Lee Marvin (1924-1987)
77. Stan Laurel (1890-1965)
77. Edward Norton
77. Warren Oates (1928-1982)
77. Sam Rockwell
77. Robert Ryan (1909-1973)
77. David Tennant
77. Denzel Washington
84. Javier Bardem
85. Fred Astaire (1899-1987)
85. James Gandolfini
85. Oliver Hardy (1892-1957)
85. Michael Hordern (1911-1995)
85. Takeshi Kitano
85. Tommy Lee Jones
85. Masi Oka
92. Arnold Schwarzenegger
92. Jean-Louis Trintignant
94. Richard Jenkins
94. Adrian Lester
96. Jean-Paul Belmondo
96. Viggo Mortensen
97. Gary Cooper (1901-1961)
97. Val Kilmer
97. Rudolf Klein-Rogge (1888-1955)
97. Charles Laughton (1899-1962)
97. Thomas Mitchell (1892-1962)
97. Geoffrey Palmer
97. Alan Tudyk

Note that this is just a thread for the results. You can find a thread for discussion here.

< Message edited by Sugarman Treacle -- 24/7/2011 7:41:13 PM >


_____________________________

I'm turning turning turning turning turning around, and all that I can see is just a yellow lemmon-tree...
Post #: 1
RE: The Empire Forum's Top 100 Actors: The Results (#97) - 2/10/2010 5:24:24 PM   
Sugarman Treacle


Posts: 7191
Joined: 1/12/2008
#97.

Gary Cooper (1901-1961, USA)



IMDb Mini Biography

"Dad was a true Westerner, and I take after him", Gary Cooper told people who wanted to know more about his life before Hollywood. Dad was Charles Henry Cooper, who left his native England at 19, became a lawyer and later a Montana State Supreme Court justice. In 1906, when Gary was 5, his dad bought the Seven-Bar-Nine, a 600-acre ranch that had originally been a land grant to the builders of the railroad through that part of Montana. In 1910, Gary's mother, who had been ill, was advised to take a long sea voyage by her doctor. She went to England and stayed there until the United States entered World War I. Gary and his older brother Arthur stayed with their mother and went to school in England for seven years. Too young to go to war, Gary spent the war years working on his father's ranch. "Getting up at 5 o'clock in the morning in the dead of winter to feed 450 head of cattle and shoveling manure at 40 below ain't romantic", said the man who would take the Western to the top of its genre in High Noon (1952). So well liked was Cooper that he aroused little envy when, in 1939, the U.S. Treasury Department said that he was the nation's top wage earner. That year he earned $482,819. This tall, silent hero was the American ideal for many people of his generation. Ernest Hemingway who lived his novels before he wrote them, was happy to have Gary Cooper play his protagonists in A Farewell to Arms (1932) and For Whom the Bell Tolls (1943).

Favourite film:
The Lives of a Bengal Lancer (1935)

Favourite performance:
As Dr. Lucius Griffith 'Biff' Grimes in One Sunday Afternoon (1933)




Val Kilmer (1959, USA)



IMDb Mini Biography

Born in Los Angeles, California. Studied at Hollywood's Professional's School and, in his teens, entered Juilliard's drama program. His professional acting career began on stage, and he still participates in theater; he played Hamlet at the 1988 Colorado Shakespeare Festival. His film debut was in the 1984 spoof Top Secret! (1984), wherein he starred as blond rock idol Nick Rivers. He was in a number of films throughout the 1980s, including the 1986 smash Top Gun (1986). Despite his obvious talent and range, it wasn't until his astonishingly believable performance as Jim Morrison in Oliver Stone's The Doors (1991) that the world sat up and took notice. Kilmer again put his good baritone to use in the movie, performing all of the concert pieces. Since then, he has played two more American legends, Elvis Presley in True Romance (1993) and Doc Holliday in Tombstone (1993). In July 1994, it was announced that Kilmer would be taking over the role of Batman/Bruce Wayne from Michael Keaton.

Favourite film:
The Doors (1991)

Favourite performance:
Jim Morrison in The Doors (1991)




Rudolf Klein-Rogge (1888-1955, Germany)



Favourite film:
Dr Mabuse: The Gambler (1922)

Favourite performance:
As Dr. Mabuse in Dr Mabuse: The Gambler (1922)




Charles Laughton (1899-1962, England)



IMDb Mini Biography

Son of Robert Laughton and Elizabeth Conlon. Educated at Stonyhurst, Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (received gold medal). First appearance on stage, 1926. Formed own film company, Mayflower Pictures Corp., with Erich Pommer in 1937. Became American citizen 1950. A consummate artist, Laughton achieved great success on stage and film, with many staged readings (particularly of George Bernard Shaw) to his credit.

Favourite film:
Hobson's Choice (1954)

Favourite performance:
As Henry Horatio Hobson in Hobson's Choice (1954)




Thomas Mitchell (1892-1962, USA)



IMDb Mini Biography

Certainly there have been many phrases coined about Thomas Mitchell as one of the most recognizable and exemplary character actors of Hollywood's golden years, but behind that elfish demeanor was a talent to fit many hats. He was a first-generation American of Irish immigrants who settled in New Jersey. The Mitchell family had a journalistic background, and after high school Thomas followed his father and brother into newspaper reporting.

However, the writing talent in him searched for more. He began turning out comic skits for the theater. Finally in 1913 he decided to become an actor. He met another future great screen character actor, Charles Coburn, a longtime Broadway stage actor--with his wife--who had formed his own company, the Coburn Players. Coburn provided young Mitchell with some much-needed experience in the works of William Shakespeare. In late 1916 Mitchell debuted on Broadway in the original play "Under Sentence" and would be a fixture on the Great White Way steadily from then to 1935. From performing he moved into writing and directing plays with his own Little Accident (1928) and Cloudy with Showers (1931) and would do directing, writing, and some producing for other companies through the 1930s. He was involved in the production of 29 plays.

Amid this full theater life, however, Mitchell looked elsewhere to exercise his versatility. In 1923 he debuted in silent film before returning to Broadway. When he next appeared in film (1936) his Little Accident had already been produced as a film twice (1930 and 1932, in French). It was in fact optioned as a feature twice more (1939 and as the retitled Casanova Brown (1944)). Mitchell soon became much in demand in Hollywood for leading character parts. In 1937 his Hollywood fame was sealed with the Frank Capra classic Lost Horizon (1937), in which he was banker/embezzler Henry Barnard. His dramatic timing was flawless, but so was his to-become-trademark comic relief one-liners. That same year he was memorable and Oscar-nominated as Dr. Kersaint in the John Ford dramatic adventure The Hurricane (1937).

In 1939 Mitchell had the unique good fortune to have memorable roles in such classic movies as Only Angels Have Wings (1939). His Best Supporting Actor Oscar for one of these, Stagecoach (1939), points up the fact that his considerable abilities would just as well have merited the award for any of these films. In so many of his roles he was the cocky, self-assured man of the world. And this makes his performance of Uncle Billy in another of these - Capra's It's a Wonderful Life (1946) - all the more unusual, for this character, now in his elder years, is quick with the wisecrack but has been apparently a failure as man of business and still works in the family business for his nephew, James Stewart. Outwardly cavalier but inwardly too self-absorbed with getting by to be reliable or competent, Mitchell's Uncle Billy is suddenly faced with an ultimate crisis - a near tragedy of circumstance he projects with profound pathos - when duped into believing he has once again been incompetent, losing the loan company's large bank deposit. His agony is multiplied by the emotional confrontation with a panic-stricken Stewart. The sequence is one of the real high dramatic gems of movie history. And Mitchell passes down one his most thought-provoking screen characters.

Of his 100 screen performances fully half of Mitchell's appearances were on the small screen. By 1951 he was immersed in the phenomenon of television playhouse, particularly and frequently appearing on Studio One, Lux Video Theater, The O. Henry Playhouse, The Ford Television Theater, but several others including Zane Grey Theater. He starred in two early TV series: Mayor of the Town (1954) and Glencannon (1959). He would become as well known and beloved to the new generation of TV watchers as he had been to the theater and film audiences going back to the early 20th century.

Favourite film:
Gone with the Wind (1939)

Favourite performance:
As Kid Dabb in Only Angels Have Wings (1939)




Geoffrey Palmer (1927, England)



IMDb Mini Biography

Born in London on June 4th, 1927, Geoffrey Palmer worked in an imports office and then as an accountant before his girlfriend persuaded him to join the local amateur dramatics society. Eventually he became assistant stage manager at Croydon's Grand Theatre, and then spent several years touring with rep. His first roles on TV came in comedy series such as those of Harry Worth and Arthur Askey. He is now a familiar face on British television.

Favourite film:
Season's Greetings (TV, 1986)

Favourite performance:
As Bernard in Season's Greetings (TV, 1986)




Alan Tudyk (1971, USA)



IMDb Mini Biography

Alan Tudyk was born in El Paso, Texas, and grew up in Plano, where he attended Plano Sr. High. In 1990, he went on to study drama at Lon Morris Jr. College. While there, he was awarded the Academic Excellence Award for Drama. He was also named Most Likely to Succeed and Sophomore Beau. During this time, Alan was also an active member of the Delta Psi Omega fraternity.

After leaving LMJC, Alan went on to study at the prestigious Juilliard conservatory but left in 1996 before earning a degree.

After a number of smaller stage productions and a small role in the movie Patch Adams (1998), Alan landed his first Broadway role in 1999 with Epic Proportions. He quickly became a sought-after comedic actor, with roles in such films as 28 Days (2000) and A Knight's Tale (2001).

In 2002, Alan got the role of Wash, the wise-cracking pilot of Serenity on the short-lived series Firefly (2002). Although it lasted only eleven episodes, this may be Alan's most well-known and best-loved role. No other networks would buy the failed series, but Universal Pictures began courting creator Joss Whedon to produce a big-screen version of the series. While awaiting the final news of Firefly's fate, Alan played the beloved Steve the Pirate in the movie Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story (2004) and the voice of the robot Sonny in I, Robot (2004).

In 2005, Alan finally reprised the role of Wash in Serenity (2005), the feature-film version of the series Firefly. The same year, he went back to Broadway from June to November, taking over the role of Lancelot for Hank Azaria in the successful musical Spamalot.

He lives in New York City but also has a place in Los Angeles, California

Favourite film:
A Knight's Tale (2001)

Favourite performance:
As Hoban "Wash" Washburne in Firefly (2002-2003)

_____________________________

I'm turning turning turning turning turning around, and all that I can see is just a yellow lemmon-tree...

(in reply to Sugarman Treacle)
Post #: 2
RE: The Empire Forum's Top 100 Actors: The Results (#96) - 6/10/2010 2:09:58 PM   
Sugarman Treacle


Posts: 7191
Joined: 1/12/2008
#96.

Jean-Paul Belmondo (1933, France)



IMDb Mini Biography

The son of the renowned French sculptor Paul Belmondo, he studied at Conservatoire National Superieur d'Art Dramatique (CNSAD); after the minor stage performances he made his screen debut in À pied, à cheval et en voiture (1957) but the episodes with his participation were cut before release. However, the breakthrough role in Jean-Luc Godard's Breathless (1960) made him one of the key figures in the French New Wave. Since mid-60s he completely switched to commercial mainstream pictures and became a big comedy and action star in France. Following the example of Alain Delon he founded his own production company Cerito named after his grandmother's maiden name. In 1989 he was awarded Cesar for his performance in Itinéraire d'un enfant gâté (1988) . Recently he returned to stage performing in the Theatre Marigny in Paris. He still appears in the movies but not so often as before preferring mostly dramatic roles. The president of France distinguished him with order of Legion of Honour. Belmondo has daughter Florence and son Paul. His elder daughter Patricia died in a fire in 1994. None of his children became actors though you could have seen his son Paul in the episodic role in Itinéraire d'un enfant gâté (1988).

Favourite film:
Pierrot le Fou (1965)

Favourite performance:
As Leon Morin in The Forgiven Sinner (1961)




Viggo Mortensen (1958, USA)



IMDb Mini Biography

Viggo is the eldest son of Grace and Viggo P. Mortensen. His father, who farmed in Denmark, met his mother, a New Yorker, in Norway. They wed and moved to New York where Viggo Jr. was born, before moving to South America where Viggo Sr. managed chicken farms and ranches in Venezuela and Argentina. Two more sons were born, Charles and Walter, before the marriage grew increasingly unhappy. When Viggo was seven, his parents sent him to a a strict boarding school, isolated in the foothills of the mountains of Argentina. Then, at age eleven, his parents divorced. His mother moved herself and the children back to her home state of New York. Viggo attended Watertown High School and became a very good student and athlete. He graduated in 1976 and went on to St. Lawrence University in Canton, New York. After graduation, he moved to Denmark - driven by the need for a defining purpose in life. He began writing poetry and short stories while working many odd jobs, from dock worker to flower seller. But, in 1982, he fell in love and followed his girlfriend back to New York City, hoping for a long romance and a writing career. He got neither.

In New York, Viggo found work waiting tables and bar tending and began taking acting classes. Three years later, he made his film debut with a small part in Witness (1985). Moving to Los Angeles in 1987, he appeared in Salvation!: Have You Said Your Prayers Today? (1987) and married his co-star, Exene Cervenka. The two had a son, Henry Mortensen. But after nearly eleven years of marriage, the couple divorced. In 1999, Viggo got a phone call about a movie he didn't know anything about: The Lord of the Rings. At first, he didn't want to do it, because it would mean time away from his son. But Henry, a big fan of the books, told his father he shouldn't turn down the role. Viggo accepted the part and immediately began work on the project, which was already underway. Eventually, the success of Lord of the Rings made him a household name - a difficult consequence for the ever private and introspective Viggo.

Favourite film:
The Lord of the Rings (2001)

Favourite performance:
As Aragorn in The Lord of the Rings (2001)

< Message edited by Sugarman Treacle -- 6/10/2010 2:18:35 PM >


_____________________________

I'm turning turning turning turning turning around, and all that I can see is just a yellow lemmon-tree...

(in reply to Sugarman Treacle)
Post #: 3
RE: The Empire Forum's Top 100 Actors: The Results (#94) - 5/11/2010 3:03:02 PM   
Sugarman Treacle


Posts: 7191
Joined: 1/12/2008
#94.

Richard Jenkins (1947, USA)



Favourite film:
The Man Who Wasn't There (2001)

Favourite performance:
As Prof. Walter Vale in The Visitor (2007)




Adrian Lester (1968, England)



Favourite film:
As You Like It (2006)

Favourite performance:
As Mickey Stone in Hustle (2004)

< Message edited by Sugarman Treacle -- 5/11/2010 3:08:12 PM >


_____________________________

I'm turning turning turning turning turning around, and all that I can see is just a yellow lemmon-tree...

(in reply to Sugarman Treacle)
Post #: 4
RE: The Empire Forum's Top 100 Actors: The Results (#94) - 6/11/2010 2:05:32 PM   
Sugarman Treacle


Posts: 7191
Joined: 1/12/2008
#92.

Arnold Schwarzenegger (1947, Austria)



IMDb Mini Biography:

With an almost unpronounceable surname and a thick Austrian accent, who would have ever believed that a brash, quick talking bodybuilder from a small European village would become one of Hollywood's biggest stars, marry into the prestigious Kennedy family, amass a fortune via shrewd investments and one day be the Governor of California!

The amazing story of uber-star Arnold Schwarzenegger is a true "rags to riches" story of the penniless immigrant making it in the land of opportunity, the United States of America. Arnold was born on July 30th, 1947 in the town of Thal, Austria and, from a young age, he took a keen interest in physical fitness and bodybuilding, going on to compete in several minor contests in Europe. However, it was when he emigrated to the United States in 1968 at the tender age of 21 that his star began to rise. Up until the early 1970's, bodybuilding had been viewed as a rather oddball sport, or even a mis-understood "freak show" by the general public, however two entrepreneurial Canadian brothers Ben Weider and Joe Weider set about broadening the appeal of "pumping iron" and getting the sport respect, and what better poster boy could they have to lead the charge, then the incredible "Austrian Oak", Arnold Schwarzenegger. Over roughly the next decade, beginning in 1970, Schwarzenegger dominated the sport of competitive bodybuilding winning five Mr. Universe titles and seven Mr. Olympia titles and, with it, he made himself a major sports icon, he generated a new international audience for bodybuilding, gym memberships worldwide swelled by the tens of thousands and the Weider sports business empire flourished beyond belief and reached out to all corners of the globe.

However, Schwarzenegger's horizons were bigger than just the landscape of bodybuilding and he debuted on screen as "Arnold Strong" in the low budget Hercules in New York (1969), then director Bob Rafelson cast Arnold in Stay Hungry (1976) alongside Jeff Bridges and Sally Field, for which Arnold won a Golden Globe Award for "Best Acting Debut in a Motion Picture". The mesmerizing Pumping Iron (1977) covering the 1975 Mr Olympia contest in South Africa has since gone on to become one of the key sports documentaries of the 20th century, plus Arnold landed other acting roles in the comedy The Villain (1979) opposite Kirk Douglas, and he portrayed Mickey Hargitay in the well- received TV movie The Jayne Mansfield Story (1980) (TV). But, what Arnold really needed was a super hero / warrior style role in a lavish production that utilized his chiseled physique, and gave him room to show off his growing acting talents and quirky humor.

Conan the Barbarian (1982) was just that role. Inspired by the Robert E. Howard short stories of the "Hyborean Age" and directed by gung ho director John Milius, and with a largely unknown cast, save Max von Sydow and James Earl Jones, "Conan" was a smash hit worldwide and an inferior, although still enjoyable sequel titled Conan the Destroyer (1984) quickly followed. If "Conan" was the kick start to Arnold's movie career, then his next role was to put the pedal to the floor and accelerate his star status into overdrive. Director James Cameron had until that time only previously directed one earlier feature film titled Piranha Part Two: The Spawning (1981), - which stank of rotten fish from start to finish - however Cameron had penned a fast paced, science fiction themed film script that called for an actor to play an unstoppable, ruthless predator - The Terminator (1984). Made on a relatively modest budget, the high voltage action / science fiction thriller The Terminator (1984) was incredibly successful worldwide, and began one of the most profitable film franchises in history. The dead pan phrase "I'll be back" quickly became part of popular culture across the globe. Schwarzenegger was in vogue with action movie fans, and the next few years were to see Arnold reap box office gold in roles portraying tough, no-nonsense individuals who used their fists, guns and witty one-liners to get the job done. The testosterone laden Commando (1985), Raw Deal (1986), Predator (1987), The Running Man (1987) and Red Heat (1988) were all box office hits and Arnold could seemingly could no wrong when it came to picking winning scripts. The tongue-in-cheek comedy Twins (1988/I) with co-star Danny DeVito was a smash and won Arnold new fans who saw a more comedic side to the muscle- bound actor once described by Australian author / TV host Clive James as "a condom stuffed with walnuts".

The spectacular Total Recall (1990) and "feel good" Kindergarten Cop (1990) were both solid box office performers for Arnold, plus he was about to return to familiar territory with director James Cameron in Terminator 2: Judgment Day (1991). The second time around for the futuristic robot, the production budget had grown from the initial film's $6.5 million to an alleged $100 million for the sequel, and it clearly showed as the stunning sequel bristled with amazing special effects, bone-crunching chases & stunt sequences, plus state of the art computer-generated imagery. Terminator 2: Judgment Day (1991) was arguably the zenith of Arnold's film career to date and he was voted "International Star of the Decade" by the National Association of Theatre Owners. Remarkably, his next film Last Action Hero (1993) brought Arnold back to Earth with a hard thud as the self-satirizing, but confusing plot line of a young boy entering into a mythical Hollywood action film confused movie fans even more and they stayed away in droves making the film an initial financial disaster. Arnold turned back to good friend, director James Cameron and the chemistry was definitely still there as the "James Bond" style spy thriller True Lies (1994) co-starring Jamie Lee Curtis and Tom Arnold was the surprise hit of 1994!

Following the broad audience appeal of True Lies (1994), Schwarzenegger decided to lean towards more family-themed entertainment with Junior (1994) and Jingle All the Way (1996), but he still found time to satisfy his hard-core fan base with Eraser (1996), as the chilling "Mr. Freeze" in Batman & Robin (1997) and battling dark forces in the supernatural action of End of Days (1999). The science fiction / conspiracy tale The 6th Day (2000) played to only mediocre fan interest, and Collateral Damage (2002) had it's theatrical release held over for nearly a year after the tragic events of Sept 11th 2001, but it still only received a lukewarm reception. It was time again to resurrect Arnold's most successful franchise and, in 2003, Schwarzenegger pulled on the biker leathers for the third time for Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines (2003). Unfortunately, directorial duties passed from James Cameron to Jonathan Mostow and the deletion of the character of "Sarah Connor" aka Linda Hamilton and a change in the actor playing "John Connor" - Nick Stahl took over from Edward Furlong - making the third entry in the "Terminator" series the weakest to date.

Schwarzenegger contributed cameo roles to The Rundown (2003), Around the World in 80 Days (2004) and The Kid & I (2005) and took political office in 2003 as the Governor of California, effectively suspending his film career for the foreseeable future.

Schwarzenegger married TV journalist Maria Shriver in April, 1986 and the couple have four children.

Favourite film:
Terminator 2: Judgement Day (1991)

Favourite performance:
As Dutch in Predator (1987)




Jean-Louis Trintignant (1930, France)



IMDb Mini Biography:

Born 1930 in Piolenc in south France as son of a wealthy industrialist. Studied law in Aix-en-Provence. Started theatrical acting in 1950, but was regarded untalented at first, until Roger Vadim discovered him for the movies. When the press stalked him 1956 because of rumors of an affair with Brigitte Bardot his partner in ...And God Created Woman (1956), he fled into the army. Ten years later he had his first big success with A Man and a Woman (1966). Since then he has starred in more than 100 movies, with a special talent for the dark characters like murderers or jealous husbands. Today he prefers theater to movies.

Favourite film:
My Night at Maud's (1969)

Favourite performance:
As Le juge in Three Colors: Red (1994)

_____________________________

I'm turning turning turning turning turning around, and all that I can see is just a yellow lemmon-tree...

(in reply to Sugarman Treacle)
Post #: 5
RE: The Empire Forum's Top 100 Actors: The Results (#94) - 9/11/2010 12:04:54 AM   
Sugarman Treacle


Posts: 7191
Joined: 1/12/2008
#85.

Fred Astaire (1899-1987, USA)



IMDb Mini Biography:

The son of an Austrian immigrant, Fred Astaire entered show business at age 5. He was successful both in vaudeville and on Broadway in partnership with his sister, Adele Astaire. After Adele retired to marry in 1932, Astaire headed to Hollywood. Signed to RKO, he was loaned to MGM to appear in Dancing Lady (1933) before starting work on RKO's Flying Down to Rio (1933). In the latter film, he began his highly successful partnership with Ginger Rogers, with whom he danced in 9 RKO pictures. During these years, he was also active in recording and radio. On film, Astaire later appeared opposite a number of partners through various studios. After a temporary retirement in 1945-7, during which he opened Fred Astaire Dance Studios, Astaire returned to film to star in more musicals through 1957. He subsequently performed a number of straight dramatic roles in film and TV.

Favourite film:
Top Hat (1935)

Favourite performance:
As Jerry Travers in Top Hat (1935)




James Gandolfini (1961, USA)



IMDb Mini Biography:

New Jersey-born James Gandolfini began acting in the New York theater. His Broadway debut was in the 1992 revival of "A Streetcar Named Desire" with Jessica Lange and Alec Baldwin. James' breakthrough role was his portrayal of Virgil the hitman in Tony Scott's True Romance (1993), but the role that brought him worldwide fame and accolades was as complex Mafia boss Tony Soprano in HBO's smash hit series "The Sopranos" (1999). He currently lives in Greenwich Village in New York City.

Favourite performance:
As Tony Soprano in The Sopranos (1999-2007)




Oliver Hardy (1892-1957, USA)



IMDb Mini Biography:

Although his Scottish-English parents were never in show business, as a young boy Oliver Hardy was a gifted singer and, by age eight, was performing with minstrel shows. In 1910 he ran a movie theatre, which he preferred to studying law. In 1913 he became a comedy actor with the Lubin Company in Florida and began appearing in a long series of shorts; his debut film was Outwitting Dad (1914). He appeared in he 1914-15 series of "Pokes and Jabbs" shorts, and from 1916-18 he was in the "Plump and Runt" series. From 1919-21 he was a regular in the "Jimmy Aubrey" series of shorts, and from 1921-25 he worked as an actor and co-director of comedy shorts for Larry Semon. In addition to appearing in two-reeler comedies, he found time to make westerns and even melodramas in which he played the heavy. He is most famous, however, as the partner of British comic Stan Laurel, with whom he had played a bit part in The Lucky Dog (1921). in the mid-1920s both he and Laurel wee working for comedy producer Hal Roach, although not as a team. In amoment of inspiration Roach teamed them together, and their first film as a team was 45 Minutes from Hollywood (1926). Their first release for Roach through MGM was Sugar Daddies (1927) and the first with star billing was From Soup to Nuts (1928). They became a huge hit as a comedy team, and after several years of two-reelers, Roach decided to star them in features, their first of which was Pardon Us (1931).

They clicked with audiences in features, too, and starred in such classics as Way Out West (1937), Parade of the Wooden Soldiers (1933) and Block-Heads (1938). They eventually parted ways with Roach and in the mid-1940s signed on with Twentieth Century-Fox. Unfortunately, Fox did not let them have the autonomy they had at Roach, where Laurel basically wrote and directed their films, though others were credited, and their films became more assembly-line and formulaic. Their popularity waned and less popular during the war years, and they made their last film for Fox in 1946. Several years later they made their final appearance as a tem in a French film, a troubled and haphazard production eventually, after several name changes, called Utopia (1951), generally regarded to be their worst film. Hardy appeared without Laurel in a few features, such as Zenobia (1939) with Harry Langdon, The Fighting Kentuckian (1949) in a semi-comedic role as a frontiersman alongside John Wayne and Riding High (1950), in a cameo role. He died in 1957.

Favourite film:
Way Out West (1937)

Favourite performance:
As Ollie in Big Business (1929)




Michael Hordern (1911-1995, England)



IMDb Mini Biography:

Sir Michael Hordern established himself as one of the premier stage actors of his generation, and also had a flourishing career as a supporting player in British and international cinema. Born on October 3, 1911, in Berkhampsted, England, Michael Murray Hordern was the son of John Calvery Hordern, a British Army captain, and the former Margareta Emily Murray. After receiving his education and graduating from Brighton College, Hordern supported himself as a teacher and salesman before launching a life in the theater in 1937, after having partaken in amateur theatricals in the evenings and on weekends. He debuted in the cinema in a bit role in Carol Reed's A Girl Must Live (1939) and also had a bit part in Girl in the News (1940), but his acting career went on hiatus when Britain went to war against the forces of fascism. Hordern joined the Royal Navy for the duration in 1940.

After being demobilized in 1945, Hordern returned to the stage, and also began appearing regular in films and on television. He established his reputation as a first-rate stage actor, excelling in classical and Shakespearan roles at the Old Vic and at the Shakespeare Memorial Theatre at Stratford. He befriended a young Richard Burton in the early 1950s, and the two would appear together in eight films starting with Alexander the Great (1956) in 1956, including, most memorably, The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1965) and Anne of the Thousand Days (1969).

Hordern is most likely known to audiences for his portrayal of Jacob Marley in the 1951 British adaptation of Charles Dickens' "A Christmas Carol" (known as A Christmas Carol (1951)) starring Alastair Sim, and as the off-screen narrator of Stanley Kubrick's Barry Lyndon (1975), which showcased his mellifluous voice. (Hordern was an outstanding radio actor.) Most critics credit his portrayal of the disillusioned journalist in England Made Me (1973) as his finest screen role.

Michael Hordern was knighted in 1983 for his services to the stage, and he wrote his autobiography, "A World Elsewhere," which was published in 1993. His masterful portrayal of Prospero in the BBC's The Tempest (1980) (TV) likely will remain the definite portrait for years to come. He was also a superb King Lear (1982) (TV).

Sir Michael Hordern died from kidney disease in Oxford, England on May 2, 1995, at the age of 83. He left behind a daughter by his wife, the former Grace Eveline Mortimer, who had precede him in death in 1986 after 42 years of marriage.

Favourite film:
Whistle and I'll Come to You (1968)

Favourite performance:
As Professor Parkins in Whistle and I'll Come to You (1968)




Tommy Lee Jones (1946, USA)



IMDb Mini Biography:

Born in San Saba, Texas, the son of Clyde C. and Lucille Marie (Scott) Jones, Tommy Lee Jones worked in underwater construction and on an oil rig. He attended St. Mark's School of Texas, a prestigious prep school for boys in Dallas, on a scholarship, and went to Harvard on another scholarship.He roomed with future Vice President Al Gore and played offensive guard in the famous 29-29 Harvard-Yale football game of '68 known as "The Tie." He received a B.A. in English literature and graduated cum laude from Harvard in 1969.

Following college, he moved to New York and began his theatrical career on Broadway in "A Patriot for Me" (1969). In 1970, he made his film debut in Love Story (1970). While living in New York, he continued to appear in various plays, both on- and off-Broadway: "Fortune and Men's Eyes" (1969); "Four on a Garden" (1971); "Blue Boys" (1972); "Ulysses in Nighttown" (1974). During this time, he also appeared on a daytime soap opera, "One Life to Live" (1968) as Dr. Mark Toland from 1971-75. He moved with wife Kate Lardner, granddaughter of short-story writer/columnist Ring Lardner, and her two children from a previous marriage, to Los Angeles.

There he began to get some roles on television: "Charlie's Angels" (1976) (pilot episode); Smash-Up on Interstate 5 (1976) (TV); and The Amazing Howard Hughes (1977) (TV). While working on the movie Back Roads (1981), he met and fell in love with Kimberlea Cloughley, whom he later married. More roles in television--both on network and cable--stage and film garnered him a reputation as a strong, explosive, thoughtful actor who could handle supporting as well as leading roles. He made his directorial debut in The Good Old Boys (1995) (TV) on TNT. In addition to directing and starring in the film, he co-wrote the teleplay (with J.T. Allen). The film, based on Elmer Kelton's novel, is set in west Texas where Jones has strong family ties. Consequently, this story of a cowboy facing the end of an era has special meaning for him.

Favourite film:
No Country For Old Men (2007)

Favourite performance:
As Samuel Gerard in The Fugitive (1993)




Takeshi Kitano (1947, Japan)



IMDb Mini Biography:

Takeshi Kitano originally studied to become an engineer, but was thrown out of school for rebellious behavior. He learned comedy, singing and dancing from famed comedian Senzaburô Fukami. Working as a lift boy on a nightclub with such features as comic sketches and striptease dancing, Kitano saw his chance when a comedian suddenly fell ill, and he went on stage in the man's place. With a friend he formed the comic duo "The Two Beat" (his artist's name, "Beat Takeshi", comes from this period), which became very popular on Japanese television.

Kitano soon embarked on an acting career, and when the director of Sono otoko, kyôbô ni tsuki (1990) (aka "Violent Cop") fell ill, he took over that function as well. Immediately after that film was finished he set out to make a second gangster movie, Boiling Point (1990). Just after finishing Getting Any? (1994), Kitano was involved in a serious motorcycle accident that almost killed him. It changed his way of life, and he became an active painter. This change can be seen in his later films, which are characterized by his giving more importance to the aesthetics of the film, such as in Fireworks (1997) and Kikujiro (1999).

Favourite film:
Fireworks (1997)

Favourite performance:
As Joon-pyong Kim in Blood and Bones (2004)




Masi Oka (1974, Japan)



Favourite film:
Get Smart (2008)

Favourite performance:
As Hiro Nakamura in Heroes (2006-2010)

< Message edited by Sugarman Treacle -- 9/11/2010 12:12:01 AM >


_____________________________

I'm turning turning turning turning turning around, and all that I can see is just a yellow lemmon-tree...

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Post #: 6
RE: The Empire Forum's Top 100 Actors: The Results (#94) - 23/11/2010 1:20:20 PM   
Sugarman Treacle


Posts: 7191
Joined: 1/12/2008
#84.

Javier Bardem (1969, Spain)



IMDb Mini Biography:

Javier Bardem is the youngest member of a family of actors that has been making films since the early days of Spanish cinema. He got his start in the family business at age six when he appeared in his first feature, "El Pícaro" (The Scoundrel). During his teenage years, he acted in several TV series, played rugby for the Spanish National Team, and toured the country with an independent theatrical group. Javier's early film role as a sexy stud in the black comedy Jamon Jamon (1992) (Ham Ham) propelled him to instant popularity and threatened to typecast him as nothing morethan a brawny sex symbol. Determined to avert a beefcake image, he refused similar subsequent roles and has gone on to win acclaim for his ability to appear almost unrecognizable from film to film. With over 25 movies and numerous awards under his belt, it is Javier's stirring, passionate performance as the persecuted Cuban writer Reynaldo Arenas in Before Night Falls (2000) that will longbe remembered as his breakthrough role. He received five Best Actor awards and a Best Actor Oscar nomination for his portrayal of a strong-willed man who survived censorship, imprisonment, and homosexual intolerance for the privilege to write freely, only to commit suicide at age 47 in New York, ending a battle with AIDS.

Favourite film:
No Country For Old Men (2007)

Favourite performance:
As Anton Chigurh in No Country For Old Men (2007)

< Message edited by Sugarman Treacle -- 23/11/2010 1:22:23 PM >


_____________________________

I'm turning turning turning turning turning around, and all that I can see is just a yellow lemmon-tree...

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Post #: 7
RE: The Empire Forum's Top 100 Actors: The Results (#77) - 29/11/2010 2:34:57 PM   
Sugarman Treacle


Posts: 7191
Joined: 1/12/2008
#77.

Stan Laurel (1890-1965, England)



IMDb Mini Biography:

Stan Laurel was born Arthur Stanley Jefferson on the 16th of June in Ulverston, Cumbria in England, 1890. His father was a vaudeville performer and this led Arthur to being a stage performer too. He didn't get much schooling and this led to the joining of Fred Karno's Troupe where Arthur understudied the future star, Charles Chaplin. In 1912 they went on a tour to America where Chaplin remained, but Stan went straight back to England. In 1916 he returned to the States and did an impersonation of Charlie Chaplin and the act was called "The Keystone Trio" and it was quite successful.

In 1917 Stan made his first movie entitled Nuts in May (1917) and at the first screening among the people in the audience were Chaplin himself and producer Carl Laemmle who were both impressed. This led onto more short comedies with such greats as 'Gilbert M. 'Broncho Billy' Anderson' , Larry Semon, and Hal Roach. Stan now changed his surname to Laurel thus given the name Stan Laurel. In 1917 Laurel had in fact appeared in a film called The Lucky Dog (1921) with an actor in the cast by the name of Babe Hardy. They formed a friendship but not a very good one. Stan later said they did not see each other for another 2 or 3 years.

It was in 1925 that Hardy and Laurel had met again at the Hal Roach studios and at that point in time Laurel was directing movies at the studio with Hardy in the cast for a couple of years. Among these films were Yes, Yes, Nanette (1925) and Wandering Papas (1926) written & directed by Stan Laurel and starring Babe who now acted under his real name, Oliver Hardy. In 1926 they began appearing together but not yet as a team. One of the directors at the Hal Roach studio known around the world as director of such great movies The Bells of St. Mary's (1945) and Going My Way (1944), Leo McCarey joined these comic geniuses and an immediate partnership unfolded. Laurel & Hardy had appeared as funny as they could be in Putting Pants on Philip (1927) which led them to stardom. They made films for another 20 years. Laurel & Hardy are now known as one of the best comedy teams. They retired from films in 1950 but Stan & Oliver went on a tour of England and appeared in many stage shows for years.


Favourite film:
Way Out West (1937)

Favourite performance:
As Stan in Big Business (1929)




Edward Norton (1969, USA)



IMDb Mini Biography:

Edward Norton was born on August 18, 1969 to parents Edward, an attorney who works for the National Trust for Historic Preservation and Robin Norton, a former foundation executive and teacher who passed away of brain cancer on March 6, 1997. Edward also has two younger siblings named James and Molly. From the age of 5 onward, the Yale graduate (majoring in history) has always been interested in acting. At the age of 8, he would ask his drama teacher what his motivation in a scene was. He attended theater schools throughout his life, and eventually managed to find work on stage in New York as a member of the Signature players, who produced the works of playwright and director Edward Albee.

Around the time when he was appearing in Albee's Fragments, in Hollywood, they were looking for a young actor to star opposite Richard Gere in a new courtroom thriller, Primal Fear (1996). The role was offered to Leonardo DiCaprio but he turned it down. Gere was on the verge of walking away from the project, fed up with the wait for a young star to be found, when Edward auditioned and won the role over 2000 other hopefuls. Before the film was even released, his test screenings for the part were causing a Hollywood sensation, and he was soon offered roles in Woody Allen's Everyone Says I Love You (1996) and The People vs. Larry Flynt (1996). Edward won the Golden Globe for Best Actor in a Supporting Role and received an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actor for his performance in Primal Fear (1996).

In 1998, Norton gained 30 pounds of muscle and transformed his look into that of a monstrous skinhead for his role as a violent white supremacist in American History X (1998). This performance would earn him his second Oscar nomination, this time for Best Actor. In 1999 came the critically acclaimed Fight Club (1999) and in 2000 came his directorial debut in Keeping the Faith (2000).

Favourite film:
25th Hour (2002)

Favourite performance:
As Monty Brogan in 25th Hour (2002)




Warren Oates (1928-1982, USA)



IMDb Mini Biography:

American character actor of the 1960s and 1970s whose distinctive style and intensity brought him to offbeat leading roles. Oates was born in a very small Kentucky town and attended high school in Louisville, continuing on to the University of Louisville and military service with the U.S. Marines. In college he became interested in the theatre and in 1954 headed for New York to make his mark as an actor. However, his first real job in television was, as it had been for James Dean before him, testing the contest gags on the game show "Beat the Clock" (1950). He did numerous menial jobs while auditioning, including serving as the hat-check man at the nightclub "21".

By 1957 he had begun appearing in live dramas such as "Studio One in Hollywood" (1948), but Oates' rural drawl seemed more fitted for the Westerns that were proliferating on the big screen at the time, so he moved to Hollywood and immediately stared getting steady work as an increasingly prominent supporting player, often as either craven or vicious types. With his role as one of the Hammond brothers in the Sam Peckinpah masterpiece Ride the High Country (1962), Oates found a niche both as an actor and as a colleague of one of the most distinguished and distinctive directors of the period. Peckinpah used Oates repeatedly, and Oates, in large part due to the prominence given him by Peckinpah, became one of those rare character actors whose name and face is as familiar as those of many leading stars. He began to play roles which, while still character parts, were also leads, particularly in cult hits like Two-Lane Blacktop (1971) and Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia (1974).

Although never destined to be a traditional leading man, Oates remained one of Hollywood's most valued character players up until his sudden death from a heart attack at the age of 53. His final two films, Tough Enough (1983) and Blue Thunder (1983), filmed back-to-back in early 1982 shortly before his death, were dedicated to his memory.

Favourite film:
Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia (1974)

Favourite performance:
As Bennie in Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia (1974)




Sam Rockwell (1968, USA)



IMDb Mini Biography:

Sam Rockwell was born on November 5, 1968, in Daly City, California, the child of two actors. The family moved to New York when he was two years old, living first in the Bronx and later in Manhattan. When Sam was five years old, his parents split up, at which point he and his father moved to San Francisco, where he subsequently grew up, while summers and other times were spent with his mother in New York.

He made his acting debut when he was ten years old, alongside his mother, and later attended J.E. McAteer High School in a program called SOTA. While still in high school, he got his first big break when he appeared in the independent film Clownhouse (1989). The plot revolved around three escaped mental patients who dressed up as clowns and terrorized three brothers home alone--Sam played the eldest of the brothers. His next big break was supposed to have come when he was slated to star in a short-lived NBC TV-series called "Dream Street" (1989), but he was soon fired.

After graduating from high school, Sam returned to New York for good and for two years he had private training at the William Esper Acting Studio. During this period he appeared in a variety of roles, such as the ABC After-School special _Over the Limit (1990) (TV)_; _Dead Drunk (1993)_ / "Dead Drunk: The Kevin Tunell Story Season 1, Episode 7: 15 March 1993" episode of HBO's "Lifestories: Families in Crisis" (1992); the head thug in Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (1990); and a guest-star turn in an Emmy-winning episode of "Law & Order" (1990), while working a string of regular day jobs and performing in plays.

In 1994, a Miller Ice beer commercial finally enabled him to quit his other jobs to concentrate on his acting career, which culminated in him having five movies out by 1996: Basquiat (1996); The Search for One-eye Jimmy (1994); Glory Daze (1995); Mercy (1995); and Box of Moon Light (1996). It was the latter film that would prove to be his real break-out in the industry. In Tom DiCillo's film, he found himself playing an eccentric named the Kid, a man-child living in a half-built mobile home in the middle of nowhere with a penchant for dressing like Davy Crockett, who manages to bring some much-needed chaos into the life of an electrical engineer played by John Turturro. The movie was not a box-office success, but it managed to generate a lot of critical acclaim for itself and Sam.

In 1997 he found himself the star of another critically lauded film, Lawn Dogs (1997). Once again he portrayed a societal outcast as Trent, a working-class man living in a trailer, earning a living mowing lawns inside a wealthy, gated Kentucky community. Soon Trent finds himself befriended by 10-year-old Devon (Mischa Barton), and the movie deals with the difficulties in their friendship and the outside world. He also gave strong performances in the quirky independent comedy Safe Men (1998), in which he plays one half of a pretty awful singing duo (the other half being played by Steve Zahn) that gets mistaken for two safe-crackers by Jewish gangsters; and the offbeat hit-man trainee in Jerry and Tom (1998) against Joe Mantegna.

After a few smaller appearances in films such as Woody Allen's Celebrity (1998) and the 1999 version of A Midsummer Night's Dream (1999), in which he played Francis Flute, he had larger parts in two of the bigger hit movies to emerge in 1999: The Green Mile (1999) and Galaxy Quest (1999), wowing audiences and critics alike with his chameleon-like performances as a crazed killer in the former and a goofy actor in the latter.

More recently, he appeared in another string of mainstream films, most notably as Eric Knox in Charlie's Angels (2000) and as Zaphod Beeblebrox in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (2005), while continuing to perform in smaller independent movies. After more than ten years in the business, Sam has earned his success.

Favourite film:
Moon (2009)

Favourite performance:
As Guy Fleegman in Galaxy Quest (1999)




Robert Ryan (1909-1973, USA)



IMDb Mini Biography:

Chicago born, distinguished US actor and long time civil rights campaigner, Robert Ryan served in the United States Marines as a drill instructor (winning a boxing championship) and went on to become a key figure in post WWII American film noir and western productions.

Ryan grabbed critical attention for his dynamic performance's as an anti-Semitic bully in the superb Crossfire (1947), as an over-the-hill boxer who refuses to take a fall in The Set-Up (1949) and as a hostile & jaded cop in On Dangerous Ground (1952). Ryan's athletic physique, intense gaze and sharply delivered, authoritarian tones made him an ideal actor for the oily world of the film noir genre, and he contributed solid performances to many noir features, usually as a vile villain. Ryan played a worthy opponent for bounty hunter James Stewart in the Anthony Mann directed western The Naked Spur (1953), he locked horns with an intrepid investigator Spencer Tracy in the suspenseful Bad Day at Black Rock (1955) and starred alongside Harry Belafonte in the grimy, gangster flick Odds Against Tomorrow (1959). Plus, the inventive Ryan excelled as the ruthless "John Claggart" in Billy Budd (1962), and two different WWII US generals - firstly in the star filled The Longest Day (1962) and secondly in Battle of the Bulge (1965).

For the next eight years prior to his untimely death in 1973, Ryan landed some tremendous roles in a mixture of productions each aided by his high calibre acting skills leaving strong impressions on movie audiences. He was one of the hard men hired to pursue kidnapped Claudia Cardinale in the hard boiled action of The Professionals (1966), a by-the-book army colonel clashing with highly unorthodox army major Lee Marvin in The Dirty Dozen (1967), and an embittered bounty hunter forced to hunt down old friend William Holden in the violent Sam Peckinpah western classic The Wild Bunch (1969). Ryan's final onscreen performance was in the terrific production of The Iceman Cometh (1973) based on the Eugene O'Neill play and also starring Lee Marvin and Fredric March.

Legend has it that Sam Peckinpah clashed very heatedly with Ryan during the making of The Wild Bunch (1969), however Peckinpah eventually backed down when a crew member reminded Sam of Robert Ryan's proficiency with his fists !

Primarily a man of pacifist beliefs, Ryan often found it a challenge playing sadistic and racist characters that very much were at odds with his own personal ideals. Additionally, Ryan actively campaigned for improved civil rights, restricting the growth of nuclear weapons and he strongly opposed McCarthyism and its abuse of innocent persons. A gifted, intelligent and powerful actor, Robert Ryan passed away on July 11th, 1973 of lung cancer.

Favourite film:
The Set-Up (1949)

Favourite performance:
As Larry Slade in The Iceman Cometh (1973)




David Tennant (1971, Scotland)



IMDb Mini Biography:

David Tennant was born David John McDonald in West Lothian, Scotland, to a father who was a Presbyterian minister. When he was about 3 or 4 years old, he decided to become an actor, inspired by his love of the BBC show "Doctor Who."

He was brought up in Bathgate, West Lothian and Paisley, Renfrewshire, Scotland and was a huge fan of the band The Proclaimers. He attended Paisley Grammar school and while there he wrote about how he wanted to become a professional actor and play the role of the Doctor in "Doctor Who."

He made his first television appearance (which was also his first professional acting job) when he was 16, after his father sent some photos of him to a casting director at Scottish television. He also attended a youth theatre group at weekends run by the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama (RSMD). When he was 16 he auditioned for and won a place at the RSMD; the youngest student to ever do so, and started as a full time drama student when he was 17.

He worked regularly in theatre and TV after leaving drama school, and his first big break came in 1994 when he was cast in a lead role in the Scottish drama "Takin' Over the Asylum." He then moved to London where his career thrived. Amongst other things, he spent several years as a member of the Royal Shakespeare Company, and became famous from his lead roles in TV dramas "Blackpool" and "Casanova."

In 2005, his childhood wish came true. David was cast to play the role of the Doctor in the BBC'S new series of "Doctor Who" alongside Billie Piper, after Christopher Eccleston decided to leave. Playing the Doctor made him a household name. Since leaving Doctor Who in 2010 his career has continued to rise, with lead roles in films, TV series and theatre.

Favourite film:
How to Train Your Dragon (2010)

Favourite performance:
As The Doctor, John Smith, Doctor Who in Doctor Who (2005-2010)




Denzel Washington (1954, USA)



IMDb Mini Biography:

Tall, strikingly handsome leading man of films and television in the 1980s and 1990s, Denzel Washington was born in 1954 in Mount Vernon, New York. He was the middle child of the 3 children of a Pentecostal minister father and a beautician mother. After graduating from high school, Denzel enrolled at Fordham University intent on a career in journalism. However, he caught the acting bug while appearing in student drama productions and, upon graduation, he moved to San Francisco and enrolled at the American Conservatory Theater. He left A.C.T. after only 1 year to seek work as an actor. With his acting versatility and powerful sexual presence, he had no difficulty finding work in numerous television productions. He made his first big screen appearance in Carbon Copy (1981) with George Segal. Through the 1980s, he worked in both movies and television and was chosen for the plum role of "Dr. Chandler" in NBC's hit medical series "St. Elsewhere" (1982), a role that he would play for 6 years. In 1989, he won the Oscar for Best Supporting Actor for his portrayal of "Tripp", the runaway slave in Edward Zwick's powerful historical masterpiece Glory (1989).

Through the 1990s, Denzel co-starred in such big budget productions as The Pelican Brief (1993); Philadelphia (1993); Crimson Tide (1995); The Preacher's Wife (1996) and Courage Under Fire (1996) - a role for which he was paid $10 million. He lives quietly in Los Angeles with his wife, Pauletta Washington, and their 4 children. Cerebral and meticulous in his film work, he made his debut as a director in 2002 with Antwone Fisher (2002).

Favourite film:
Crimson Tide (1995)

Favourite performance:
As Det. Alonzo Harris in Training Day (2001)

< Message edited by Sugarman Treacle -- 29/11/2010 2:39:11 PM >


_____________________________

I'm turning turning turning turning turning around, and all that I can see is just a yellow lemmon-tree...

(in reply to Sugarman Treacle)
Post #: 8
RE: The Empire Forum's Top 100 Actors: The Results (#75) - 1/12/2010 11:29:12 PM   
Sugarman Treacle


Posts: 7191
Joined: 1/12/2008
#75.

Chow Yun-Fat (1955, Hong Kong)



IMDb Mini Biography:

Chow Yun Fat is a charismatic, athletically built and energetic Asian-born film star who first came to the attention of western audiences via his roles in the high-octane/blazing guns action films of maverick HK director John Woo.

Born in 1955 on the quiet island of Lamma, part of the then British colony of Hong Kong near its famous Victoria Harbour, Chow's family moved to urban Hong Kong in 1965 and in early 1973, Chow attended a casting call for TVB, a division of Shaw Bros. productions. With his good looks and easy-going style, Chow was originally a heartthrob actor in non-demanding TV and film roles. However, his popularity increased with his appearance as white-suited crime boss Hui Man-Keung in the highly popular HK film Shang Hai tan xu ji (1983).

In 1985, Chow started receiving acclaim for his work and scored the Golden Horse (Best Actor) Award in Taiwan and another Best Actor Award from the Asian Pacific Film Festival for his performance in Dang doi lai ming (1984). With these accolades, Chow came to the attention of Woo, who cast Chow in the fast-paced gangster film A Better Tomorrow (1986) (aka "A Better Tomorrow"). The rest, as they say, is history. The film was an enormous commercial success, and Chow's influence on young Asian males was not dissimilar to the adulation given to previous Asian film sensations such as Bruce Lee or Jackie Chan. Nearly every young guy in Hong Kong ran out and bought himself a "Mark Coat," as they became known--a long, heavy woolen coat worn by Chow in the movie (although it is is actually very unsuited to Hong Kong's hot and humid climate).

Further hard-edged roles in more John Woo crime films escalated Chow's popularity even higher, and fans all over the world flocked to see A Better Tomorrow II (1987) (aka "A Better Tomorrow 2"), The Killer (1989) (aka "The Killer"), and Hard Boiled (1992) (aka "Hard Boiled"). With the phenomenal global interest in the HK action genre, Chow was enticed to the United States and appeared in The Replacement Killers (1998) with Mira Sorvino, The Corruptor (1999) with Mark Wahlberg, and, for a change of pace, in the often-filmed romantic tale of Anna and the King (1999).

Chow then returned to the Asian cinema circuit and starred in the critically lauded kung fu epic Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000) (aka "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon"). His wide appeal can be seen in his "boy next door" type of personality and his ability to play such a broad spectrum of roles from a comedic buffoon to a lovestruck Romeo to a trigger-happy professional killer. A highly entertaining and gifted actor with dynamic on-screen presence, Chow continues to remain in strong demand in many film markets.

Favourite film:
The Killer (1989)

Favourite performance:
As Ah Jong in The Killer (1989)




Lee Marvin (1924-1987, USA)



IMDb Mini Biography:

Prematurely white-haired character star who began as a supporting player of generally vicious demeanor, then metamorphosed into a star of both action and drama projects, Lee Marvin was born in New York City to Lamont Waltman Marvin, an advertising executive, and his wife Courtenay Washington Davidge, a fashion writer. The young Marvin was thrown out of dozens of schools for incorrigibility. His parents took him to Florida, where he attended St. Leo's Preparatory School near Dade City.

Dismissed there as well, he enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps at the beginning of World War II. In the battle of Saipan in June 1944, he was wounded in the buttocks by Japanese fire which severed his sciatic nerve. He received a medical discharge and got menial work as a plumber's apprentice in Woodstock, NY. While repairing a toilet at the local community theater, he was asked to replace an ailing actor in a rehearsal. He was immediately stricken with a love for the theater and went to New York City, where he studied and played small roles in stock and Off-Broadway. He landed an extra role in Henry Hathaway's You're in the Navy Now (1951), and found his role expanded when Hathaway took a liking to him.

Returning to the stage, he made his Broadway debut in "Billy Budd", and after a succession of small TV roles, moved to Hollywood, where he began playing heavies and cops in roles of increasing size and frequency. Given a leading role in Eight Iron Men (1952), he followed it with enormously memorable heavies in The Big Heat (1953) and The Wild One (1953). Now established as a major screen villain, Marvin began shifting toward leading roles with a successful run as a police detective in the TV series "M Squad" (1957). A surprise Oscar for his dual role as a drunken gunfighter and his evil, noseless brother in the western comedy Cat Ballou (1965) placed him in the upper tiers of Hollywood leading men, and he filled out his career with predominantly action-oriented films.

A long-term romantic relationship with Michelle Triola led, after their breakup, to a highly publicized lawsuit in which Triola asked for a substantial portion of Marvin's assets. Her case failed in its main pursuit, but did establish a legal precedent for the rights of unmarried cohabitors, the so-called "palimony" law. Marvin continued making films of varying quality, always as a star, until his sudden death from a heart attack in 1987.

Favourite film:
Point Black (1967)

Favourite performance:
As Bill Masters in Seven Men From Now (1956)

_____________________________

I'm turning turning turning turning turning around, and all that I can see is just a yellow lemmon-tree...

(in reply to Sugarman Treacle)
Post #: 9
RE: The Empire Forum's Top 100 Actors: The Results (#74) - 2/12/2010 10:58:30 PM   
Sugarman Treacle


Posts: 7191
Joined: 1/12/2008
#74.

Claude Rains (1889-1967, England)



IMDb Mini Biography:

William Claude Rains, born in the Camberwell area of London, was the son of the British stage actor Frederick Rains. The younger Rains followed, making his stage debut at the age of eleven in "Nell of Old Drury." Growing up in the world of theater, he saw not only acting up close but the down-to-earth business end as well, progressing from a page boy to a stage manager during his well-rounded learning experience. Rains decided to come to America in 1913 and the New York theater, but with the outbreak of World War I the next year, he returned to serve with a Scottish regiment in Europe. He remained in England, honing his acting talents, bolstered with instruction patronized by the founder of the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts, Sir Herbert Beerbohm Tree. It was not long before his talent garnered him acknowledgment as one of the leading stage actors on the London scene. His one and only silent film venture was British with a small part for him, the forgettable -- Build Thy House (1920).

In the meantime, Rains was in demand as acting teacher as well, and he taught at the Royal Academy. Young and eager Laurence Olivier and John Gielgud were perhaps his best known students. Rains did return to New York in 1927 to begin what would be nearly 20 Broadway roles. While working for the Theater Guild, he was offered a screen test with Universal Pictures in 1932. Rains had a unique and solid British voice-deep, slightly rasping -- but richly dynamic. And as a man of small stature, the combination was immediately intriguing. Universal was embarking on its new-found role as horror film factory, and they were looking for someone unique for their next outing, The Invisible Man (1933). Rains was the very man. He took the role by the ears, churning up a rasping malice and volume in his voice to achieve a bone chilling persona of the disembodied mad doctor. He could also throw out a high-pitched maniac laugh that would make you leave the lights on before going to bed. True to Universal's formula mentality, it cast him in similar roles through 1934 with some respite in more diverse film roles -- and further relieved by Broadway roles (1933, 1934) for the remainder of his contract. By 1936, he was at Warner Bros. with its ambitious laundry list of literary epics in full swing. His acting was superb, and his eyes could say as much as his voice. And his mouth could take on both a forbidding scowl and the warmest of smiles in an instant. His malicious, gouty Don Luis in Anthony Adverse (1936) was inspired. After a shear lucky opportunity to dispatch his young wife's lover, Louis Hayward, in a duel, he triumphs over her in a scene with derisive, bulging eyes and that high pitched laugh -- with appropriate shadow and light backdrop -- that is unforgettable.

He was kept very busy through the remainder of the 1930s with a mix of benign and devious historical, literary, and contemporary characters always adapting a different nuance -- from murmur to growl -- of that voice to become the person. He culminated the decade with his complex, ethics-tortured Senator "Joe" Paine in Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939). That year he became an American citizen. Into the 1940s, Rains had risen to perhaps unique stature: a supporting actor who had achieved A-list stardom -- almost in a category by himself. His some 40 films during that period ranged from subtle comedy to psychological drama with a bit of horror revisited; many would be golden era classics. He was the firm but thoroughly sympathetic Dr. Jaquith in Now, Voyager (1942) and the smoothly sardonic but engaging Capt. Louis Renault -- perhaps his best known role -- in Casablanca (1942). He was the surreptitiously nervous and malignant Alexander Sebastian in Notorious (1946) and the egotistical and domineering conductor Alexander Hollenius in Deception (1946). He was the disfigured Phantom of the Opera (1943) as well. He played opposite the challenging Bette Davis in three movies through the decade and came out her equal in acting virtuosity. He was nominated four times for the Best Supporting Actor Oscar -- but incredibly never won. With the 1950s the few movies left to an older Rains were countered by venturing into new acting territory -- television. His haunted, suicidal writer Paul DeLambre in the mountaineering adventure The White Tower (1950), though a modest part, was perhaps the most vigorously memorable film role of his last years. He made a triumphant Broadway return in 1951's "Darkness at Noon."

Rains embraced the innovative TV playhouse circuit with nearly 20 roles. As a favored 'Alfred Hitchcock' alumnus, he starred in five "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955) suspense dramas into the 1960s. And he did not shy away from episodic TV either with some memorable roles that still reflected the power of Claude Rains as consummate actor -- for many, first among peers with that hallowed title.

Favourite film:
The Invisible Man (1933)

Favourite performance:
As The Invisible Man in The Invisible Man (1933)

_____________________________

I'm turning turning turning turning turning around, and all that I can see is just a yellow lemmon-tree...

(in reply to Sugarman Treacle)
Post #: 10
RE: The Empire Forum's Top 100 Actors: The Results (#72) - 4/12/2010 2:30:27 PM   
Sugarman Treacle


Posts: 7191
Joined: 1/12/2008
#72.

Nathan Fillion (1971, Canada)



IMDb Mini Biography:

Canadian-born actor Nathan Fillion gained critical acclaim and a large cult of fans when he starred as Captain Malcolm Reynolds on the Joss Whedon TV series "Firefly" (2002), having previously been a regular on "One Life to Live" (1968) and "Two Guys, a Girl and a Pizza Place" (1998). Fillion had also appeared in small roles in the films Blast from the Past (1999) and Saving Private Ryan (1998).

Whedon gave Fillion a chance to display his range when he cast Fillion as the twisted preacher Caleb, a villain, in the seventh and final season of "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" (1997).

When "Firefly" (2002) was prematurely canceled in late 2002, the show's cast, crew, and many fans were devastated. Whedon vowed to resurrect the series in some way, and Fillion played Captain Reynolds again in the feature-film Serenity (2005). Fillion followed this film with more big screen leading roles in the horror-comedy Slither (2006) and the indie hit Waitress (2007). He also continued to be a force in television, starring in the short-lived Fox-TV series "Drive" (2007) and appearing on ABC's "Desperate Housewives" (2004). He took his first singing part (and cemented his cult appeal) as Captain Hammer in Whedon's musical Internet smash "Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog" (2008).

Favourite film:
Serenity (2005)

Favourite performance:
As Captain Malcolm Reynolds in Firefly (2002-2003)




Lee Tracy (1898-1968, USA)



IMDb Mini Biography:

Rangy, red-headed and straightforward to the bone while possessing distinctively adenoidal vocal tones, this actor with a voracious appetite for high living was a fine cinematic representation of the racy and race-paced style of pre-Code Hollywood. Lee Tracy patented with peerless skill the lightning rod timing and machine gun delivery so identified with that period and would have continued on handsomely in films had severe typecasting, a hair-trigger temper and a notoriously reckless off-camera life not gotten the best of him.

Christened William Lee Tracy on April 14, 1898, the Atlanta-born actor was the son of a traveling railroad superintendent and a former school teacher. Lee attended Western Military Academy in Alton, Illinois, while growing up, and then relocated with his family to upstate New York. Lee may have studied engineering at Union College in 1918, but he also showed an interest in dramatics and was almost immediately asked to join a theater company upon his graduation. WWI interrupted his nascent stage career when he joined the army. Following his discharge, he cast aside thoughts of a theater career and instead became a U.S. Treasury agent. Within two years' time, however, he was back via the vaudeville stage and touring stock companies. This all culminated in a most auspicious Broadway debut in "The Showoff" in 1924.

It took but a couple of years for Tracy to achieve certified stardom with the George Abbott production of "Broadway" (1926), in which he played a song-and-dance man, receiving the New York Drama Critics Award for his efforts. In 1928, following more vaudeville work, Lee found his quintessential role in the form of Hildy Johnson, the hustling, fast-talking newspaperman, in Charles MacArthur and Ben Hecht's timeless play "The Front Page". If ever an actor and role fit together like a hand in a glove, this was it, and it was highly unfortunate, with all due respect to actor Pat O'Brien, that Tracy was not afforded the proper chance to transfer this prototype Broadway part to the 1931 film. During this time he was also developing an off-stage reputation as a carouser and heavy drinker.

Nevertheless, Fox Studios immediately signed Tracy and offered up a fine screen debut for him co-starring with Mae Clarke in the early talkie Big Time (1929) as the male half of a husband-and-wife vaudeville team who breaks off with his mate and falls on heavy times while she becomes a star. In Born Reckless (1930), Tracy played the first of his Walter Winchell-like, staccato-styled characters. Tracy went on to perfectly evoke his fast-talking image in such Depression-era films as the drama Liliom (1930) and the ribald comedy She Got What She Wanted (1930).

A highly impulsive man, Tracy abandoned Hollywood at this early stage of the game and returned to his former glory, Broadway, appearing to fine advantage in "Oh, Promise Me" and "Louder, Please" in 1930 and 1931, respectively. But films continued to beg for his services; this time it was Warner Bros. He contributed greatly to both the melodrama The Strange Love of Molly Louvain (1932) and the horror opus Doctor X (1932) and easily stole the proceedings, this time in a comic mode, as the cynical, scandal-sniffing columnist in Blessed Event (1932). Columbia Studios decided to get in on the action with a three-picture deal. Tracy played a no-holds-barred politico in Washington Merry-Go-Round (1932), the title role in Night Mayor (1932) and an ex-con in Carnival (1935). In between, however, trouble started brewing with his unrestrained night life and patterned absences from the set.

A fourth big studio, MGM, took him on in 1933 with a contract boost despite his "bad boy" reputation, yet more personality problems surfaced. Despite excellent performances in such films as Clear All Wires! (1933), The Nuisance (1933), Turn Back the Clock (1933), Advice to the Lovelorn (1933), and the MGM classics Dinner at Eight (1933) and Bombshell (1933), both showcasing MGM's comedic sex siren Jean Harlow, Tracy went too far. During the filming of Viva Villa! (1934) in Mexico City, Tracy displayed shocking, ungentlemanly behavior that resulted in fisticuffs with the law and a high-profile arrest on public morals charges. MGM not only kicked Tracy off the picture but felt compelled to apologize publicly to the Mexican people for his disrespect and terminate the actor's five-year contract.

Tracy freelanced thereafter, often for RKO, but the quality of his pictures began to slide and his constant rash of quicksilver reporters, columnists and press agents had worn out their welcome. He returned to the stage in both New York ("Bright Star") and London ("Idiot's Delight") and was warmly received. In the midst of it all, he married Helen Thoms Wyse, a nonprofessional, in 1938 and, defying all odds, made the marriage work. She survived him by thirty years.

With his last postwar film at the time being High Tide (1947), Tracy's looks had hardened dramatically and he looked at TV being a possible medium for his talents. Throughout the '50s and early '60s, he appeared on a number of shows, including "Kraft Television Theatre", "Wagon Train" and "Ben Casey". He also took on series leads, such as "The Amazing Mr. Malone" (1951), "Martin Kane" (1949), and "New York Confidential" (1959). And there was always the stage.

Tracy's last hurrah, both on Broadway and in film, was Gore Vidal's blistering political drama The Best Man (1964). Recreating his 1961 Tony-nominated role of the crusty, terminally ill U.S. president, he received his only Oscar nod for this standout part. The rest of his working years went by with less distinction. In the summer of 1968 he was diagnosed with liver cancer and succumbed to the illness on October 18 of that year in a Santa Monica hospital.

Favourite film:
Blessed Event (1932)

Favourite performance:
As Alvin Roberts in Blessed Event (1932)

< Message edited by Sugarman Treacle -- 4/12/2010 2:31:14 PM >


_____________________________

I'm turning turning turning turning turning around, and all that I can see is just a yellow lemmon-tree...

(in reply to Sugarman Treacle)
Post #: 11
RE: The Empire Forum's Top 100 Actors: The Results (#71) - 10/12/2010 12:37:08 PM   
Sugarman Treacle


Posts: 7191
Joined: 1/12/2008
#71.

Nicolas Cage (1964, USA)



IMDb Mini Biography:

The son of comparative literature professor August Coppola (a brother of director Francis Ford Coppola) and dancer/choreographer Joy Vogelsang, Cage changed his name early in his career to make his own reputation, succeeding brilliantly with a host of classic, quirky roles by the late 1980s.

Initially studying theatre at Beverly Hills High (though he dropped out at 17), he secured a bit part in Fast Times at Ridgemont High (1982) -- most of which was cut, dashing his hopes and leading to a job selling popcorn at the Fairfax Theater, thinking that would be the only route to a movie career. But a job reading lines with auditionees for uncle Francis' Rumble Fish (1983) landed him a role in that film, followed by the punk-rocker in Valley Girl (1983), which was released first and truly launched his career.

His one-time passion for method acting reached a personal limit when he smashed a street-vendor's remote-control car to achieve the sense of rage needed for his gangster character in The Cotton Club (1984).

In his early 20s, he dated Jenny Wright for two years and later linked to Uma Thurman. After a relationship of several years with Christina Fulton, a model, they split amicably and share custody of a son, Weston Cage (b.1992).

Favourite film:
The Rock (1996)

Favourite performance:
As Dr. Stanley Goodspeed in The Rock (1996)

_____________________________

I'm turning turning turning turning turning around, and all that I can see is just a yellow lemmon-tree...

(in reply to Sugarman Treacle)
Post #: 12
RE: The Empire Forum's Top 100 Actors: The Results (#70) - 12/12/2010 10:24:44 PM   
Sugarman Treacle


Posts: 7191
Joined: 1/12/2008
#70.

John Mills (1908-2005, England)



IMDb Mini Biography:

Sir John Mills, one of the most popular and beloved English actors, was born Lewis Ernest Watts Mills on February 22, 1908, at the Watts Naval Training College in North Elmham, Norfolk, England. The young Mills grew up in Felixstowe, Suffolk, where his father was a mathematics teacher and his mother was a theater box-office manager. The Oscar-winner appeared in more than 120 films and TV movies in a career stretching over eight decades, from his debut in 1932 in Midshipmaid Gob (1932) through Bright Young Things (2003) and The Snow Prince (2009).

After graduating from the Norwich Grammar School for Boys, Mills rejected his father's academic career for the performing arts. After brief employment as a clerk in a grain merchant's office, he moved to London and enrolled at Zelia Raye's Dancing School. Convinced from the age of six that performing was his destiny, Mills said, "I never considered anything else."

After training as a dancer, he started his professional career in the music hall, appearing as a chorus boy at the princely sum of four pounds sterling a week in "The Five O'Clock Revue" at the London Hippodrome, in 1929. The short, wiry song-and-dance man was scouted by Noel Coward and began to appear regularly on the London stage in revues, musicals and legitimate plays throughout the 1930s. He appeared in a score of films before the war, "quota quickies" made under a system regulating the import of American films designed to boost local production. He was a juvenile lead in The Ghost Camera (1933), appeared in the musical Car of Dreams (1935), and then played lead roles in Born for Glory (1935), Nine Days a Queen (1936) and The Green Cockatoo (1937). His Hollywood debut was in Goodbye, Mr. Chips (1939) with Robert Donat, but he refused the American studios' entreaties to sign a contract and returned to England.

Mills relished acting in films, finding it a challenge rather than the necessary economic evil that many English actors at the time, such as Laurence Olivier, felt it was, and it was the cinema that would make him an internationally renowned star. He anchored his film career in military roles, such as those in his early pictures Born for Glory (1935) (a.k.a. "Forever England") and Raoul Walsh's You're in the Army Now (1937). He appeared in the classic In Which We Serve (1942), where he worked with his mentor Coward and with Coward's co-director David Lean, who would go on to direct Mills in some of his most memorable performances.

Throughout his film career Mills played a wide variety of military characters, portraying the quintessential English hero. He later tackled more complex characterizations, such as the emotionally troubled commander in Tunes of Glory (1960). He also played Field Marshal Haig in the satire Oh! What a Lovely War (1969) that mocked the entire genre. However, it was in his World War II films, which included We Dive at Dawn (1943), Waterloo Road (1945) and Johnny in the Clouds (1945), that Mills established himself as an innovative English film star.

With his ordinary appearance and everyman manner, Mills seemed "the boy-next-door," but the Mills hero was decent, loyal and brave, as well as tough and reliable under stress. In his military roles, he managed throughout his career to include enough subtle variations on the Mills heroic type to avoid appearing typed. He could play such straight heroes as Scott of the Antarctic (1948) as well as deconstruct the type in Ice-Cold in Alex (1958) and "Tunes of Glory." The latter film features one of his finest film roles, that of the brittle Col. Basil Barrow, the new commander of a Scots battalion. Mills superbly played an emotionally troubled martinet in a role originally slated for Alec Guinness, his Great Expectations (1946) co-star, who decided to take the flashier role of the colonel's tormentor. It was one of Mills' favorite characters.

No male star of English cinema enjoyed such a long and rewarding career as a star while appearing predominantly in English films. As an actor, Mills chose his roles on the basis of the quality of the script rather than its propriety as a "star" turn. Because of this, he played roles that were more akin to character parts, such as shoemaker Willy Mossop in Hobson's Choice (1954). As he aged, his proclivity for well-written roles enabled him to make a seamless transition from a lead to character lead to character actor from the 1950s to the 1960s.

Almost 40 years after his film debut, Mills won the Best Supporting Actor Academy Award for playing the mute village idiot in Lean's Ryan's Daughter (1970/I), an uncharacteristic part. In addition to "In Which We Serve" and "Ryan's Daughter," Lean had also directed Mills in memorable performances in This Happy Breed (1944) and "Hobson's Choice". He gave one of his finest turns as Pip in Lean's masterpiece "Great Expectations", in which Mills' performance was central to the success of the picture.

Other significant films in which Mills appeared include The Rocking Horse Winner (1949), King Vidor's War and Peace (1956), The Chalk Garden (1964), King Rat (1965), The Wrong Box (1966), Lady Caroline Lamb (1972), Young Winston (1972) and Stanley Kramer's Oklahoma Crude (1973). He also appeared with his daughter Hayley Mills in Tiger Bay (1959) and The Family Way (1966) and had a cameo in her Disney hit The Parent Trap (1961). Mills appeared in a Disney hit of his own, Swiss Family Robinson (1960), as the paterfamilias. He had one of the better cameo parts in producer Michael Todd's epic Around the World in Eighty Days (1956), playing a carriage driver, and appeared in a non-speaking part as Old Norway in Kenneth Branagh's Hamlet (1996).

In 1967 he appeared in the short-lived American TV series "Dundee and the Culhane" (1967) on CBS. In the hour-long series Mills played an English lawyer named Dundee who roamed the Wild West with a young American lawyer named Culhane, who was also a fast draw with a six-gun. The network was disappointed with the quality of the show's writing and cancelled it after 13 episodes. One of the series' directors was Ida Lupino, who played Mills' sister in "The Ghost Camera" over 30 years before (Lupino also directed Hayley in The Trouble with Angels (1966)). Mills' most famous television role was probably the title character in ITV's "Quatermass" (1979).

He appeared on Broadway during the 1961-62 season as the lead character in Terence Rattigan's "Ross," a fictionalization of the life of T.E. Lawrence, for which he was nominated for a Best Actor Tony Award. His only other Broadway appearance was in the 1987 revival of George Bernard Shaw's "Pygmalion," in which he played Alfred Doolittle. The play was nominated for a Tony for Best Revival, and Amanda Plummer, playing his character's daughter, Eliza, also received a Tony nomination.

After divorcing Aileen Raymond, whom he had married at the age of 19, Mills married playwright Mary Hayley Bell on January 16, 1941. Since he was serving in the army, they could not have a church service, and they renewed their vows at St. Mary's Church, next to their home, Hills House, in Denham, England, in 2001.

Mills has worked as both producer and director: in 1966, he directed daughter Hayley in Gypsy Girl (1966) (a.k.a. "Gypsy Girl), from a script written by his wife. He produced "The Rocking Horse Winner" and The History of Mr. Polly (1949), the latter film featuring his older daughter Juliet Mills as a child. Whistle Down the Wind (1961) in which Hayley's character mistakes a runaway convict played by Alan Bates for Jesus Christ, was based on a novel written by Mary.

Living in Hollywood during the 1960s where his daughter Hayley enjoyed her own Oscar-winning career as a child star, Mills and his wife became very popular with members of the movie colony. After Hayley grew out of her child actress roles, Mills returned to England, where he continued his film work. He became a council member of the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art and a life patron of the Variety Club.

Mills was appointed a Commander of the British Empire in 1960 and was knighted in 1976. Although he suffered from deafness and failing eyesight and went almost completely blind in 1990, he continued to act, playing both blind and sighted characters with his customary joie de vivre and panache. The British Academy of Film and Television Arts honored him with a Special Tribute Award in 1987 and a Fellowship, its highest award, in 2002. He was honored with a British Film Institute Fellowship in 1995 and was named a Disney Legend by The Walt Disney Co.

After a brief illness, Sir John Mills died at the age of 97 on April 23, 2005, in Denham, Buckinghamshire, England. He was survived by his widow (who survived him by eight months), his son Jonathan, his daughters Juliet and Hayley, and his grandson Crispian Mills, the lead singer of the hit pop music group Kula Shaker. He was the author of an autobiography, "Up in the Clouds, Gentleman Please," published in 1981.

Favourite film:
Hobson's Choice (1954)

Favourite performance:
As Lt. Col. Basil Barrow in Tunes of Glory (1960)

_____________________________

I'm turning turning turning turning turning around, and all that I can see is just a yellow lemmon-tree...

(in reply to Sugarman Treacle)
Post #: 13
RE: The Empire Forum's Top 100 Actors: The Results (#68) - 13/12/2010 6:56:26 PM   
Sugarman Treacle


Posts: 7191
Joined: 1/12/2008
#68.

Tom Cruise (1962, USA)



IMDb Mini Biography:

If you had told 14 year old Franciscan seminary student Thomas Cruise Mapother IV that one day in the not too distant future he would be considered one of the top 100 movie stars of all time, he would have probably grinned and told you that his ambition was to become a priest. Nonetheless, this sensitive, deeply religious youngster who was born in July 1962 in Syracuse, New York, was destined to become Tom Cruise, one of the highest paid and most sought after actors in screen history. The only son (among four children) of nomadic parents young Tom spent his boyhood eternally on the move and by the time he was 14 he had attended 15 different schools in the US and Canada. He finally settled in Glen Ridge, New Jersey, with his mother and her new husband. While in high school, he developed an interest in acting and abandoned his plans of becoming a priest, and at age 18 headed for New York and a possible acting career. The next 15 years of his life are the stuff of legends.

He made his film debut with a small part in Endless Love (1981) and from the outset exhibited an undeniable box office appeal to both male and female audiences. Though below average height and not particularly handsome in the traditional sense, within 5 years Tom Cruise was starring in some of the top grossing films of the decade including Top Gun (1986); The Color of Money (1986), Rain Man (1988) and Born on the Fourth of July (1989). By the 1990s and 2000s he was one of the highest paid actors in the world earning an average 15 million dollars a picture in such blockbuster hits as Interview with the Vampire: The Vampire Chronicles (1994), Mission: Impossible (1996), Mission: Impossible II (2000), Mission: Impossible III (2006), Vanilla Sky (2001), Minority Report (2002), The Last Samurai (2003), Collateral (2004), War of the Worlds (2005), and Jerry Maguire (1996) - for which he received an Academy Award Nomination for best actor.

In 1990 he renounced his devout Catholic beliefs and embraced The Church Of Scientology claiming that Scientology teachings had cured him of the dyslexia that had plagued him all of his life. A kind and thoughtful man well known for his compassion and generosity, Tom Cruise is one of the best liked members of the movie community. He was married to actress Nicole Kidman until 2001. Thomas Cruise Mapother IV has indeed come a long way from the lonely wanderings of his youth.

Favourite films:
Collateral (2004) and Magnolia (1999)

Favourite performances:
As Frank T.J. Mackey in Magnolia (1999) and as Charlie Babbitt in Rain Man (1988)




Kurt Russell (1951, USA)



IMDb Mini Biography:

Kurt Russell landed a part in the Elvis Presley movie, It Happened at the World's Fair (1963) when he was 10 years old. In 1960, Walt Disney himself signed Russell to a 10 year contract. Once his stint as a child actor ended, he spent the early 1970's playing minor league baseball. In 1979, he gave a classic performance as Elvis Presley in John Carpenter's ABC-TV movie. He followed with roles in a string of well-received films: Used Cars (1980), Escape from New York (1981), The Thing (1982) and Silkwood (1983). In 1983 he became reacquainted with 'Goldie Hawn' (who appeared with him in The One and Only, Genuine, Original Family Band (1968) when they worked together on Swing Shift (1984). The two have lived together ever since. The movie was a failure - as was their next one together, Overboard (1987).

During the 1980's, Russell starred in a rash of disappointments: The Best of Times (1986), Big Trouble in Little China (1986) and Winter People (1989). Finally, his career seemed to be seriously stalled. He only landed Tango & Cash (1989) after Patrick Swayze dropped out; Dennis Quaid was the first choice for the part in Backdraft (1991). In the end, these two roles were key in re-establishing him as a box-office draw. Russell and Goldie Hawn live on a 72-acre retreat, Home Run Ranch, outside of Aspen. He has two sons, Boston Russell (from a brief marriage to actress Season Hubley) and Wyatt Russell with Goldie Hawn).

Favourite film:
Backdrift (1991)

Favourite performance:
As R.J. MacReady in The Thing (1982)

< Message edited by Sugarman Treacle -- 13/12/2010 6:57:54 PM >


_____________________________

I'm turning turning turning turning turning around, and all that I can see is just a yellow lemmon-tree...

(in reply to Sugarman Treacle)
Post #: 14
RE: The Empire Forum's Top 100 Actors: The Results (#66) - 15/12/2010 11:19:18 AM   
Sugarman Treacle


Posts: 7191
Joined: 1/12/2008
#66.

Tom Courtenay (1937, England)



IMDb Mini Biography:

Acting chameleon Sir Tom Courtenay, along with Sirs Alan Bates and Albert Finney, became front-runners in an up-and-coming company of rebel upstarts who created quite a stir in British "kitchen sink" cinema during the early 60s. An undying love for the theatre, however, had Courtenay channeling a different course than the afore-mentioned greats and he never, by his own choosing, attained comparable cinematic stardom.

The gaunt and glum, fair-haired actor was born Thomas Daniel Courtenay of modest surroundings on February 25, 1937, in Hull, East Yorkshire, England, the son of Thomas Henry Courtenay, a ship painter, and his wife Anne Eliza (née Quest). Graduating from Kingston High School there, he trained in drama at London's Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts. His reputation as an actor grew almost immediately with his professional debut in 1960 as Konstantin in "The Seagull" at the Old Vic. Following tours in Scotland and London with the play, Tom performed in "Henry IV, Part I" and "Twelfth Night" (also at the Old Vic) before assuming the title role of Billy from Albert Finney in the critically-acclaimed drama "Billy Liar" at the Cambridge Theatre in 1961. The story, which tells of a Yorkshire man who creates a fantasy world to shield himself from his mundane middle-class woes, was the initial spark in Tom's rise to fame.

The recognition he received landed him squarely into the heap of things as a new wave of "angry young men" were taking over British cinema during the swinging 60s. Singled out for his earlier stage work at RADA, he was eventually handed the title role in the war film Private Potter (1962), but it was his second movie that clenched stardom. Winning the role of Colin Smith in The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner (1962), Courtenay invested everything he had in this bruising portrayal of youthful desolation and rebellion. As a reform school truant whose solitary sentencing for robbing a bakery leads to a reawakening and subsequent recognition as a long distance runner, he was awarded a "Promising Newcomer" award from the British Film Academy, It was Courtenay then, and not Finney, who recreated his stage triumph as Billy Fisher in the stark film version of Billy Liar (1963). British Film Academy nominations came his way for this and for his fourth movie role in King & Country (1964). Vivid contributions to the films King Rat (1965), the ever-popular Doctor Zhivago (1965), which earned him his first Oscar nomination, and The Night of the Generals (1967) followed.

Despite all this cinematic glory, Courtenay did not enjoy the process of movie-making and reverted back to his first passion -- the theatre -- beginning in 1966. Displaying his versatility with roles in such classic works as "The Cherry Orchard," "Macbeth" (as Malcolm), "Charley's Aunt," "The Playboy of the Western World," "Hamlet," "She Stoops to Conquer," "Peer Gynt" and "Arms and the Man," he still found scattered work in films, including The Day the Fish Came Out (1967), A Dandy in Aspic (1968) and Otley (1968), but none matched his earlier brilliance. In 1971 he took a self-imposed, decade-long sabbatical from filming.

Forming a sturdy association with the Royal Exchange Theatre in Manchester that would last over a decade, he continued to impress with lead roles in "The Rivals" and "The Prince of Homburg". Following his huge success as the libidinous Norman in "The Norman Conquests" in London, he made his Broadway debut with "Otherwise Engaged" (1977) and earned a Tony nomination and Drama League Award in the process. It was his second Tony-nominated triumph in "The Dresser" in 1980-1981, however, that lured Courtenay back to films when he was asked to recreate the role for the large screen. The Dresser (1983)_ co-starred Tom as the mincing personal assistant to an appallingly self-destructive stage star played by Albert Finney (Paul Rogers played the role with Tom on Broadway) who struggles to get the actor through a rigorous performance of "King Lear". Both British actors received Oscar nominations but lost the 1984 "Best Actor" award to American Robert Duvall.

Since then Tom has appeared on occasion in TV and film roles -- usually in support. A few standouts include the films Let Him Have It (1991), Whatever Happened to Harold Smith? (1999), Last Orders (2001) and Nicholas Nickleby (2002), and the TV mini-series A Rather English Marriage (1998) (TV), for which he earned a British Television Award, and "Little Dorrit" (2008).

Over the years Sir Tom has excelled in solo stage shows as well. As a chronic alcoholic in "Moscow Stations," he won the 1994 London Critics Circle Theatre and London Evening Standard Theatre awards for "Best Actor". In 2002, he wrote the one-man show "Pretending To Be Me," based on the letters and writings of poet Philip Larkin. In the past decade he has continued to distinguish himself on both the classical ("King Lear," "Uncle Vanya") and contemporary ("Art") stages.

Courtenay's marriage to actress Cheryl Kennedy lasted about a decade (from 1973 to 1982). In 1988 he married Isabel Crossley, a stage manager at the Royal Exchange Theatre in London. He has no children from either marriage. In 1999, Sir Tom Courtenay was award an honorary doctorate from Hull University and in 2000 published his memoir "Dear Tom: Letters From Home", which earned strong reviews. Knighthood came a year after that.

Favourite film:
The Dresser (1983)

Favourite performance:
As Colin Smith in The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner (1962)




Joe Pesci (1943, USA)



IMDb Mini Biography:

Compact Italian-American actor born February 9, 1943, in Newark, NJ, who first broke into entertainment as a child actor and by the mid-50s was starring on the series "Star Time Kids". In the mid-'60s he released a record under the stage name of "Joe Ritchie" titled "Little Joe Sure Can Sing", and was also playing guitar with several bands, including Joey Dee and The Starliters. He even joined with friend Frank Vincent to start a vaudeville-style comedy act, but met with limited success (interestingly, Pesci and Vincent would later go on to co-star in several gangster films together, including Goodfellas (1990) and Casino (1995))

Pesci's first film role was as an uncredited dancer in Hey, Let's Twist (1961) and then he had to wait another 15 years for a minor part in The Death Collector (1976). His work in the second film was seen by Robert De Niro, who convinced director Martin Scorsese to cast him as "Joey LaMotta" in the epic boxing film Raging Bull (1980), which really got him noticed in Hollywood. He played opposite Rodney Dangerfield in Easy Money (1983), was with buddy DeNiro again in Once Upon a Time in America (1984), nearly stole the show as con man Leo Getz in Lethal Weapon 2 (1989) and scored a Best Supporting Actor Oscar playing the psychotic Tommy DeVito in "Goodfellas".

His comedic talents shone again in the mega-popular Home Alone (1990), and he put in a terrific performance as co-conspirator David Ferrie in JFK (1991). Pesci was back again as Leo Getz for Lethal Weapon 3 (1992), and was still a bumbling crook in Home Alone 2: Lost in New York (1992), and had a minor role in the Robert De Niro-directed A Bronx Tale (1993). He was lured back by Scorsese to play another deranged gangster named Nicky (based on real-life hood Tony Spilotro [aka "The Ant"]) in the violent Casino (1995), and starred in the comedies 8 Heads in a Duffel Bag (1997) and Gone Fishin' (1997), although both failed to fire at the box office.

He returned again as fast-talking con man Leo Getz in Lethal Weapon 4 (1998).

Favourite film:
Goodfellas (1990)

Favourite performance:
As Tommy DeVito in Goodfellas (1990)

_____________________________

I'm turning turning turning turning turning around, and all that I can see is just a yellow lemmon-tree...

(in reply to Sugarman Treacle)
Post #: 15
RE: The Empire Forum's Top 100 Actors: The Results (#65) - 16/12/2010 10:34:49 PM   
Sugarman Treacle


Posts: 7191
Joined: 1/12/2008
#65.

John Malkovich (1953, USA)



IMDb Mini Biography:

In 1976, John Malkovich joined Chicago's Steppenwolf Theatre, newly founded by his friend Gary Sinise. After that, it would take seven years before Malkovich would show up in New York and win an Obie in Sam Shepard's play "True West". In 1984, Malkovich would appear with Dustin Hoffman in the Broadway revival of "Death of a Salesman", which would earn him an Emmy when it was made into a made-for-TV movie the next year. His big-screen debut would be as the blind lodger in Places in the Heart (1984), which earned him an Academy Award Nomination for best supporting actor. Other films would follow, including The Killing Fields (1984) and The Glass Menagerie (1987), but he would be well remembered as Vicomte de Valmont in Dangerous Liaisons (1988).

Playing against Michelle Pfeiffer and Glenn Close in a costume picture helped raise his standing in the industry. He would be cast as the psychotic political assassin in Clint Eastwood's In the Line of Fire (1993), for which he would be nominated for both the Academy Award and the Golden Globe. In 1994, Malkovich would portray the sinister Kurtz in the made-for-TV movie Heart of Darkness (1993) (TV), taking the story to Africa as it was originally written. Malkovich has periodically returned to Chicago to both act and direct.

Favourite film:
Dangerous Liaisons (1988)

Favourite performance:
As Vicomte Sébastien de Valmont in Dangerous Liaisons (1988)

< Message edited by Sugarman Treacle -- 16/12/2010 10:35:15 PM >


_____________________________

I'm turning turning turning turning turning around, and all that I can see is just a yellow lemmon-tree...

(in reply to Sugarman Treacle)
Post #: 16
RE: The Empire Forum's Top 100 Actors: The Results (#62) - 26/12/2010 11:25:47 AM   
Sugarman Treacle


Posts: 7191
Joined: 1/12/2008
#62.

Brendan Gleeson (1955, Ireland)



IMDb Mini Biography:

Brendan Gleeson was born on March 29, 1955 in Dublin, Ireland. From a very young age, he loved to learn, especially reading classical text in and outside the classroom. He took great attention to Irish play writers such as Samuel Beckett, which eventually led to him performing in his high school play production of "Waiting for Godot", and paying great attention to detail in his high school drama classes. Upon finishing 12th grade, he spent a couple of years with the Dublin Shakespeare Festival, and under the advice of a director there, headed across to London and auditioned for drama schools. He was nearly immediately accepted to the prestigious Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, and he graduated from the three year BA honors course.

After RADA, he returned home to Dublin, and continued with theatre, as well as making a living as a secondary-level teacher specifically in English and Drama. Soon to follow, he was invited to audition for the Royal Shakespeare Company in Stratford upon Avon, and spent a couple of seasons back in England on the stage. He then, at the age of thirty five, decided to audition for films in the UK and began to build a very respectable resume playing many different diverse characters. His classical acting skills gained the attention of Mel Gibson and he was cast in Braveheart (1995). Ever since, he has continued to bring his huge stage presence to the screen, always delivering the character in full development to his audience. He is married to his lovely wife, Mary, since 1982. They gave four sons.

Favourite film:
In Bruges (2008)

Favourite performance:
As Ken in In Bruges (2008)




Jason Robards (1922-2000, USA)



IMDb Mini Biography:

Powerful and highly respected American star character actor. Son of stage and film star Jason Robards Sr., he was born in Chicago, but raised mostly in Los Angeles. A star athlete at Hollywood High School, he served in the U.S. Navy in World War II, where he saw combat as a radioman (though he is not listed in official rolls of Navy Cross winners, despite the claims some -- not he -- have made. Neither was he at Pearl Harbor during the Dec. 7, 1941 attack, his ship being at sea at the time.) Returning to civilian life, he attended the American Academy of Dramatic Arts and struggled as a small-part actor in local New York theatre, TV and radio before shooting to fame on the New York stage in Eugene O'Neill's "The Iceman Cometh" as Hickey. He followed that with another masterful O'Neill portrayal, as the alcoholic Jamie Tyrone in "Long Day's Journey Into Night" on Broadway.

He entered feature films in The Journey (1959) and rose rapidly to even greater fame as a film star. Robards won consecutive Academy Awards for Best Supporting Actor for All the President's Men (1976) and Julia (1977), in each case playing real-life people. He continued to work on the stage, winning continued acclaim in such O'Neill works as "Moon For the Misbegotten" and "Hughie." Robards died of lung cancer in 2000.

Favourite film:
A Thousand Clowns (1965)

Favourite performance:
As Murray in A Thousand Clowns (1965)




Harry Dean Stanton (1926, USA)



IMDb Mini Biography:

Prolific character actor with a drooping, weather-beaten appearance and superb acting talent that have been his ticket to appearing in over 100 films, and 50 TV episodes. Born in West Irvine, Kentucky, Stanton served in WW II, then returned to the University of Kentucky to appear in a production of "Pygmalion", before heading out to California and honing his craft at the prestigious Pasadena Playhouse. Stanton then toured around the US with a male choir, worked in children's theater, and then headed back to California. His first role onscreen was in the tepid Tomahawk Trail (1957), but he was quickly noticed and appeared regularly in minor roles as cowboys and soldiers through the late 1950s and early 1960s. His star continued to rise and he received better roles in which he could showcase his laid-back style, such as in Cool Hand Luke (1967), Kelly's Heroes (1970), Dillinger (1973), The Godfather: Part II (1974), and in Alien (1979). It was around this time that Stanton came to the attention of director Wim Wenders, who cast him in his finest role yet as Travis in the moving Paris, Texas (1984). Next indie director Alex Cox gave Stanton a role that really brought him to the forefront, in the quirky cult film Repo Man (1984).

Stanton was now heavily in demand, and his unique look got him cast as everything from a suburban father in the mainstream Pretty in Pink (1986) to a soft-hearted, but ill-fated, private investigator in Wild at Heart (1990) and a crazy yet cunning scientist in Escape from New York (1981). Apart from his film performances, Stanton is also an accomplished musician, and "The Harry Dean Stanton Band" and their unique spin on mariachi music have been playing together for well over a decade. They have toured internationally to rave reviews. Stanton became a cult figure of cinema and music and when Deborah Harry sang the lyric "I want to dance with Harry Dean..." in her 1990s hit "I Want That Man", she was talking about him.

As he moved into the time in his life when most other people would be calling it a day, Harry Dean Stanton has remained consistently active onscreen, most recently appearing in films including Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (1998), The Green Mile (1999) and The Man Who Cried (2000). A true gem amongst character actors, and with an onscreen presence capable of adding that something extra to any production.

Favourite film:
Paris, Texas (1984)

Favourite performance:
As Travis Henderson in Paris, Texas (1984)

_____________________________

I'm turning turning turning turning turning around, and all that I can see is just a yellow lemmon-tree...

(in reply to Sugarman Treacle)
Post #: 17
RE: The Empire Forum's Top 100 Actors: The Results (#61) - 3/1/2011 12:56:50 AM   
Sugarman Treacle


Posts: 7191
Joined: 1/12/2008
#61.

David Thewlis (1963, England)



IMDb Mini Biography:

David Thewlis was born David Wheeler in 1963 and lived with his parents above their combination wallpaper and toy shop in Blackpool during his childhood. Originally he came to London with his band Door 66, however he changed his plans and entered Guildhall School of Drama. He had minor roles in films and TV until he took the main role in Naked (1993). The film won him several awards including the New York Critics Award. He has since been in many other films including DragonHeart (1996), Restoration (1995), Black Beauty (1994) and recently took the part of Professor Remus John Lupin in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (2004). He has lived with the British actress Anna Friel since 2001.

Favourite film:
Naked (1993)

Favourite performance:
As Johnny in Naked (1993)

_____________________________

I'm turning turning turning turning turning around, and all that I can see is just a yellow lemmon-tree...

(in reply to Sugarman Treacle)
Post #: 18
RE: The Empire Forum's Top 100 Actors: The Results (#58) - 3/1/2011 12:39:42 PM   
Sugarman Treacle


Posts: 7191
Joined: 1/12/2008
#58.

John Cazale (1935-1978, USA)



IMDb Mini Biography:

An Italian-American, Cazale only made five feature films in his career, all which many fans and critics alike call classics. But before his film debut, the short The American Way (1962) he won numerous Obie Awards for his stage performances in "The Indian Wants the Bronx" and "The Line".

Cazale scored the role of Fredo Corleone in Francis Ford Coppola's The Godfather (1972), after his long time friend, Al Pacino, invited him to audition. He reprised his role as the troubled Fredo in The Godfather: Part II (1974), where his character endures one of the most infamous movie moments in the history of cinema.

Cazale also starred with Gene Hackman and Harrison Ford in the thriller, The Conversation (1974), as Hackman's assistant, Stan. The Godfather's director, Francis Ford Coppola, also directed the movie.

Cazale's fourth feature film, Dog Day Afternoon (1975), earned him a Golden Globe nomination for Best Supporting Actor for his role as Sal, a bank robber. His long time friend and Godfather co-star, Al Pacino, played his partner, Sonny.

His final film, The Deer Hunter (1978), was filmed whilst he was ill with cancer. He became engaged to his co-star, Meryl Streep, whilst filming The Deer Hunter (1978), whom he met when they both appeared in the New York Public Theater's 1976 production of Shakespeare's Measure for Measure.

Controversy occurred during the filming. While the studio was unaware of his condition, the director, Michael Cimino, knew about it. As Cazale was evidently weak, he was forced to film his scenes first. When the studio discovered he was suffering from bone cancer, they wanted him removed from the film. His co-star and fiancé, Meryl Streep, threatened to quit if he was fired. He died shortly after filming was completed.

Favourite film:
The Godfather (1972)

Favourite performance:
As Sal in Dog Day Afternoon (1975)




Jean Gabin (1904-1976, France)



IMDb Mini Biography:

Jean-Alexis Moncorge started his career with 15 years at the theatre and debuted at the "Moulin Rouge" in Paris in 1929. Despite of his rude aspect he knew to be the gentleman of the French cinema in the time between the two World Wars. One of his most popular personalities was inspector Maigret. But he was also able to play all other kind of people: aristocrats, farmers, thieves and managers. He never stopped working and when death surprised him in 1976 he was still an institution for the French audience.

Favourite film:
Le quai des brumes (1938)

Favourite performance:
As Jean in Le quai des brumes (1938)




Max von Sydow (1929, Sweden)



IMDb Mini Biography:

He was born in a middle-class family in Lund, where his father was an ethnologist. When he was in high school, he and a few fellow students, including Yvonne Lombard, started a theatre club which encouraged his interest in acting. After conscription he began to study at the Royal Dramatic Theatre's acting school (1948-1951), together with Lars Ekborg, Margaretha Krook and Ingrid Thulin. His first role was as "Nils the crofter" in Alf Sjöberg's Bara en mor (1949). After graduation he worked at the city theatres in Norrkoeping and Malmö. His work in the movies by Ingmar Bergman made him well-known internationally, and he started to get offers from abroad. His career abroad began with The Greatest Story Ever Told (1965) and Hawaii (1966). Since then, his career includes very different kind of characters, like "Emperor Ming" in Flash Gordon (1980) or the artist Frederick in Hannah and Her Sisters (1986). In 1987 he made his directing debut with Katinka (1988). He has become one of Sweden's most admired and professional actors.

Favourite film:
Europa (1991)

Favourite performance:
As Frederick in Hannah and Her Sisters (1986)

_____________________________

I'm turning turning turning turning turning around, and all that I can see is just a yellow lemmon-tree...

(in reply to Sugarman Treacle)
Post #: 19
RE: The Empire Forum's Top 100 Actors: The Results (#57) - 7/1/2011 12:38:32 AM   
Sugarman Treacle


Posts: 7191
Joined: 1/12/2008
#57.

Christopher Walken (1943, USA)



IMDb Mini Biography:

Amazingly versatile stage & screen actor with sandy colored hair, pale complexion and a somewhat nervous disposition. Has a reputation for playing mentally unbalanced characters on-screen, however that generalisation would not do justice to Walken's depth and breadth of performances. He learnt his stage craft, including dancing, at Hofstra University & ANTA, and picked up a Theatre World award for his performance in the revival of the Tennessee Williams play "The Rose Tattoo".

Walken then first broke through into cinema in 1969 appearing in Me and My Brother (1969), before appearing alongside Sean Connery in the sleeper heist movie The Anderson Tapes (1971). His eclectic work really came to the attention of critics in 1977 with his intense portrayal of Diane Keaton suicidal younger brother in Annie Hall (1977), and then he scooped the Best Supporting Actor Academy Award in 1977 for his role as Nick in the electrifying The Deer Hunter (1978). Walken was lured back by The Deer Hunter (1978) director Michael Cimino for a role in the financially disastrous western Heaven's Gate (1980), before moving onto surprise audiences with his wonderful dance skills in Pennies from Heaven (1981), taking the lead as a school teacher with telepathic abilities in the Stephen King inspired The Dead Zone (1983) and then as billionaire industrialist Max Zorin trying to blow up Silicon Valley in the 007 adventure A View to a Kill (1985).

Looking at many of Walken's other captivating screen roles, it is easy to see the diversity of his range and even his droll comedic talents with humorous appearances in Biloxi Blues (1988), Wayne's World 2 (1993), Joe Dirt (2001), Mousehunt (1997) and America's Sweethearts (2001). Most recently, he continued to surprise audiences again with his work as a heart broken and apologetic father to Leonardo DiCaprio in Catch Me If You Can (2002). Christopher Walken's talents continue to remain in high demand and movie audiences relish watching how capably he re-invents himself for each new challenging role.

Favourite film:
Pulp Fiction (1994)

Favourite performance:
As Captain Koons in Pulp Fiction (1994)

_____________________________

I'm turning turning turning turning turning around, and all that I can see is just a yellow lemmon-tree...

(in reply to Sugarman Treacle)
Post #: 20
RE: The Empire Forum's Top 100 Actors: The Results (#55) - 8/1/2011 11:36:55 PM   
Sugarman Treacle


Posts: 7191
Joined: 1/12/2008
#55.

Jim Carrey (1962, Canada)



IMDb Mini Biography:

The youngest of four children born to Percy (an accountant and aspiring jazz saxophonist) and Kathleen, Jim Carrey was an incurable extrovert from day one. As a child he performed constantly, for anyone who would watch, and even mailed his résumé to "The Carol Burnett Show" (1967) at age 10. In junior high he was granted a few precious minutes at the end of each school day to do stand-up routines for his classmates (provided, of course, that he kept a lid on it the rest of the day).

Carrey's early adolescence took a turn for the tragic, however, when the family was forced to relocate from their cozy town of Newmarket to Scarborough (a Toronto suburb). They all took security and janitorial jobs in the Titan Wheels factory, Jim working 8-hour shifts after school let out (not surprisingly, his grades and morale both suffered). When they finally deserted the factory, the family lived out of a Volkswagen camper van until they could return to Toronto. Back on firmer ground, Carrey decided to strike out into the comedy club scene. He made his (reportedly awful) professional stand-up debut at Yuk-Yuk's, one of the many local clubs that would serve as his training ground in the years to come. He dropped out of high school, worked on his celebrity impersonations (among them Michael Landon and James Stewart), and in 1979 worked up the nerve to move to Los Angeles. He finessed his way into a regular gig at The Comedy Store, where he impressed Rodney Dangerfield so much that the veteran comic signed him as an opening act for an entire season.

During this period Carrey met and married waitress Melissa Womer, with whom he had a daughter (Jane). The couple would later go through a very messy divorce, freeing Carrey up for a brief second marriage to actress Lauren Holly. Wary of falling into the lounge act lifestyle, Carrey began to look around for other performance outlets. He landed a part as a novice cartoonist in the short-lived sitcom "The Duck Factory" (1984); while the show fell flat, the experience gave Carrey the confidence to pursue acting more vigorously.

He scored the male lead in the ill-received Lauren Hutton vehicle Once Bitten (1985), and a supporting role in Peggy Sue Got Married (1986), before making a modest splash with his appearance as the alien Wiploc in Earth Girls Are Easy (1988). Impressed with Carrey's lunacy, fellow extraterrestrial Damon Wayans made a call to his brother, Keenen Ivory Wayans, who was in the process of putting together the sketch comedy show "In Living Color" (1990). Carrey joined the cast and quickly made a name for himself with outrageous acts (one of his most popular characters, psychotic Fire Marshall Bill, was attacked by watchdog groups for dispensing ill- advised safety tips).

Carrey's transformation from TV goofball to marquee headliner happened within the course of a single year. He opened 1994 with a starring turn in Ace Ventura: Pet Detective (1994), a film that cashed in on his extremely physical brand of humor (the character's trademark was talking out his derrière). Next up was the manic superhero movie The Mask (1994), which had audiences wondering just how far Carrey's features could stretch. Finally, in December, he hit theaters as a loveable dolt in the Farrelly brothers' Dumb & Dumber (1994) (his first multi-million dollar payday).

Now a box-office staple, Carrey brought his manic antics onto the set of Batman Forever (1995), replacing Robin Williams as The Riddler. He also filmed the follow-up to his breakthrough, Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls (1995), and inked a deal with Sony to star in The Cable Guy (1996) (replacing Chris Farley) for a cool $20 million--at the time, that was the biggest up-front sum that had been offered to any comic actor. The movie turned out to be a disappointment, both critically and financially, but Carrey bounced back the next year with the energetic hit Liar Liar (1997). Worried that his comic shtick would soon wear thin, Carrey decided to change course. In 1998, he traded in the megabucks and silly grins to star in Peter Weir's The Truman Show (1998) playing a naive salesman who discovers that his entire life is the subject of a TV show, Carrey demonstrated an uncharacteristic sincerity that took moviegoers by surprise. He won a Golden Globe for the performance, and fans anticipated an Oscar nomination as well--when it didn't materialize, Carrey lashed out at Academy members for their narrow-minded selection process.

Perhaps inspired by the snub, Carrey threw himself into his next role with abandon. After edging out a handful of other hopefuls (including Edward Norton) to play eccentric funnyman Andy Kaufman in Man on the Moon (1999), Carrey disappeared into the role, living as Kaufman -- and his blustery alter-ego Tony Clifton -- for months (Carrey even owned Kaufman's bongo drums, which he'd used during his audition for director Milos Forman).

His sometimes uncanny impersonation was rewarded with another Golden Globe, but once again the Academy kept quiet. An indignant Carrey next reprised his bankable mania for the Farrelly brothers in Me, Myself & Irene (2000), playing a state trooper whose Jekyll and Hyde personalities both fall in love with the same woman (Renée Zellweger). Carrey's real-life persona wound up falling for her too--a few months after the film wrapped, the pair announced they were officially a couple. By then, Carrey had already slipped into a furry green suit to play the stingy antihero of Ron Howard's How the Grinch Stole Christmas (2000). He plans to take a break from the limelight after the holiday flick (as he puts it, "I'm looking forward to getting out of America's face"). Is there another Carrey reinvention in the works? If so, he's not talking.

Favourite film:
Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004)

Favourite performance:
As Joel Barish in Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004)




Choi Min-Sik (1962, South Korea)



IMDb Mini Biography:

Choi Min-shik first made a name for himself in theater before breaking into the film world with a role in Park Chong-won's acclaimed film Our Twisted Hero (1997). In the mid-nineties he continued to act in theater productions as well as in several TV dramas, including Moon Over Seoul with Han Seok-gyu. 1997 marked his return to motion pictures, with a role as a tough-talking police investigator in Song Neung-han's No. 3 (1997). His biggest role came in 1999, when he was cast in Korea's most successful film ever, Swiri (1999). His portrayal of a North Korean agent garnered him much praise and a Best Actor Award from the 1999 domestic Grand Bell Awards.

Favourite film:
Lady Vengeance (2005)

Favourite performance:
As Dae-su Oh in Oldboy (2003)

_____________________________

I'm turning turning turning turning turning around, and all that I can see is just a yellow lemmon-tree...

(in reply to Sugarman Treacle)
Post #: 21
RE: The Empire Forum's Top 100 Actors: The Results (#54) - 9/1/2011 11:15:53 AM   
Sugarman Treacle


Posts: 7191
Joined: 1/12/2008
#54.

Ed Harris (1950, USA)



IMDb Mini Biography:

By transforming into his characters and pulling the audience in, Ed Harris has earned the reputation as one of the most talented actors of our time. Born in Tenafly, New Jersey, Harris grew up as the middle child. After graduating high school, he attended New York's Columbia University, where he played football. After viewing local theater productions, Harris took a sudden interest in acting. He left Columbia, headed to Oklahoma, where his parents were living, and enrolled in the University of Oklahoma's theater department.

After graduation, he moved to Los Angeles to find work. He started acting in theater and television guest spots. Harris landed his first leading role in a film in cult-favorite George A. Romero's Knightriders (1981). Two years later, he got his first taste of critical acclaim, playing astronaut John Glenn in The Right Stuff (1983). Also that year, he made his New York stage debut in Sam Shepard's "Fool for Love", a performance that earned him an Obie for Outstanding Actor. Harris' career gathered momentum after that. In 2000, he made his debut as a director in the Oscar-winning film Pollock (2000).

Favourite film:
The Right Stuff (1983)

Favourite performance:
As Jackson Pollock in Pollock (2000)

_____________________________

I'm turning turning turning turning turning around, and all that I can see is just a yellow lemmon-tree...

(in reply to Sugarman Treacle)
Post #: 22
RE: The Empire Forum's Top 100 Actors: The Results (#53) - 11/1/2011 10:32:04 PM   
Sugarman Treacle


Posts: 7191
Joined: 1/12/2008
#53.

Sean Connery (1930, Scotland)



IMDb Mini Biography:

Thomas Sean Connery was born on August 25, 1930 in Fountainbridge, Edinburgh. His mother, Euphamia C. Maclean, was a cleaning lady, and his father, Joseph Connery, was a factory worker and truck driver. He also has a brother named Neil Connery, who works as a plasterer in Edinburgh. Before going into acting, Sean had many different jobs, such as a Milkman, lorry driver, a laborer, artist's model for the Edinburgh College of Art, coffin polisher and bodybuilder. He also joined the Royal Navy, but was later discharged because of medical problems. At the age of 23, he had a choice between becoming a professional footballer or an actor, and even though he showed much promise in the sport, he chose acting and said it was one of his more intelligent moves.

No Road Back (1957) was Sean's first major movie role, and it followed by several Tv-movies such as Anna Christie (1957) (TV), Macbeth (1961) (TV) and Anna Karenina (1961) (TV) and guest appearances on TV-series, and also films such as Hell Drivers (1957), Another Time, Another Place (1958), Darby O'Gill and the Little People (1959), The Frightened City (1961). In 1962 he appeared in The Longest Day (1962) with a host of other stars.

His big breakthrough came in 1962 when he starred as secret agent James Bond in Dr. No (1962). He played James Bond in six more films: From Russia with Love (1963), Goldfinger (1964), Thunderball (1965), You Only Live Twice (1967), Diamonds Are Forever (1971), and Never Say Never Again (1983). All movies were big box-office hits, if not critically acclaimed as well. Among his many distinctive "Bond girls" were Ursula Andress, Lana Wood, Barbara Carrera Jill St. John and Kim Basinger.

After and during the success of the Bond-films he has maintained a successful career as an actor and has appeared in films, such as Marnie (1964), The Hill (1965), Murder on the Orient Express (1974), The Man Who Would Be King (1975), Time Bandits (1981), Highlander (1986), The Name of the Rose (1986), The Untouchables (1987) (which earned him an Oscar for best actor in a supporting role), Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989), The Hunt for Red October (1990), Rising Sun (1993), The Rock (1996), Finding Forrester (2000), and The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen (2003).

Sean married actress Diane Cilento in 1962 and they had a son, Jason Connery, born on January 11, 1963, he followed in his father's footsteps and also became an actor. The marriage ended in divorce in 1973. In 1975 he married Micheline Roquebrune and they have stayed married, they have no children together. He is also a grandfather. His son, Jason and his ex-wife, actress Mia Sara had a son, Dashiell Quinn Connery, in 1997.

Favourite film:
Goldfinger (1964)
 
Favourite performance:
As Daniel Dravot in The Man Who Would Be King (1975)

_____________________________

I'm turning turning turning turning turning around, and all that I can see is just a yellow lemmon-tree...

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Post #: 23
RE: The Empire Forum's Top 100 Actors: The Results (#50) - 12/1/2011 10:36:31 AM   
Sugarman Treacle


Posts: 7191
Joined: 1/12/2008
#50.

Samuel L. Jackson (1948, USA)



IMDb Mini Biography:

Samuel L. Jackson usually played bad guys and drug addicts before becoming an action hero, as the character Mitch Henessey, in The Long Kiss Goodnight (1996) and in Die Hard: With a Vengeance (1995). From character player to leading man. His performance in Pulp Fiction (1994) gave him an Oscar nomination for his character Jules Winnfield. He was active in the black student movement. In the seventies he joined the Negro Ensemble Company (together with Morgan Freeman). In the eighties he became well known by three movies made by Spike Lee - Do the Right Thing (1989), Mo' Better Blues (1990) and Jungle Fever (1991). He received a Silver Berlin Bear for his part in the movie Jackie Brown (1997) as Ordell Robbi. 

Favourite film:
Pulp Fiction (1994)

Favourite performance:
As Jules Winnfield in Pulp Fiction (1994)








Ian McKellen (1939, England)



IMDb Mini Biography:


On May 25th, 1939, in the town of Burnley in northern England, Ian Murray McKellen was born. His parents, Denis and Margery, soon moved with Ian and his sister Jean to the coal mining town of Wigan. It was in this small town that young Ian rode out World War II. He soon developed a fascination with acting and the theater, which was encouraged by his parents. They would all bring him to plays, those by William Shakespeare, in particular. The amateur school productions fostered Ian's growing passion for theatre.

When Ian was of age to begin attending school, he made sure to get roles in all of the productions. At Bolton School in particular, he developed his skills early on. Indeed, his first role in a Shakespearian play was at Bolton, as Malvolio in "Twelfth Night". Ian soon began attending Stratford-upon-Avon theater festivals, where he saw the greats perform: Laurence Olivier, Wendy Hiller, John Gielgud, Ralph Richardson and Paul Robeson. He continued his education in English Drama, but soon it fell by the wayside as he concentrated more and more on performing. He eventually obtained his Bachelor of Arts in 1961, and began his career in earnest. McKellen began working in theatre over the next few years.

Very few people knew of Ian's homosexuality; he saw no reason to go public, nor had he told his family. They did not seem interested in the subject and so he saw no reason to bring it up. In 1988, Ian publicly came out of the closet on the BBC Radio 4 program, while discussing Margaret Thatcher's "section 28" legislation which would make the "public promotion of homosexuality" a crime. It was reason enough for McKellen to take a stand, and he has been active in the Gay Rights movement ever since.

Ian currently resides in Limehouse, where he lives with his current lover of 8 years, Sean Mathias. The two worked together on the film Bent (1997). To this day, McKellen works mostly in theater, and was knighted by 'Queen Elizabeth' in 1990 for his efforts in the arts. However, he has managed to make several quite successful forays into film. He has appeared in several productions of Shakespeare's works including his well received Richard III (1995), and in a variety of other movies.

However, it has only been recently that his star has finally begun to shine in the eyes of North American audiences. Roles in various films, Cold Comfort Farm (1995) (TV), Apt Pupil (1998) and Gods and Monsters (1998), riveted audiences. The latter, in particular, created a sensation in Hollywood, and McKellen's role garnered him several of awards and nominations,including a Golden Globe and an Oscar nod.

McKellen continues to work extensively on stage... solidifying his role as Laurence Olivier's worthy successor,having recently scored hits in the London productions of "Peter Pan" and Noel Coward's "Present Laughter".
 
Favourite film:
The Lord of the Rings (2001)

Favourite performance:
As Gandalf in The Lord of the Rings (2001)








Alastair Sim (1900-1976, Scotland)



IMDb Mini Biography:


The son of Alexander Sim JP and Isabella McIntyre, Alastair Sim was educated in Edinburgh. Always interested in language (especially the spoken word) he became the Fulton Lecturer in Elocution at New College, Edinburgh University from 1925 until 1930. He was invited back and became the Rector of Edinburgh University (1948 - 1951). His first stage appearance was as Messenger in Othello at the Savoy Theatre, London. He went on to create some of the most memorable (usually comedic) roles in British films from 1936 until his death in 1976.

Favourite film:
Hue and Cry (1947)

Favourite performance:
As Wetherby Pond in Happiest Days of Your Life (1950)

< Message edited by Sugarman Treacle -- 12/1/2011 10:42:17 AM >


_____________________________

I'm turning turning turning turning turning around, and all that I can see is just a yellow lemmon-tree...

(in reply to Sugarman Treacle)
Post #: 24
RE: The Empire Forum's Top 100 Actors: The Results (#49) - 15/1/2011 4:15:32 PM   
Sugarman Treacle


Posts: 7191
Joined: 1/12/2008
#49.

Dustin Hoffman (1937, USA)



IMDb Mini Biography:

Graduated from Los Angeles High School in 1954. Went to Santa Monica City College where he dropped out after a year due to bad grades. But before he did, he took an acting course because he was told that "nobody flunks acting." Also received some training at Los Angeles Conservatory of Music. Decided to go into acting because he did not want to work or go into the service. Trained at The Pasadena Playhouse for two years.

Favourite film:
All the President's Men (1976)

Favourite performance:
As Ben Braddock in The Graduate (1967)

_____________________________

I'm turning turning turning turning turning around, and all that I can see is just a yellow lemmon-tree...

(in reply to Sugarman Treacle)
Post #: 25
RE: The Empire Forum's Top 100 Actors: The Results (#48) - 16/1/2011 11:16:44 AM   
Sugarman Treacle


Posts: 7191
Joined: 1/12/2008
#48.

Ben Johnson (1918-1996, USA)



IMDb Mini Biography:

Born in Oklahoma, Ben Johnson was a ranch hand and rodeo performer when, in 1940, Howard Hughes hired him to take a load of horses to California. He decided to stick around (the pay was good), and for some years was a stunt man, horse wrangler, and double for such stars as John Wayne, Gary Cooper and James Stewart. His break came when John Ford noticed him and gave him a part in an upcoming film, and eventually a star part in Wagon Master (1950). He left Hollywood in 1953 to return to rodeo, where he won a world roping championship, but at the end of the year he had barely cleared expenses. The movies paid better, and were less risky, so he returned to the west coast and a career that saw him in over 300 movies.

Favourite film:
The Last Picture Show (1971)

Favourite performance:
As Sam the Lion in The Last Picture Show (1971)

_____________________________

I'm turning turning turning turning turning around, and all that I can see is just a yellow lemmon-tree...

(in reply to Sugarman Treacle)
Post #: 26
RE: The Empire Forum's Top 100 Actors: The Results (#47) - 16/1/2011 10:26:40 PM   
Sugarman Treacle


Posts: 7191
Joined: 1/12/2008
#47.

Christian Bale (1974, Wales)



IMDb Mini Biography:

The 10th Anniversary issue of "Entertainment Weekly" crowned Christian Bale as one of the "Top 8 Most Powerful Cult Figures" of the past decade, citing his incredible and legendary cult status on the Internet. EW also calls Bale one of the "Most Creative People in Entertainment" after his brilliant turn as the psychopathic yuppie serial killer in American Psycho (2000). And "Premiere" lauded him as one of the "Hottest Leading Men Under 30". Christian Bale has garnered a huge international audience ever since he wowed critics with his devastating performance in Steven Spielberg's WWII epic Empire of the Sun (1987).

Bale made his professional debut opposite British comedian Rowan Atkinson on the London West End stage. He auditioned with 4000 other kids for the coveted role of James Graham in Spielberg's Empire of the Sun (1987). Bale received a special citation for Best Performance by a Juvenile Actor from the National Board of Review -- an award specially created for his performance in "Empire". In the following decade, Welsh-born Bale has appeared in Shakespeare, dramas and comedies demonstrating a versatility, depth and range that has made him one of the best reviewed actors today and one of the most popular actors on the Internet. Bale is the youngest in a family of 3 older sisters (Erin, Sharon, and Louise Bale).

Favourite film:
The Dark Knight (2008)
 
Favourite performance:
As John Preston in Equilibrium (2002)

< Message edited by Sugarman Treacle -- 16/1/2011 10:27:50 PM >


_____________________________

I'm turning turning turning turning turning around, and all that I can see is just a yellow lemmon-tree...

(in reply to Sugarman Treacle)
Post #: 27
RE: The Empire Forum's Top 100 Actors: The Results (#46) - 22/1/2011 11:17:38 AM   
Sugarman Treacle


Posts: 7191
Joined: 1/12/2008
#46.

Mark Ruffalo (1967, USA)



IMDb Mini Biography:

A native of Wisconsin, Mark Ruffalo moved with his family to Virginia Beach, Virginia where he lived out most of his teenage years. Following high school, Mark moved with his family to San Diego and soon migrated north, eventually settling in Los Angeles. He took classes at the Stella Adler Conservatory and subsequently co-founded the Orpheus Theatre Company, an Equity-Waiver establishment where he did yeoman work. Practically performing in every capacity, he went from acting, writing, directing and producing to running the lights and building sets while building up his resume. Despite good stage reviews, Mark couldn't get arrested in film and TV, having to bartend for nearly nine years to make ends meet.

Ready to give it all up, a chance meeting and resulting collaboration with playwright/screenwriter Kenneth Lonergan changed everything. Ruffalo won NY success in Lonergan's play "This Is Our Youth", which led to his winning the male lead in Lonergan's film You Can Count on Me (2000). His stunning, mesmerizing performance as Laura Linney's ne'er-do-well brother had Hollywood opening its eyes wide to this new serious talent. Some reviewers even found themselves comparing him to an early Marlon Brando. Despite this career-breaking success, Mark remains true to his stage roots and small theater company in L.A., occasionally directing and performing in-between taking on the big, lucrative film projects that are now offered.

Although he is not yet a top marquee item, Mark has continued to impress with his range and versatility in both leads and character roles and remains consistently in demand. His more notable films of late have included XX/XY (2002), My Life Without Me (2003) and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004).
 
Favourite film:
You Can Count on Me (2000)

Favourite performance:
As Terry Prescott in You Can Count on Me (2000)

_____________________________

I'm turning turning turning turning turning around, and all that I can see is just a yellow lemmon-tree...

(in reply to Sugarman Treacle)
Post #: 28
RE: The Empire Forum's Top 100 Actors: The Results (#44) - 22/1/2011 11:53:27 AM   
Sugarman Treacle


Posts: 7191
Joined: 1/12/2008
#44.

Gary Oldman (1958, England)



IMDb Mini Biography:

Gary Oldman, the son of a welder and a homemaker, won a scholarship to Britain's Rose Bruford Drama College, where he received a B.A. in theatre arts in 1979. He subsequently studied with the Greenwich Young People's Theatre and went on to appear in a number of plays throughout the early '80s, including "The Pope's Wedding," for which he received Time Out's Fringe Award for Best Newcomer of 1985-1986 and the British Theatre Association's Drama Magazine Award as Best Actor for 1985. His film debut was in the 1986 biopic Sid and Nancy (1986), wherein he played Sex Pistol Sid Vicious, picking up the Evening Standard Film Award as Best Newcomer. In 1988, he received a Best Actor nomination from the British Academy of Film and TV Arts for his portrayal of '60s playwright 'Joe Orton'. His ability to transform himself physically and his command of accents have allowed him to play a broad range of characters and a number of historical figures, including, in addition to those mentioned above, Lee Harvey Oswald (JFK (1991)) and Ludwig van Beethoven (Immortal Beloved (1994)).
 
Favourite film:
The Dark Knight (2008)

Favourite performance:
As Stansfield in Léon (1994)




Gregory Peck (1916-2003, USA)



IMDb Mini Biography:


Gregory Peck was born in La Jolla, California. His father was a druggist in San Diego. His parents divorced when he was five years old. An only child, he was sent to live with his grandmother. He never felt he had a stable childhood. His fondest memories are of his grandmother taking him to the movies every week and of his dog, which followed him everywhere. He studied pre-med at UC-Berkeley and, while there, got bitten by the acting bug and decided to change the focus of his studies. He enrolled in the Neighborhood Playhouse in New York and debuted on Broadway after graduation. His debut was in Emlyn Williams' play "The Morning Star" (1942). By 1943 he was in Hollywood, where he debuted in the RKO film Days of Glory (1944).

Stardom came with his next film, The Keys of the Kingdom (1944), for which he was nominated for an Academy Award. Peck's screen presence displayed the qualities for which he became well known. He was tall, rugged and heroic, with a basic decency that transcended his roles. He appeared in Alfred Hitchcock's Spellbound (1945) as an amnesia victim accused of murder. In The Yearling (1946), he was again nominated for an Academy Award and won the Golden Globe. He was especially effective in westerns and appeared in such varied fare as David O. Selznick's critically blasted Duel in the Sun (1946), the somewhat better received Yellow Sky (1948) and the acclaimed The Gunfighter (1950). He was nominated again for the Academy Award for his roles in Gentleman's Agreement (1947), which dealt with anti-Semitism, and Twelve O'Clock High (1949), a story of high-level stress in an Air Force bomber unit in World War II.

With a string of hits to his credit, Peck made the decision to only work in films that interested him. He continued to appear as the heroic, larger-than-life figures in such films as Captain Horatio Hornblower R.N. (1951) and Moby Dick (1956). He worked with Audrey Hepburn in her debut film, Roman Holiday (1953). Peck finally won the Oscar, after four nominations, for his performance as lawyer Atticus Finch in To Kill a Mockingbird (1962). In the early 1960s he appeared in two darker films than he usually made, Cape Fear (1962) and Captain Newman, M.D. (1963), which dealt with the way people live. He also gave a powerful performance as Capt. Keith Mallory in The Guns of Navarone (1961), one of the biggest box-office hits of that year.

In the early 1970s he produced two films, The Trial of the Catonsville Nine (1972) and The Dove (1974), when his film career stalled. He made a comeback playing, somewhat woodenly, Robert Thorn in the horror film The Omen (1976). After that, he returned to the bigger-than-life roles he was best known for, such as MacArthur (1977) and the monstrous Nazi Dr. Josef Mengele in the huge hit The Boys from Brazil (1978). In the 1980s he moved into television with the mini-series "The Blue and the Gray" (1982) and The Scarlet and the Black (1983) (TV). In 1991 he appeared in the remake of his 1962 film, playing a different part, in Martin Scorsese's Cape Fear (1991). He was also cast as the progressive-thinking owner of a wire and cable business in Other People's Money (1991).

In 1967 Peck received the Academy's Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award. He was also been awarded the US Presidential Medal of Freedom. Always politically progressive, Peck was active in such causes as anti-war protests, workers' rights and civil rights. He died in June 2003, aged 87.
 
Favourite film:
To Kill a Mockingbird (1962)

Favourite performance:
As Atticus Finch in To Kill a Mockingbird (1962)
Honory Mention: As Philip Schuyler Green in Gentlemen's Agreement (1947)

_____________________________

I'm turning turning turning turning turning around, and all that I can see is just a yellow lemmon-tree...

(in reply to Sugarman Treacle)
Post #: 29
RE: The Empire Forum's Top 100 Actors: The Results (#43) - 22/1/2011 12:08:58 PM   
Sugarman Treacle


Posts: 7191
Joined: 1/12/2008
#43.

Ralph Fiennes (1962, England)



IMDb Mini Biography:

Eldest of 6 children born to photographer Mark Fiennes and his wife, Jini - aka Jennifer Lash - a novelist. Siblings are Martha Fiennes, a director; Magnus, a musician; Sophie, a producer; and twins Joseph Fiennes, an actor, and Jacob, a gamekeeper. Foster brother Michael (Mick) is an archaeologist. Cousin is British explorer Sir Ranulph Fiennes. Attended Bishop Wordsworth Boys' School, the Chelsea College of Art & Design, and the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. Joined Britain's Royal National Theatre in 1987 and the Royal Shakespeare Company in 1988.

Favourite film:
The Constant Gardener (2005)
 
Favourite performance:
As Amon Goeth in Schindler's List (1993)

_____________________________

I'm turning turning turning turning turning around, and all that I can see is just a yellow lemmon-tree...

(in reply to Sugarman Treacle)
Post #: 30
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