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JBG's Top 50 Songs: Complete! - 27/3/2010 5:56:29 PM   
jamesbondguy


Posts: 6238
Joined: 6/1/2007
From: The Village Green
A fine slice of bandwagon jumping. It'll be done by the end of tomorrow, though. Don't worry, it wouldn't a torrent of Smiths praise, alone. I limited the number of songs allowed per artist, and the Smiths, obviously, won't be there until the top part of the list. Enjoy, suckers.

< Message edited by jamesbondguy -- 28/3/2010 11:12:48 PM >


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RE: JBG's Top 50 Songs - 27/3/2010 5:57:50 PM   
FritzlFan


Posts: 4793
Joined: 19/11/2008
From: Bristol


You also appear to be copying my pace.

How many per artist have you limited it to? It if it's not giving too much away.


< Message edited by FritzlFan -- 27/3/2010 6:04:18 PM >


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RE: JBG's Top 50 Songs - 27/3/2010 6:21:25 PM   
jamesbondguy


Posts: 6238
Joined: 6/1/2007
From: The Village Green
50) The Last Time I Saw Richard- Joni Mitchell

I’ve only just gotten into Mitchell’s work, but the final track on Blue has been my favourite song among the few albums I’ve heard. A sublime mix of optimism and pessimism, Mitchell tells of the dark-café-dwelling depression which will eventually strike down every romantic. Heard outside of the album, it’s sadness becomes even fresher, even more startling and even more capable of leaving you open-mouthed, a new player in Mitchell’s world-view.

See it here: Irritatingly, I could only find cover versions on youtube. Feel free to look at them, though. No idea if they're any good, I'm afraid.

49) Wasting My Time- Klaus Nomi

The most enjoyable track from the first of two albums by doomed, falsetto-voiced starman Klaus Nomi (one of the first celebrities to die of AIDS), New York hero. There’s not a huge amount to it, but his vocals are remarkable, and the alternative-disco-lite music isn’t as off-putting as most of the songs on Klaus Nomi. Actually, I adore it.

See it here: Hot tuxedo action here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S0_7lDi7TQY

48) Autumn Almanac- The Kinks

One of Ray Davies’ finest songs of his finest period, a delicate, tender, sad and subtly humorous take on the perspective of a hunchbacked gardener whom Davies often saw around his London home. It emerges as a powerful, poetic portrait of national character, from the view of one of Davies’ many outsider-observers. “I go to Blackpool, for my holidays…” And just witness the sublime lift in the "hear it calling me" bit. Apparently, one of Johnny Marr's favourites, as well.

See it here: The band seem to be smiling like madmen for some reason, in this clip. Gotta love Ray's schoolboy get-up and little twirl, though. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zNgo07Cg7lI

47) Song From Under The Floorboards- Magazine

The greatest song by weirdo-intellectual-alternative-poet-songwriter-hero Howard Devoto and Magazine, a sublime roar of nonchalant disaffection (if that makes sense) propelled by a sudden tonal, mood and musical change towards the end, and the sublime post-punk keyboards and guitars of the band, and, most particularly, John McGeoch. “I am angry, I am ill and I’m as ugly as sin” is perhaps the greatest opening line in music history.

See it here: A live version: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TqCNp0fdRMU

46) Afternoon Tea- The Kinks

Another portrait from Ray Davies and The Kinks, this time of romantic rejection and, of course, the deeply English tradition of afternoon tea. Davies tale of provincial loser-ism is shot through with his usual tenderness, and is backed by an utterly sublime set of backing-vocals and hand-claps from Dave and the rest of the band that rivals those in Waterloo Sunset.

See it here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eNlvtpSRnm0

45) Sitting By The Riverside- The Kinks

Taken from their greatest album, Sitting By The Riverside is essential to Village Green Preservation Society’s stories of longing, alienation from the modern world and romanticising of English village life. Here, Ray imagines a solace in which he can “lie with arms open wide”, but finds himself still haunted by an unrequited love, and never too far away from the middle-class bores, rats and poverty which are the banes of his life.

See it here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8xpsEaEXMPk

44) Billy Budd- Morrissey

The first on this list from Moz is one I’m not too sure why I adore so much. It’s a minor song, undoubtedly, and, if I were to be objective, one of the weaker tracks on the superb Vauxhall And I. It’s a typically Moz story of an outsider, albeit one who becomes such through his (probably homosexual, but, like many Morrissey songs, it’s written from a gender-neutral perspective) relationship with the rogue of the title. Rejected from a job application, it ends on a strictly pessimistic note of longing, yearning and self-sacrifice which is such a quintessential part of Morrissey’s defeatism. Some see it as being a song addressed to Johnny Marr (which would take out the homosexual relationship element) and the legacy of The Smiths, but I’m not entirely convinced. Either way, it’s one of those rare songs which, upon hearing it, makes me feel the precise same emotions and moods as the character’s in the song. It’s not often something like that happens.

See it here: A brilliant, heavier live version: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xrByjyohdng

43) Trash- The New York Dolls

Morrissey would approve of this choice, no doubt, seeing as how he’s covered it in concert. However, the original is the highest point on the Dolls’ first album, and arguably the highest point of their career, an absolute rush of a song which bowls everyone and everything out of it’s way in it’s sheer exuberance, speed and sugar-rush emotion. Johansen always seemed totally alive, but here he reaches extremes, and he’s backed admirably by Sylvain’s sublime echoes. Thunders’ guitar is as powerful as it’s ever been, and Nolan drums his way into lovelorn oblivion. Take a bow, you wonderful transvestites, you.

See it here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F0A19X1AISg

42) Breakfast Time- Orange Juice

I’ve only recently been converted to the joys of Edwyn Collins’ and the sound of Young Scotland. The version I’m discussing here is the rickety, Postcards Records-era one available on The Glasgow School, rather than it’s Rip It Up makeover (in general, I much prefer the early, postcard-era Orange Juice to the indie-funk sound of Rip It Up onwards). Starting with a ringing alarm, Collins’ delivers a typically witty, fey and lovelorn summing up of his morning, before concluding in cries of “how I wish I was young again!” Considering he was only 20 or so when he wrote it, something’s gone wrong somewhere. The unpredictable music is loveable. Orange Juice are loveable.

See it here: All I could find was a Rip It Up-era version with terrible sound quality. Sorry. It's on last.fm, though.

41) Amateur Hour- Sparks

An absolutely classic single, and one of the stand-outs of Sparks’ masterpiece, Kimono My House. A definitively Ron Mael-penned account of puberty and sexual awakening, which hinges on the lines “for she can show you what you must do/ to be more like people better than you”. Trust the Maels to cut through human relationships with such a typically sharp-sword. Delivered in that envy-making burst of Russell Mael falsetto and frantic Ron keyboarding which made Sparks the most thrilling sound of the early 70’s. Put that in your pipe and smoke it, Bowie, Bolan and co. Only kidding, I like you two, too.

See it here: A live version with terrible clothes on Russell Mael. Ah well, it was the glam-era. Classic deadpan Ron, though. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pSOgxD1kgl0

40) Lonely- Eddie Cochran

I adore Eddie Cochran (hell, his music got me into music), one of the great heroes of 50’s rock’n’roll, doomed icon (he died in a car-crash only months after Buddy Holly‘s death, at only 21) and, arguably, one of the creators of punk (just listen to the crashing Somethin’ Else). Here, though, is one of his ballads, and a damn fine one it is, too. A slower, melancholy tale of human loneliness, with Eddie wishing to die and questioning God on what precisely this “thing that mortal’s call love” is, it has an emotional depth that far outstrips the more well-known Heartbreak Hotel. Not entirely representative of Eddie’s work, this is, however, something worth savouring (or being cremated with). How anyone could fail to fall head-over-heels with a man with quiff like that, though, is a question the song fails to answer.


See it here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YNoWi-eMHMw

< Message edited by jamesbondguy -- 28/3/2010 12:49:55 AM >


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RE: JBG's Top 50 Songs - 27/3/2010 6:22:06 PM   
jamesbondguy


Posts: 6238
Joined: 6/1/2007
From: The Village Green

quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan



You also appear to be copying my pace.

How many per artist have you limited it to? It if it's not giving too much away.



I tried five, but it was six, in the end.

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RE: JBG's Top 50 Songs - 28/3/2010 12:11:01 AM   
FritzlFan


Posts: 4793
Joined: 19/11/2008
From: Bristol
I've also only been getting into Mitchell's work lately, but pretty much every track on Blue is brilliant (the CD of it arrived today, which may or may not be  coincidence). A Case of You is just about my favourite, though.

That Orange Juice track isn't actually on last.fm, btw.


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RE: JBG's Top 50 Songs - 28/3/2010 12:17:03 AM   
jamesbondguy


Posts: 6238
Joined: 6/1/2007
From: The Village Green

quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan

That Orange Juice track isn't actually on last.fm, btw.



Someone told me all of The Glasgow School is on last.fm (the liars). There'll be some more of their songs coming up, though, if you want to check them out.

Where is everyone tonight?

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RE: JBG's Top 50 Songs - 28/3/2010 12:43:03 AM   
jamesbondguy


Posts: 6238
Joined: 6/1/2007
From: The Village Green
39) Terminal Preppie- Dead Kennedys

Probably my most listened-to song in my really, really punk stage, and still my favourite Kennedys track. A hilariously, bitingly, terrifyingly, depressingly accurate portrait of the kind of drunken, rich and moronic student who we all come to suspect dominate our college and university campuses, delivered with typical Biafra vibrancy, and breakneck Kennedys punk, it effectively became my main weapon , for quite a while, in an ongoing war against the dim-ass/soon-to-be-yuppie teens I come into daily contact with. Last year saw the release of “I love College” by Asher Roth or whatever it was called, and it seemed to be another Biafra-penned parody, before I realised it was actually serious.

See it here: Hear Biafra go: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B84tIOhnXnM

38) Drivin’- The Kinks

Another Kinks track, another masterpiece. Arthur (Or The Rise And Fall Of The British Empire) was a concept album which tackled, possibly for the first time in music, the post-war years of Atlee and, more importantly, Eden and Macmillan. A devastating portrait of a generation destroyed by war, inequality and a newfound suburban mediocrity, Drivin’ was one of the album’s lightest moments. Following the anti-war Some Mother’s Son, which told of the death of Arthur’s brother in WW2, it paints a picture of a possibly imaginary-countryside escape/solace, where war, rent-collectors, the Tories and irritating parents will be far behind. Idyllic. As the writer of the never-to-be-made accompanying TV movie put it, the songs in Arthur are ones the British population have been singing all their lives.

See it here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jzIxpWwIVPk


37) Eine Symphonie Des Grauens- The Monochrome Set

The Monochrome Set, who once provoked riots from their student-y audience at gigs, are now a much underrated, mostly-forgotten post-punk entity, outside of certain cult and critical circles. Those in the know, however, are aware that their brand of hyper-witty, smart, arty-post-punk is quite seriously exciting. Eine Symphonie Des Grauens, one of their earliest songs, is a track that might have provoked many a merry skip at indie discos were it not for it’s completely deadpan, “just how sarcastic is this?” tone and lyrics. Indeed, this is a very different take on death than the Morrissey song above- here, the opening verse is “I’m dead and dank and rotten/my arms are wrapped in cotton/my corpse loves you, let’s marry.”- not to mention the heavy use of camp sexual innuendo and music that sounds like it’s being played on instruments of human bone. I half expect Bid (real name: Ganesh Seshadri ) designed to completely alienate all but a very select crowd. Not the most pleasant move, but this is a song that should separate the indie heroes from the indie riff-raff. Hilarious, exciting, perfectly crafted lyrically and full of erratic, bouncing-wildly-around ideas, this is a gothic-humour you should love, you cretins.

See it here: The original single: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GCGJQ5uXR8A
And a frantically wonderful live version that moves so fast, Bid ends up slurring half the lyrics: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A5RNn8jAV68&feature=related

36) Mama, Lay Softly On The Riverbed- Morrissey

From one end to another. The newest Moz song on the list (from last year’s Years of Refusal), it’s also his most despairing, dark and morbid in recent memory. A devastating first-person account from a boy who’s mother has been forced to the grave by the people in grey, poverty and debt, Morrissey first promises to take his violent revenge, before surrendering, and telling of his desire to take a safe and warm place among his mother. The line “life is nothing much too lose” is probably taken from A.E. Housman, one of Moz’s (and my) favourite poets. Backed by a military drum assault, this is proof that Morrissey can still plunge into the darkest, dankest areas of human experience with as much poetry as ever, while remaining relevant- this could be an alternative, howling anthem for the worst victims of the economic downturn. Not a song for everyone, of course, but for fans, this is a masterwork. A couple of decades on from his first appearance on the scene, Moz is less ready to fuck about than ever. And it’s incredibly exciting.

See it here: A less powerful live version, but it’s the best out there: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9qkcsiaxVnQ

35) Do You Remember Walter?- The Kinks

The last Kinks song for quite a while, Do You Remember Walter is the second track on Village Green Preservation Society. I don’t think there’s even been a more powerful song written on the subject of lost friendship, and the whole thing is shot through with Davies’ special brand of boredom and frustration with suburban mediocrity, and stifling of ambition. Full of instant melancholy, it could have become an anthem for betrayed outsiders everywhere had more people stopped listening to “You’ve Really Got Me” so bloody much and realised that Ray Davies left simplistic pop lyrical fumblings behind to become the best British voice of his generation.

See it here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cA5bcZeGqwE

34) Hold Me, Hug Me, Rock Me- Gene Vincent

If Elvis Presley is the nice, heartbroken boy down the road, Gene Vincent is the ruffian who’ll pinch your arse and steal your wallet (and probably enjoy both). Or, at least, that’s how it sounds from da musix. In truth, it appears he was a nice guy, a friend of the previous appeared Eddie Cochran. But this sums up the rebel energy and force of rockabilly, and all of it’s power and excitement. The lyrics may not be among the genre’s best (well, it‘s only got a couple of lines in it), but damn, this one just about sets fire to your hair.

See it here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JHIFGMKWars

33) Petty (Thief) Lout- The Fall

The last track on one of the 80’s masterpieces, here everyone in The Fall completely outdoes themselves. A classic, intellectual post-punk stomp/ slow, shadowy narrative propelled by the spectacular fragmented-feeling guitars of Brix Smith and Craig Scanlon and THOSE DRUMS (anyone who knows The Fall and any of their drummers will know what I mean), Mark E. Smith splatters the song with his special brand of madman observations, criticisms, images and social commentary and scene-setting, before concluding with the classic cry that “suburbia holds more than you’d care for!” The message? Take this, England.

See it here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dTZq7VTIWF8


32) Sunday Morning- The Velvet Underground

The first song on the first Velvet Underground album, Sunday Morning was the deceptively gentle opener that probably launched a thousand melodic, alternative bands. Or so critical consensus usually says. In truth, Sunday Morning is an almost untouchable masterpiece, with an unsettling and deeply melancholic mood. Reed’s relaxation sounds like the calm before the emotional and physical storm (or the calm after a drug binge, I guess). Originally it was marked for Nico to song, and I would have loved to have heard that (I’m not being sarcastic- I genuinely love Nico).

See it here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cA5bcZeGqwE

31) (Marie’s The Name) His Latest Flame- Elvis Presley

Featuring an absolutely classic riff (recycled by Johnny Marr for The Smiths’ Rusholme Ruffians), Presley never sounded more beaten, more heartbroken, more vulnerable and more like an actual person and not a media creation than he did here. It has a tremendous amount of personal significance (more external than anything related to the lyrics) that means it ranks so high, when, really, it should be cowering in the lower 40’s, about to be bovver-boot stomped away by Gene Vincent’s Hold Me, Hug Me, Rock Me. Ah well, memories. It’s still a great, classic song, though.

See it here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4jgI7IoD5RM

30) I Can Never Go Home Anymore- The Shangri-Las

The highest point in the Shangri-Las career, this is the tragic tale of adolescent loneliness, runaways and suicide that has floored anyone with a brain. I almost went for Past, Present and Future, but this track is probably the one I return to most, with it’s transcendental backing vocals, and the most heartbroken, caressing spoken-word performance from Mary Weiss in Shangri-Las history. There’s not a single way in hell that they aren’t the best, and most revolutionary, female pop group of the 60’s.

See it here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dYdr-MslXkw&feature=fvw


< Message edited by jamesbondguy -- 28/3/2010 12:46:40 AM >


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RE: JBG's Top 50 Songs - 28/3/2010 12:55:35 AM   
FritzlFan


Posts: 4793
Joined: 19/11/2008
From: Bristol
Stop writing well.


That Fall track is actually very good indeed, as is terminal Preppie. It may be a bit 'heavy' () for my tastes, but the lyrics are fantastic.

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RE: JBG's Top 50 Songs - 28/3/2010 1:05:45 AM   
jamesbondguy


Posts: 6238
Joined: 6/1/2007
From: The Village Green
quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan

Stop writing well.


Thanks.

quote:


That Fall track is actually very good indeed, as is terminal Preppie. It may be a bit 'heavy' () for my tastes, but the lyrics are fantastic.


I'm not usually a fan of 'heavy' music, but I do really love a lot of punk stuff (and, especially, the more intellectual areas of punk, which Dead Kennedys are definitely, lyrically, a part of. I mean, Biafra is a political speaker now).

Edit: I like the way this is becoming a JBG-Fritzlfan love-in.

< Message edited by jamesbondguy -- 28/3/2010 2:06:57 AM >


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RE: JBG's Top 50 Songs - 28/3/2010 2:54:32 AM   
FritzlFan


Posts: 4793
Joined: 19/11/2008
From: Bristol
quote:

ORIGINAL: jamesbondguy

Edit: I like the way this is becoming a JBG-Fritzlfan love-in.





I believe it is your duty to listen to every song I linked in my thread.

_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Miles Messervy 007

Child labour is necessary in the short term




(in reply to jamesbondguy)
Post #: 10
RE: JBG's Top 50 Songs - 28/3/2010 2:56:20 AM   
jamesbondguy


Posts: 6238
Joined: 6/1/2007
From: The Village Green
Your thread has 50 more than mine! Can I just choose the 50 that sound most interesting? Because then I'll have heard 60 or so (I've already gone through a few).

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RE: JBG's Top 50 Songs - 28/3/2010 3:02:17 AM   
FritzlFan


Posts: 4793
Joined: 19/11/2008
From: Bristol
I accept. 

Be sure to include most of the highly placed ones.


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RE: JBG's Top 50 Songs - 28/3/2010 3:25:26 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
Great choices so far. Regarding Billy Budd, I can't place the song right now and Mrs. R is asleep so can't listen to the Youtube link, but how much of it is taken from Melville? Because that should aid in understanding the song.

(in reply to FritzlFan)
Post #: 13
RE: JBG's Top 50 Songs - 28/3/2010 1:05:12 PM   
jamesbondguy


Posts: 6238
Joined: 6/1/2007
From: The Village Green
Pretty much none of it, I think. There is, however, the fact that Melville also wrote a story about a sailor called John Marr, which is usually used as the main evidence it's a Marr-related song (as well as the "12 years on" line).

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RE: JBG's Top 50 Songs: 50-20 now up - 28/3/2010 1:24:07 PM   
jamesbondguy


Posts: 6238
Joined: 6/1/2007
From: The Village Green

29) Please Sir- Wild Beasts

The track that got me into Wild Beasts, this is the wonderfully dark, dank and rotten (oh, hello Bid) song starts with a stubbornly brilliant mixing of Thrope’s falsetto antics and Fleming’s growling hi-jinxs, detailing the protagonist’s desperate pleading to an old head teacher to be readmitted to the school of his youth, the one he was expelled from for “only winding a lad” (before he bolted) and “fumbling a lass” (besides, he was revolted), which is shot through with what seems to be a degree of subtly homoerotic longing. The kind of music you’d expect to hear in a small village, overlooked by a haunted hill with the hangman’s noose still standing for historical interest, it’s a wonderful thing.

See it here: Don’t you love live music? Just for the uniquely irritating audiences, surely? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1KAa1DSqUCk

28) Femme Fatale- The Velvet Underground And Nico

In my opinion, this is the finest VU and Nico collaboration, a pretty self-explanatory song which rides on a sound which seems both thin and deep at the same time, with Nico’s German sighs backed by Reed’s high-pitched drawls. Almost supernaturally magic, and unlike anything else in music history, no matter that it isn’t one of their feedback-drenched, improvised trademarks.

See it here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m8IV6lJSm1c

27) My New House- The Fall

Arguably the stand-out from This Nation’s Saving Grace, My New House is a typically winding, stomp-y, pyschobilly-influenced 80’s Fall track, with Smith lapsing into momentary falsetto, and telling us of the unfortunate haunting of his new house from Mr Reagan, who hung himself a few doors down. I have no idea why I prefer it to other songs on the album, all I know is that I could listen to it forever. At least, it seems to sum-up that melding of the everyday social realism and the supernatural, bizarre and vivid which makes Mark E Smith’s lyrics so damn unique, and so damn confounding and so damn special.

See it here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xS_MauJshXU

26) Couldn’t Get Ahead- The Fall

For some reason, every Fall song, with one exception (still to come), on this list seems to come from This Nation, or, at least, be connected to it. I adore Hex Enduction Hour and Perverted By Language almost as much, so I have no idea why it dominates so. However, this classic single does much of what I’ve described above. It’s a brief punch in the face, leaping from a tale of missing to the bus due to not being able to get money out of the pocket in time, to, well, lots of other subjects, backed by Brix’s buried backing vocals, and those drums, those guitars, those post-punk rockabilly rhythms. You could invade Northampton Town Hall to this music. Well, the revolution has to start somewhere.

See it here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0jGpgZxiiB0

25) Everyday Is Like Sunday- Morrissey

Hey, Morrissey’s back (I doubt Mark would approve, but then Mark doesn’t really approve of much). Everyday Is Like Sunday is undoubtedly his most famous solo single, and with good reason. A deeply evocative tale of a deserted, dull coastal town where “every day is silent and grey”, Morrissey sings of having his clothes stolen, etching postcards with messages about wanting to escape, drinking greasy tea and welcoming Armageddon. A song that sums up the experience of living in one of thousands of dead-end English towns (how I know it all to well), when placed alongside Viva Hate’s anti-Thatcher “Margaret On The Guillotine”, it becomes a lot easier to see this song as another, subtle tirade on Thatcher’s policies effects on English life, similar to the same dead Englands of The Queen Is Dead and many a Smiths song. Thanks for it all, Margaret.

See it here: My weekdays, bizarrely, seem to have been captured here (except I’m not a girl): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NhdOQ5BnBys

24) Reinforcements- Sparks

Those darned Maels are back again. This is a song about needing reinforcements in everyday life, and very witty it is, too. As always, it’s propelled by those keyboards, and those frantic falsetto vocals, and, by God, it’s addictive, addictive, addictive.

See it here: I can’t get the version on you tube to work (apparently it won’t in this country), so watch this one, instead. It’s the almost-as-brilliant Thanks But No Thanks, from the same album: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qMbbYxW4KAg

23) Tender Object- Orange Juice

Edwyn is back, ladies and gentlemen, and he’s brought one of his best with him. Tender Object is Orange Juice at their most coy, and their most fey. Against that classic scratchy indie-funk sound, Collins, in his perfect voice, sings of his days “sick inside and eyes on the ground”, lost in his “chic cold misery”, before heading down to the shopping arcade to laugh at his own reflection in the windows. I can understand why some can hardly stand this band, but, by God, I can’t get enough of their hi-jinks, Collins’ shy mix of irony and confessional sadness of the bookish loner.

See it here: Like all Orange Juice songs, I prefer the rickety, more ramshackle version on the original Postcard Records releases/demos (as do many, it appears), but this version on their first album is a fine take: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LvVlJaUSnbs

22) Love Sick- Orange Juice

Oh, hello again, Edwyn. I adore the line: “Sorry to moan, but it’s what I do best!” I can’t get enough. I can’t help myself. At least I’m falling and laughing.

See it here: Couldn’t find the original, but here’s an OK Peel Session:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v-fJshYyjaU

21) These Things Take Time- The Smiths

A nicely alliterative title allows us into this absolute classic of a song. On one level, it’s one of Morrissey’s first, and finest, ‘anti-sex’ songs (and essential in concreting his image as 80s music‘s only celibate), as he reveals himself ‘as the most inept that ever stepped’, frightened by the idea of shenanigans, and more willing to lose himself in past romantic illusions than accept the advances of his partner by a shadowy railway line, concluding that “vivid and prime, you will leave me behind…” On the other, it’s an essential, early track in establishing the Smiths aesthetic, a real, kitchen-sink world of angst played out in dingy rooms on high-rise estates and by disused railway lines (a bizarre recurring feature in early Smiths songs, with the similar settings of Still Ill and I Wan’t The One I Can’t Have). The fact that Moz plays one of his usual tricks in keeping the song gender neutral (I.e. not from an explicitly, stated male or female viewpoint) only increases it’s relatable status, as does Marr’s backing. Oddly, this being the first Smiths song on the list, musically it’s not one of Marr’s most accomplished, remarkable tunes, but it’s still a clanging, evocative, gritty slice of music, unlike anyone else’s I can think of, and with the trademark Morrissey-Marr melancholia. The inversion of the famous theme to The Sound Of Music (“the hills are alive with celibate cries”) is absolute witty genius. An essential response to boringly sexual entertainment, and a song I hold incredibly close to my heart.

See it here: Germany moves to the sound of live Smiths: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ts1AuzDujjI

20) These Days- Nico

The gorgeous stand-out from Chelsea Girl (apart from the title track, in plural) is this Jackson Browne-penned masterpiece seems to sum up Nico, even if she didn’t write it herself. A deeply sad song, with it’s sadness as tender as it could be, it tells of Nico’s giving up on everything and everyone. This is the pure sound of musical consolation, of waiting, of surrendering, of regret. The more I listen, the more perfect it gets.

See it here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J1N8GtDkYfQ


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Post #: 15
RE: JBG's Top 50 Songs: 50-20 now up - 28/3/2010 2:13:54 PM   
Piles


Posts: 5545
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From: Whalley Range
Great list so far. Surprising how little Smiths has shown up. I am hoping that Still Ill will be your number one.

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Post #: 16
RE: JBG's Top 50 Songs: 50-20 now up - 28/3/2010 2:36:14 PM   
jamesbondguy


Posts: 6238
Joined: 6/1/2007
From: The Village Green

quote:

ORIGINAL: Piles

Great list so far. Surprising how little Smiths has shown up. I am hoping that Still Ill will be your number one.


Just wait till the top ten...

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Post #: 17
RE: JBG's Top 50 Songs: 50-20 now up - 28/3/2010 4:23:53 PM   
Piles


Posts: 5545
Joined: 6/8/2007
From: Whalley Range
quote:

Smiths aesthetic, a real, kitchen-sink world of angst played out in dingy rooms on high-rise estates and by disused railway lines (a bizarre recurring feature in early Smiths songs, with
quote:

ORIGINAL: jamesbondguy


quote:

ORIGINAL: Piles

Great list so far. Surprising how little Smiths has shown up. I am hoping that Still Ill will be your number one.


Just wait till the top ten...


Come on, we both know you'll never get there .


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Post #: 18
RE: JBG's Top 50 Songs: 50-30 now up - 28/3/2010 4:51:33 PM   
jamesbondguy


Posts: 6238
Joined: 6/1/2007
From: The Village Green
I just finished writing number five. I really had nothing to do this weekend, as you can tell.

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Post #: 19
RE: JBG's Top 50 Songs: 50-30 now up - 28/3/2010 11:07:13 PM   
jamesbondguy


Posts: 6238
Joined: 6/1/2007
From: The Village Green
19) Shoplifting- The Slits

I almost went for Typical Girls, but I plumped for Shoplifting purely because I have to listen to it ten times or so every time I reach it on the punk/post-punk/reggae-punk masterpiece Cut.
Not the deepest song on the album by any means, but this one seems to sum-up the aggression, wit and apathetic strength of the riot-grrrl influencing Slits, one of the few female-dominated (or, in this case, wholly female) and truly feminist groups to emerge out of the mostly macho British punk scene of the 70’s. Based on the band’s experience’s when they all living below the poverty-line, it’s possibly pop music’s most exciting condoning of petty thieving, with Ari Up’s indefinable drawl and screams set against a rattling, bouncing musical back-drop.

See it here: The reformed Slits blast it out: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5x78FDlEcts

18) Rock’n’Roll Suicide- David Bowie

The finest song of Bowie’s career (and that’s saying something) comes at the end of Ziggy Stardust and The Spiders From Mars, a natural conclusion which takes every inch of power and drama already featured in the album and kicks it into the stratosphere. Bowie is know for his lyrical and, sometimes, otherworldly detachment, but here he appeals directly to the audience in his most heartbreaking and Godly vocal performance, ending the story of the Rock’n’roll suicide’s ‘final day’ with the as-impassioned-as-it-possibly-could-be cry of “No love, you’re not alone!”, before urging obviously us to reach for his hands… after all, those knives that lacerate our brains? He’s had his share, and he’ll help us with the pain. I almost included Velvet Goldmine here, but this song is undoubtedly one of British music’s greatest achievements.

See it here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9jg4ekLG9Zo

17) Just Lust- Buzzcocks

The second anti-sex song, of sorts, on the list is Pete Shelley’s frantic (and also gender-neutral) rebuff of multiple sexual advances by his partner, shot through with typical Buzzcockian disembowelling wit (if this song contained the lines “all this slurping and sucking/it’s putting me off my food!” from You Tear Me Up, it would be perfect). A hilarious inversion of pop’s usual lyrical ground (“you‘re telling me lies, when you say that it‘s a must”), it’s sly philosophical musings come like atom bombs- “if passion is a fashion, then emotions are a curse…” All of it’s backed by the incredibly exciting sugar-rush of music that continues to make the Buzzcocks a desperately exciting original scene punk band, whereas the McLaren gang and the Joe Strummer combo have long since passed into dusty, museum history.

See it here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UTiQtJpNf44

16) Consolation Prize- Orange Juice

The most obviously Richman-inspired track from Orange Juice, this is the band at their lovelorn, camp-y best, with Collins’ desperate pleas to be a rebound lover (including attempts to impress with a Roger McGuinn-style haircut (http://waynenet.files.wordpress.com/2008/06/byrds65.jpg)
which is deemed “so frightfully camp it made you laugh”, and offers to buy a dress), ending in sly cries of “I’ll never be man enough for you!” While Orange Juice are often credited as being an essential part of the creation of the indie pop genre, they remain far more coy, intelligent and honest group of young men than most of those that followed.

See it here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LyG7VzPY_hI

15) ESP- Buzzcocks

Yay, more from the Buzzcocks. Here Steve Diggle and Pete Shelley obviously found the glorious metallic rif that underpins the song so incredibly addictive that’s it’s strung-out for a beautiful, doom-y four-minutes-fifty of locked-in-my-room lonely desperation. Shelley here takes the final attempt at reaching someone, asking “do you believe in ESP?”, before urging the listener/target to “think!” And to think there are many terribly boring people who think that music peaked in 1967 or so. The power of alternative music summed-up in one foul, rank, rotten burst of genius.

See it here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UAAppaQGZf0&feature=related

14) Nostalgia- Buzzcocks

The final song on the list from those punk layabouts, Nostalgia is possibly their most relentlessly intelligent track lyrically, a beautiful, idiosyncratic summing up of transcendental longing and boredom. Convinced that good things must be coming, Shelley rides on the wave of “nostalgia for an age yet to come.” His yearning is scored by a burst of fast-giving-up-hope musical energy. Perfect, and arguably the poetic height of the original punk movement.

See it here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZkF50iY2nDs

13) Kicker Conspiracy- The Fall

Everything brilliant about The Fall, from the rattling stomp of their music to the sublime mix of vitriol and humour that is Smith’s lyrics, is summed up in this classic single about football. As I said about a previous Fall song, I could listen to this forever. An post-punk kick-up-the-arse, tackling the subject with that perfect mixture of intellectual bitterness and darkly playful, amusing social commentary and humour. You might not expect it, but Smith will always be the ally of every frustrated, bored, intelligent and angry young man. Sick of the dull, foolish people who surround you? Guess what- Mark is too! Just don’t expect to be able to cry on his shoulder.

See it here: Ignore Mark E Smith’s hair at it’s very worst and you’ll get an amusing video with the band invading a grimy football stadium (and looking every inch the nonchalant gang), with MES spitting out the lyrics as you always knew he would: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JjyQkt04Urc

12) After Hours- The Velvet Underground

Lou Reed deemed this song “too innocent” for him to sing, and passed his lyrics, instead, over to the band’s groundbreaking drummer, and all-round hero, Maureen Tucker. Her fragile, almost child-ish vocals invest the song with a freshness that is completely beguiling, and completely relatable. Although it’s influence on hundreds of twee bands to come is undeniable, Reed’s lyrics are so strong, so subtly reminiscent of struggle, pain and bad-times-ahead-and-behind that it outclasses it’s many admirers lesser efforts. The sound of someone trying to hold on to a tiny shred of hope, it’s utterly heartbreaking.

See it here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zRdyDSbWg7w

11) Heroin- The Velvet Underground

The finest Velvet Underground recording, and the one that somehow defines them, combining Reed’s literate, dark lyrics with a doomy, repetitive one-drum beat from Maureen Tucker and bursts/a long stream of feedback and improvisatory guitar juxtaposed with a deceptively gentle opening and simple vocal melody. In short, it sounds revolutionary, transcendental, vicious and beyond the limits of what’s usually considered popular music. Reed’s tale is a sad one, detailing the plight of junkie who’s addiction helps him shut out the misery and violence of the world, and the lyrics cut deeper than anything else on their debut album. A night-time song, it’s frustration and tragedy make it bizarrely relatable even outside of it’s specific drug-focus. An incredible, remarkable work, it boots himself, from the first note onwards, into the realm of high art. This isn’t just music, this is everything.

See it here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6xcwt9mSbYE

10) Falling And Laughing- Orange Juice

Considered to be among the very first “indie pop” singles, it’s also, along with The Smiths’ This Charming Man, one of the very best, applying the foundations of scratchy-white-boy-funk-given-an-alternative-music-make-over and stories of romantic dysfunction that the genre would return to again and again. This, however, perfects the formula almost straight away, with Collins’ bookish loner drawling his sentiments against a musical backdrop which already holds the future in it (from Johnny Marr to Orange Juice-wannabes Franz Ferdinand), before concluding in his delirious sobs that he’s “falling and laughing”. Music rarely seems as exciting, or as open.

See it here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pq8QsM7WaGw

9) This Is Our Lot- Wild Beasts

The best song so far by the best modern British indie band, the group who are defining the sound of modern England in the same way The Kinks and The Smiths did before them. This Is Our Lot is a deeply poetic account of “quiffed and cropped” lovers holding each other “all heavy with hops” while contemplating what precisely their lot in life is. Another song that fits quite neatly into this list’s seemingly set groove of kitchen-sink realist poetry and drama, this could be an effective companion piece to what will be in the number one place. A startling intro allows for the song’s “desolate, rainy, grey street under a starry sky” feel to set in almost immediately, infusing the whole song with a feel of oncoming doom, of tears and sorrow just waiting to pounce on the temporary, disillusioned romanticism. A number 1 single in any sane universe but, as Lou Reed would surely agree, this is no sane universe.

See it here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y5-fU9fYCIo (No, the guy at the front is not in the band)

8) The Last Of The Famous International Playboys- Morrissey

“Reggie Kray, do you know my name?” Well, evidently he, and Ronnie, did. Well, obviously they did, for Ronnie, in his book, praised the tune and criticised the lyrics for being “lacking.” With all respect, Mr Kray, you’re a bit wrong there. One of the best of Moz’s solo songs is this Fall-lite stomp, with Moz, genius that he is, turning out a set of lyrics based around a young lad who commits rather pathetic crimes in order to make himself more attractive, seduced by the news world that hands stardom to criminals. With it’s Kray-baiting refrain (with a typically Moz sly reference to Ronnie’s homosexuality), it’s also damn catchy, a truly electric song which bounds with boover-booted energy and that sublime Moz mix of pathos, humour, sadness and social criticism, emerging as arguably his finest song on the criminal and human underworld that so fascinates him. A heaven-send, unlike anything else and anyone else.

See it here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bk1wUKoXL20

7) Rusholme Ruffians- The Smiths

That brilliant combo of Morrissey, Marr, Rourke and Joyce are back, and this time, they’ve gone 50’s rock’n’roll. The second track on Meat Is Murder (The Headmaster Ritual was one of the songs sacrificed for the “6 songs per artist” ruling) continues the violent childhood reminisces, with Moz recalling the deadly Mancunian fairs of his youth (where, he says, he was once head butted by a random stranger while waiting in line), with just a dash of Albert Finney coming into contact with Ms Roberts and a couple of squaddies in a Nottingham fair in Saturday Night And Sunday Morning. Thus, we have a portrait of stabbings, thieving, greased-up, quiffed fair workers who become temporary objects of affection, refused engagement rings, flashing, fights, the scratching of names on arms with fountain pens to confirm love, contemplated suicide from rejected girls, and a deep desire for human affection from Moz, the eternal observer of life’s parties and miseries. Johnny Marr recycles that sparkling riff from Marie’s The Name, giving it a contemporary, exciting spin (this song could explain why I, and many others, adore him), and Andy Rourke throws out possibly his finest, most electrifying bass-line. And the chemistry is unstoppable. Watch out, The Smiths are coming.

See it here: A brilliant, energetic live version: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RIaURk_UKCs

6) I Want The One I Can’t Have- The Smiths

Fittingly, the second song on Meat Is Murder is followed by the third song from Meat Is Murder, The Smiths’ absolutely, terrifyingly superb summing up of desire, danger and squashed ambition. A far more ambiguous song than one would first expect, it’s gender-neutrality allows for both an equally strong heterosexual and homosexual reading (personally, I prefer the latter). Along the way, Morrissey describes what he sees as the riches of the poor- “a double bed and a stalwart lover for sure”- which he explained as being about the importance of the wedding in the working-class Manchester world he grew up in, and imagery which echoes moments from many of his favourite kitchen-sink films (The Leather Boys, most explicitly), and describes a run in with a tough boy, raised on prisoner’s aid, who’s already killed a policeman in his early adolescence. The song ends with a return to the alley by the disused railway line of These Things Take Time, with a desperate plea for “self-validation”. Marr’s music is absolutely perfect, capturing the feel of a desperate, rainy day in a grim town so strongly you can almost taste it, smell it and see it (if you can’t already). Were their two artists who were ever made for each other in quite the same way?

See it here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pIPb83MhiLo

5) Late Night, Maudlin Street- Morrissey

An stunning Morrissey epic, this is perhaps the song that most sums up his world view, and the territory which he lives in and which he writes about. Running to over six minutes, just after the end of The Smiths, Morrissey sings a deeply nostalgiac elegy to his old abode, Maudlin Street, and an unrequited love on the day he’s about to leave. Full of sadness, the house where he “never spent a happy hour” is a trigger for memories of strong emotions and situations played out against the backdrop of a humdrum town, finally letting go of it’s tight trap. “I am moving house… a half-life disappears today”… But it’s not without it’s humour, with Morrissey talking of the nation turning it’s back and gagging whenever he takes off his clothes, and his run-ins with the old hags who can’t wait to see him go, despite their polite waving hands. A deeply moving epic, I can barely listen to it without surrendering, and I’ve been known to well up while it plays out, as well (how embarrassing). One of his most relatable works, if it really did take the severance of his partnership with Johnny Marr to prompt him to write such a tragically nostalgic song, it seems there was a silver lining after all.

See it here: A lyrically cut-down version, this recent live performance can’t begin to capture the majesty and vocal brilliance of the version on Viva Hate, but it’s a decent enough sign of how moving the song is in it’s original incarnation:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xIP7XGiDgkk

4) Dead End Street- The Kinks

The final song from The Kinks on this list is the one that confirms, completely and ultimately, that Ray Davies was leagues ahead of any of his 60’s British contemporaries. As I have already pointed out, much of this list revolves around kitchen-sink realist songs and lyrics, and Dead End Street is the most explicit, the most direct of this genre. A stunning look at continuing poverty after the end of the post-war consensus, Davies, who had financial difficulties himself throughout this time, takes the role of an unhappily unemployed, frustrated newlywed, finally realising that he is stuck on Dead End Street. “There’s a crack up in the ceiling, and the kitchen sink is leaking, out of work and got no money…” “What are we living for? A two-roomed apartment on the second-floor… the rent-collector’s knocking trying to get in…” “Gonna die on Dead End street…” “On a cold and frosty morning/wipe my eyes and stop me yawning/and my feet are nearly frozen/boil some tea and put some toast on”, “no chance to emigrate/I’m deep in debt and now it’s too much”, “we both want to work so hard/ but we can’t get the chance…” The song is full of classic lines of frustration, anger and melancholic resignation, an almost-anthem for the Angry Young Man movement. Oddly enough, the song ends in a vaudeville, music-hall chorus call, of sorts, which only seems to introduce a new layer of irony to the song. An utter masterpiece, and a sign that, outside of the vapid swinging sixties scene, when most lyricists were writing either utter shit or utter shit about the psychedelic drug trips of spoilt middle-class bores, there were people willing to write about the struggles of ordinary people.

See it here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yK8Bk__ENKU
Or you can see the video (which was banned by the BBC for being too morbid) here. Be aware, though, that the sound is a bit flat: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vuhVccHBGaE&feature=related

3) I Know It’s Over- The Smiths

In many ways the most overwhelmingly poetic song Morrissey wrote in The Smiths, Johnny Marr has referred to it as a “DIY, post-punk torch song.” Not a bad description for this epic, first-person investigation into solitariness, sullenness and loneliness that outclasses How Soon Is Now spectacularly and easily. Beginning with “Mother, I can feel the soil falling over my head”, Morrissey spins a tale of empty beds, sad brides, loutish lovers etc. before launching into the epic, interrogative mid-section, which was thrown as much at the audience as it is Morrissey himself. “If you’re so clever, then why are you on your own tonight?” poses the old object of Moz’s unrequited affections, before launching into multiple takes on the same questioning… good-looking, entertaining, etc etc. By the end, despite Morrissey’s repeated cries about the soil falling over his head, he has accepted that “love is natural and real… but not for such as you and I”, a conclusion that is both hopeless and, bizarrely, contentedly resigned. An absolute masterpiece, it’s an essential track in establishing Morrissey and Marr’s unique brand of melancholia. Even without the social criticism, implied or explicit, of much Smiths material (well, apart from the brief swipes at those pesky loutish lovers), it’s a song which knocks anyone with a brain out upon instantly hearing it. Soaring, majestic, and ultimately clanking with the chains of desperation, both lyrically and musically, Morrissey, Marr, Rourke and Joyce rarely did a better track, throwing at us arguably the most profound emotional moment in modern music.

See it here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k2e4V3Xh17w
Or a stunning live version here (it’s slightly cut down lyrically, but Moz excels himself vocally and passionately): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yz5JtWNwJ-k

2) Stretch Out And Wait- The Smiths

In the 1980’s Morrissey was celibate. How, then, did he write one of the greatest songs ever about sex? Missing much of the negativity of These Things Take Time and Miserable Lie, Stretch Out And Wait takes a different approach. Full of typical Moz-Marr melancholia, but with a good dash of enchantment and optimism, it places it’s story of sexual awakening against the backdrop of a “high-rise estate” and “amid concrete and clay and general decay”, with the protagonist letting their puny body lie down, conducting the way with their cold hands (it’s the Eskimo blood in the veins) and launching into a burst of existential angst among the most moving passages in Morrissey’s work- “Will the world end in the night time?” “I really don’t know.” “Will the world end in the day time?” “I really don’t know” “And is there any point ever having children?” “Oh, I don’t know”- before ending with an echoing guitar-strumming epilogue from Marr (yes, the version from The World Won’t Listen is far superior). A tender, realistic and gentle work of living just outside of society and it’s rules and regulations, it, does, however, still pose the idea that sex is nothing more than a way to let yourself lose yourself. Ah well, with songs as open and as passionate as this, who cares?

See it here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SGcKPWOo9nk

1) Still Ill- The Smiths

A seeming constant ever since I first got into The Smiths, this song has slowly morphed itself into something approaching the story of my life- or, at least, it feels that way. Beginning by stating that “life is simply taking and not giving/England is mine and it owes me a living!”, Morrissey launches into a classic song which could define him lyrically- there’s romantic disillusionment, a bleak portrait of England, a kitchen-sink setting (I love the “under the iron bridge” refrain especially), a writing off of the usefulness of employment, and the early Smiths-theme of a sort of constant, ambiguous weakness/illness. Not to mention a small slice of wit (the sore lips line always makes me smile). Lyrically, it’s one of Morrissey’s finest early Smiths roars of working-class disillusionment. Marr’s composition starts off with a clanking, scratching piece of guitar, before launching, sublimely, into a melodic masterpiece, underpinned by the superb work of Rourke and Joyce. Nothing is out of place, nothing could be improved. A song that will remain incredibly important for me for just about forever.

See it here: Some typically fine dancing from Moz in this live version: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XyIH9AV3KwQ

The songs I most regret leaving out: The Headmaster Ritual, Half A Person, Cemetry Gates, There Is A Light That Never Goes Out, Frankly Mr Shankly, Nowhere Fast, Well I Wonder, Bigmouth Strikes Again, Reel Around The Fountain, Sweet And Tender Hooligan, Miserable Lie, Asleep, Girl Afraid among many others by The Smiths


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Post #: 20
RE: JBG's Top 50 Songs: 50-30 now up - 29/3/2010 12:08:34 AM   
paul_ie86


Posts: 11422
Joined: 4/1/2007
From: Chelsea Hotel #2
You finished a list. My world is turned upside down.

I have not heard most of your list, should get on that

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Post #: 21
RE: JBG's Top 50 Songs: 50-30 now up - 29/3/2010 1:05:28 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
Congrats on finishing. I'm shocked.

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Post #: 22
RE: JBG's Top 50 Songs: 50-30 now up - 29/3/2010 1:29:00 AM   
FritzlFan


Posts: 4793
Joined: 19/11/2008
From: Bristol
Well done. Well done.

Some pretty good choices, too - if incredibly predictable. (Much more so than mine, which is comforting.)


Also, you can do the blurbs for your top 2 Smiths albums (their self-titled album is available, too) for the albums thread if you like - they both finished pretty highly.

< Message edited by FritzlFan -- 29/3/2010 1:22:26 PM >


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Post #: 23
RE: JBG's Top 50 Songs: 50-30 now up - 29/3/2010 3:21:12 PM   
Olaf


Posts: 23695
Joined: 26/2/2007
From: 41°N 93°W
Nice list. I like The Smiths, The Kinks and VU, so that's at least 70% of the list right away  very strong selections all round really, good work. And the choice of Late Night Maudlin Street as the top solo Moz track is inspired, such a brilliant underrated song.

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Post #: 24
RE: JBG's Top 50 Songs: 50-30 now up - 29/3/2010 4:29:33 PM   
jamesbondguy


Posts: 6238
Joined: 6/1/2007
From: The Village Green

quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan

Also, you can do the blurbs for your top 2 Smiths albums (their self-titled album is available, too) for the albums thread if you like - they both finished pretty highly.


I'll definitely do Meat Is Murder and TQID, and I'll leave the other open in case anyone else wants to take it (not being greedy, you see). If no-one else takes it, though, I'd be happy to do that one as well.

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Post #: 25
RE: JBG's Top 50 Songs: 50-30 now up - 29/3/2010 8:10:03 PM   
Piles


Posts: 5545
Joined: 6/8/2007
From: Whalley Range
Still Ill, yay! Not a single Dylan song, though? You dickhead!

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Top 100 Moz Songs / Top 100 Films

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Post #: 26
RE: JBG's Top 50 Songs: 50-30 now up - 29/3/2010 8:14:25 PM   
Piles


Posts: 5545
Joined: 6/8/2007
From: Whalley Range
quote:

ORIGINAL: jamesbondguy


quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan

Also, you can do the blurbs for your top 2 Smiths albums (their self-titled album is available, too) for the albums thread if you like - they both finished pretty highly.


I'll definitely do Meat Is Murder and TQID, and I'll leave the other open in case anyone else wants to take it (not being greedy, you see). If no-one else takes it, though, I'd be happy to do that one as well.


Can I do Meat is Murder and you do the other two? x.


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Post #: 27
RE: JBG's Top 50 Songs: 50-30 now up - 30/3/2010 1:46:44 PM   
Deviation


Posts: 27284
Joined: 2/6/2006
From: Enemies of Film HQ
Jesus Christ JayB completed a list. 

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quote:


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I really wish I could go down to see Privates

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Post #: 28
RE: JBG's Top 50 Songs: 50-30 now up - 30/3/2010 6:27:19 PM   
jamesbondguy


Posts: 6238
Joined: 6/1/2007
From: The Village Green

quote:

ORIGINAL: Piles

quote:

ORIGINAL: jamesbondguy


quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan

Also, you can do the blurbs for your top 2 Smiths albums (their self-titled album is available, too) for the albums thread if you like - they both finished pretty highly.


I'll definitely do Meat Is Murder and TQID, and I'll leave the other open in case anyone else wants to take it (not being greedy, you see). If no-one else takes it, though, I'd be happy to do that one as well.


Can I do Meat is Murder and you do the other two? x.



OK.

_____________________________

Just like Geoffrey Ingram.

(in reply to Piles)
Post #: 29
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