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RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/12/2010 6:55:31 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 78042
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo
I don't like all bad films you know!

_____________________________

So, sir, we let him have it right up! And I have to report, sir, he did not like it, sir.

Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

(in reply to swordsandsandals)
Post #: 10771
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/12/2010 3:33:01 PM   
swordsandsandals


Posts: 12571
Joined: 6/1/2006
From: A magical forest

quote:

ORIGINAL: Gimli The Dwarf

I don't like all bad films you know!


Ah, but this had a hint of the Van Helsing about it. Hideously ugly, badly scripted and just a bad film.

_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rawlinson

Swords is right about everything.



quote:

ORIGINAL: Hood_Man

Swords smells like bum.



(in reply to Gimli The Dwarf)
Post #: 10772
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 8/12/2010 1:59:31 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 78042
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo
So it was awesome then?


Elab, PA, Rinc or any other Modly folk who enter here, where would a personal list of film music go? I'd guess the underused Soundtracks bit, but TV and actor lists crop up in Lists often, so I just wondered.



< Message edited by Gimli The Dwarf -- 8/12/2010 2:10:47 AM >


_____________________________

So, sir, we let him have it right up! And I have to report, sir, he did not like it, sir.

Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

(in reply to swordsandsandals)
Post #: 10773
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 8/12/2010 6:21:31 PM   
Rinc


Posts: 12841
Joined: 2/10/2005
From: A park bench, with a newspaper quilt
I reckon it's alright here. Go for it.

_____________________________

No spoilers please:

Invisiotext:
[ color=#F1F1F1 ]text[ /color ]

(in reply to Gimli The Dwarf)
Post #: 10774
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 8/12/2010 7:11:29 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54624
Joined: 1/10/2005
Music is a bit different though - precedence, and previous advice, is that music specific lists should go in Audiophile rather than in here.

That said, I'm not so sure how it works in the Soundtrack subforum as I rarely venture there - do people put film music lists in there? That may be different.

_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to Rinc)
Post #: 10775
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 8/12/2010 7:18:20 PM   
homersimpson_esq


Posts: 20120
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Springfield
I did a top ten soundtracks once, and I think I put it in soundtracks. There is significantly less traffic there tho, so I'd be tempted to allow it here.

_____________________________

That deep-browed Homer ruled as his demesne.


Bristol Bad Film Club
A place where movie fans can come and behold some of the most awful films ever put to celluloid.

(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 10776
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 8/12/2010 7:52:20 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54624
Joined: 1/10/2005
And unlike the normal music lists, it is a film related one which would make that fair, too.

_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to homersimpson_esq)
Post #: 10777
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 8/12/2010 8:45:27 PM   
MOTH

 

Posts: 3479
Joined: 3/10/2005
From: Sittin' on the dock of the bay
Nosferatu The Vampyre (Werner Herzog, 1979)
Herzog's homage to the Murnau's Nosferatu can't really match the classic original (you could say it can't really escape the Shadow of the Vampire, chortle), but it's a credible update and a fairly good Dracula film in it's own right, with Kinski delivering a memorable Count. The distinctly eerie footage of mummified corpses during the opening credits is also worth a mention (7/10)

_____________________________

I've only gone and set up a blog! This week I've been mostly reviewing The Lego Movie and Wadjda. Click: The Fast Picture Show

(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 10778
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 9/12/2010 12:48:24 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 78042
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo
Thanks, Mod people! Expect a new list in here sometime soon


_____________________________

So, sir, we let him have it right up! And I have to report, sir, he did not like it, sir.

Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

(in reply to MOTH)
Post #: 10779
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 9/12/2010 7:31:47 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 78042
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo
59. Monsters (1st view, 2010, Gareth Edwards) - 4/5*
Not quite so brilliant as I'd been led to believe. The improvised nature of the dialogue if often obvious, and it was particularly difficult to care for Andrew. It would have worked better in many ways without the backstories for the characters, cliched as they were. The same sense of danger and empathy would have been felt. But it does work very well as a road/monster/apocalypse/romance film, with many great sequences.

239. Deck The Halls (1st view, 2006, John Whitesell) - 3/5*

243. Fred Claus (1st view, 2007, David Dobkin) - 3/5*
Paul Giamatti! Rachel Weisz! Miranda Richardson! Kevin Spacey! Elizabeth Banks! How do you mess up a film with this cast? Stick Vince Vaughn in there!

1. Plan 9 From Outer Space (1st view, 1959, Ed Wood) - 5/5*
2. Inception (2nd view, 2010, Christopher Nolan) - 4/5
3. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, part 1 (1st view, 2010, David Yates) - 4/5*
4. Watchmen (2nd view, 2009, Zack Snyder) - 4/5*
5. Agora (1st view, 2009, Alejandro Amenábar) - 4/5*
6. Horton Hears A Who! (1st view, 2008, Jimmy Hayward/Steve Martino) - 4/5*
7. Monsters (1st view, 2010, Gareth Edwards) - 4/5*
8. Star Trek (2nd view, 2009, J.J. Abrams) - 4/5
9. Valkyrie (1st view, 2008, Bryan Singer) - 4/5*
10. Tokyo Godfathers (1st view, 2003, Satoshi Kon) - 4/5*

11. A Single Man (1st view, 2009, Tom Ford) - 4/5*
12. Deck The Halls (1st view, 2006, John Whitesell) - 3/5*
13. Fred Claus (1st view, 2007, David Dobkin) - 3/5*
14. Open Season (1st view, 2006, Roger Allers/Jill Culton) - 2/5*
15. Meet The Spartans (1st view, 2008, Jason Friedberg/Aaron Seltzer) - 1/5*


Shorts

1. Coyote Falls (2010, Matthew O'Callaghan)
2. Canned Feud (1951, Friz Freleng)
3. Kit for Cat (1948, Friz Freleng)
4. Bugs and Thugs (1954, Friz Freleng)
5. Putty Tat Trouble (1951, Friz Freleng)
6. Bunker Hill Bunny (1950, Friz Freleng)
7. Tweety's S.O.S. (1951, Friz Freleng)
8. Daffy Duck Hunt (1949, Robert McKimson)
9. A Broken Leghorn (1959, Robert McKimson)
10. Devil May Hare (1953, Robert McKimson)
11. Speedy Gonzales (1955, Friz Freleng)
12. The Foghorn Leghorn (1948, Robert McKimson)
13. Die, Sweet Roadrunner, Die (2010, Greg Colton)
14. Lumber Jerks (1955, Friz Freleng)
15. The Moonbird (2010, Brother McLeod)
16. Early to Bet (1951, Robert McKimson)
17. The Phantoms of Nabua (2009, Apichatpong Weerasethakul)





< Message edited by Gimli The Dwarf -- 30/12/2010 9:39:53 AM >


_____________________________

So, sir, we let him have it right up! And I have to report, sir, he did not like it, sir.

Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

(in reply to Gimli The Dwarf)
Post #: 10780
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 11/12/2010 1:14:14 AM   
Miles Messervy 007


Posts: 6884
Joined: 11/2/2009
I have seen quite a few films since my last appearance here:

Features:

3. Rashômon [In the Woods] (1950, Kurosawa)
My original review of this still holds up quite well even though I don't write like that any more, for better or worse.
If you want a really bad example of my writing, look no further than this:
Mad laughter. Awesome medium scene. Amazing ending. The villager kicks ass. The cinematography rocks. The music is amazing. The acting is great, especially the face expressions. Truth. Vanity. Gender. Faith.

39. La nuit américaine [Day for Night] (1973, Truffaut)
Amazing. The ensemble cast is fantastic, particularly Baye, Leaud, and Truffaut himself. It's full of memorable lines, funny, human, great musically, and seems a fair depiction of the film-making process with all its ups and downs. The downs are actually quite emotional, but the most revealing stuff is in between, showing the boredom and repetition of film shoots. A film which depicts boredom successfully without being boring is usually great, and this applies here.

48. The Virgin Suicides (1999, S. Coppola)
This film is atmosphere, pure and simple. Trying to read into it just spoils the magic, really. Perfect soundtrack, amazing cinematography, natural performances, and confident direction (speaking of which, it better end up on the debuts list). I probably prefer LiT, but only just. Somewhere is the only film coming out in 2010 I really want to see.

51. Speed Racer (2008, Wachowski/Wachowski)
It's up to you to decide whether I'm being an ironic hipster bandwagon douchebag or genuine. The truth is neither, as the film cannot and should not be taken seriously. It's dazzling visually, funny if you know what kind of humour to expect, and somehow makes predictability awesome. I would equate this to going to a candy store, getting all the candy you want, eating all, and not feeling sick afterwards, which is pretty much a dream of every child. The film is that bad metaphor, and I am this child.

61. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 (2010, Yates)
Fanboy alert! Not as great as Half-Blood Prince, and probably infuriating to someone who hasn't read the books, and a part of an ingenious but immensely irritating money-making scheme, but still bloody wonderful. That scene with Harry and Hermione and Nick Cave and the animated segment are brilliant beyond belief.
Sorry for all the annoying alliterations.

74. Written on the Wind (1956, Sirk)
Fantastic. That climactic dance scene is one of the best things committed to celluloid, the cinematography and the set design are gorgeous, the performances are amazing, and Hudson's sexuality plays into it perfectly. I think this may have converted me to Sirk.

80. Only Angels Have Wings (1939, Hawks)
This, in turn, may be the beginning of my conversion to Hawks, a film-maker I've until this been at best lukewarm on (Gentlemen Prefer Blondes really soured on me, Scarface is chasms away from the remake, His Girl Friday is an atonal mess with squandered perfect potential and The Big Sleep would be great if it wasn't a total travesty to the novel). Friendship, love, sacrifice are treated effortlessly and elegantly, Grant, Arthur, Hayworth, and particularly Barthelmess shine in their roles, and though it doesn't live up to the promise of its opening (which has amazing inexplicable atmosphere), it's a great film for sure.

88. Fahrenheit 451 (1966, Truffaut)
Haven't seen this in ages, but love the book and the director. Predictably, Truffaut's weakest film I've seen, but the bad things about it actually kinda add to it (the hilariously bad special effects, the weirdness of the dual casting choice, Werner's accent), and the good things are numerous as well (Herrmann's score might be his best, the ending is astonishing, and the scene with the old woman is, too). Not a patch on the book but good anyway (and I know this makes my response to The Big Sleep seem hypocritical, but I think that might improve on a re-watch when I know what deviations to expect as I did here). To be honest, the omission of The Mechanical Dog isn't that missed, though some other things are, but that's to be expected.

92. A Man for All Seasons (1966, Zinnemann)
Not very reliable historically, particularly the convenient omission of the fact that More liked burning protestants, but like Joan D'Arc, impressive even to an atheist as a display of human spirit (and stubbornness, but these two go hand in hand). And it has amazing production values (the theatrical origins aren't obvious apart from the scenes length, which is always a good sign) and a cast to die for. Also, the screenplay is amazing, with some brilliant intellectual back-and-forth which never feels forced or too confusing. Not quite as good as the other Oscar-nominated play adaptation from 1966, but certainly an Oscar winner I have no qualms with whatsoever.

116. El mariachi (1992, Rodriguez)
My first Mexican film, apparently. Solid high concept action film, made on an astonishingly low budget but still exciting. The love story is so-so, and the music is not as affecting to me as it is to the characters, but there is some funny black humour and it's thankfully short. So while Rodriguez' career became a bit of a mess (well, I still love Sin City, and Spy Kids is one of my nostalgia films, but still), this is a pretty great debut.
This review makes no sense whatsoever, whatever.

119. Buffalo ’66 (1998, Gallo)
Really funny, hits the right notes on awkwardness. The lies, the repetitions, the fragility all work. Good cast, cinematography, and music, too. It's a bit too ridiculous and has too much ego fellatio (lol) to be a masterpiece, but a great film for sure. The two he made after this don't look that good though.

125. Ronin (1998, Frankenheimer)
A bit of a mess, I suppose, but an engaging one. Lots of double-crossing and car chases (one of those is justly acclaimed), and pretty lame gunfights. The Bond fan in me appreciated the three villains in one film. It's also ghost-written by Mamet, so it's nice to watch professionals at work, making it akin to a Mann or a Melville. On that note, it has a nicely muted colour palette, with extras not wearing any bright colours whatsoever. The characters make a lot of stupid decisions, the McEllhone-De Niro romantic subplot is not entirely necessary, and Witt's Russian is awful, but I'm satisfied. I bought The Train which looks like it's going to kick ass.

131. Götter der Pest [Gods of the Plague] (1970, Fassbinder)
Totally misogynistic and pretty empty, but still somehow mesmerising, His worst I've seen, mostly because it's a retread of Love Is Colder Than Death but brings less to the table. Some typically awesome non quotable Fassbinder lines though and as usual with his early ones, fantastically stark static cinematography/mise-en-scene. In short, this dude was a dude to top all dudes.

143. Pokolenie [A Generation] (1955, Wajda)
A short, average technically and uneven otherwise portrayal of youth during the Nazi occupation of Poland. The night-time scenes are shockingly lit (and the Arrow release seems really inferior to the Criterion one), and it occasionally slips into propagandist melodrama, but the vignette approach works, the supporting characters are well drawn, and the central relationship is moving. Also, Polanski in an early role. Expect more from Wajda's further stuff (got the other two from the trilogy here), but this is a more than solid introduction.
Oh yeah, my first non-Kieslowski Polish film (though Possession is by a Polish director, of course), here's to many more to come.

144. L’atalante (1934, Vigo)
Didn’t meet my (albeit astronomic, given that it’s in the top 20 of any self-respecting ‘greatest ever’ list) expectations. A nicely (especially in terms of visuals) told and influential love story, but only affecting episodically and never really that amazing. I was never bored, but the poetic realism/naturalistic approach never allow either the plot or the atmosphere to develop (and despite Simon’s character, it wasn’t nearly as funny as Nice or Conduite).

169. Grandma’s Boy (1922, Newmeyer)
My first Lloyd feature. Doesn't have the frantic pace of his two shorts I've seen, but is much more coherent and touching. Dumbo-style (of course this came first and there are loads other stories like this, but Dumbo is the archetype for me since I saw it first) tale of believing in yourself, with some great slapstick, inventive chase scenes, and a great (fake) flashback. Plus the romance is absolutely believable for some reason, hmm. Not as commonly admired as Safety Last!, but this was Lloyd's favourite film of his and that's gotta count for something.

184. Ivansxtc (2000, Rose)
First time in ages that I find about a film and watch it on the same day instead of keeping it on my shelves (or hard drive) for ages, which is nice. Watched in class because my film teacher is a fan.
Very interesting. Very ugly DV look, more Dogme than Mann, not aided by the pixelated quality of the avi we watched. But it suits the film, because it strips away any notion of glamour from Hollywood. And yet it is not against Hollywood, it is more concerned with its characters, most of whom are vapid vain assholes, and the location suits it perfectly. It's adapted from a Tolstoy novella, so Hollywood is really more of a setting (though brilliantly used) than a theme.
The theme is mortality, and how we spend our lives, and how we grin when people congratulate us on a job well done. For something so gratuitous it has some nice black humour (not going to quote because it's not as good out of context). It is powerful, with great central performances (Merendino is hilarious, Weller predatory, Huston unsympathetic and so real), though some of the supporting ones lag, most notably the sister's and girlfriend's (who is played by the writer/producer so that partly explains it).
It also has some pretty crap TV-style editing at the beginning, feeling like In the Loop without the self-awareness or the excuse of being adapted from a TV series.
Still though, this is a grower and I want to see more Rose now.

189. Wall Street (1987, Stone)
Greed is good, film is too obvious, but offers a nice snapshot of the time, good performances (Hannah is the worst though I don't get why she was that hated), and an aria from Rigoletto and a Talking Heads song are neighbours on the soundtrack, which has my respect anyway.

Kinda exhausted, so will finish the features and list the shorts and do the November round-up tomorrow.

< Message edited by Miles Messervy 007 -- 11/12/2010 1:19:16 AM >


_____________________________

quote:

jamesbondguy:
Miles is clearly the finest film theorist of his generation

quote:

Deviation:
if it isn't ham, I'll eat a living pig.

(in reply to Gimli The Dwarf)
Post #: 10781
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 11/12/2010 2:33:58 AM   
Deviation


Posts: 27284
Joined: 2/6/2006
From: Enemies of Film HQ
quote:

ORIGINAL: Miles Messervy 007



51. Speed Racer (2008, Wachowski/Wachowski)
It's up to you to decide whether I'm being an ironic hipster bandwagon douchebag or genuine. The truth is neither, as the film cannot and should not be taken seriously. It's dazzling visually, funny if you know what kind of humour to expect, and somehow makes predictability awesome. I would equate this to going to a candy store, getting all the candy you want, eating all, and not feeling sick afterwards, which is pretty much a dream of every child. The film is that bad metaphor, and I am this child.





_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Dpp1978
There are certainly times where calling a person a cunt is not only reasonable, it is a gross understatement.

quote:


ORIGINAL: elab49
I really wish I could go down to see Privates

(in reply to Miles Messervy 007)
Post #: 10782
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 11/12/2010 2:52:13 AM   
TheDudeAbides


Posts: 783
Joined: 15/1/2006
From: In the neighbourhood, feeling a bit daffy.
Miles, I couldn't agree more that the 1932 Scarface is 'chasms away from the remake'. However, I fear our chasms may be going in different directions... 

For one thing, no amount of Paul Muni's hammy cod-Italian theatrics could ever approach the tooth-grinding awfulness of Pacino's gurning ludicrisy

Anyway, glad you're coming round to Hawks. Only six or seven masterpieces more and we might have you convinced...

< Message edited by TheDudeAbides -- 11/12/2010 2:55:04 AM >


_____________________________

Reviews, film chat and the like at http://resilientlittlemuscle.blogspot.com

The Oxford Student - proud home of a film section somewhere between Siskel and Ebert: http://oxfordstudent.com/?cat=11

"Hammy is a stretch, I personally think he was just over zealous."
- IMDb reviewer on Dick Powell

"Good night, Papa. Machs gut."

(in reply to Deviation)
Post #: 10783
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 11/12/2010 3:05:52 AM   
Miles Messervy 007


Posts: 6884
Joined: 11/2/2009
Yes, I'm afraid so. Recently I've become enamoured with 80s excess (I like the word 'gurning', nice touch), but the 30s Scarface is very boring anyway.
I really want to see Ball of Fire, but I think Rio Bravo will be my next Hawks.

_____________________________

quote:

jamesbondguy:
Miles is clearly the finest film theorist of his generation

quote:

Deviation:
if it isn't ham, I'll eat a living pig.

(in reply to TheDudeAbides)
Post #: 10784
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 11/12/2010 5:57:49 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 78042
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo
Features

97. Tokyo Godfathers (1st view, 2003, Satoshi Kon) - 4/5*

186. A Single Man (1st view, 2009, Tom Ford) - 4/5*
I'll admit that I wasn't paying the greatest deal of attention when I saw this, and maybe that's why it falls into a lowish 4 rating. Colin Firth was great, hence the score, but I was hoping the film itself would be better.

Shorts

11. Coyote Falls (2010, Matthew O'Callaghan)
Awesome.

69. Die, Sweet Roadrunner, Die (2010, Greg Colton)

< Message edited by Gimli The Dwarf -- 11/12/2010 6:43:35 AM >


_____________________________

So, sir, we let him have it right up! And I have to report, sir, he did not like it, sir.

Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

(in reply to Miles Messervy 007)
Post #: 10785
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 11/12/2010 12:36:36 PM   
Miles Messervy 007


Posts: 6884
Joined: 11/2/2009
Continued as promised:

Features:

155. Romper Stomper (1992, Wright)
Even though superficially this is quite similar to the film below it, they couldn't be more different. This doesn't attempt to moralise, and shows the skinheads as basically animals. Their ugly lifestyle fuels the film, which is quick and brutal. Crowe is pretty great in this early role, but the stand-out performance belongs to McKenzie, who makes the sub-plot much better than it had any right to be. Overall, not something I'd want to watch again, but still good.

160. American History X (1998, Kaye)
Very solid film-making, but too streamlined to deserve its super-inflated IMDB rating. The prison flashback is hardly convincing, and some of the more interesting aspects of it are handled rather crudely (for example, Norton's character's relationship with his bigoted dad is only shown in the most superficial way possible), but the performances and the technical stuff compensate for that.

177. Monsters (2010, G. Edwards)
As usual, I'm on the fence. This is not the masterpiece it's purported to be, but neither did it deserve the numerous walk-outs my cinema had. The problem is that it tries to be both a monsters movie and a character-driven one, and doesn't entirely succeed at either. I think it would be better if the characters' relationship stayed platonic, for one, and there are segments in the middle which drag fairly severely. However, the ending is fantastic, the cinematography beautiful, and unlike Primer this doesn't wear its "I was made for next to nothing" credentials that openly (though the special effects are pretty awful at times). Also, I had a shit seat in the cinema so the experience wasn't ideal.
PS. One thing that really irritated me is that nobody suggests to fly. Petty, I know.

194. Animal Crackers (1930, Heerman)
Most of the songs (except "I must be leaving") I can take or leave (though I liked Harpo's harp-playing more this time), and the love sub-plot, too, and it's a bit too obvious that it is both an early sound film and a play adaptation, but still hilarious. The Eugene O'Neill parodies, the breaking of the 4th wall, Harpo's leg in the bridge scene, and Groucho's African monologue are just brilliant.

206. Festen [The Celebration] (1998, Vinterberg)
Good when it’s darkly farcical (and I wish I wouldn’t know about the reveal, that would have made those scenes even better), pretty boring otherwise. The characters are flatly written and all humanity they get is what the actors put in, which I guess kinda fits with Dogme’s ideology, but most of the actors are bland and Larsen is outright horrible. Dogme rules still as stupid and arbitrary as I thought after finally having seen one of those films – murder is superficial action but suicide and child abuse aren’t? Plus the way the film is lit (or rather, not lit) is actually further away from how you would see it in reality. People’s eyes don’t shake like handheld cameras do either. But, Dogme rules or not, this is just way too uneven to be great. Don’t get the appeal, sorry.

225. Despicable Me (2010, Coffin/Renaud)
Too cutesy, but has some great gags ("formerly Lehman Brothers"). And I don't care what you say, I like the minions.

258. British Sounds [See You at Mao] (1970, Godard/Roger)
Ridiculous, really. I like the news presenter segment and the car factory bit, unbearable as both are), but most of it is just boring agit-prop despite naked feminists and discussions of Beatles' songs.

Shorts:

8. What’s Opera, Doc? (1957, Jones) {7 mins}
Liked it much better this time around. Not quite my fav of Jones' many masterpieces, but a masterpiece nonetheless, particularly the gorgeous animation, but also the deconstruction.

19. À propos de Nice [About Nice] (1930, Vigo) {22 mins}
Superb silent photo-essay (I’d struggle to call this a documentary for reasons obvious to anyone who has seen it). Subversive, manic, grotesque, sexually charged, and so much ahead of its time it’s unbelievable. No inter-titles, pure use of glorious visuals. The music helped, too.

49. Zéro de conduite [Zero for Conduct] (1933, Vigo) {42 mins}
Funny and absurd, though not very coherent and feels underdeveloped. Some fantastic scenes make this more than worthwhile, even though I am not a huge fan of films about the repressive life at boarding schools (see if...., Au Revoir Les Enfants [both of which incidentally take queues from this as does my beloved The 400 Blows)

58. The Big Shave (1968, Scorsese) {6 mins}
The crisp set and the groovy music make the blood even more shocking, and the Vietnam context is not even necessary to appreciate it. Great high concept short. I hope the director went on to do something else and wasn't a one hit wonder.

66. One A.M. (1916, Chaplin) {17 mins}
My first Chaplin short, and a relative disappointment. I admire Chaplin's tenacity, but the fact that each gag is repeated 3 times make this far too long. Though it's interesting that this has only one character, if you don't count the driver, maybe Chaplin would have been better off playing off someone else. It's going to be a hundred years old soon, sure, but something like The Kid dates way better in my opinion.

75. Taris, roi de l'eau [Jean Taris, Swimming Champion] (1931, Vigo) {9 mins}
Some innovative techniques by Vigo here, and it’s interesting to hear that in 1931, breaststroke was a new style, but otherwise not too exciting.



_____________________________

quote:

jamesbondguy:
Miles is clearly the finest film theorist of his generation

quote:

Deviation:
if it isn't ham, I'll eat a living pig.

(in reply to Gimli The Dwarf)
Post #: 10786
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 11/12/2010 5:06:05 PM   
swordsandsandals


Posts: 12571
Joined: 6/1/2006
From: A magical forest
Miles I found myself agreeing with several of those reviews, particularly Day for Night and HP7. This worries me.
HOWEVER, you said that you were never bored throughout L'Atalante. I, on the other hand, most definitely was.

_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rawlinson

Swords is right about everything.



quote:

ORIGINAL: Hood_Man

Swords smells like bum.



(in reply to Miles Messervy 007)
Post #: 10787
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 11/12/2010 10:24:45 PM   
Miles Messervy 007


Posts: 6884
Joined: 11/2/2009
As usual, reliably late. Unexciting month apart from a few films, but very consistent.

FILMS WATCHED IN NOVEMBER 2010


Features:


1. Rashômon [In the Woods] (1950, Kurosawa) RW 10 imdb review


2. La nuit américaine [Day for Night] (1973, Truffaut) 9 imdb review


3. The Virgin Suicides (1999, S. Coppola) 9 imdb review


4. Speed Racer (2008, Wachowski/Wachowski) 9 imdb review


5. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 (2010, Yates) C 8 imdb review


6. Written on the Wind (1956, Sirk) 8 imdb review


7. Only Angels Have Wings (1939, Hawks) 8 imdb review


8. Fahrenheit 451 (1966, Truffaut) RW 8 imdb review


9. A Man for All Seasons (1966, Zinnemann) 8 imdb review


10. Fast Times at Ridgemont High (1982, Heckerling) 8 imdb review


11. El mariachi (1992, Rodriguez) 8 imdb review


12. Buffalo ’66 (1998, Gallo) 8 imdb review


13. Ronin (1998, Frankenheimer) 8 imdb review


14. Götter der Pest [Gods of the Plague] (1970, Fassbinder) 8 imdb review


15. Pokolenie [A Generation] (1955, Wajda) 8 imdb review


16. L’atalante (1934, Vigo) 8 imdb review


17. Grandma’s Boy (1922, Newmeyer) 8 imdb review


18. Ivansxtc (2000, Rose) 8 imdb review


19. Wall Street (1987, Stone) 8 imdb review


20. Animal Crackers (1930, Heerman) 8 imdb review


21. Festen [The Celebration] (1998, Vinterberg) 7 imdb review


22. Despicable Me (2010, Coffin/Renaud) C 7 imdb review


23. British Sounds [See You at Mao] (1970, Godard/Roger) 6 imdb review


Shorts:

1. What’s Opera, Doc? (1957, Jones) {7 mins} RW 9 imdb review
2. À propos de Nice [About Nice] (1930, Vigo) {22 mins} 9 imdb review
3. Zéro de conduite [Zero for Conduct] (1933, Vigo) {42 mins} 8 imdb review
4. The Big Shave (1968, Scorsese) {6 mins} 8 imdb review
5. One A.M. (1916, Chaplin) {17 mins} 7 imdb review
6. Taris, roi de l'eau [Jean Taris, Swimming Champion] (1931, Vigo) {9 mins} 7 imdb review


See code, ratings, and a brief explanation on shorts in the initial post.

Stats:
Films seen by decade (+shorts)
10s: 0 (+1)
20s: 1 (+0)
30s: 3 (+3)
40s: 0 (+0)
50s: 3 (+1)
60s: 2 (+1)
70s: 3 (+0)
80s: 2 (+0)
90s: 5 (+0)
00s: 2 (+0)
10s: 2 (+0)

Average rating for features: 8.0
Average rating for shorts: 8.0
Average rating for cinema viewing: 7.5
Average rating for re-watches: 9.0

Directors with more than one feature:
François Truffaut - 2

Directors with one feature:
Akira Kurosawa, Sofia Coppola, Andy Wachowski, Larry Wachowski, David Yates, Douglas Sirk, Howard Hawks, Fred Zinnemann, Amy Heckerling, Robert Rodriguez, Vincent Gallo, John Frankenheimer, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Andrzej Wajda, Jean Vigo, Frew Newmeyer, Bernard Rose, Oliver Stone, Victor Heerman, Thomas Vinterberg, Pierre Coffin, Chris Renaud, Jean-Luc Godard, Jean-Henri Roger

_____________________________

quote:

jamesbondguy:
Miles is clearly the finest film theorist of his generation

quote:

Deviation:
if it isn't ham, I'll eat a living pig.

(in reply to Gimli The Dwarf)
Post #: 10788
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 13/12/2010 1:11:37 AM   
swordsandsandals


Posts: 12571
Joined: 6/1/2006
From: A magical forest
Twilight Saga: Eclipse

The completist in me felt I had to watch this. I really, really didn't.

The Princess and the Frog

Yeah, 5th time this year. I own 3 herzogs I haven't seen, about 10 Hitchcocks, Close Encounters, Far From Heaven, Papillon, American Gangster and Miracle at St Anna. All of which I haven't seen. Yet I don't have friends who'd want to watch them. I do have friends that love this so I find myself sitting down, once again, to enjoy this vibrant, colourful and joyous film. I didn't complain once.

_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rawlinson

Swords is right about everything.



quote:

ORIGINAL: Hood_Man

Swords smells like bum.



(in reply to Miles Messervy 007)
Post #: 10789
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 13/12/2010 9:40:01 AM   
matty_b


Posts: 14580
Joined: 19/10/2005
From: Outpost 31 calling McMurtle.
Bad Santa (Terry Zwigoff)

A yearly staple in the household and a perfect antidote to the other schmaltzy films of the season (which I still enjoy ), Bad Santa sees Billy Bob Thornton on brilliant foul-mouthed form as Willie Stokes, a department store Santa who uses his job as a ploy to scope out the security of said stores to rob them later with his dwarf assistant (equally foul-mouthed Tony Cox). The best thing about Bad Santa is that it's cruel, cynical, scaborous and yet when Willie is forced to befriend a chubby and socially-inept young child he manages to find a morsel of decency in his black heart, and the film does this without ever descending into cheese. It helps that the kid is genuinely affecting not teeth-gratingly cutesty, as he bats away Willie's drunken profanities with wide-eyed questions of where he stables his reindeer and why he's in bed with Mrs Santa Claus's sister. This builds up to a genuinely affecting climax that it's earned and other brilliant scenes such as Willie dealing out some much-needed punishment to the kid's school bully. Of course, there's an argument that it's pretty much a one-man show as Thornton fights, fornicates, boozes and swears across the screen, but he's an irresistable scoundrel, and who can complain at that? It gets better and better each year. (9/10)


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Cool Breeze
Mattyb is a shining example of what the perfect Empire Forum member is.


(in reply to Gimli The Dwarf)
Post #: 10790
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 14/12/2010 4:49:04 PM   
Gram123

 

Posts: 5537
Joined: 19/1/2006
From: Reino Unido
083) Ong Bak 2: The Beginning  (Tony Jaa & Panna Rittikrai, Thailand, 2008, BD) - 5.5

As has been well noted, this has nada to do with the original Ong Bak film, though that doesn't matter really, as long as we see Tony Jaa kicking major ass. And we do, this film is certainly fight-heavy, but a lot of it is weapons-based, and unfortunately, the film feels (even) less realistic for it - Jaa looks better when he's flying towards someone with his knee aimed at their throat than he does wielding a sword.
The look of the film is much more stylised, which makes me think it must have been made with blu ray buyers in mind. They've made extra effort to use fancy camera techniques, and add a rich golden filter, and caputre images that are rife with detail, from craggy faced warriors and slow-mo spitting bad guys with blackened teeth.

As you might expect, Ong Bak 2 features some of the maddest stunts of all the films I've seen this year, even though the period setting means there are no vehicles, tall buildings or other such modern props. Particularly mental are the boarding an elephant by running up it's face () and the weird "Crow Ghost" baddie backflipping from atop an elephant's head, landing on the tusks and simultaneously stamping on Tien's (Tony Jaa's) bonce, dislodging him from his tuskular position.
However, even taking pachyderm gymnastics into account, the film is fairly average. The revenge plot is nothing new, and some of the fights are sub-par, including Jaa's tribute to drunken boxing (which is more drunken kicking).


I'm now left with a small quandry. The cliffhanger at the end of OB2 leaves me kinda wanting to see how it ends, but all opinion seems to say the third film is bad bad bad and should be avoided. So do I stick with what is effectively half of an ok story with an unresolved cliffhanger ending, or do I pick up OB3 to see the story completed, with expectations significantly lowered?

_____________________________

Gram123's Top Songs Project

(in reply to matty_b)
Post #: 10791
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 14/12/2010 9:02:56 PM   
matty_b


Posts: 14580
Joined: 19/10/2005
From: Outpost 31 calling McMurtle.
Monsters (Gareth Edwards)

I wish I could pinpoint exactly why this left me cold as opposed to blown away like a lot of other people. The concept is great and Edwards conjures up some fantastic, surrealist images of a part of Earth abandoned to huge swathes of mostly harmless giant aliens. Ultimately, I came away feeling that it would play better either as a silent, or a short. I didn't find the central couple particularly engaging and while I appreciate the point that the film isn't actually about the creatures, I still think if they're forming the crux of the world we're experiencing, we should see more of them. SPOILERS Also, while I got the ending I think it's quite telling I just thought it was clever rather than emotionally devastating as it was clearly aiming for. SPOILERS END. Ultimately, it's a brave and interesting experiment that Edwards doesn't totally pull off, but give him a real budget to play with and let's see what he can do with it. (7/10)

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows part one (David Yates)

I think for someone like me, who's never read a single book in the series, all the films come across as bitty, truncuated and highly reliant on excised scenes. This is again true, as I was fairly baffled at times by what should be a relatively straightforward children's film. It also meanders quite a lot, with only a vaguely defined, nebulous threat hanging over our characters - it certainly doesn't feel like it's hurtling towards a climax. Still, I think the three leads have all become very engaging, there's some brilliance in the supporting performances and the Three Brothers story was amazing. And, yeah, I guess the death at the end was fairly moving. (7/10)

Die Hard (John McTiernan)

Probably the greatest American action film to date and a festive classic to boot. We all know Alan Rickman's slick Euro-terrorist, Hans Gruber, saunters away casually with the film in his pocket - he's still the cinematic villain that every other actor aspires to be - and it's amusing to note that Bruce Willis was once regarded as a fairly absurd choice for the role. He smirks and only plays one note, but plays it so well here he burns with star quality. But McTiernan's direction and the clever, darkly witty script are the real stars here. It's easy to forget how well the film is set up (with little masterstrokes such as setting McClane up with no shoes at the beginning of the film - everything he does to combat the terrorists becomes so much more painful because of it) and how slickly and organically everything moves - for well over the first hour, it's actually a game of cat and mouse with McClane and Gruber trying to outmanouver each other while the LAPD blunder straight into their respective plans. This gives the fiery climax and last third explosions real and bruising power. It's done so well it's no surprise that every other American action film made afterwards cowers in its shadow - even if I still can't get onboard with the Al Powell character and the "Hurrah, he's learned to kill again!" arc he's given. (9.5/10)

_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Cool Breeze
Mattyb is a shining example of what the perfect Empire Forum member is.


(in reply to Gram123)
Post #: 10792
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 15/12/2010 4:51:40 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 78042
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo
37. Inception (2nd view, 2010, Christopher Nolan) - 4/5
Moved down about 10 spots since I first saw it. It really is very hard to care about the entire Mal storyline, and as such it's hard to care about much of what happens to Cobb. But the mechanics and science of the dreams are brilliantly intriguing, even if some concepts are woefully underused or confusing. Hardy and Gordon-Levitt are the standouts of the cast.

303. Open Season (1st view, 2006, Roger Allers/Jill Culton) - 2/5*
Only worth watching for Gary Sinise as the mad hunter. At least he tries with his vocals. Seriously, who thought that Martin Lawrence and Ashton Kutcher would be ideal casting for this?

325. Meet The Spartans (1st view, 2008, Jason Friedberg/Aaron Seltzer) - 1/5*
There are times when I wish I didn't want to everything ever made. This is one of them. But it still isn't the worst film I've seen this year, and it's about 79 times better than Gummo.



< Message edited by Gimli The Dwarf -- 15/12/2010 4:52:07 AM >


_____________________________

So, sir, we let him have it right up! And I have to report, sir, he did not like it, sir.

Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

(in reply to matty_b)
Post #: 10793
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 15/12/2010 9:13:39 AM   
MOTH

 

Posts: 3479
Joined: 3/10/2005
From: Sittin' on the dock of the bay

quote:

ORIGINAL: matty_b
Die Hard (John McTiernan)

Probably the greatest American action film to date and a festive classic to boot. We all know Alan Rickman's slick Euro-terrorist, Hans Gruber, saunters away casually with the film in his pocket - he's still the cinematic villain that every other actor aspires to be - and it's amusing to note that Bruce Willis was once regarded as a fairly absurd choice for the role. He smirks and only plays one note, but plays it so well here he burns with star quality. But McTiernan's direction and the clever, darkly witty script are the real stars here. It's easy to forget how well the film is set up (with little masterstrokes such as setting McClane up with no shoes at the beginning of the film - everything he does to combat the terrorists becomes so much more painful because of it) and how slickly and organically everything moves - for well over the first hour, it's actually a game of cat and mouse with McClane and Gruber trying to outmanouver each other while the LAPD blunder straight into their respective plans. This gives the fiery climax and last third explosions real and bruising power. It's done so well it's no surprise that every other American action film made afterwards cowers in its shadow - even if I still can't get onboard with the Al Powell character and the "Hurrah, he's learned to kill again!" arc he's given. (9.5/10)


Tis great. for all the action credentials, it's the superb script that sets this above it's peers - everything that happens or is mentioned in the first 20 mins (the shoe conversation, Argyle, the photo, the Rolex, Holly's surname, the kids) not only acts as set-up, but becomes important later in the film. Simply superb, unlike......



....Anthony Zimmer (Jerome Salle, 2005)
With The Tourist currently garnering lukewarm reviews in the cinema, thought I'd check out the original. It's a fairly serviceable thriller up until a staggeringly stupid plot development late on, which impressively manages to make no sense at all! No wonder the remake is floundering. I'd have Sophie Marceau over Angelina Jolie any day, though. Oh yes, I'd have her.... (4/10)

_____________________________

I've only gone and set up a blog! This week I've been mostly reviewing The Lego Movie and Wadjda. Click: The Fast Picture Show

(in reply to matty_b)
Post #: 10794
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 15/12/2010 3:26:15 PM   
matty_b


Posts: 14580
Joined: 19/10/2005
From: Outpost 31 calling McMurtle.
Ben-Hur (William Wyler)

I have a fondness - some would say a weakness - for big, long, clumsy historical epics that take up a whole afternoon, and Ben-Hur is the biggest and clumsiest of the lot. Let's be clear, its 11 Oscar haul was ludicrous - Wyler can't think of a single creative thing to do when shooting two characters talking, there are ponderous stretches throughout, Heston is painfully average at best and the Oscar for Hugh Griffith blacking up is just disgraceful (if anyone deserved a supporting nod in the film, it was Jack Hawkins). Yet it's still a film I have a great deal of liking for. The production values are still striking and some scenes resonate with a stirring power still - the meeting with Christ, everything onboard the slave galley and the justly-celebrated chariot race. (7.5/10)

_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Cool Breeze
Mattyb is a shining example of what the perfect Empire Forum member is.


(in reply to MOTH)
Post #: 10795
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 15/12/2010 3:34:04 PM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 78042
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo
Best thing about Ben Hur is the awesome music.

_____________________________

So, sir, we let him have it right up! And I have to report, sir, he did not like it, sir.

Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

(in reply to matty_b)
Post #: 10796
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 15/12/2010 3:35:07 PM   
matty_b


Posts: 14580
Joined: 19/10/2005
From: Outpost 31 calling McMurtle.
Yes, that is one Oscar I don't have a problem with. 

_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Cool Breeze
Mattyb is a shining example of what the perfect Empire Forum member is.


(in reply to Gimli The Dwarf)
Post #: 10797
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 15/12/2010 3:57:52 PM   
swordsandsandals


Posts: 12571
Joined: 6/1/2006
From: A magical forest
Glory

Superb. The ending is devastating, the supporting performances excellent. Matthew Broderick does his best despite being miscast, and the score is overbearing, but on the whole this was a very good, if very Ed Zwick, film.

O Brother, Where Art Thou?

Rewatching this highlighted just how insane this film is. Still amazing, even if some of the episodes don't work as well as others.

The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford

Almost out Malick's Malick. Almost.

_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rawlinson

Swords is right about everything.



quote:

ORIGINAL: Hood_Man

Swords smells like bum.



(in reply to matty_b)
Post #: 10798
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 15/12/2010 6:05:12 PM   
drews


Posts: 271
Joined: 5/10/2005
From: Wimbledon Centre Court
November movies in chronological order (All movies first time viewings unless stated):
-Serious Man, A (Joel Coen, Ethan Coen, 2009) - 3/5
-Halloween II  (Rob Zombie, 2009) - 1/5
-Män som hatar kvinnor (The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo) (Niels Arden Oplev, 2009) - 4/5
-G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra (Stephen Sommers, 2009) - 3/5
-Anna M. (Michel Spinosa, 2007) - 3/5
-Nightmare on Elm Street 4, A: The Dream Master (Renny Harlin, 1988) - 2/5
-Låt den rätte komma in (Let the Right One In) (Tomas Alfredson, 2008)  - 5/5 (Two viewings)
-Nightmare on Elm Street 5, A: The Dream Child (Stephen Hopkins, 1989) - 2/5
-Battlestar Galactica: The Plan (Edward James Olmos, 2009) - 3/5
-Miss March (Zach Cregger, Trevor Moore, 2009) - 2/5
-Festen (The Celebration) (Thomas Vinterberg, 1998) - 3/5
-Suor Omicidi (The Killer Nun) (Giulio Berruti, 1979) - 2/5
-Harold and Maude (Hal Ashby, 1971) - 3/5
-Death Warrior (Bill Corcoran, 2009) - 2/5
-Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (Howard Hawks, 1953) - 4/5
-Ringu 2 (Hideo Nakata, 1999) - 2/5
-Unrivaled (Warren P. Sonoda, 2010) - 2/5
-Broken (Simon Boyes, Adam Mason, 2006) - 2/5
-Game of Death, The (Robert Clouse, Sammo Hung Kam-Bo (uncredited), Bruce Lee (uncredited), 1978) - 2/5
-Waiting... (Rob McKittrick, 2005) - 3/5
-Toy Story 3 (Lee Unkrich, 2010) - 5/5 (Two viewings)
-Where the Truth Lies (Atom Egoyan, 2005) - 3/5    
-Wallace and Gromit in 'A Matter of Loaf and Death' (Nick Park, 2008) - 4/5 (Two viewings)
-American Virgin (Clare Kilner, 2009) - 2/5
-Room with a View, A (James Ivory, 1985) - 3/5
-Teeth (Mitchell Lichtenstein, 2007)- 2/5

_____________________________

When an opportunity in a fight presents itself, "I" don't hit, "it" hits all by itself. - BRUCE LEE

Beer: The cause of, and solution to, all of life's problems. - HOMER SIMPSON

#8 member of The Wire fan club. PM Dantes Inferno to join.

(in reply to swordsandsandals)
Post #: 10799
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 15/12/2010 7:33:32 PM   
Miles Messervy 007


Posts: 6884
Joined: 11/2/2009

quote:

ORIGINAL: Gimli The Dwarf
325. Meet The Spartans (1st view, 2008, Jason Friedberg/Aaron Seltzer) - 1/5*
There are times when I wish I didn't want to everything ever made. This is one of them. But it still isn't the worst film I've seen this year, and it's about 79 times better than Gummo.



I've seen 5 minutes of this and it melted my brain. Speaking of Gummo:
116. Gummo (1997, Korine)
As usual, I watch a super-divisive film, and sit on the fence. This is ugly (not visually, very nice in that regard, actually) and yet fascinating. The plotlessness didn't bother me, but the reason I can't say this is a masterpiece is because it walks the line between an existential wonder and a revolting freakshow. How interesting what it's depicting also changes throughout. Manz and the little bunny boy are great, but there's a lot of vaguely distasteful but not fully shocking filler. It's not actually as disgusting as some of the negative reactions to this film had me believe. Poor cats, though. I think this will grow on me (it has already since yesterday), but can't see it ever becoming one of my favourites.
PS. Forgot to mention the great soundtrack. Also, found a nice quote about it on RT amongst all the negative reviews: "Like watching life on the surface of an alien planet"

191. The Enforcer (1976, Fargo)
Marvellous. Well, not really, but I really don't get the hate. Very solid entertainment, with some great bits. The only complaint is that Schifrin is missed, but the female partner thing is done much better than could have been expected, the incompetent captain is funny and Harry is more badass than in Magnum Force (though that is probably a better film). It's also interesting to see Popwell to get a bigger part, however iconic his two previous Dirty Harry appearances may be. Looking forward to Sudden Impact mostly, but this was good, too.

_____________________________

quote:

jamesbondguy:
Miles is clearly the finest film theorist of his generation

quote:

Deviation:
if it isn't ham, I'll eat a living pig.

(in reply to Gimli The Dwarf)
Post #: 10800
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