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Empire Top 100 Albums 2010 - The Results

 
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Empire Top 100 Albums 2010 - The Results - 29/3/2010 12:33:56 AM   
FritzlFan


Posts: 4793
Joined: 19/11/2008
From: Bristol
=95) April - Sun Kil Moon (2008)
=95) Picaresque - The Decemberists (2005)
=95) Use Your Illusion 1 - Guns N' Roses (1991)
=95) Rumours - Fleetwood Mac (1977)
=95) Jagged Little Pill - Alanis Morrisette (1995)
=95) Water & Solutions - Far (1998)
=95) 69 Love Songs - The Magnetic Fields (1999)
=95) The Stone Roses - The Stone Roses (1989)
=95) Closer - Joy Division (1980)
=95) Whiskey for the Holy Ghost - Mark Lanegan (1994)
=95) Violator - Depeche Mode (1990)
=95) Led Zeppelin I - Led Zeppelin (1969)
=95) Songs of Faith and Devotion - Depeche Mode (1993)
=95) The Wall - Pink Floyd (1979)
=89) For Emma, Forever Ago - Bon Iver (2007)
=89) () - Sigur Ros (2002)
=89) Different Class - Pulp (1995)
=89) Weezer (The Blue Album) - Weezer (1994)
=89) Tilt - Scott Walker (1995)
=89) Rain Dogs - Tom Waits (1985)
=84) Stop Making Sense - Talking Heads (1984)
=84) Scott 4 - Scott Walker (1969)
=84) Leftism - Leftfield (1995)
=84) Whatever and Ever Amen - Ben Folds Five (1997)
=84) Tea For the Tillerman - Cat Stevens (1970)
=80) Maxinquaye - Tricky (1995)
=80) Infinity Land - Biffy Clyro (2004)
=80) Bryter Layter - Nick Drake (1970)
=80) White Blood Cells - The White Stripes (2001)
=78) Crooked Rain, Crooked Rain - Pavement (1994)
=78) Darkness on the Edge of Town - Bruce Springsteen (1978)
=75) Wish You Were Here - Pink Floyd (1975)
=75) Chutes Too Narrow - The Shins (2003)
=75) Tender Prey - Nick Cave & the Bad Seeds (1988)
=71) Ten - Pearl Jam (1991)
=71) Pet Sounds - The Beach Boys (1966)
=71) The Midnight Organ Fight - Frightened Rabbit (2008)
=71) The Kinks Are the Village Green Preservation Society - The Kinks (1968)
=68) Remain in Light - Talking Heads (1980)
=68) Neon Bible - Arcade Fire (2007)
=68) Coming Up - Suede (1996)
=65) Appetite for Destruction - Guns N' Roses (1987)
=65) Rubber Soul - The Beatles (1965)
=65) Rum Sodomy & the Lash - The Pogues (1985)
=63) Nothing's Shocking - Jane's Addiction (1988)
=63) Piper at the Gates of Dawn - Pink Floyd (1967)
62) If You're Feeling Sinister - Belle & Sebastian (1996)
=58) It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back - Public Enemy (1988)
=58) ...And Justice For All - Metallica (1988)
=58) Let It Bleed - The Rolling Stones (1969)
=58) I'm Your Man - Leonard Cohen (1988)
=55) Pinkerton - Weezer (1996)
=55) Small Change - Tom Waits (1976)
=55) The Velvet Underground & Nico - The Velvet Underground (1967)
=53) Mezzanine - Massive Attack (1998)
=53) The Smiths - The Smiths (1984)
52) Origin of Symmetry - Muse (2001)
=49) Silent Alarm - Bloc Party (2005)
=49) The Wild, the Innocent & the E Street Shuffle - Bruce Springsteen (1973)
=49) Astral Weeks - Van Morrison (1968)
=45) Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots - The Flaming Lips (2002)
=45) Screamadelica - Primal Scream (1991)
=45) Definitely Maybe - Oasis (1994)
=45) Dog Star Man - Suede (1994)
=42) Pink Moon - Nick Drake (1972)
=42) Fever to Tell - Yeah Yeah Yeahs (2003)
=42) The Remote Part - Idlewild (2002)
41) The Bootleg Series Vol. 4: Bob Dylan Live 1966, The "Royal Albert Hall" Concert - Bob Dylan (1998)
=39) In Rainbows - Radiohead (2007)
=39) In the Aeroplane Over the Sea - Neutral Milk Hotel (1998)
38) The Doors Are Open - Picnic at the Whitehouse (1987)
37) Have One On Me - Joanna Newsom (2010)
36) Bringing it All Back Home - Bob Dylan (1965)
35) Spirit of Eden - Talk Talk (1988)
=32) Nevermind - Nirvana (1991)
=32) Abbey Road - The Beatles (1969)
=32) Good News For People Who Love Bad News - Modest Mouse (2004)
=30) Ys - Joanna Newsom (2006)
=30) Ágætis byrjun - Sigur Ros (1999)
=27) The Colour and the Shape - The Foo Fighters (1997)
=27) The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars - David Bowie (1972)
=27) The Bends - Radiohead (1995)
=24) Ballad of the Broken Seas - Isobell Campbell and Mark Lanegan (2006)
=24) Endtroducing..... - DJ Shadow (1996)
=24) Is This It - The Strokes (2001)
23) Music Has the Right to Children - Boards of Canada (1998)
=21) Led Zeppelin IV - Led Zeppelin (1971)
=21) The Beatles (The White Album) - The Beatles (1968)
20) Born to Run - Bruce Springsteen (1975)
19) Grace - Jeff Buckley (1994)
18) The Holy Bible - The Manic Street Preachers (1994)
17) Ladies and Gentlemen We Are Floating in Space - Spiritualized (1997)
=15) Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band - The Beatles (1967)
=15) Blood on the Tracks - Bob Dylan (1975)
=13) Unknown Pleasures - Joy Division (1979)
=13) (What's the Story) Morning Glory? - Oasis (1995)
12) Loveless - My Bloody Valentine (1991)
11) Blonde on Blonde - Bob Dylan (1966)
=9) Meat Is Murder - The Smiths (1985)
=9) Nebraska - Bruce Springsteen (1982)
8) Doolittle - The Pixies (1989)
7) The Queen is Dead - The Smiths (1986)
6) Kid A - Radiohead (2000)
5) London Calling - The Clash (1979)
4) Revolver - The Beatles (1966)
3) OK Computer - Radiohead (1997)
=1) Funeral - Arcade Fire (2004)
=1) Highway 61 Revisited (1965)


< Message edited by FritzlFan -- 1/4/2010 11:47:18 PM >


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Miles Messervy 007

Child labour is necessary in the short term



Post #: 1
RE: Empire Top 100 Albums 2010 - The Results. - 29/3/2010 1:04:22 AM   
FritzlFan


Posts: 4793
Joined: 19/11/2008
From: Bristol
=95) April - Sun Kil Moon (2008)



=95) Picaresque - The Decemberists (2005)

Among this decade's prominent indie rock bands, few are as idiosyncratic as The Decemberists. They straddle genres like seasoned jockeys straddle winning racehorses – with confidence, flair and a certain winning touch. Informed by a grandiloquence that is at once eloquent and enthralling, The Decemberists take influence from artists as disparate as Morrissey and Jethro Tull and styles as conflicting as olde sea shanties and British kitchen-sink realism. Theirs is a kind of genre hybridity that bears the hallmarks of an entire generation (perhaps more) of musical history and filters it through a personalised, literate worldview. Picaresque, the band's final LP release before being signed to industry bigwigs Capitol, is the apex of that, a collection of songs that play out like the theatrical form of the album's title, disparate and yet connected by an overarching sentiment – but it's a sentiment that's darker than the jovial-sounding title lets on.

Picaresque is a one-of-a-kind album – there's not many albums that follow up a song about teenage failure on the sports field (and at life in general) with an epic seven-minute spy thriller told from the perspective of the manipulated party – and it's that uniqueness, that singular identity that marks it out as an essential release of this new millennium, and perhaps one of the defining releases of last decade's indie-rock explosion.  Colin Meloy's lyrics may seem dense and overly articulate on first listen (the opening track, The Infanta, is a five minute love letter to Spanish royalty and filled to the brim with gilded language), but Meloy has such a keen sense of character and narrative that it's nigh-on impossible not to get sucked into his tales, be they sprawling (The Bagman's Gambit, The Mariner's Revenge Song) or intimate (Eli the Barrowboy, On the Bus Mall). The highlights are undoubtedly Meloy's more epic works – The Mariner's Revenge Song, a nine-minute sea shanty about a boy who spends twenty years seeking revenge against a "rake and a roustabout”  who caused his mother's death; the aforementioned spy thriller/romance The Bagman's Gambit – but that's not to discount the more subtle, ground-level songs on the album – We Both Go Down Together, a beautifully creepy paeon to suicide;  From My Own True Love (Lost At Sea), sung by a fisherman's wife to her postman; The Engine Driver, in which numerous men of put-upon professions are connected by powerful, painful loves. Even when his songs aren't focused on a particular story – 16 Military Wives, The Infanta – Meloy is more than adept at crafting social commentary or palpable atmosphere with his words and his nebbish, folk-everyman voice.

The Decemberists also have astounding versatility as a band, alternating between vastly different sounds with surprising alacrity. The slight whiplash that comes from going from the haunting, faintly distressing From My Own True Love (Lost at Sea) to the deceptively upbeat and freakishly catchy 16 Military Wives, or from the quiet and melancholic On the Bus Mall to the (again) deceptively catchy, recorded-in-one-take The Mariner's Revenge Song is par for the course with The Decemberists – there is no way, on first listen, you know what's coming next (unless you've read this, in which case, sorry). Like the picaresque theatre that underpins its structure and overall style, Picaresque is bitty in the best kind of way. It is theatrical both in its grandiosity and in its strongly humanistic vein, almost as if it were summoning Osborne through the vessel of late-era Stoppard. It's a meditation on love, death, failure, friendship, falling apart, and the dichotomies of our very existence, as channelled through a kaleidoscope of literary tradition and pop culture diffusion; an eloquent and profoundly human approach embodied in the words of the ratty homeless narrator in On the Bus Mall – "And here in our hovel we fuse like a family/But I will not mourn for you.” In short, Picaresque is my favourite album ever. (blurb by Pigeon Army)



=95) Use Your Illusion 1 - Guns N' Roses (1991)



=95) Rumours - Fleetwood Mac (1977)



=95) Jagged Little Pill - Alanis Morrisette (1995)



=95) Water & Solutions - Far (1998)



=95) 69 Love Songs - The Magnetic Fields (1999)



=95) The Stone Roses - The Stone Roses (1989)



=95) Closer - Joy Division (1980)



=95) Whiskey for the Holy Ghost - Mark Lanegan (1994)



=95) Violator - Depeche Mode (1990)



=95) Led Zeppelin I - Led Zeppelin (1969)



=95) Songs of Faith and Devotion - Depeche Mode (1993)



=95) The Wall - Pink Floyd (1979)


< Message edited by FritzlFan -- 1/4/2010 7:06:39 PM >


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Miles Messervy 007

Child labour is necessary in the short term




(in reply to FritzlFan)
Post #: 2
RE: Empire Top 100 Albums 2010 - The Results. - 29/3/2010 12:37:26 PM   
FritzlFan


Posts: 4793
Joined: 19/11/2008
From: Bristol
=89) For Emma, Forever Ago - Bon Iver (2007)

Albums that are really my favourites are albums that can define a period in my life. When I listen to them I am transformed back to a period of time. Bon Iver's album is one of those albums. I waited all year for a great album and this finally arrived. I listened to it non-stop with it carrying me through some pretty tough times. It's incredible that an album recorded so simply can be so atmospheric. It sweeps you up into a new world and takes over. Every song flows perfectly into the next, every one is a stand-out.

"It's seamless in its construction, poetic in its songwriting and moving in its aesthetic impression."
Delusions of Adequacy

"It's rare to be so gushing about a debut album--yet after living with this album for a few weeks, you'll be hard pressed to find any flaws."
MusicOMH.com

"For Emma, though only nine tracks long, is as beautiful, bleak and intimate as anything 2008 is likely to throw up."
Observer

"Isolation doesn't get more splendid than this"
Mojo

"This album is simply wondrous."
Drowned In Sound
(Blurb by PB~!)

=89) () - Sigur Ros (2002)



=89) Different Class - Pulp (1995)



=89) Weezer (The Blue Album) - Weezer (1994)



=89) Tilt - Scott Walker (1995)



=89) Rain Dogs - Tom Waits (1985)


< Message edited by FritzlFan -- 16/5/2010 12:18:12 AM >


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Miles Messervy 007

Child labour is necessary in the short term




(in reply to FritzlFan)
Post #: 3
RE: Empire Top 100 Albums 2010 - The Results. - 29/3/2010 1:17:42 PM   
FritzlFan


Posts: 4793
Joined: 19/11/2008
From: Bristol
=84) Stop Making Sense - Talking Heads (1984)



=84) Scott 4 - Scott Walker (1969)

After huge success as the leader of the pop (that's pop in the way music was pre-beards) phenomona The Walker Brothers (by 1966 they had more fan club members than now-forgotten Liverpool act The Beatles, who I'm assured were quite popular at the time) it all got a bit too much for Scott Walker, and he left the group. HE went leftfield in his early solo work, his first three albums (titled, Scott, Scott 2 and Scott 3 for easiness, rivalling Led Zep and The Velvet Underground for lazy album titling) were an endearing mix of European influences, mainly in the form of Belgian singer Jacques Brel (whose songs covered a range of topics, mostly Sex and Death). The previous year had wielded Walker his biggest UK solo single (A cover of Brel's faux-autobiographical Jackie) and he had just been given a show on BBC, so he could expect good things from Scott 4.

But the album was a huge commercial failure. This was put down at the time to Walker insistence that the album be released under his birth name (Noel Scott Engel) and to not include the word "Walker” anywhere on the album's sleeve. It's a nice idea, but the album is called Scott 4 and has a big picture of Walker on the cover, so its hard to believe that people just didn't know it was his record. Whatever the reason, it was quickly deleted by Phillips, only to be saved by interest in Walker 15 years later upon the release of his "comeback” album, Climate of the Hunter.

Today, of course, Scott 4 is widely thought of as Walker's masterpiece (something its creator seems to find amusing). It is his first solo album to contain entirely self-penned work and the range of his writing is extraordinary. It opens with The Seventh Seal, which is a song about the film, or rather a song which is the film, as it flows beautifully to the films narrative. Elsewhere The Worlds Strongest Man a touching ode to needing a loved one, Boy Child a haunting ode to the weight of nostalgia and that's without mentioning that there is a song called The Old Man's Back Again (Dedicated to the Neo-Stalinist Regime), which perhaps is more of an indicator as to why it wasn't an enourmous commercial success.

The real beauty of the album though, lies in Walker's voice, his baritone in good shape, and he provides the album with its slightly haunting atmosphere, only helped along with the late Wally Stott's beautiful arrangements.
Overall Scott 4 is a beautiful, perfect album. Its lack of success sent its creator off the rails and it would take him 25 years to make an album of comparative quality, the brutally beautiful noise masterpiece that is Tilt. But Scott 4 is a great starting place for anyone who wants to discover the fractured beauty of Noel Scott Engel.
(blurb by Rhubarb)


=84) Leftism - Leftfield (1995)



=84) Whatever and Ever Amen - Ben Folds Five (1997)



=84) Tea For the Tillerman - Cat Stevens (1970)



=80) Maxinquaye - Tricky (1995)



=80) Infinity Land - Biffy Clyro (2004)



=80) Bryter Layter - Nick Drake (1970)



=80) White Blood Cells - The White Stripes (2001)

It's not very often you can remember the first time you listened to a record. But I remember the first time I listened to White Blood Cells. It was taped off for me, by my brother who was in a very Robert Johnson phase and so had heard some good things about Jack White. So I put it on, and from the distant feedback of the opening track – Dead Leaves and The Dirty Ground – I was absolutely hooked. It was an absolutely life changing experience, as great track moved to great track I felt like I was getting a history of American Music all on one cassette – all so different, yet unmistakably the same band, thanks to Jacks trademark howl and Meg's simple, effective drumming.

It turns out that as I was discovering The White Stripes, so were most people. Music was a mostly pretty shocking place at the time – The White Stripes were a hipsters curio and the biggest bands (outside of The Strokes, whose Is This It arrived the same year) were either drearily bland (Coldplay, Travis et al) or shouty/rappy/talentless Nu Metal types (Limp Bizkit, Papa Roach et al). It was an absolutely clear call to my fifteen year old self.

The good news is that it sounds as mighty now as it did on release, nearly a decade ago. It kicks off with the garage-y Dead Leaves, which segues effortlessly into the Country Rock Hotel Yorba, which moved into the bluesy I'm Finding It harder to Be A Gentleman, which in turn becomes to riotous two minutes of Fell In Love With a Girl, the video to which put the Stripes on the map. Elsewhere you get Citizen Kane quoting blues, tender paens to childhood, punky songs about respecting your elders.

Even the cover art is sublime. It shows the Stripes as the White Blood Cells being attacked by the blacked out Press (ie, a virus), just as the Stripes went into the stratosphere.

The Stripes have made a great many stellar albums, but they've not quite bettered this one for me, but neither, in the time since its release, has anybody else. (blurb by Rhubarb)


< Message edited by FritzlFan -- 1/4/2010 12:41:45 AM >


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Miles Messervy 007

Child labour is necessary in the short term




(in reply to FritzlFan)
Post #: 4
RE: Empire Top 100 Albums 2010 - The Results. - 29/3/2010 7:31:54 PM   
FritzlFan


Posts: 4793
Joined: 19/11/2008
From: Bristol
=78) Crooked Rain, Crooked Rain - Pavement (1994)



=78) Darkness on the Edge of Town - Bruce Springsteen (1978)



=75) Wish You Were Here - Pink Floyd (1975)



=75) Chutes Too Narrow - The Shins (2003)



=75) Tender Prey - Nick Cave & the Bad Seeds (1988)



=71) Ten - Pearl Jam (1991)



=71) Pet Sounds - The Beach Boys (1966)



=71) The Midnight Organ Fight - Frightened Rabbit (2008)



=71) The Kinks Are the Village Green Preservation Society - The Kinks (1968)



< Message edited by FritzlFan -- 29/3/2010 7:33:37 PM >


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Miles Messervy 007

Child labour is necessary in the short term




(in reply to FritzlFan)
Post #: 5
RE: Empire Top 100 Albums 2010 - The Results. - 30/3/2010 2:47:03 PM   
FritzlFan


Posts: 4793
Joined: 19/11/2008
From: Bristol
=68) Remain in Light - Talking Heads (1980)



=68) Neon Bible - Arcade Fire (2007)



=68) Coming Up - Suede (1996)



=65) Appetite for Destruction - Guns N' Roses (1987)



=65) Rubber Soul - The Beatles (1965)



=65) Rum Sodomy & the Lash - The Pogues (1985)



=63) Nothing's Shocking - Jane's Addiction (1988)



=63) Piper at the Gates of Dawn - Pink Floyd (1967)



62) If You're Feeling Sinister - Belle & Sebastian (1996)



_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Miles Messervy 007

Child labour is necessary in the short term




(in reply to FritzlFan)
Post #: 6
RE: Empire Top 100 Albums 2010 - The Results. - 30/3/2010 5:16:48 PM   
FritzlFan


Posts: 4793
Joined: 19/11/2008
From: Bristol
=58) It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back - Public Enemy (1988)



=58) ...And Justice For All - Metallica (1988)



=58) Let It Bleed - The Rolling Stones (1969)



=58) I'm Your Man - Leonard Cohen (1988)

"If you want a different kind of love I'll wear a mask for you"
Leonard Cohen's eight album I'm Your Man is undoubtedly his masterpiece. Coming at a time when his popularity was at its lowest, it reinvigorated his career (Columbia did not release his previous album, Various Positions in the US), giving him his biggest critical hit since his debut album. It is easy to see why it is so well regarded. From the cynicism of Everybody Knows in which Cohen describes his views on modern love to the title song, which is one of the most beautiful love songs ever crafted, Cohen does not hit a bum note on the album.

Musically, the album is a change from his previous work. This album is somewhat reliant on synth sounds. It turns out that this suits gravelly vocals perfectly, accenting them and giving the lyrics an extra oomph. The lyrics themselves are up to Cohen's usual incredibly high standards. Some of his best songs are on this album. There are too many standouts to pick one song, but a telling sign of the quality of the songs is that out of the eight songs on this album, six are on The Essential Leonard Cohen. Although, I suspect the songs that were left out (Jazz Police and I Can't Forget) so that people would buy the album, and in my opinion are not any indication of their quality. For those of you who think of Cohen as a dreary sad sack, I think this will serve as a wakeup call to his genius.
(Blurb by Paul_ie86)

=55) Pinkerton - Weezer (1996)



=55) Small Change - Tom Waits (1976)



=55) The Velvet Underground & Nico - The Velvet Underground (1967)



=53) Mezzanine - Massive Attack (1998)



=53) The Smiths - The Smiths (1984)

Blurb reserved by jamesbondguy


52) Origin of Symmetry - Muse (2001)


< Message edited by FritzlFan -- 16/5/2010 12:20:17 AM >


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Miles Messervy 007

Child labour is necessary in the short term




(in reply to FritzlFan)
Post #: 7
RE: Empire Top 100 Albums 2010 - The Results. - 30/3/2010 11:13:32 PM   
FritzlFan


Posts: 4793
Joined: 19/11/2008
From: Bristol
=49) Silent Alarm - Bloc Party (2005)



=49) The Wild, the Innocent & the E Street Shuffle - Bruce Springsteen (1973)

In early 1973, Bruce Springsteen released his debut album – Greetings From Asbury Park, N.J. It received plenty of critical acclaim and attention – evoking calls of "the next Dylan” for his lyrical wordplay on songs such as "Blinded By the Light” – but it was this album, released the same year, that led critics to believe that Springsteen was more than just a promising lyricist.

The album begins with "The E Street Shuffle” – a sort of jazz-funk effort that looks at events on the Jersey Shore and boardwalk during the summer. This setting continues into the second track – "4th of July, Asbury Park (Sandy)”, a perfect ballad. Then we have "Kitty's Back”, possibly the jazziest song the band has recorded, which leaves an 'open-ended middle' part where a member can improvise as they wish during live performances. The fourth and final song on the first side of the LP is "Wild Billy's Circus Story”, sometimes considered a weak song by people who are wrong.

The Wild, the Innocent & the E Street Shuffle is essentially an album where Springsteen is looking back on his life in New Jersey as he thinks about leaving. A vast step up from the album eight months prior, then.

Unfortunately, as there are only seven songs on the album, many top-drawer songs had to be left out. This is a shame, as songs such as Zero and Blind Terry, Thundercrack, Seaside Bar Song and The Fever (the first two in particular) amongst others are too good to be merely outtakes. The final three songs of The Wild, the Innocent & the E Street Shuffle – "Incident on 57th Street”, "Rosalita (Come Out Tonight)” and "New York City Serenade” are certainly three of the finest songs Springsteen has ever written. Indeed, I would go as far as to say that they are as good as the final three songs on any album you can name.
(Blurb by FritzlFan)


=49) Astral Weeks - Van Morrison (1968)

Blurb reserved by FritzlFan


=45) Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots - The Flaming Lips (2002)



=45) Screamadelica - Primal Scream (1991)



=45) Definitely Maybe - Oasis (1994)



=45) Dog Star Man - Suede (1994)



=42) Pink Moon - Nick Drake (1972)



=42) Fever to Tell - Yeah Yeah Yeahs (2003)



=42) The Remote Part - Idlewild (2002)



41) The Bootleg Series Vol. 4: Bob Dylan Live 1966, The "Royal Albert Hall" Concert - Bob Dylan (1998)



< Message edited by FritzlFan -- 16/5/2010 12:19:44 AM >


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Miles Messervy 007

Child labour is necessary in the short term




(in reply to FritzlFan)
Post #: 8
RE: Empire Top 100 Albums 2010 - The Results. - 1/4/2010 12:37:28 AM   
FritzlFan


Posts: 4793
Joined: 19/11/2008
From: Bristol
=39) In Rainbows - Radiohead (2007)

I would have no hesitation in proclaiming Radiohead to be the best British band since the Beatles. From the long line of excellent bands - Led Zeppelin, The Stones, The Smiths, Blur, Joy Division, The Clash, Sex Pistols, T Rex, The Stone Roses (if only for their debut) and more recently Arctic Monkeys and The Libertines - , no one has appealed more to my taste and been so consistently brilliant than Radiohead. Their first album is nowhere near as bad as people make out (and indeed, if some average band like The Pigeon Detectives released it now, it'd be heralded as a very solid album. However, it's since the release of The Bends that they have consistently been one of, if not the best band in the world; and In Rainbows seems to be the culmination of all their work so far; not in the sense that its their most recent release - because that would be utterly bone headed of me to write that - , but because it blends all of what makes Radiohead stunning into what could be described as a magnum opus. Kid A rivals it as the band's best album, but for the amount of different sounds on one album, In Rainbows is the most accomplished and polished yet.

The first side of the album has 3 songs that rival any of Radiohead's best songs (that's not to say the rest of the first side is bad); 15 Step, Reckoner and Jigsaw Falling Into Place. There's a lyrical and musical brilliance in all of them that are totally contrasting stylistically, but on an album of such pure coherence, it works; I would almost describe it as their 'White Album', so to speak. Reckoner stands alone however, in being possibly their masterpiece, Yorke's falsetto voice used as an instrument in its own right to rival the strings and percussion. Along with Paranoid Android, Exit Music and You And Whose Army, it's their best song.

The second side also contains a number of hidden stunners, Down Is The New Up and Up On The Ladder representative of classic Radiohead, while Bangers + Mash is a song that evokes drum and base all the way through it; great fun at parties! The only thing it's missing is a Just, or a My Iron Lung to cement its brilliance for all eternity. Even so, it all adds up to possibly my favourite album by possibly my favourite band.
(Blurb by Epiphany Demon)

=39) In the Aeroplane Over the Sea - Neutral Milk Hotel (1998)

"Weird, beautiful, absorbing, difficult, In the Aeroplane Over the Sea is a surrealist text loosely based on the life, suffering and reincarnation of Anne Frank, with guest appearances from a pair of Siamese twins menaced by the cold and carnivores, a two-headed boy bobbing in a jar, anthropomorphic vegetables and a variety of immature erotic horrors.” (Cooper, Kim, '33 1/3: In the Aeroplane Over the Sea', Continuum International Publishing Group (New York, 2006)

Kim Cooper's summary of Neutral Milk Hotel's second – and last – LP is both perfect and imperfect. It's perfect because it lets you know what you're in for and gives you an idea of what the album is; it's imperfect because it tries to summarise In the Aeroplane over the Sea in one paragraph, and such an endeavour will always be futile. In the Aeroplane over the Sea is a masterpiece of lyrical surrealism and lo-fi instrumental genius, a dense, incredible forty-minute album that never ceases to amaze and enthral.

While Jeff Mangum made the world sit up and take notice with 1995's On Avery Island, it was in 1998 that he cemented his position as one of the greatest singer-songwriters of our generation with Aeroplane before abruptly disappearing from the music world (since Aeroplane's release, Mangum has only contributed to a handful of albums and played an even smaller number of live shows). His vocals raw and stripped down, Mangum guides us through a bizarre and poignant landscape of grotesque figures and dark, sexually-tinged imagery with the intensity of an otherworldly tour guide who's dreamed it all, seen it afterwards and become intent on warning others of what it is. Mangum's cracking howls give harsh and unforgiving life to a world that seems to flicker between realities, each one as brilliantly captivating as the last (the devastating, potent Oh Comely is an excellent example, switching between protagonists and objects of affection with deft skill and couching it all in powerful, multi-faceted poetry).

Not just content with providing the world with one of the most lyrically astounding works of the decade, though, Jeff and the rest of Neutral Milk Hotel present the memoirs of his dreams and everything in between with some absolutely brilliant musical compositions. From the loud, upbeat, distorted guitars of Holland, 1945, to the otherworldly singing saw of the titular track, from the haunting acoustic guitar accompanying Oh Comely to the myriad of fuzz-drenched brass and keyboard instruments in tracks like The King of Carrot Flowers Pt. One and Untitled, the soundscapes of Neutral Milk Hotel complement the lyrics perfectly and are integral in the effective manifestation of Mangum's world of monstrosities and beauties. Whether they're producing an exhilarating, upbeat sound or a more melancholic, perturbing one, Neutral Milk Hotel show themselves to be masters of their vast instrument cupboard and then some. And that, along with everything else, makes In the Aeroplane over the Sea what it is. Nothing more, nothing less. But then, it doesn't need to be anything more or anything less. What it is is perfect.
(blurb by Pigeon Army)


38) The Doors Are Open - Picnic at the Whitehouse (1987)

Blurb reserved by TheManWithNoShame


37) Have One On Me - Joanna Newsom (2010)



36) Bringing it All Back Home - Bob Dylan (1965)



35) Spirit of Eden - Talk Talk (1988)

Picture, if you can, McFly spending nearly a year in the studio working on the follow-up to their most recent record. Before it's released, the band says they won't be touring it – impossible to play live, they say – and in the build-up, they make noises about the likes of Miles Davis and Erik Satie. Finally, it's released, and the band's teen audience (not to mention the record label) are horrified: McFly's latest is an elegant mix of gospel music, jazz and post-rock. It's got no singles. It sounds nothing like what came before. It's groundbreaking, heartbreaking, beautiful music.

Impossible, right? Wrong. Mark Hollis's Talk Talk were the MOR also-rans of the synthpop age, little more than a low-rent Duran Duran with the occasional genius single ("It's My Life”, "Talk Talk”). Even with 1986's The Colour of Spring, a massive leap forward for the band in terms of composition and ambition, nobody could have predicted that Hollis's band would single-handedly invent almost every major experimental genre of the last two decades. And yet that's what they did with Spirit of Eden -the godfather of Radiohead's abstract excursions, Spiritualized's cosmic free jazz, Sigur Rós's delicate elegance. It was, and is, ahead of its time.

There are only six songs, though all exceed the five minute mark, and picking a favourite is a difficult decision. I'd probably have to be predictable and go with the genuinely perfect "I Believe In You” (if I was trapped on a desert island with one song for company, that's most likely what my choice would be anyway). But the album is liberally dotted with moments of transcendence – the cluster of strings roughly four minutes into opener "The Rainbow”; the guitars in "Desire” making a racket like Led Zeppelin at their most elemental; the gentle organ of "Wealth”; and of course, Hollis's vocals, as much an instrument as anything else that appears on the album, the core of the record.
There's real sadness in his voice, and it lends a weight to the music in a way that few other vocalists have been able to do since. More than anything else, Hollis is why I can't stop returning to this album. 'Take my freedom', he says on the final line of the record, with the most agonisingly impassioned vocal delivery you'll ever hear, 'for giving me a sacred love'. And that, I think, sums up how I feel about Spirit of Eden better than anything I could write. (blurb by Olaf)



=32) Nevermind - Nirvana (1991)



=32) Abbey Road - The Beatles (1969)



=32) Good News For People Who Love Bad News - Modest Mouse (2004)



=30) Ys - Joanna Newsom (2006)



=30) Ágætis byrjun - Sigur Ros (1999)


< Message edited by FritzlFan -- 16/5/2010 12:21:09 AM >


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Miles Messervy 007

Child labour is necessary in the short term




(in reply to FritzlFan)
Post #: 9
RE: Empire Top 100 Albums 2010 - The Results. - 1/4/2010 6:46:23 PM   
FritzlFan


Posts: 4793
Joined: 19/11/2008
From: Bristol
=27) The Colour and the Shape - The Foo Fighters (1997)



=27) The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars - David Bowie (1972)

I first listened to Bowie whilst going through my Mum's LP collection. In amongst Cream and McCartney's Pipes of Peace were three of Bowie's best known albums; Low, Hunky Dory and The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars. Or Ziggy Stardust to you and me. I didn't really get Low at first and Hunky Dory has suffered slightly on repeat listens, but Ziggy Stardust I loved from the first instant and have loved even more every time I put it on. Even the absurdly long name didn't put me off. Every album I consider great is usually made up of the following: a few absolutely brilliant standout tracks and inbetween some very good ones. I never expect a great album to be filled with 10 classics, but I do want to be entertained by every song, and Ziggy Stardust does that exactly. Firstly the standout tracks. I really do believe there are four bonafide classic songs on the album. The album starts with Five Years, an enthrallingly triumphant opener, it builds into such a crescendo, it sounds as if Bowie is nearly collapsing by the end. Then we have track number three in Moonage Daydream, full of glam rock and hiding behind its slower tempo with powerful guitar riffs and Bowie sounding strangely emotional whilst singing about a ray gun. Just after Moonage Daydream we have Starman which purveyors of TOTP2 would have seen countless times on the telly box. In fact this is the first song I really got to know Bowie in and even now I get completely sucked in by its cheerful psychedelia. From then on in the album we get fantastic pop song after fantastic pop song, shifting from anger in It Ain't Easy, to a modlike riff driving through Hang Onto Yourself to tracks like Star and Suffragette City which The Beatles would have been proud of. The album when listened to seems to move at a furious pace and then suddenly the final track, and possibly Bowie's greatest moment, stops everything. Gone are the electric guitars and the power of Bowie's voice. An acoustic guitar and the first line of 'Time takes a cigarette, puts it in your mouth,' welcomes us to Rock 'n' Roll Suicide. After all that has gone before the quiet intro hits the listener like a steam train. With the second verse it gains momentum, trumpets, drums and an electric guitar and then the chorus hits. Bowie is once again surprisingly emotional as he tells us 'you're not alone' and the song builds and builds and builds. It becomes harder and Bowie even more desperate to tell us we're not alone and wanting us to give him our hands. It's outstanding and the perfect finale to a brilliant album that beneath its space opera and glam veneer is an album borne of power and emotion. We hear Bowie defiant and angry, delighted and playful, but all the time wanting the listener to join him in his triumph. (blurb by Rinc)


=27) The Bends - Radiohead (1995)



=24) Ballad of the Broken Seas - Isobell Campbell and Mark Lanegan (2006)



=24) Endtroducing..... - DJ Shadow (1996)



=24) Is This It - The Strokes (2001)



23) Music Has the Right to Children - Boards of Canada (1998)



=21) Led Zeppelin IV - Led Zeppelin (1971)



=21) The Beatles (The White Album) - The Beatles (1968)



_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Miles Messervy 007

Child labour is necessary in the short term




(in reply to FritzlFan)
Post #: 10
RE: Empire Top 100 Albums 2010 - The Results. - 1/4/2010 7:05:39 PM   
FritzlFan


Posts: 4793
Joined: 19/11/2008
From: Bristol
20) Born to Run - Bruce Springsteen (1975)

Blurb reserved by rawlinson


19) Grace - Jeff Buckley (1994)

My favourite album of all time is the classic Grace by Jeff Buckley.  An album with something for everyone that truly mesmerises from start to finish.  The haunting Corpus Christi Carol or the really rocky Eternal Life show the complete contrasts on display here, and  I think that anyone could really love this album.  I honestly feel that Buckley's voice is the best I've ever heard; it's an instument all of it's own.  The opening song, Mojo Pin, shows this off so well with his gentle whispers to his heart-wrenching cries.  It's a testament to the power of his voice that he can take songs from artists like Nina Simone (Lilac Wine), Leonard Cohen (Hallelujah) and a hymn from the 1500's and completely own them and make them his own.  Although covered endlessly by the likes of Bon Jovi, Rufus Wainwright and Alexandra Burke, it is Buckley's version of Hallelujah that is the nation's favourite, a great cover because it is so different from the original becoming it's equal rather than a poorer version.  Every song here is essential listening with Last Goodbye, Lover, You, Should've Come Over and Eternal Life being amongst my favourites, but the real gem is the bonus track included on rereleases of the album - Forget Her.  Some purists like to keep it away from the album, because it wasn't originally chosen by Buckley for inlcusion, but I'm really glad it's there now as it's a song that both lyrically and tonally I can really relate to.  It seems so genuine and heartfelt and that's a great way to end this album in my opinion.  Of course, there is no knowing exactly what would've been next for Buckley had he not died tragically.  Although I obviously wish he were still with this, there's a great sense that in only having one album, his career is really perfect.  No tricky second album, no critical fallout, no sell-out or change of fanbase; just one perfect album, what a legacy. (blurb by PB~!)


18) The Holy Bible - The Manic Street Preachers (1994)



17) Ladies and Gentlemen We Are Floating in Space - Spiritualized (1997)



=15) Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band - The Beatles (1967)

No matter one's personal opinion on the band, no one can deny their status as the biggest band of all time. I'm still young in my exploration of The Beatles and claim to be neither an expert nor a superfan, but when it comes to my favourite albums of all time, this is right up there. The original concept album* which cemented their legacy as more than a pop band, Sgt. Pepper's is a roller-coaster ride from the rocky jaunt of the title track to the perfect A Day In The Life (my second favourite song ever.) Sgt. Pepper has something for everyone. For your granny there's 'When I'm Sixty-Four.' For your stoner mate who needs a shower there's Within You Without You. Sgt. Peppers works so well because it not only flows so well as an album, but all of the songs are fantastic on their own. It's like a greatest hits album its that good. It's influence is still seen today, especially with the recent remasters and Rock Band game. Quite simply, Sgt. Peppers is perfect.

Before Sgt. Pepper's, no one seriously thought of rock music as actual art. That all changed in 1967, though, when John, Paul, George and Ringo (with "A Little Help" from their friend, producer George Martin) created an undeniable work of art which remains, after 3-plus decades, one of the most influential albums of all time. From Lennon's evocative word/sound pictures (the trippy "Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds", the carnival-like "Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite") and McCartney's music hall-styled "When I'm 64", to Harrison's Eastern-leaning "Within You Without You", and the avant-garde mini-suite, "A Day in the Life", Sgt. Pepper's was a milestone for both 1960s music and popular culture in general.
(blurb by PB~!)


=15) Blood on the Tracks - Bob Dylan (1975)



=13) Unknown Pleasures - Joy Division (1979)

Blurb reserved by Olaf


=13) (What's the Story) Morning Glory? - Oasis (1995)



12) Loveless - My Bloody Valentine (1991)

In many respects, Loveless is an album about one man rather than a band. MBV main man Kevin Shields pretty much assembled the album himself, playing all the guitar and bass parts and creating drum parts from samples of percussionist Colm Ó Cíosóig's playing (Ó Cíosóig did play live on two tracks however, "Only Shallow” and the self-written "Touched”). The album's recording took three years, and nearly bankrupted Creation Records after he spent somewhere in the region of half a million pounds to produce it. The question of whether you consider Shields to be an endlessly inventive sonic visionary in the Wilson mould or a relentlessly perfectionist madman in, er, the Wilson mould aside (hint: he's both), it's clear to see that Loveless is very much Shields's album. As such, it's unsurprising to know that he never followed it up – Loveless is the perfect album.

Aside from simply being an outstanding record, Loveless is one of a very select group of albums – Revolver, Pet Sounds, Bitches Brew, The Velvet Underground's debut – to genuinely invent a new sonic vocabulary for rock music. Marrying the fuzzy sounds of C86 with punishing avant-garde noise, it spawned a genre (shoegaze), and while it's hard to name bands directly influenced by Loveless due to its singular sound, its DNA is practically encoded into every major alternative band since. After nearly fifty years as the key instrument in rock, it seemed that all that could be done with the guitar, had been done – but Shields opened the six-string up to a whole world of new opportunities with Loveless, producing a sound that was (and still is) like no other. There's elements of indie pop ("Blown A Wish”), acid house ("Soon”), ambient ("Loomer”) and something much harder to define (um, all of it really). But even despite all this, it fits in its fair share of anthems: "When You Sleep”, "I Only Said” and "Sometimes” are as much perfect pop songs as they are abstract soundscapes (though that could be just me). (blurb by Olaf)


11) Blonde on Blonde - Bob Dylan (1966)



< Message edited by FritzlFan -- 1/4/2010 11:46:46 PM >


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Miles Messervy 007

Child labour is necessary in the short term




(in reply to FritzlFan)
Post #: 11
RE: Empire Top 100 Albums 2010 - The Results. - 1/4/2010 11:14:34 PM   
FritzlFan


Posts: 4793
Joined: 19/11/2008
From: Bristol
=9) Meat Is Murder - The Smiths (1985)

Blurb reserved by Piles


=9) Nebraska - Bruce Springsteen (1982)

(Blurb by rawlinson)


8) Doolittle - The Pixies (1989)



7) The Queen is Dead - The Smiths (1986)

Blurb reserved by jamesbondguy


6) Kid A - Radiohead (2000)



5) London Calling - The Clash (1979)



4) Revolver - The Beatles (1966)


< Message edited by FritzlFan -- 16/5/2010 12:22:04 AM >


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Miles Messervy 007

Child labour is necessary in the short term




(in reply to FritzlFan)
Post #: 12
RE: Empire Top 100 Albums 2010 - The Results. - 1/4/2010 11:23:26 PM   
FritzlFan


Posts: 4793
Joined: 19/11/2008
From: Bristol
3) OK Computer - Radiohead (1997)



_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Miles Messervy 007

Child labour is necessary in the short term




(in reply to FritzlFan)
Post #: 13
RE: Empire Top 100 Albums 2010 - The Results. - 1/4/2010 11:38:06 PM   
FritzlFan


Posts: 4793
Joined: 19/11/2008
From: Bristol
2) Songs I Like - Dick Van Dyke (1963)



1) Put on a Happy Face - Dick Van Dyke (2008)



_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Miles Messervy 007

Child labour is necessary in the short term




(in reply to FritzlFan)
Post #: 14
RE: Empire Top 100 Albums 2010 - The Results. - 1/4/2010 11:45:44 PM   
FritzlFan


Posts: 4793
Joined: 19/11/2008
From: Bristol
=1) Funeral - Arcade Fire (2004)

Music works best whenever it not only blows you away, but whenever it sums up a period of time and moment for you completely. I bought Funeral in a whim. Gorillaz and Coldplay were my albums of choice at the time and Bright Eyes was me going alternative and quirky. I really liked the artwork and I saw it in some Best of the Year lists so I thought why not? I got home and didn't listen to it. I do that alot. Eventually 'Rebellion' turned up on a BBC advert and I realised it was that Arcade Fire band that I bought so I popped the CD on my IPod, headed out to do my paper round and wow, I was blown away. Funeral changed not just my listening tastes but also how I looked at music. Music didn't have to build to a big chorus to have an impact and it could take me in any direction.

Both brave and ambitious, like an early U2, but still subtle and never cliched, Funeral is a pure joy to listen to. Dot Music got it perfect when they described it like this: ""Funeral” is the sort of perfectly-realised record you'd hope from a band at the top of their game. For a debut release it's unmatched in recent years. Hearing it is to wake from a black and white slumber and to view the world in widescreen Technicolour." Even MNE summed it up brilliantly: "For those of us who still believe in music's power to redeem, 'Funeral' feels like detox, the most cathartic album of the year." Whether it's the pure energy and excitement of Neighbourhood #3 and Rebellion (Lies) or the achingly beautiful In The Backseat Funeral has something for everyone. Then there's Wake Up. Nothing in the past decade was as bold or as brilliant and it was the kick up the arse everyone needed. Funeral is not only one of the best albums of the last decade but one of the best albums of all time.
(blurb by PB~!)


=1) Highway 61 Revisited - Bob Dylan (1965)


I'll hand over to Frank Zappa to open my essay.

"When I heard 'Like A Rolling Stone,' I wanted to quit the music business, because I felt: 'If this wins and it does what it's supposed to do, I don't need to do anything else.'

That snare shot, the opening to Like A Rolling Stone, possibly Dylan's greatest song, forebodes what is to come on the majestic Highway 61 Revisited, an album that transcends what popular music is. Its legacy can't be underestimated, one Dylan himself has claimed is his best album. It's an album of such coherent thought and purpose that it's hard to think anything in music has ever bettered it.

Opening with the vicious Like A Rolling Stone and continuing on in that fashion for almost every single track, it's claimed to be the peak of Dylan's 'angry young man' work, and it's hard to argue with that; each song feels like it's come from another age altogether - I feel like punk rock derived lots of its teenage angst from this album - , the title song and Tombstone Blues works of such pace and fury, Queen Jane Approximately much more than what sounds like a gentle disapproving statement, Ballad Of A Thin Man almost an essay on how out of place conventionalism can feel. There's nothing on the album that doesn't kick open your mind, as Bruce Springsteen said, and you can't help but let Dylan in, trample over every pre-conception you've ever had - not just of music, but of everything - and walk out. The cherry on top of the album however, is the beautifully haunting Desolation Row, lyrics so poignant and poetic that it's a wonder it belongs on the same album. I'm glad it does; it's a perfect footnote to the greatest album of all time. (blurb by Epiphany Demon)


< Message edited by FritzlFan -- 1/4/2010 11:46:01 PM >


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Miles Messervy 007

Child labour is necessary in the short term




(in reply to FritzlFan)
Post #: 15
RE: Empire Top 100 Albums 2010 - The Results. - 20/10/2010 4:19:21 PM   
gazpop


Posts: 2511
Joined: 26/6/2010
From: 666 Godwin Street, Naziland
Hi all. So sorry I'm late. Did I miss much? I'm not sure, were the 100 all voted in or an opinion? I'm well pleased at the variety, much kudos, but in the spirit of moaning, just a few points....
Rumours 95? What?
Roses also 95? Makes me feel it's hard to take the rest seriously. The reason half the band of the 90's and noughties picked up a guitar.
Leftism 84?
Ten 71?
Rubber Soul 65?
Appetite for Destruction also 65?
Public Enemy 58?
Definitely Maybe 45? And Morning Glory above it? Insanity!

And how does Spiritualized get to 17?!? And Roses at 95? Something is definitely wrong with the world. And where was 3 feet high and rising?

Oh well, we're all different yeah? Respect for all the hard work though.

Edit: No Jazz or Sheer Heart Attack? No Axis Bold As Love or Are You Experienced? No Arctic Monkeys? Huh? The most important and relevant band of the last 5 years? How could this have happened? And did I miss The Cure?

Anyway, thanks for reading my (semi) rants. Sorry Fritzl

< Message edited by gazpop -- 20/10/2010 4:25:18 PM >


_____________________________

Yeah, that's real fine expensive gear you brought out here, Mr. Hooper.'Course I don't know what that bastard shark's gonna do with it-might eat it I suppose. Seen one eat a rockin' chair one time. Hey chieffy, next time you just ask me which line to pull

(in reply to FritzlFan)
Post #: 16
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