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RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/2/2010 3:13:01 AM   
Miles Messervy 007


Posts: 6884
Joined: 11/2/2009

quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

quote:

ORIGINAL: Miles Messervy 007


quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

quote:

ORIGINAL: Miles Messervy 007

Well, I mean an opinion on art.


An opinion on art can still be wrong. If your opinion is "I found Amelie depressing" then of course that can't be wrong because you're talking about subjective feelings. But if your opinion is "I think Reservoir Dogs is a metaphor for the Holocaust", or "Avatar must be good because it made so much money" or "Million Dollar Baby won the Oscar so that must mean it's good", then it's wrong.
Yeah, but I didn't say anything of the latter kind


But I didn't say you did. I just disagreed when you said an opinion can't be wrong.
Yada yada yada Are there any Keaton features you prefer to The General, rawls?

_____________________________

quote:

jamesbondguy:
Miles is clearly the finest film theorist of his generation

quote:

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Post #: 2221
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/2/2010 4:49:38 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 78115
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo

quote:

ORIGINAL: jamesbondguy


quote:

ORIGINAL: Miles Messervy 007

is an unequivocally depressing experience.



This isn't the first time you've used 'depressing' as a reason to criticise something (coughGermanyYearZerocoughwhatwereyouexpectingcough) and I've gotta ask 'why?' Unless life has suddenly become a barrel of laughs for everyone on the planet in the last few minutes then art surely has the right, or even the duty, to occasionally be a bit grim/upsetting/melancholy/whatever?



I think the fact that life most definitely isn't a barrel of laughs is quite a good arguement for not wanting to see depressing stuff on films. If I want a reminder that the world's a wretched cesspool of disaster, depravity, disease, despair and degradation and, if you're lucky, once in a blue moon something vaguely decent will happen that will make you forget for a few minutes how terribly awful life is, then I'll just pick up a paper. For the opposite, I'll watch Monsters Inc


_____________________________

So, sir, we let him have it right up! And I have to report, sir, he did not like it, sir.

Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

(in reply to jamesbondguy)
Post #: 2222
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/2/2010 5:16:02 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.

50. Pontypool (2008; Bruce McDonald)

Spoilers

An impressive low budget zombie film set in a radio station in a small Canadian town. Reports begin to filter in of riots and a little ultraviolence. They soon discover that the zombie virus is spreading through the spoken word. It's been done before as a radio play, The Peoria Plague, a legendary early 70s American radio play that of course took its inspiration from War of the Worlds and came from the perspective of a radio station trying to keep broadcasting through a zombie attack. The language twist is nice, the political implications of people being driven wild by language is a little too obvious and I think it hurts the film slightly. Stephen McHattie plays the shock jock trying to keep the broadcast going and it's a strong performance, powering the film and helping ensure it never feels too stagy (even though so much of it feels like it could easily have been adapted from a play). An entertainingly odd little film that hopefully will get a bit more attention than it has so far.

9/10

(in reply to GoodBadGroovy)
Post #: 2223
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/2/2010 5:17:05 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
quote:

ORIGINAL: Gimli The Dwarf


quote:

ORIGINAL: jamesbondguy


quote:

ORIGINAL: Miles Messervy 007

is an unequivocally depressing experience.



This isn't the first time you've used 'depressing' as a reason to criticise something (coughGermanyYearZerocoughwhatwereyouexpectingcough) and I've gotta ask 'why?' Unless life has suddenly become a barrel of laughs for everyone on the planet in the last few minutes then art surely has the right, or even the duty, to occasionally be a bit grim/upsetting/melancholy/whatever?



I think the fact that life most definitely isn't a barrel of laughs is quite a good arguement for not wanting to see depressing stuff on films. If I want a reminder that the world's a wretched cesspool of disaster, depravity, disease, despair and degradation and, if you're lucky, once in a blue moon something vaguely decent will happen that will make you forget for a few minutes how terribly awful life is, then I'll just pick up a paper. For the opposite, I'll watch Monsters Inc



Would you feel the same about other artforms?

(in reply to Gimli The Dwarf)
Post #: 2224
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/2/2010 6:30:40 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
Shorts
 
36. Inspirace (1949; Karel Zeman)
 
Spoilers
 
An extraordinarily beautiful piece of animation. Inspirace is a love story that plays out inside a drop of water during a storm. A glassblower is watching a rainstorm and sees a drop of water hanging on a leaf. He imagines a world within the bubble, a ballerina dances along a frozen lake and finds herself joined by a seed that transforms into a Pierot-esque dancer. They dance together but are parted by the ice. Rather amazingly, the animation was created by Zeman constantly reheating and repositioning fragile blown-glass figures. I think this is one of the most impressive animated shorts ever created.
 
10/10

(in reply to GoodBadGroovy)
Post #: 2225
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/2/2010 6:38:52 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 78115
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo
quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

Would you feel the same about other artforms?


Well, I wasn't being entirely serious, but I'd say no. For me at least, I get wrapped up and involved in a film more than anything else, a depressing song or book won't bother me in the same way as a film, in the same way that if I'm after escapism then a film will always be more effective.




< Message edited by Gimli The Dwarf -- 7/2/2010 6:42:59 AM >


_____________________________

So, sir, we let him have it right up! And I have to report, sir, he did not like it, sir.

Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

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Post #: 2226
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/2/2010 6:46:18 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
quote:

ORIGINAL: Gimli The Dwarf

quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

Would you feel the same about other artforms?


Well, I wasn't being entirely serious, but I'd say no. For me at least, I get wrapped up and involved in a film more than anything else, a depressing song or book won't bother me in the same way as a film, in the same way that if I'm after escapism then a film will always be more effective.





Does it bother you in the same way if it's a t.v. show? Because some stuff I know you love, like BSG for example, I found incredibly depressing at times.

(in reply to Gimli The Dwarf)
Post #: 2227
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/2/2010 6:56:44 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 78115
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo
29. The Reckless Moment (1st view, 1949, by Max Ophüls) - 4/5*
Film noir starring James Mason as a man who tries to blackmail Joan Bennett after she disposes of a body, mistakenly believing the man was killed by her daughter. Very enjoyable.

31. Carmen Jones (1st view, 1954, Otto Preminger) - 4/5*
Musical film based in the Broadway play which was in turn based on the short story from the 1840s and the 1870s opera by Bizet. Phew! The operatic nature of the music doesn't always seem to the suit the film, and the dubbed singing voices for the leads is obvious, but there's some fine performances and great songs.



_____________________________

So, sir, we let him have it right up! And I have to report, sir, he did not like it, sir.

Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 2228
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/2/2010 7:01:37 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 78115
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo
quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

Does it bother you in the same way if it's a t.v. show? Because some stuff I know you love, like BSG for example, I found incredibly depressing at times.



BSG had a lot more to offer than just doom and gloom though, and when it was bad, it was empathy with the characters and a desire to see them pull through that made it special. That's the key, some kind of emotional connection, and BSG has it in spades. I think it's when it's just depressing for the sake of it that it bothers me. Who willingly wants to be depressed and little else?


< Message edited by Gimli The Dwarf -- 7/2/2010 7:02:39 AM >


_____________________________

So, sir, we let him have it right up! And I have to report, sir, he did not like it, sir.

Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

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Post #: 2229
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/2/2010 7:07:32 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
quote:

ORIGINAL: Gimli The Dwarf

29. The Reckless Moment (1st view, 1949, by Max Ophüls) - 4/5*
Film noir starring James Mason as a man who tries to blackmail Joan Bennett after she disposes of a body, mistakenly believing the man was killed by her daughter. Very enjoyable.

31. Carmen Jones (1st view, 1954, Otto Preminger) - 4/5*
Musical film based in the Broadway play which was in turn based on the short story from the 1840s and the 1870s opera by Bizet. Phew! The operatic nature of the music doesn't always seem to the suit the film, and the dubbed singing voices for the leads is obvious, but there's some fine performances and great songs.




Great films both. Did you ever see the remake of The Reckless Moment with Kovac in the James Mason role?

quote:

BSG had a lot more to offer than just doom and gloom though, and when it was bad, it was empathy with the characters and a desire to see them pull through that made it special. That's the key, some kind of emotional connection, and BSG has it in spades. I think it's when it's just depressing for the sake of it that it bothers me. Who willingly wants to be depressed and little else?


I can see that, I think it depends on what you view as depressing though. I think a film can wallow in negative feelings and if the artistry is strong enough there's always something else to take away from it, even when it's gut-wrenchingly dark stuff like In a Glass Cage. I tend to get more depressed by stuff like Precious, which is not only depressing, but it also has no talent behind the acting, writing or directing to pull it through.

(in reply to Gimli The Dwarf)
Post #: 2230
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/2/2010 7:23:42 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 78115
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo

quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson


Great films both. Did you ever see the remake of The Reckless Moment with Kovac in the James Mason role?



Called The Deep End, wasn't it? Yep, saw it a while back and thought it was very good. That may have been the ER connection though



quote:


I can see that, I think it depends on what you view as depressing though. I think a film can wallow in negative feelings and if the artistry is strong enough there's always something else to take away from it, even when it's gut-wrenchingly dark stuff like In a Glass Cage. I tend to get more depressed by stuff like Precious, which is not only depressing, but it also has no talent behind the acting, writing or directing to pull it through.


I probably agree with all of that. The film that started this off, Persona, I don't find particularly depressing but it was fascinating enough that I probably wouldn't have minded even if it did. Recently, Martyrs was one that just went too far.

_____________________________

So, sir, we let him have it right up! And I have to report, sir, he did not like it, sir.

Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 2231
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/2/2010 10:07:56 AM   
elab49


Posts: 54673
Joined: 1/10/2005
quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson


50. Pontypool (2008; Bruce McDonald)

Spoilers

An impressive low budget zombie film set in a radio station in a small Canadian town. Reports begin to filter in of riots and a little ultraviolence. They soon discover that the zombie virus is spreading through the spoken word. It's been done before as a radio play, The Peoria Plague, a legendary early 70s American radio play that of course took its inspiration from War of the Worlds and came from the perspective of a radio station trying to keep broadcasting through a zombie attack. The language twist is nice, the political implications of people being driven wild by language is a little too obvious and I think it hurts the film slightly. Stephen McHattie plays the shock jock trying to keep the broadcast going and it's a strong performance, powering the film and helping ensure it never feels too stagy (even though so much of it feels like it could easily have been adapted from a play). An entertainingly odd little film that hopefully will get a bit more attention than it has so far.

9/10



UNfortunately Tesco have bumped up the price on this again - although, in compensation, it's Thirst they have at the £7 mark this week

I sat through a good chunk of the film thinking 'this'd make a fantastic radio play' - not just for the obvious War of the Worlds connection, so I'm not surprised to hear that it kind of has.

What did you make of the final sequence? I reposted my review in the Weird and Strange thread because some of the posters had seen it and I wondered if I'd picked up a couple of things oddly - like the possible implication of 'when' he began talking gibberish if the military voice at the end was right. And curing a plague transmitted apparently with words of affection with one of those words when kiss nixed kill.

Still very vividly in my head this film.

_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 2232
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/2/2010 10:41:28 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
Pontypool spoilers


Yeah, it's an interesting one, isn't it? It's certainly a possibility that we're supposed to see it as the viewer becoming infected when we're told he's talking gibberish. Have you tried rewatching it to try and pinpoint any possible crossover where we might have been infected? I'm thinking of giving it a try tonight now.  It'll either be that or starting series 3 of Primeval. Although I can't imagine a better moment in series 3 than Lester vs the beastie in series 2.

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Post #: 2233
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/2/2010 10:50:45 AM   
Dantes Inferno


Posts: 5887
Joined: 27/10/2007
From: Norway
8. Coffee and Cigarettes (2003, Jarmusch) - 8/10*
My Jim Jarmusch journey started with the atrocious excuse of a film best known as Dead Man (which sits uncomfortably somewhere in my Top 10 Most Hated Movies of All Time), continued with Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai (easily the coolest film I have ever seen), and now has come to the train station named Coffee and Cigarettes, home of many residents (many of them famous, some less).

The film consists of a series of vignettes with the red thread being pretty much what you guess the red thread is: coffee and cigarettes. People talk, smoke and drink, then talk, smoke and drink some more. That’s the rhythm of the movie. Sometimes it hits the beat, as with the segments starring Steven Wright and Roberto Benigni, the one with Alfred Molina and Steve Coogan (the movie’s best), and in particular the one with GZA, RZA and Bill Murray, which is dead funny (to see the rappers toast to GZA’s “Liquid Swords” nearly gave me a hard-on).

Overall, it is a cool movie, both in its tone and its presentation, and although most of the segments are better off alone (it gets a bit tiring watching them all in sequence), it survives thanks to a poignant ending that ties some of the movie's smallest details together. A curious watch, but when I decide to see it again, it will be because of certain individual shorts, all of which will be watched by their own and not in company of the others.

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Post #: 2234
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/2/2010 11:13:12 AM   
elab49


Posts: 54673
Joined: 1/10/2005
quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

Pontypool spoilers


Yeah, it's an interesting one, isn't it? It's certainly a possibility that we're supposed to see it as the viewer becoming infected when we're told he's talking gibberish. Have you tried rewatching it to try and pinpoint any possible crossover where we might have been infected? I'm thinking of giving it a try tonight now.  It'll either be that or starting series 3 of Primeval. Although I can't imagine a better moment in series 3 than Lester vs the beastie in series 2.
##

Ah yes - the kids have been looking for a pet. One of my favourite bits as well

I was waiting to rewatch till 'im indoors had time as he expressed an interest (he didn't watch it with me first time round).

_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 2235
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/2/2010 1:27:21 PM   
Rhubarb


Posts: 24509
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: No Direction Home
quote:

ORIGINAL: Miles Messervy 007


quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

quote:

ORIGINAL: Miles Messervy 007

Well, I mean an opinion on art.


An opinion on art can still be wrong. If your opinion is "I found Amelie depressing" then of course that can't be wrong because you're talking about subjective feelings. But if your opinion is "I think Reservoir Dogs is a metaphor for the Holocaust", or "Avatar must be good because it made so much money" or "Million Dollar Baby won the Oscar so that must mean it's good", then it's wrong.
Yeah, but I didn't say anything of the latter kind
Anyway,
38. The General (1926, Bruckman/Keaton)
I thought the South were the baddies? 0/10




















































































4. The General (1926, Bruckman/Keaton)
Awesome. A thrilling ride from start to finish, it hasn't dated a day. Keaton's nonchalant audaciousness (see point above, he could have made it about the North, but he didn't, did he?) and a wonderfully engaging script make this a silent masterpiece. 9, but only because I've been reserving 10s for re-watches in order to have a 'real' favourites list. In reality, this isn't any worse than my top 2 in any sense. I'm going to check out more feature Keaton very soon based on this


quote:

ORIGINAL: Dantes Inferno

8. Coffee and Cigarettes (2003, Jarmusch) - 8/10*
My Jim Jarmusch journey started with the atrocious excuse of a film best known as Dead Man (which sits uncomfortably somewhere in my Top 10 Most Hated Movies of All Time), continued with Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai (easily the coolest film I have ever seen), and now has come to the train station named Coffee and Cigarettes, home of many residents (many of them famous, some less).

The film consists of a series of vignettes with the red thread being pretty much what you guess the red thread is: coffee and cigarettes. People talk, smoke and drink, then talk, smoke and drink some more. That's the rhythm of the movie. Sometimes it hits the beat, as with the segments starring Steven Wright and Roberto Benigni, the one with Alfred Molina and Steve Coogan (the movie's best), and in particular the one with GZA, RZA and Bill Murray, which is dead funny (to see the rappers toast to GZA's "Liquid Swords” nearly gave me a hard-on).

Overall, it is a cool movie, both in its tone and its presentation, and although most of the segments are better off alone (it gets a bit tiring watching them all in sequence), it survives thanks to a poignant ending that ties some of the movie's smallest details together. A curious watch, but when I decide to see it again, it will be because of certain individual shorts, all of which will be watched by their own and not in company of the others.



What a good day.

_____________________________

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WWLD?


quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan

You organisational skills sicken me, Rhubarb.



(in reply to Miles Messervy 007)
Post #: 2236
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/2/2010 1:47:33 PM   
Dantes Inferno


Posts: 5887
Joined: 27/10/2007
From: Norway
So, what should be next on my Jarmusch journey?

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Post #: 2237
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/2/2010 2:27:41 PM   
Rhubarb


Posts: 24509
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: No Direction Home
Give some of his earlier stuff a go. Down By Law has the magic of Tom Waits and Roberto Bengini trying to escape from prison, Stranger than Paradise is a masterful absurdist comedy musing on the American Dream and Night on Earth is a vigentte piece similar to C&C.

_____________________________

Team Ginge
WWLD?


quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan

You organisational skills sicken me, Rhubarb.



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Post #: 2238
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/2/2010 4:23:10 PM   
paul_ie86


Posts: 11422
Joined: 4/1/2007
From: Chelsea Hotel #2
I've yet to see any Jarmusch *sadface*

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Post #: 2239
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/2/2010 4:39:17 PM   
Miles Messervy 007


Posts: 6884
Joined: 11/2/2009
I'm yet to see any Jarmusch either, from the descriptions, Ghost Dog and Night on Earth sound best, so I'll start with those.
With Keaton, I'll probably go for Steamboat Bill next, looks great.

_____________________________

quote:

jamesbondguy:
Miles is clearly the finest film theorist of his generation

quote:

Deviation:
if it isn't ham, I'll eat a living pig.

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Post #: 2240
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/2/2010 4:44:54 PM   
Deviation


Posts: 27284
Joined: 2/6/2006
From: Enemies of Film HQ
The World's Greatest Sinner (Timothy Carey, 1962)- USA - 7/10

A messy, unpolished piece of OTT surreal genius.

Thirst (Park Chan-Wook, 2009)- USA/S.KOR - 8/10

The first hour is a mess. Too slow, put together in a rather clunky way and stuck with a build up that doesn't really know where which direction it is taking, with some great visuals, humor, wit and sequences saving the thing from being an utter mess. In the second half, the film gets its act together. It then becomes a film about lust, love, guilt and passion, as the lead vampire priest falls into a moral conundrum involving the attainment of his food. Kang-ho is excellent here, giving his priest a gentle and vulnerable presence while also giving him a menacing vampiric presence. It is a true visual experience, it is humorous, moving, terrifying and most importantly, it feels like something unique. And the OST not being nominated for the Oscars while Horner getting a nomination for his worst work further proves that the Oscars nominees are chosen by monkeys. And not the smart monkeys.

In the Loop (Armando Iannucci, 2009)- UK - 9.5/10

A satire about the fucking boring psychos and incompetents that made the latest USA fuck-up possible. Rightfully compared to the equally excellent Dr. Strangelove: or how I learned to stop worrying and love the Bomb, it is hilarious, compelling and engaging, with an ending that also succeeds in being also rather moving. One of the very best films released last decade. And Peter Capaldi deserves every award ever made.

The Princess and the Frog (Ron Clements and John Musker, 2009)- USA - 6.5/10

The first 20 minutes are somewhat spectacular, the animation, setting and characters are put together in a rather outstanding way. The rest, when the plot actually comes in is a rather episodic, clunky with music I forgot five minutes after the number happened (at least I still remember the numbers of Nine). Like the Clements and Musker's previous works (and nice unsubtle reference in the parade there ), the villain is the best thing here, and the animation is just plain outstanding. The redneck firefly and the Jazz alligator were somewhat annoying though. It's still a Disney film, updated for the modern age, but at least it is very much fun and a beauty to stare at.






_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Dpp1978
There are certainly times where calling a person a cunt is not only reasonable, it is a gross understatement.

quote:


ORIGINAL: elab49
I really wish I could go down to see Privates

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Post #: 2241
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/2/2010 5:04:04 PM   
Epiphany Demon


Posts: 6497
Joined: 14/11/2007

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation

Thirst (Park Chan-Wook, 2009)- USA/S.KOR - 8/10
In the Loop (Armando Iannucci, 2009)- UK - 9.5/10


This reminds me why I haven't killed you yet. Although Thirst could have done with being a mark higher.

Haven't seen In The Loop for a while. Might watch it tomorrow.

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Post #: 2242
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/2/2010 5:14:45 PM   
Deviation


Posts: 27284
Joined: 2/6/2006
From: Enemies of Film HQ
quote:

ORIGINAL: Epiphany Demon

This reminds me why I haven't killed you yet. Although Thirst could have done with being a mark higher.



I would have actually, if it wasn't for the first hour.


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Dpp1978
There are certainly times where calling a person a cunt is not only reasonable, it is a gross understatement.

quote:


ORIGINAL: elab49
I really wish I could go down to see Privates

(in reply to Epiphany Demon)
Post #: 2243
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/2/2010 5:51:50 PM   
paul_ie86


Posts: 11422
Joined: 4/1/2007
From: Chelsea Hotel #2
Shorts

1. Rejected (Don Hertzfeld, 2000) Watch it here now
I don't know what to say about this, except to say that it is simply amazing.

< Message edited by paul_ie86 -- 7/2/2010 5:55:32 PM >


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Post #: 2244
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/2/2010 6:02:57 PM   
Miles Messervy 007


Posts: 6884
Joined: 11/2/2009
Yes, it is

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quote:

jamesbondguy:
Miles is clearly the finest film theorist of his generation

quote:

Deviation:
if it isn't ham, I'll eat a living pig.

(in reply to paul_ie86)
Post #: 2245
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/2/2010 7:25:14 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54673
Joined: 1/10/2005
 
In the Mood for Love (Wong, 2000)

Hong Kong in the 60s. Partly because of immigration from Shanghai, living space is short. Two married couples rent rooms next door to each other, in flats lived in by the owners. They move in on the same day with their belongings being mixed up back and forth and with the owners being regular mah-jongg partners live, to an extent, in each other's pockets. Mrs Chan's husband is often abroad on business, so is Mr Chow's wife. Over time they come to realise that their spouses are having an affair and the couple get closer as they play out scenarios that might have brought their cheating partners together.

I think it is easy to see why In the Mood for Love is Wong's most successful film. You can't help but get caught up in the dance between the central couple as the waltz plays moving them together and apart again. Gorgeously shot with Maggie Cheung often shown as a still centre, surrounded by movement, austerely styled and controlled. The film makes their partners as elusive to us as they are to them – Mrs Chow only seen from the back (with the same hair down style that Miss Yu, the boss's mistress has), Mr Chan only heard. The camera often observes them at work through windows, oval or square. This pair are kept at a distance so we, like the central couple, only get a feel from them as they try and play-act a relationship (who would have made the first move, how would they make love?), realising a little too late that they may be going down the same route themselves. This is one film where you really do, I think, need to get a DVD with the deleted scenes – they are actually an extension of the story that makes us wonder how far the relationship did go. It catches up with them in later years and when they finally meet, and we get a rather important speech from Ah Ping on what love is and whether simply knowing it is enough. What these scenes show us is that the dance never stops.

The central performances from Cheung and Leung are often left unremarked beside comments on the style of the film, but watch Cheung as she tries to make excuses to keep Mrs Chow at the door or that beautifully constructed sequence in the restaurant as they admit their discoveries out loud. Both performances are understated and perfectly nuanced – two controlled people trying to deal with pain, discovery and then their own revelation.

It also reminds me in some respects of Terence Davies's work – I think mostly because of the way the film uses music, and constructs it round the domestic life. I think it is obvious how personal this is and Wong does talk elsewhere about it, suggesting that it is very autobiographical for him, remembering the Nat King Cole songs his mother listened to when he was a boy at that time. And the soundtrack is a stunner – one of the few (along with that for the sequel 2046) that I listen to regularly.

In the Mood for Love is a beautiful film – an aural and visual delight, yes, but with nuanced performances at the centre showing us restrained people dealing with both pain and possibility.


Day of the Jackal (Zinnemann, 1973)

Based on Frederick Forsyth's book, Zinnemann turns the story into a surprisingly pacy trail across Europe as Fox's Jackal uses people from place to place, picking up equipment and closing off his trail, and, separately, Michel Lonsdale leads detectives in Paris and London trying to pick it up again. One of those films that I end up watching through to the end every time it is on. Good fun. And apparently you can still pull that passport trick which I find quite scary!


Daybreakers (Spierigs, 2009) SPOILERS

The vampires have taken over – rather than the creatures of myth, a viral outbreak traced back to a bat has brought the human population to the brink of extinction while the vampires live out their 9-5, out and about in their 'normal' world.

The film has gotten some praise for the world it creates for the vampires, but I just don't get it. Apart from the clothing – this is not supposed to be the normal goth vamp stuff but the woman dress like they're in fin de siècle Vienna and the men are Nick Cave clones. The lifestyle is simply odd. They can only live a life in the dark – so why this lot are based in LA I have no idea – surely it doesn't give them many hours of night to be out and about? Isn't that just a little silly? In all that time they haven't worked out how to close things down and move their world further from the equator so they can maximise their time out in it? Wanting an element of familiarity is one thing – but to limit themselves so much just seemed kind of ill-thought it.

But what an ending, eh? First one human in a car, to what must be one of most important vamp buildings. Then just as he failed, another. Then just as he failed, hell, I was expecting Blade to turn up next. A complete mess frankly. Surely it would have been more subtle would have been somehow fixing the new stable substitute with the transformed blood?

So. Not that good and not that interesting a take on the genre. No-one really impressed in the film and Sam Neill was wasted. There wasn't much excitement and it was pretty poorly paced.


Simon Magus (Hopkins, 1999)

A dwindling village of Jews try to cling to their homes as one has an idea of bringing in a railway. And the outcast Simon flirts with Christianity as he is used by opponents of the plan in the town.

Crossing into fantasy of sorts as Noah Taylor's oddball Simon seems to interact with Ian Holm's devil, it is a fairly slight story. Rutger Hauer turns up as a squire returned from the city who fancies himself a poet and literary light, and offering land for conversation before bumping into an equally intellectual woman in the village – Hauer is pretty poor in the role, and it doesn't help. The best performances come from the townsfolk generally – Terence Rigby has a small but well-played role and Sean McGinley as the villain is very good, although his plot to use the rumours of Jews killing and eating babies doesn't really have as much bite as it should.

Overall, I don't think the story or dialogue is controlled well enough – the film feels a little flabby and people like Townsend and Davitz are wasted in poorly played romantic subplots. They might have worked on the location a bit, too – for a rural community it all just looked a little too neat and cultivated, given the community's main problem was a lack of young men.

The Happiest Days of Your Life (Launder, 1950)

First day of term at Nutbourne College is a little odd this year – thanks to a Ministry cock-up, the decidedly minor boys school is going to play host to St Swithins – a girls' school. With both sets of staff initially completely unsuspecting and then desperate to ensure none of the parents find out (or, in headmaster Pond's case, his prospective employers), a perfect farce ensues.

Happiest Days is one of the most popular British films ever made. It comes from the successful team of Launder and Gilliatt, with John Dighton (who contributed to the likes of  Went the Day Well and Kind Hearts and Coronets at Ealing) helping to transfer his play to screen (after 2 previous outings on TV). The creative team would shortly take most of the cast on to a series seen as something of a sequel from the film a couple of years later, as they returned to school with St Trinians (Searle helped produce the animation for the titles for this film as well). Apparently keeping fairly close to the play, the quality of the one-liners, visual comedy and performances have made this a perennial favourite.

Credit should be given, particularly, to Richard Wattis as the dryly cynical maths master who first introduces us to the staff and goes the extra mile in his determination to ensure Sim moves on to greater things, just for the sake of him actually moving on. Wattis was one of the best known faces in British cinema in the 50s and 60s, often playing clerks and public servants including a man from the Ministry when St Trinians trundled round.

The great joy, of course, is the pairing of two of Britain's finest actors and, arguably, its greatest comic actors – Alistair Sim as head of Nutbourne, Wetherby Pond, and Margaret Rutherford leading St Swithins into the fray. The perfect timing of both is a master class in comedy, with the clashing visits that makes up the final 20 minutes of the film providing some of their greatest work when they finally decide to collude, and you just watch Sim, so lately quoting Knox's views of the regiment of women, falling back on impeccable manners as he leads Rutherford and Grenfell to the common room and the reactions and ingenuity as the competing tours desperately try to stay apart.

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Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


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(in reply to Deviation)
Post #: 2246
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/2/2010 7:29:31 PM   
Miles Messervy 007


Posts: 6884
Joined: 11/2/2009
In The Mood For Love looks sooo brilliant. Hoping for lovefilm's cooperation there.
The Day of the Jackal is indeed great

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quote:

jamesbondguy:
Miles is clearly the finest film theorist of his generation

quote:

Deviation:
if it isn't ham, I'll eat a living pig.

(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 2247
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/2/2010 8:23:59 PM   
homersimpson_esq


Posts: 20120
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Springfield
List updated. The Princess and the Frog 4/5, and Youth in Revolt 3/5.

Might do reviews later.


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Bristol Bad Film Club
A place where movie fans can come and behold some of the most awful films ever put to celluloid.

(in reply to Miles Messervy 007)
Post #: 2248
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/2/2010 9:33:21 PM   
paul_ie86


Posts: 11422
Joined: 4/1/2007
From: Chelsea Hotel #2
9. Sideways (Alexander Payne, 2004)


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(in reply to homersimpson_esq)
Post #: 2249
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/2/2010 10:18:58 PM   
Miles Messervy 007


Posts: 6884
Joined: 11/2/2009
10. Dzhentlmeny udachi [Gentlemen of Luck] (1972, Seryj)
A Russian cult comedy of which I know half by heart but until a few hours ago hadn't actually seen. It totally lives up to the hype. I don't know whether you can find it anywhere on DVD, but it's on youtube with subtitles Not sure how much is lost in translation but it's a superb film.
9

Also watched a short which can't be rated or ranked:
President McKinley Taking the Oath (1901, Edison) {1 min} youtube
Only watched it cause it's in the national film registry. It is self-explanatory I hope - nothing revelatory but still pretty unique. I'm gonna watch the sequel (or prequel) later

< Message edited by Miles Messervy 007 -- 4/4/2010 5:07:43 PM >


_____________________________

quote:

jamesbondguy:
Miles is clearly the finest film theorist of his generation

quote:

Deviation:
if it isn't ham, I'll eat a living pig.

(in reply to paul_ie86)
Post #: 2250
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