Register  |   Log In  |  
Sign up to our weekly newsletter    
Follow us on   
Search   
Forum Home Register for Free! Log In Moderator Tickets FAQ Users Online

RE: Your 100 Favourite Directors: Results

 
Logged in as: Guest
  Printable Version
All Forums >> [Film Forums] >> Lists and Top 10s >> RE: Your 100 Favourite Directors: Results Page: <<   < prev  1 [2]
Login
Message << Older Topic   Newer Topic >>
RE: Your 100 Favourite Directors: Results - 14/2/2011 6:28:59 PM   
Rhubarb


Posts: 24508
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: No Direction Home


24. Truffaut

_____________________________

Team Ginge
WWLD?


quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan

You organisational skills sicken me, Rhubarb.



(in reply to Rhubarb)
Post #: 31
RE: Your 100 Favourite Directors: Results - 14/2/2011 7:15:43 PM   
Rhubarb


Posts: 24508
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: No Direction Home


23 = Tarantino

_____________________________

Team Ginge
WWLD?


quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan

You organisational skills sicken me, Rhubarb.



(in reply to Rhubarb)
Post #: 32
RE: Your 100 Favourite Directors: Results - 14/2/2011 8:23:19 PM   
Rhubarb


Posts: 24508
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: No Direction Home


22 = Tarkovsky

_____________________________

Team Ginge
WWLD?


quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan

You organisational skills sicken me, Rhubarb.



(in reply to Rhubarb)
Post #: 33
RE: Your 100 Favourite Directors: Results - 15/2/2011 6:19:37 PM   
Rhubarb


Posts: 24508
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: No Direction Home


21. Chaplin

_____________________________

Team Ginge
WWLD?


quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan

You organisational skills sicken me, Rhubarb.



(in reply to Rhubarb)
Post #: 34
RE: Your 100 Favourite Directors: Results - 15/2/2011 6:20:08 PM   
Rhubarb


Posts: 24508
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: No Direction Home


20. Coppola (Francis Ford)

_____________________________

Team Ginge
WWLD?


quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan

You organisational skills sicken me, Rhubarb.



(in reply to Rhubarb)
Post #: 35
RE: Your 100 Favourite Directors: Results - 16/2/2011 2:24:48 PM   
Rhubarb


Posts: 24508
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: No Direction Home


19 = Herzog

_____________________________

Team Ginge
WWLD?


quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan

You organisational skills sicken me, Rhubarb.



(in reply to Rhubarb)
Post #: 36
RE: Your 100 Favourite Directors: Results - 16/2/2011 2:25:10 PM   
Rhubarb


Posts: 24508
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: No Direction Home


18 = Allen

_____________________________

Team Ginge
WWLD?


quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan

You organisational skills sicken me, Rhubarb.



(in reply to Rhubarb)
Post #: 37
RE: Your 100 Favourite Directors: Results - 16/2/2011 6:57:44 PM   
Rhubarb


Posts: 24508
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: No Direction Home


17. Lang



_____________________________

Team Ginge
WWLD?


quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan

You organisational skills sicken me, Rhubarb.



(in reply to Rhubarb)
Post #: 38
RE: Your 100 Favourite Directors: Results - 16/2/2011 6:58:09 PM   
Rhubarb


Posts: 24508
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: No Direction Home


16. Nolan



_____________________________

Team Ginge
WWLD?


quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan

You organisational skills sicken me, Rhubarb.



(in reply to Rhubarb)
Post #: 39
RE: Your 100 Favourite Directors: Results - 16/2/2011 6:58:24 PM   
Rhubarb


Posts: 24508
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: No Direction Home


15. Fincher

_____________________________

Team Ginge
WWLD?


quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan

You organisational skills sicken me, Rhubarb.



(in reply to Rhubarb)
Post #: 40
RE: Your 100 Favourite Directors: Results - 17/2/2011 1:50:34 PM   
Rhubarb


Posts: 24508
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: No Direction Home


14. Powell (And Pressburger)

_____________________________

Team Ginge
WWLD?


quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan

You organisational skills sicken me, Rhubarb.



(in reply to Rhubarb)
Post #: 41
RE: Your 100 Favourite Directors: Results - 17/2/2011 1:51:30 PM   
Rhubarb


Posts: 24508
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: No Direction Home

13. Kieślowski

_____________________________

Team Ginge
WWLD?


quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan

You organisational skills sicken me, Rhubarb.



(in reply to Rhubarb)
Post #: 42
RE: Your 100 Favourite Directors: Results - 17/2/2011 1:51:55 PM   
Rhubarb


Posts: 24508
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: No Direction Home


12. The Coens

_____________________________

Team Ginge
WWLD?


quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan

You organisational skills sicken me, Rhubarb.



(in reply to Rhubarb)
Post #: 43
RE: Your 100 Favourite Directors: Results - 18/2/2011 1:42:25 PM   
Rhubarb


Posts: 24508
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: No Direction Home


One of the most unusual and challenging directors in American cinema, the name David Lynch is associated with weirdness, seedy locations, sexual depravity and unconventional narratives. Lynch is one of the few directors who really seems to understand dream-states and dream-logic and his work exists in that twilight world if surreal dreams and terrifying nightmares, .

Lynch's career started when he moved to Philadelphia in the mid 60s, where the attended the world famous Academy of Fine Arts. It was there he began moving away from his early interest in other art forms to work in film. His first film was Six Men Getting Sick, a short film that played at an art exhibition. What started as an experiment, with Lynch only becoming interested in animation because he wanted to see his pictures move, soon became a passion. His second short film The Alphabet, a nightmarish work starring his wife as a girl reciting the alphabet to a series of bizarre animations. The Alphabet is a view of childhood and aging filtered through a bad dream. His films caught the attention of the AFI and he was given a grant that he used to create The Grandmother. The film focuses on a neglected child growing a grandmother, it remains one of his most unsettling and brilliant works.

Over the next six years, at the AFI Conservatory, Lynch began work on Eraserhead. Inspired by his life and his fears while living in Philadelphia, Eraserhead is a bleak and disturbing film about a young man, living in an industrial nightmare. His girlfriend has given birth to a mutant child and left him and he slowly breaks down as surreal visions and nightmarish apparitions take over his life. The film represents the bleakness Lynch felt while living in Philadelphia, as well as his own terror of fatherhood. Despite fears that the film was unreleasable, the midnight movie circuit made it into a cult classic. The critics also responded and it became a surprising success story. During the extended filming he made another short, The Amputee. While not up to the standards of his last few shorts, it's still an exceptionally strong film.

Impressed by Eraserhead, Mel Brooks would hire Lynch to direct The Elephant Man, the story of the life of John Merrick. Lynch was able to marry his own unique approach with a conventional narrative and got a spectacular success story as a result. The Oscars came calling and Lynch received his first Oscar nods for director and screenplay. Still a hugely popular film, The Elephant Man remains the work he's most famous for in the mainstream. Lynch refused to sell out his integrity when he made the move to more populist cinema and The Elephant Man couldn't be mistaken for the work of anyone else.

Following the success of The Elephant Man, he was offered the opportunity to reject Return of the Jedi, he turned it down, understanding he woule be tied to Lucas's vision. Instead he decided to direct Dune, as part of an agreement that Lynch would have complete control over his next project after the sci-fi epic. The film was a massive flop and Lynch's worst work to date. Although arguably it's still a better film than Jedi. The film was later re-released with extra footage and Lynch had his name removed from the film in protest.

His next film, Blue Velvet was far more successful, if controversial. Lynch uses Blue Velvet to examine the darkness that lies beneath the surface of suburbia, and in the hearts of those who live there. College student Kyle MacLachlan returns home after his father's heart attack and discovers a severed ear in a field. He becomes mixed up in a mystery that includes tormented club singer Isabella Rossellini (Surely one of the bravest performances of the decade) and a psychotic criminal, played by an extraordinary Dennis Hopper. Lynch was to get his second Academy Award nomination and he would develop a theme of small-town darkness that he returned to in more depth a few years later with Twin Peaks. Blue Velvet also sparked his association with Angelo Badalamenti, the composer who would work on most of Lynch's film from then on.

In the late 80s, Lynch directed The Cowboy and the Frenchman for French television, before moving into American television with Twin Peaks. An expansion of the themes of Blue Velvet, Twin Peaks once again seeks to expose the darkness beneath small-town Americana. The most popular girl in school, Laura Palmer, has been found raped and murdered and FBI Agent Dale Cooper (MacLachlan again) is called in to investigate. The show became a phenomenon, but clashes with the network meant the series came to a premature end. Even now it's regularly ranked as one of the greatest television shows of all time and much of it has rightly become iconic. Lynch was quickly becoming a household name.

During Twin Peaks, Lynch began a collaboration with Julee Cruise, who was responsible for the theme tune for the show. He was to direct a unique concert video for Cruise - Industrial Symphony No. 1: The Dream of the Broken-Hearted. Crossing over with both Twin Peaks and his next film, Wild at Heart, Broken-Hearted was as much performance art as music. Wild at Heart came next, minor Lynch, but minor Lynch is still better than most other directors. Nic Cage still remembered how to act and Laura Dern continued (After Blue Velvet) to have a highly productive working relationship with Lynch.

He would next return to Twin Peaks, this time taking it to the big screen with Fire Walk with Me. When he delivered a prequel, instead of the solution to the mystery that everyone was expecting, it flopped. It's a great film, one of his best. But an audience looking for easy answers stayed away. Around the same time he made Hotel Room for HBO, an anthology film that stands among his odder, but more intriguing work.

Lost Highway came in 1997, it re-teamed him with Barry Gifford, the writer of Wild at Heart. This confusing, non-linear work about murder and identity change was his best film since Blue Velvet. A flop at the time, in retrospect it's become a strong fan-favourite with some career best work from Patricia Arquette and Bill Pullman. Continuing to surprise, in 1999, Lynch made his oddest movie yet, a film with no violence, no sex, no swearing and an easy to follow plot. It was the simple true story about an old man who rides a lawnmower across America to see his ill brother. Richard Farnsworth was Oscar nominated for his lead performance and he would have made a worthy winner. Touching without being sentimental, it has the feel of old Hollywood mixed with Lynch's own warped perspective on life.

Lynch next moved back to television and tried to get another series off the ground. He was given the money to shoot a pilot, but disputes with the network caused the series to be cancelled. Lynch completed the pilot as a film, Mulholland Drive, and it gave him another critical success, earning Lynch his third best director Oscar nomination and helping to launch the career of Naomi Watts. Like Lost Highway, it tells its story in a non-linear fashion, makes use of identity change, dream-logic and refuses to give any easy answers.

Lynch made a series of internet short films in the five years that passed between MD and his next feature. Inland Empire was his most uncompromising film to date. Yet again, there's no traditional narrative structure and the surreal mystery was difficult enough to alienate even some die-hard Lynch fans. The sympathetic viewer will find many pleasures, including a jaw-dropping central performance by Laura Dern.

Constant themes repeat in Lynch's films. The dream logic he uses to present his stories, the use of industrial imagery to present visions of something approaching Hell, the darkness that lurks beneath the surface of people and places, deformity, characters (especially women) who are have multiple identities or are split in two. Despite the emphasis on narrative oddities, Lynch is a great director of actors, in particular women. He's been accused of misogyny in the past (without any sane basis) but with the odd exception (Frank Booth, Dale Cooper) his most memorable characters have been female. The career best work he got out of Rossellini, Arquette, Dern and Naomi Watts is a testament to that.

Lynch appears to have no directorial projects on the horizon at present, contenting himself with other art forms and his work in transcendental meditation. But long gaps between films are normal for him, and whenever he decides to return to cinema, whatever the project may be, we can be sure it'll be something intriguing, thought-provoking and baffling. RAWLS

< Message edited by Rhubarb -- 18/2/2011 1:43:41 PM >


_____________________________

Team Ginge
WWLD?


quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan

You organisational skills sicken me, Rhubarb.



(in reply to Rhubarb)
Post #: 44
RE: Your 100 Favourite Directors: Results - 18/2/2011 3:34:50 PM   
Rhubarb


Posts: 24508
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: No Direction Home


10. Godard

_____________________________

Team Ginge
WWLD?


quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan

You organisational skills sicken me, Rhubarb.



(in reply to Rhubarb)
Post #: 45
RE: Your 100 Favourite Directors: Results - 18/2/2011 3:51:01 PM   
Rhubarb


Posts: 24508
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: No Direction Home


9. Scott

himself has been quoted as saying that he is a creator of worlds. Whether these worlds are in our past or our future is not important, and the genre breakdown of his career reaffirms that fact. This is a man who has tackled nearly every genre, to varying degrees of success, but always makes his films look gorgeous. Is he getting better? Well, this is a difficult question because his two strongest films, and two of my favourite films ever, are his second and third films. That being said, with the exception of A Good Year and possibly Hannibal, he's had a streak of brilliant films since Gladiator. This definitely makes the 00s his best decade in terms of overall quantity of quality output.

I don't need to talk about his career high. For me that is Blade Runner - the pinnacle of science-fiction cinema, and a phenomenal achievement. His career low? Well, I'd have to say the film that came a decade after his best film - 1492 is the only film of his that I really didn't enjoy watching, and I think that came over in the review. It's odd, because it has had on average stronger reviews than many of his supposed 'flops'. Nevertheless, for me it represents the nadir of his career.

While he will always be considered a 'movie director' as opposed to a 'film director' (Sir Ridley himself has made that distinction of words) when he is on form, he is magnificent. And, if along the way, he makes a few lesser films, that fail to connect for one reason or another, then I think the Blade Runners and the Kingdom of Heavens and the Thelma & Louises more than make up for that.HOMER

< Message edited by Rhubarb -- 18/2/2011 9:28:34 PM >


_____________________________

Team Ginge
WWLD?


quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan

You organisational skills sicken me, Rhubarb.



(in reply to Rhubarb)
Post #: 46
RE: Your 100 Favourite Directors: Results - 18/2/2011 6:42:28 PM   
Rhubarb


Posts: 24508
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: No Direction Home


8. Miyasaki

_____________________________

Team Ginge
WWLD?


quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan

You organisational skills sicken me, Rhubarb.



(in reply to Rhubarb)
Post #: 47
RE: Your 100 Favourite Directors: Results - 18/2/2011 6:43:54 PM   
Rhubarb


Posts: 24508
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: No Direction Home


7 Spielberg

_____________________________

Team Ginge
WWLD?


quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan

You organisational skills sicken me, Rhubarb.



(in reply to Rhubarb)
Post #: 48
RE: Your 100 Favourite Directors: Results - 18/2/2011 8:50:02 PM   
Rhubarb


Posts: 24508
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: No Direction Home


06 Wlder

_____________________________

Team Ginge
WWLD?


quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan

You organisational skills sicken me, Rhubarb.



(in reply to Rhubarb)
Post #: 49
RE: Your 100 Favourite Directors: Results - 19/2/2011 12:12:53 AM   
Rhubarb


Posts: 24508
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: No Direction Home


5. Welles.

_____________________________

Team Ginge
WWLD?


quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan

You organisational skills sicken me, Rhubarb.



(in reply to Rhubarb)
Post #: 50
RE: Your 100 Favourite Directors: Results - 19/2/2011 1:57:07 PM   
Rhubarb


Posts: 24508
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: No Direction Home


4. Kubrick.

_____________________________

Team Ginge
WWLD?


quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan

You organisational skills sicken me, Rhubarb.



(in reply to Rhubarb)
Post #: 51
RE: Your 100 Favourite Directors: Results - 19/2/2011 2:30:27 PM   
Rhubarb


Posts: 24508
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: No Direction Home


03. Scorsese.

To say that Martin Scorsese is one of the finest directors of all time is a huge understatement. Often unfairly dismissed as a director of gangster films, Scorsese has in fact mastered a variety of genres, from horror to comedy to musicals, he's even made religious epics. While it's true that he often returns to themes of Italian-American identity and Catholic guilt, it's unfair to put that all down to a gangster fetish. If Scorsese's work demonstrates one thing, it's that he has a deep interest of the inner torment of outsiders. One of the great New York directors, born and raised there, he's explored New York from its highest society to its lowest dregs. He instinctively understands it's power to be both inspirational and to be a nightmare world and isn't afraid to paint it as an unpleasant place. There have been few greater evocations of Hell in cinema than the way he presents the New York streets in Taxi Driver.

Early trips to the cinema gave him a deep love for all cinema, embracing a wide variety of genres, with westerns, Italian neorealism and 'epic' cinema in particular having a great impact on him as a young man. While he's never directed a western, you can see homages to their themes, especially brutal men who exist both inside and outside society, in much of his own work. His films are also plagued by good old fashioned Catholic guilt. His initial plans to become a priest were given up in order to become a director and that notion of people desperately seeking redemption from sin powers many of his narratives.

Scorsese's early, film-school, shorts have become rightly celebrated, in particular The Big Shave, the director's darkly comic criticism of the Vietnam war, something that would reappear in the little scene documentary, Street Scenes. But it was his first feature, Who's That Knocking at My Door, that saw him begin to establish many o his thematic concerns. The emphasis on a troubled young Italian-American male lead would set the template for the early part of Scorsese's career. It also saw him working with long-time collaborators Harvey Keitel and Thelma Schoonmaker for the first time. He quickly became one of the famous 'movie brats' along with other legendary directors George Lucas, Francis Ford Coppola and Steven Spielberg. He also became acquainted with John Cassavetes, who became something of a mentor to the young director.

Scorsese would follow Who's That Knocking at My Door with Boxcar Bertha, like many other young directors of the era, getting a helping hand from Roger Corman. The film is distinctively Scorsese, while still retaining a rougher exploitation charm, it stands with the likes of Peter Bogdanovich's Targets as one of the best films to come out of Corman's stable. Cassavetes would warn Scorsese to stay away from this kind of fare, praising his talents, but advising him to stick to more personal work. He took that advice when it came to Mean Streets. A film in the best tradition of some of Scorsese's heroes, including Sam Fuller and Cassavetes himself. It was a blistering, exhilarating film, based on Scorsese's youth in Little Italy, that launched him as one of the most exciting talents of the era. It also paired him with Robert De Niro for the first time. Actually writing his script on the streets of Little Italy and filling his soundtrack with the music of the time, Scorsese created one of the most vibrant and alive films ever made. The director's great talent for scoring a scene with just the right music started here.

The success of Mean Streets would lead to Ellen Burstyn personally requesting he be given the role of director for a new script she was interested in, Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore. This was an unexpected move for the director to make, away from the more masculine driven films he'd made so far, and it displays his obvious versatility and talent. He would repay Burstyn's faith in him by directing her to an Oscar win. The same year he would return to more personal territory with Italianamerican, one of his finest films, an excellent documentary about his parents and Little Italy.

Taxi Driver would follow next, still Scorsese's greatest film after all this time. A claustrophobic experience, it was made at the peak of Scorsese and De Niro's work together. Inspired by Dostoevsky's Notes from Underground and scriptwriter Paul Schrader's own disturbed life, the film is shot through with religious imagery. The lead character, Travis Bickle, is a figure created in hate and looking for some kind of redemption, even if it's the wrong kind. He's been shaped by the trauma of war and is spilling his self-loathing over onto the streets of a city that chews up all those not tough enough to survive. Taxi Driver would earn itself a best picture nomination at the Oscars, but Scorsese would miss out on a director nomination.

Scorsese and De Niro's next team up would be a box-office failure and a film still unfairly overlooked in his career. A love letter both to his home town and to the classic Hollywood musicals of old, New York New York still manages to find room for Scorsese's recurring theme of masculinity in crisis. Around the same time period, he also directed The Last Waltz, a documentary following the last concert of The Band, and American Boy, a rather brilliant documentary about Steven Prince, who had provided a memorable cameo to Taxi Driver.

The failure of New York, New York had sent Scorsese spiralling into depression and drug addiction, something that also stifled his creativity. It took the influence of old friend De Niro to bring him back to directing, with the story of boxer Jake La Motta. The film, Raging Bull, would reteam Scorsese with both De Niro and Schrader, and earn him his first best director Oscar nomination. He had just survived a drug overdose and saw La Motta's self-destruction as being a metaphor his own life, and also a way to save both his career and his life. He would pour himself into the film, even adding uncredited work to the script. Catholic guilt, violence and attempts at redemption are major thematic concerns once again. I think this is often where the confusion comes in, Scorsese isn't an obsessive director of gangster films, he's just obsessed with male self-destruction, two ideas that often go together. Raging Bull would come to be regarded as one of the greatest films of all time.

Scorsese's next film saw him team with De Niro for the fifth time, this time for a black comedy. The King of Comedy sees De Niro star as another disturbed loner, but this time one who's desperate for fame at any cost. Again, it was a box-office failure, but its critical reputation has increased over the years to the point where it's now considered one of his greatest films and an unusual companion piece to Taxi Driver.

Scorsese would then begin work on bringing the controversial The Last Temptation of Christ to the screen, it would take five years. During those years, he realised that his more intimate style of film-making was at odds with the commercial scene of the 1980s. His first attempt at shifting gears was to aim towards the low-budget, creating the nightmarish black comedy After Hours in the process. He finally secured the backing to make Christ by directing his first mainstream film, The Color of Money. A sequel to The Hustler, it tames down the Fast Eddy character to have the same bite as the original, but it made Scorsese a more attractive proposition to studios.

Teaming with Schrader again, Scorsese finally directed The Last Temptation of Christ in 88. Wrongly labelled as blasphemous, mostly by people who couldn't be bothered to watch it, it proved to be a highly controversial film. In fact it's a deeply spiritual film and one of the best attempts to tackle Christ in the cinema. It's also a key film in Scorsese's career, seeing him revisit the religion that had haunted his work for nearly twenty years. It also earned him another Oscar nomination. Next up would be a segment for the anthology, New York Stories. Teaming up with Francis Ford Coppola and Woody Allen, each directing a section of the film, Scorsese would offer the enthralling Life Lessons, the only reason to bother watching the film.

In 1990 Scorsese made his second film about gangsters, Goodfellas. Regarded by many as his finest film to date, Goodfellas saw Scorsese receive another Oscar nom. In what was now becoming one of the worst jokes in cinema, he lost to a bland freak win, first Redford, then Levinson, now Costner. But after the relatively low-key 80s, it helped re-establish his reputation as one of the great American directors.

In the wake of the critical and commercial success of Goodfellas, his next move was a strange one, a remake of the classic Cape Fear. Scorsese brought an obvious Hitchcockian feel to the film, and it's an entertaining piece, but the over-the-top (some even argued misogynistic) violence and the grotesque nature of De Niro's performance undercut the good work done in deepening the narrative. It's Scorsese's worst film to date, despite some of its charms.

Even more out of left field was his next film, a period piece adaptation of Edith Wharton's The Age of Innocence. When you think about it, it does make perfect sense for a New York director to tackle this work, it focused on New York society, just the high society of the late 19th century. It's an insightful film that obviously meant a great deal to the director and one which is far above the usual middle-brow literary adaptations. It could be his great unsung masterpiece.

In 95, Scorsese returned to gangsters with the Goodfellas companion piece, Casino. Pesci returned as a psychotic character who threatens to drag down those around him. Underrated on its initial release, its reputation has grown through the years. It did begin to seem that post-Goodfellas, the director could do little right. He wasn't matching the success of that film and while he was directing some superb films, many were starting to write him off again. Around the same time he took the time out to chronicle his cinematic inspirations in a documentary about his personal American cinema history.

He ended the decade by continuing to confound those who looked to pigeon hole the director by making another religious epic, this time a meditative look at the Dalai Lama. Continuing the theme of the 90s, it was another film that was neglected, and another masterpiece. He would then reunite with Schrader on Bringing out the Dead. A throwback to both Taxi Driver and After Hours, it was a darkly comic look at the nightmare world of New York after dark, let down by an unengaging lead performance from Nic Cage. He would also make another personal documentary, this time focusing on the influence of Italian cinema on his career.

It would be three years before he released another film, this time, bizarrely, it was a companion piece to The Age of Innocence. It might not seem like that at first glance, but when you look at the thematic concerns of Gangs of New York, the society of New York in the 19th Century, this time as seen from the perspective of its underclass, it becomes the flipside of Innocence. Despite it being obviously a Scorsese film thematically, it was too conventional to really succeed and there were rumours of interference from the notorious Harvey Weinstein. Scorsese was again nominated for best director at the Oscars. He again lost, but at least this time to a director with talent. He did, however, form a lasting bond with Leonardo DiCaprio on the set of Gangs, DiCaprio took over as Scorsese's second great muse figure and Scorsese rehabilitated DiCaprio's pummelled post-Titanic reputation.

His next project was to serve as executive producer on The Blues, a documentary series on the history of Blues music that saw episodes directed by several legendary film-makers, including Scorsese himself, it was his best work since Kundun. He followed that with a return to the days of classic Hollywood with The Aviator. Both thematically and stylistically it was the kind of old school epic that would be regarded as a classic if it had been made in the 50s. True, it's overlong and some of the performances don't work, but it's a vast improvement from the compromised Gangs... In 2005 Scorsese would direct his finest film in 15 years, the exhaustive documentary on the early career of Bob Dylan - No Direction Home. A strong contender for the title of greatest music documentary of all time, it was fascinating for both fans and non-fans of the great man's career. It also showed that the director was operating at full power once again.

In 2006 he directed an English language remake of a Hong Kong crime thriller, Infernal Affairs. Renaming it The Departed and moving away from New York and into Boston, it was expected to be a Cape Fear-esque minor offering from the director. Shattering all expectations, it became his highest grossing film and finally won him his Oscar. Since the win there's been complaints that it was a lifetime achievement award, conveniently ignoring the fact that it was nominated against a group of films that were never even in the position of challenging for the award. If the Oscar ceremony was a coronation, it was a long overdue one. And the film greatly improves on its inspiration, which was an entertaining Hong Kong film, but far from a masterpiece on the levels of 70s and 80s HK cinema. He would then return to concert films with Shine a Light, a film depicting a live tour by The Rolling Stones. A decent film, it's not up to the standards of his earlier work, largely because The Stones' best days are long gone.

His most recent work, Shutter Island, is another Hitchcock homage. The plotline is silly, the big twist is signposted from about 20 minutes in, and some of the scenes (the WWII flashbacks) are among the worst Scorsese has ever directed. But it's an entertaining ride, one of the best Hitchcock tributes you'll ever see, and the talented cast are obviously having great fun working on the film.

The future seems packed. It includes a HBO series called Boardwalk Empire, a 3D children's film - The Invention of Hugo Cabret, a George Harrison documentary, a remake of the classic Japanese movie, Silence and a Sinatra biopic along with a long rumoured re-teaming with De Niro. Even as he approaches his 70s, Scorsese remains one of the most interesting and versatile directors in American cinema, and he's earned the right to be recognised as one of the great film-makers of all time.RAWLINSON

< Message edited by Rhubarb -- 19/2/2011 2:34:44 PM >


_____________________________

Team Ginge
WWLD?


quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan

You organisational skills sicken me, Rhubarb.



(in reply to Rhubarb)
Post #: 52
RE: Your 100 Favourite Directors: Results - 19/2/2011 2:39:46 PM   
Rhubarb


Posts: 24508
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: No Direction Home


2. Kurosawa

_____________________________

Team Ginge
WWLD?


quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan

You organisational skills sicken me, Rhubarb.



(in reply to Rhubarb)
Post #: 53
RE: Your 100 Favourite Directors: Results - 19/2/2011 2:40:05 PM   
Rhubarb


Posts: 24508
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: No Direction Home


1. Hitchcock

_____________________________

Team Ginge
WWLD?


quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan

You organisational skills sicken me, Rhubarb.



(in reply to Rhubarb)
Post #: 54
Page:   <<   < prev  1 [2]
All Forums >> [Film Forums] >> Lists and Top 10s >> RE: Your 100 Favourite Directors: Results Page: <<   < prev  1 [2]
Jump to:





New Messages No New Messages
Hot Topic w/ New Messages Hot Topic w/o New Messages
Locked w/ New Messages Locked w/o New Messages
 Post New Thread
 Reply to Message
 Post New Poll
 Submit Vote
 Delete My Own Post
 Delete My Own Thread
 Rate Posts


 
Movie News  |  Empire Blog  |  Movie Reviews  |  Future Films  |  Features  |  Video Interviews  |  Image Gallery  |  Competitions  |  Forum  |  Magazine  |  Resources
 
Forum Software © ASPPlayground.NET Advanced Edition 2.4.5 ANSI

0.096