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RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 8/9/2010 8:38:44 AM   
elab49


Posts: 54574
Joined: 1/10/2005
Were you not even visually impressed by the show Swords? It's one of the most impressively shot TV series I've seen in the UK for years outside of nature docs.

_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to swordsandsandals)
Post #: 9451
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 8/9/2010 9:20:43 AM   
Professor Moriarty

 

Posts: 10261
Joined: 6/10/2005
From: the waters of Casablanca
On my travels I watched The A-Team yesterday.

I have approximately zero idea of what was going on in the film, but it manages to keep itself moving at such a pace that you can continue to stuff popcorn into your mouth without that issue being too bothersome.

The guy from District 9 as Howling Mad Murdoch was ace. The van was amazing. The rest of it was a lot of big bangs, big guns and people running down the sides of buildings. I did however miss BA picking someone up and throwing them down, which I consider an integral part of any A-Team plot.

(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 9452
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 8/9/2010 11:01:35 AM   
swordsandsandals


Posts: 12571
Joined: 6/1/2006
From: A magical forest

quote:

ORIGINAL: elab49

Were you not even visually impressed by the show Swords? It's one of the most impressively shot TV series I've seen in the UK for years outside of nature docs.


I didn't notice actually. I spent most of the time figuring out how I could purge myself from watching it after the granny sex.

_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rawlinson

Swords is right about everything.



quote:

ORIGINAL: Hood_Man

Swords smells like bum.



(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 9453
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 8/9/2010 12:30:32 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation

Graphic?

Erm...........eh...........rawlinson is this why you like it?



It's about ten seconds of one episode. You know Swords, he thought Janet Jackson's nipple slip was hardcore porn.

quote:

I spent most of the time figuring out how I could purge myself from watching it after the granny sex.


Euphemism?

(in reply to Deviation)
Post #: 9454
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 8/9/2010 4:29:21 PM   
swordsandsandals


Posts: 12571
Joined: 6/1/2006
From: A magical forest
I need some time to recover from The Illusionist before I write a proper review. And I intend to. Everyone should see this film.

_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rawlinson

Swords is right about everything.



quote:

ORIGINAL: Hood_Man

Swords smells like bum.



(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 9455
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 8/9/2010 5:10:46 PM   
Deviation


Posts: 27284
Joined: 2/6/2006
From: Enemies of Film HQ
The Philip Glass soundtrack was the best thing about that film. 

_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Dpp1978
There are certainly times where calling a person a cunt is not only reasonable, it is a gross understatement.

quote:


ORIGINAL: elab49
I really wish I could go down to see Privates

(in reply to swordsandsandals)
Post #: 9456
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 8/9/2010 5:23:12 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54574
Joined: 1/10/2005
Wrong Illusionist, muppet.

_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to Deviation)
Post #: 9457
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 8/9/2010 5:26:20 PM   
swordsandsandals


Posts: 12571
Joined: 6/1/2006
From: A magical forest

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation

The Philip Glass soundtrack was the best thing about that film. 


Lolz.

I'm talking about the sublime animation by Sylvain Chomet, one of the most beautiful, emotional films I've seen in a long, long time. Or ever, come to think of it.

_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rawlinson

Swords is right about everything.



quote:

ORIGINAL: Hood_Man

Swords smells like bum.



(in reply to Deviation)
Post #: 9458
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 8/9/2010 5:28:05 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54574
Joined: 1/10/2005
Have you seen Belleville, Swords?

_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to swordsandsandals)
Post #: 9459
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 8/9/2010 5:34:23 PM   
swordsandsandals


Posts: 12571
Joined: 6/1/2006
From: A magical forest

quote:

ORIGINAL: elab49

Have you seen Belleville, Swords?


Alas no. I'm not even sure why not, me being the animation nut that I am.

_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rawlinson

Swords is right about everything.



quote:

ORIGINAL: Hood_Man

Swords smells like bum.



(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 9460
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 8/9/2010 5:46:09 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54574
Joined: 1/10/2005
Although Illusionist is a must see for me at the moment, the artwork I've seen doesn't seem quite as impressive as his debut. Still amazing, and beautifully drawn but more landscapy and less slightly surreal.

And no Bruno

_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to swordsandsandals)
Post #: 9461
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 8/9/2010 5:56:24 PM   
swordsandsandals


Posts: 12571
Joined: 6/1/2006
From: A magical forest
It's definitely not as surreal as Belleville, from what I've seen of that. Only a singer at the beginning feels like BRDV, with a lanky, weird look about her.

_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rawlinson

Swords is right about everything.



quote:

ORIGINAL: Hood_Man

Swords smells like bum.



(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 9462
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 8/9/2010 5:59:50 PM   
FritzlFan


Posts: 4793
Joined: 19/11/2008
From: Bristol
quote:

ORIGINAL: swordsandsandals

I need some time to recover from The Illusionist before I write a proper review. And I intend to. Everyone should see this film.


I look forward to seeing if you're a novice film critic.

_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Miles Messervy 007

Child labour is necessary in the short term




(in reply to swordsandsandals)
Post #: 9463
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 8/9/2010 6:00:52 PM   
swordsandsandals


Posts: 12571
Joined: 6/1/2006
From: A magical forest

quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan

quote:

ORIGINAL: swordsandsandals

I need some time to recover from The Illusionist before I write a proper review. And I intend to. Everyone should see this film.


I look forward to seeing if you're a novice film critic.


?

_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rawlinson

Swords is right about everything.



quote:

ORIGINAL: Hood_Man

Swords smells like bum.



(in reply to FritzlFan)
Post #: 9464
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 9/9/2010 11:26:45 PM   
Deviation


Posts: 27284
Joined: 2/6/2006
From: Enemies of Film HQ
Lame for not getting it swords, lame.

Also, THUNDER AND LIGHTNING CURE WILL BE SO AWESOME TO WATCH TONIGHT.


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Dpp1978
There are certainly times where calling a person a cunt is not only reasonable, it is a gross understatement.

quote:


ORIGINAL: elab49
I really wish I could go down to see Privates

(in reply to swordsandsandals)
Post #: 9465
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 10/9/2010 7:22:28 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 77530
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo
26. The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo (1st view, 2010,Niels Arden Oplev) - 4/5*
27. The Girl Who Played With Fire (1st view, 2009, Daniel Alfredson) - 4/5*



Two of the best thrillers I've seen in a very long time.

_____________________________

So, sir, we let him have it right up! And I have to report, sir, he did not like it, sir.

Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

(in reply to Deviation)
Post #: 9466
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 10/9/2010 8:44:29 AM   
MOTH

 

Posts: 3479
Joined: 3/10/2005
From: Sittin' on the dock of the bay
Continuing my effort to catch up on some acknowledged classics, with..

La Dolce Vita (Federico Fellini, 1960)
A stylish, vibrant film and still remarkably relevant in today's world of media tittle-tattle. The structure and themes are interesting, even if some sequences don't work as well as others and add to a long running time. But the music is great throughout and Fellini captures some wonderful imagery, not least the sight of Anita Ekberg's breasts struggling to escape the confines of her little black dress.(9/10)

_____________________________

I've only gone and set up a blog! This week I've been mostly reviewing The Lego Movie and Wadjda. Click: The Fast Picture Show

(in reply to Gimli The Dwarf)
Post #: 9467
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 10/9/2010 1:54:53 PM   
Pigeon Army


Posts: 14612
Joined: 29/1/2006
From: Pixar HQ, George Lucas' Office.
Short reviews today.

156. Bringing Up Baby (1938, Hawks, USA) - 3.5/5
As a budding fan of Cary Grant (The Philadelphia Story, Arsenic & Old Lace and His Girl Friday are all favourites), I had (naturally) high expectations for him and this film, and at least he doesn't disappoint. Grant is brilliant, at first doggedly resistant to the madness his nebbish, risk-averse paleontologist, Dr. David Huxley, finds himself trapped in, but slowly engulfed, possessed by the craziness that surrounds him like some kind of madcap whirlpool. Hepburn is solid as the object of his consternation, dizzy heiress Susan Vance, but her character frequently oscillates between charmingly screwy and unbearably selfish and hateful. It's really, really hard to find her funny when she's actively going out of her way to destroy Huxley's life for her own selfish impulses, and while she's surrounded by likable and hilarious characters (Charlie Ruggles is outstanding as big game hunter Major Applegate, Barry Fitzgerald's soused Irish gardener is consistently sidesplitting, and Baby is a leopard and is awesome), every act of selfish destruction renders her just that little bit less palatable, and makes the resolution (seemingly typical of screwball comedies) kind of depressing, rather than the triumph of love it seems to be painted as.

170. The Hills Have Eyes (1977, Craven, USA) - 3.5/5
This is how you do characters in a horror film. Craven doesn't give the Carter family a whole lot of depth, this much is true, but he does give each character a distinct personality and make their relationships and dialogue believable and individual - they may be fodder, but you get the feeling Craven wants you to be invested in them; that he wants you to be scared for something as well as of something. For the first half of the film, Craven does get you scared of something, as well - every shot of the desert the Carters get stuck in emphasises how inhospitable and ominous it is, and Craven really wrings the tension out of the dark expanses and the rocky cliff jutting out the middle of them. We literally can't see anything other than the Carters for most of these sequences, and every sound and moving shadow frays your nerves just that little bit more, particularly as we become more invested in the younger members of the family. It goes a bit off the rails in the second half, with some wildly inappropriate music (it sounds like Craven was trying to make a 1970s cop show) and Looney Tunes-esque booby traps unnecessarily lightening up proceedings, but it's quite entertaining all the same. Also, Beast fucking rules.

173. Tomorrow, When the War Began (2010, Beattie, AUS/USA) - 3.5/5
(This is copy-pasted from my review on another forum )

Australia's answer to Red Dawn, Tomorrow, When the War Began is an action film/coming-of-age story written and directed by Stuart Beattie about seven teens who go camping one weekend, and return to the small town they call home to find Australia's been invaded by an unidentified Asian country interested in settling on Aussie's barren wastelands. If you were a child in Australasia during the 1990s or 2000s, then the book series was pretty much a rite of passage, and the majority of people who read it are, to this day, quite fond of it - and Beattie understands this. It's a flawed film, suffering from Beattie's recent tendency to overwrite his dialogue - in one scene, each character delivers their own pivotal dramatic monologue about how they're dealing with the invasion, one after the other, without stopping. The first fifteen minutes also feature some fairly groan-worthy humour, the latent race issues inherent in Marsden's initial series are glossed over, and there's an intrusive narration by lead protagonist Ellie (Caitlin Stasey) shoehorned in at some really bad times. The actors also expose their amateur roots a bit too readily - Lewis grates as red-blooded Aussie bloke Kevin, Hurd-Wood (playing Kevin's girlfriend Corrie) lacks a personality, and Chris Pang (Ellie's love interest, Lee) flubs a key monologue about halfway through. However, Beattie gets the spirit of the book dead on, lightening up the sudden maturity check the characters are put through with some gratifying scenes of shit blowing up, before bringing them crashing back to the reality of the guerilla war they're forced to fight. It's doubtless an unrealistic and slightly odd mixture of teenage wish-fulfillment and forced lessons about maturity, but Beattie's slick action direction (garbage truck, fuck yeah) and balanced script help overcome these concerns. The characters only intermittently feel like the cliches they're set up as in order to induce some light humour, and they feel like genuine teens thanks to the largely authentic performances (Andy Ryan also deserves a mention as the film's initial comic relief, the oddball stoner Chris, as does Ashleigh Cummings, who is excellent as god-botherer Robyn and one to watch). It's never too serious as to seem self-important, and it's never too ridiculous as to seem silly - it straddles the line between the two quite well, and Beattie's setpieces tie it all together in satisfying fashion. There's also some intriguing lip service paid to the whole metaphor for Australian's colonisation but let's face it you want kids with guns and that's what you get.

212. The Face of Fu Manchu (1965, Sharp, UK/GER) - 3/5
You guys get your Kurosawas and Murnaus and Kubricks all nice and restored and shown on your cinema screen, and that's cool. But I bet you don't get fucking Fu Manchu on your cinema screens. Well, we do. And it's awesome. No doubt, the film is mind-bogglingly racist - it's a 1960s revival of a villain from the time when Yellow Peril didn't describe Lt. Surge and his Pikachu-Raichu double-team, and nomenclatures like "Oriental" and "Chinaman" are dropped with the frequency of a Lebowskifest meeting in an Asian restaurant - and the protagonists are hilariously 'British' and unable to connect even the biggest of dots together. However, there's something bizarrely entertaining about a film in which the heroes are the definition of stiff-upper-lip (Nigel Green) and a German James Mason knockoff (Joachim Fuchsberger), and the villain is the decidedly not-Asian Christopher Lee staring at people and threatening to kill everything in the world if his vague demands are not met some time in the future (no rush). It helps that Green and Fuchsberger basically run from setpiece to setpiece, fighting off a cast of Asians and balding white men made up to (unconvincingly) look Asian, slowly working out what Fu Manchu is doing and loudly announcing confidential information in public places. It may be as xenophobic as Morrissey when he needs to promote a new album, and it has other flaws up the wazoo, but goddamn it's fun.


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rinc
She's supposed to be 13! I'd want her to be very attractive though


quote:

ORIGINAL: MonsterCat
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army
Stop being mean to Deviation

No.

(in reply to MOTH)
Post #: 9468
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 10/9/2010 7:38:29 PM   
Deviation


Posts: 27284
Joined: 2/6/2006
From: Enemies of Film HQ
quote:

ORIGINAL: MOTH

Continuing my effort to catch up on some acknowledged classics, with..

La Dolce Vita (Federico Fellini, 1960)
A stylish, vibrant film and still remarkably relevant in today's world of media tittle-tattle. The structure and themes are interesting, even if some sequences don't work as well as others and add to a long running time. But the music is great throughout and Fellini captures some wonderful imagery, not least the sight of Anita Ekberg's breasts struggling to escape the confines of her little black dress.(9/10)


Welcome to the wonderful word of Fellini, hated by imbeciles (). Any chance you'll check out 8 1/2?


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Dpp1978
There are certainly times where calling a person a cunt is not only reasonable, it is a gross understatement.

quote:


ORIGINAL: elab49
I really wish I could go down to see Privates

(in reply to MOTH)
Post #: 9469
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 10/9/2010 7:45:32 PM   
Dantes Inferno


Posts: 5887
Joined: 27/10/2007
From: Norway
I second that welcome. La Dolce Vita is awesome. See Amarcord too.

_____________________________

President of The Wire fan club. PM me to join.

(in reply to Deviation)
Post #: 9470
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 10/9/2010 9:11:58 PM   
MOTH

 

Posts: 3479
Joined: 3/10/2005
From: Sittin' on the dock of the bay
quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation

quote:

ORIGINAL: MOTH

Continuing my effort to catch up on some acknowledged classics, with..

La Dolce Vita (Federico Fellini, 1960)
A stylish, vibrant film and still remarkably relevant in today's world of media tittle-tattle. The structure and themes are interesting, even if some sequences don't work as well as others and add to a long running time. But the music is great throughout and Fellini captures some wonderful imagery, not least the sight of Anita Ekberg's breasts struggling to escape the confines of her little black dress.(9/10)


Welcome to the wonderful word of Fellini, hated by imbeciles (). Any chance you'll check out 8 1/2?



checked it out last year - actually makes an interesting companion piece to La Dolce Vita, although I don't think it's as good. Or at least it's not as much fun. I, Vitelloni is on the DVD-R ready to be watched as soon as I get round to it. which won't be soon, cos i'm off to sunnier climes on holiday for a week. woo-hoo!

< Message edited by MOTH -- 10/9/2010 9:14:09 PM >


_____________________________

I've only gone and set up a blog! This week I've been mostly reviewing The Lego Movie and Wadjda. Click: The Fast Picture Show

(in reply to Deviation)
Post #: 9471
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 11/9/2010 1:34:21 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 77530
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo

quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army

Short reviews today.

156. Bringing Up Baby (1938, Hawks, USA) - 3.5/5



Looking at your main list, this should be number 1.

_____________________________

So, sir, we let him have it right up! And I have to report, sir, he did not like it, sir.

Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

(in reply to Pigeon Army)
Post #: 9472
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 11/9/2010 12:47:35 PM   
Pigeon Army


Posts: 14612
Joined: 29/1/2006
From: Pixar HQ, George Lucas' Office.
quote:

ORIGINAL: Gimli The Dwarf


quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army

Short reviews today.

156. Bringing Up Baby (1938, Hawks, USA) - 3.5/5



Looking at your main list, this should be number 1.


Looking at your your face, this should be number shut up.

The bit in your av was pretty funny, though.


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rinc
She's supposed to be 13! I'd want her to be very attractive though


quote:

ORIGINAL: MonsterCat
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army
Stop being mean to Deviation

No.

(in reply to Gimli The Dwarf)
Post #: 9473
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 11/9/2010 1:36:34 PM   
Pigeon Army


Posts: 14612
Joined: 29/1/2006
From: Pixar HQ, George Lucas' Office.
140. Les vampires (The Vampires) (1915, Feuillade, FRN) - 4/5
It'd be naive to say there aren't problems with Louis Feuillade's epic pulp crime serial. At nearly seven hours long, it's almost inevitable that it would lag at points, and while it never drags for too long at any one point, Feuillade's editing leaves shots hanging a bit longer than they need to at either end, making them just elongated enough to be noticeable. Feuillade's script also has a fair share of moments that suggest Feuillade wasn't the tightest plotter around - the introduction of a love interest for dogged protagonist Phillipe Guerande in the ninth of ten chapters sticks out, as does the film's fake-out between the sixth and seventh chapters (what a place to stop for the night, though). However, for the most part, Feuillade sets out to thrill and excite, and when he's not stretching out his shots or allowing Marcel Levesque to mug for the camera and hold up proceedings (I swear at least 15 minutes of the film is him staring at the camera and making silly gestures), he does just that. Feuillade crafts some genuinely dynamic action sequences that overcome the restrictions of the static camera Feuillade works with (the chase sequence in chapter nine, the rescue mission in chapter ten) and while the Vampires and the heroes both seem to stumble through the film and achieving things despite their myriad of fuck-ups, Feuillade manages to make every single plan and its inevitable foiling incredibly tense and riveting (the switch up in chapter two is a great example of this). The acting's also great - Edouard Mathe is fantastic as driven reporter Guerande, his ability to do the police's job better than the police easy to accept; Musidora is oddly captivating as Irma Vep, even if she's got that same "wide eyes = expressiveness" bullshit going on that Maria Falconetti had in The Passion of Joan of Arc; Fernand Herrman is brilliantly slimy as master thief Moreno; and Levesque is great as comic relief Mazamette when he's not breaking the fourth wall (Rene Poyen is also great as Mazamette's cheeky son, emulating his father's fourth wall-breaking as if knowing that his dad's being a dick when he does it). Let's not pretend that the story at the centre of this is high art - there's no need to when it's this damn fun.


< Message edited by Pigeon Army -- 11/9/2010 1:38:22 PM >


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rinc
She's supposed to be 13! I'd want her to be very attractive though


quote:

ORIGINAL: MonsterCat
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army
Stop being mean to Deviation

No.

(in reply to Pigeon Army)
Post #: 9474
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 11/9/2010 10:22:21 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54574
Joined: 1/10/2005
Hall of Fame
 
Kings of the Road (Wenders, 1976)
Rashomon (Kurosawa, 1950)
Les Vampires (Feuillade, 1915)
 
They Drive By Night (Woods, 1938)
 
They Drive By Night is one of the films provided to support the argument that the period of British classic noir actually started before the US (and finished after).
 
Shorty Matthews becomes the prime suspect when an old girlfriend is murdered shortly after his release from jail. Going on the run (in a truck, that favourite icon of the noir genre and possibly part of the confusion with the 1940 US release of the same number that focuses entirely on trucking), he helps out another old friend who nearly comes unstuck with another trucker, eludes the police then ends up back in London, helped by the friend, Molly, who has become a minor heroine after fooling the police about her relationship with Shorty.

At this point we get an almost completely different storyline, similar to the serial killer plotlines that Hitchcock was so fond of. With the introduction of the brilliant Ernest Thesiger, we're suddenly in more of a murder mystery genre, winding down to a symbolic scene outside the prison that links back to an execution that took place as Shorty left at the start of the film.
 
Shorty's storyline – ejected back into a seedy world of dance girls and crooks and murderers – clearly has strong noir elements. This is enhanced by the camerawork while he's on the run – the dark of the trucks and the chases through the woods. The film is based on a book by James Curtis (recently reissued); an author who dealt with the down and outs of society and the links between poverty and crime, exactly the kind of source material that noir thrived upon.
 
Although quota quickies had a bad name, there are some real gems out there, some easier to get a hold of than others. They Drive by Night isn't one of them, sadly.
 
Alfie (Gilbert, 1966)
 
The epitome of the swinging 60s as Michael Caine in his starmaking role of Alfie swans round London free as a bird, not tied down by any woman. Merrily breaking the 4th wall, Caine dominates the screen and your opinion of the film really stands or falls on how you find his character. Irrespective, however – you can't fault the performance.

Based on a rather more controversial play a couple of years earlier (which the relevant censorship office had had several shades of conniptions about), the BBFC gave the film a much easier time. Where the abortion scene was ripped to pieces on stage it survives pretty much intact onto the screen.  It seemed at times that every other New Wave film had the abortion scene – the impact of the 'real' world seemed to be a desperate need to repeatedly present unwanted pregnancies. This is kind of the case with Alfie as he gets involved with a married woman, but the scenes surrounding the termination are actually very well done – you don't get the overdone grotesque of Up the Junction, or the comedy aunt helping out in Saturday Night Sunday Morning. You get someone coming in to do the job and go – leaving a quiet devastation behind and a game-changer for hard-bitten Alfie as he gets rid of the remains but, even then, his final choice, his decision to try something different, blows up in his face. So 'what's it all about'?

And another one to ignore the remake of!

 
Live Now, Pay Later (Lewis, 1962)
 
And now the earlier film that Alfie's writer clearly owes something of a debt to. Ian Hendry plays a tally man – with rationing coming to an end and the American dream filtering through the cinema, Britain's households learned to furnish with the best, but all on tick. Albert goes door to door, selling the future to housewives, and knowing the ins and outs of what'll happen when the bailiffs, often inevitably, come to call.
 
There are many similarities to Alfie. The slick patter is near identical, and there are some very close links to the relationships in Alfie, starting with a breakup and dealing with an unwanted child and an ex who hooks up with a good man (Carry On regular Peter Butterworth – nice to see him in a more sober role).
 
Live Now is more of a satire on modern society though. Although it touches on hypocrisy in local politics, even the upbeat musical number that opens the film emphasises the criticism of the contemporary desire for HP goods, even if wrapped up in an often charming and very amusing package (a very early role for a slightly bouffant hair Peter Bowles provides some additional amusement).
 
It's Hendry's film start to finish. An actor who should have been a far bigger star than he was, he turns in a fantastic central performance as the outwardly confident but really a bit of a mess Albert, whose world makes increasingly less sense as he loses the woman he's closest to and see the effect of his sales pitch up close.
 
The Invisible (Goyer, 2007)
 
A bright high school student on the brink of defying his mother and heading abroad for a creative writing course gets caught up in a situation with an excessively angry fellow student. When the girl attacks him, believing he reported her for theft, he floats about the film in an extended out of body experience learning to 'understand' and 'get' the girl and forming a link with her that does not end well, while also learning to understand why his mother is such an unreasonable bitch.
 
This isn't very good. There is no naturalness or rhythm to the language used, and it sounds so po-faced and deliberate and 'look at us we're being MEANINGFUL'. It's a silly story and the character of Annie is a ridiculously bad conceit and never remotely credible. Not that the 2 leads don't try and there is one rather transcendent moment when Annie dances that you actually feel you might be seeing a real person
 
Dead End (Wyler, 1937)
 
The introduction of the Dead End Kids to Hollywood – a group of actors, most of whom had been in a play in New York about the lives of kids in the poorer parts of the city, who ran riot on the set and most other sets they ended up on but who, the originals and later replacements, made series of films for years.
 
The idea to transform the play into a film was that of the director, William Wyler. Creating a world where the apartments of the rich live side by side with slum tenements (so the former can get a picturesque view of the river), it tells several linked stories – a sister whose brother (one of the kids) gets into trouble after bullying a rich man's son and then cutting the man himself; an unemployed architect in love with a rich man's mistress; and, a returning killer – Baby Face – back to find his old girlfriend.
 
To an extent the storylines seem rather trite but there's a good deal of anger in some of the writing and, in particular, Sylvia Sydney is superb as the sister, on strike, who considers some rather difficult options to get out of the slum and help her brother. Baby Face has to deal with a mother ashamed of him and a girlfriend (the excellent Oscar nominated Claire Trevor) who has an illness the film doesn't have the balls to mention. But even with that he, Bogart, takes the time to throw temptation in the way of the slum kids – a suggestion that his way out is the only way out. Through all this, Joel McCrea's storyline is the slightest, even though he is presented front and centre as the American hero.
 
The film feels like a play in many ways – the structured stage setting clearly doesn't intend to branch out from a limited number of locations. But the film looks amazing – the world Toland creates with his camera, starting with the movement from the city to this small patch, from the slum to the houses of the rich, is fantastic and even though it's set up like a stage setting it never feels that way – the depths of the shadows, the movement of the camera, all conspire to repeatedly fool you. And when the story descends into murder, the shadows leap out of the alleyways and ratchet up the tension. Wonderfully shot – Toland was a master at work.  

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ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


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Post #: 9475
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 11/9/2010 10:32:35 PM   
matty_b


Posts: 14549
Joined: 19/10/2005
From: Outpost 31 calling McMurtle.
The Road (John Hillcoat)

Rarely has a film so successfully adapted the tone and feel of the book it's based upon - Cormac McCarthy's tale of a man and son struggling to survive in a post-apocalyptic wilderness is one of utter desolation, bereft of hope, and Hillcoat's adaptation nails it beautifully. Shot upon a slate-grey palette it's a remarkable visual achievement - as it needs to be, with such little dialogue. Trees on the verge of crumbling to dust, vast and barren wastelands and buildings that have been razed to the ground are tremendously evocative and thoroughly convinces you of the traumatic events our two main characters have to live through. Viggo Mortenson and Kodi Smit-McPhiee as father and son strike up a believable family chemistry and share the hollow look of endless aching pain. As you might guess, it's not cheery Friday night fodder, but it's tremendously affecting and beautifully realised. (9/10)

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Post #: 9476
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 12/9/2010 2:49:33 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54574
Joined: 1/10/2005
Hall of Fame

Bringing Up Baby (Hawks, 1938)
La Grande Illusion (Renoir, 1937)

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quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to matty_b)
Post #: 9477
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 12/9/2010 7:36:08 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54574
Joined: 1/10/2005
Long Weekend (Eggleston, 1977)
 
Unusual Australian horror where the most frightening thing on screen is the increasingly toxic relationship between the two very unsympathetic leads.
 
After what sounds like a swinging party and a resultant abortion, Peter and Marcia are in meltdown. Peter decides rather foolishly that a weekend at the coast is a good idea. Unfortunately, nature is as out of sorts as they are – Marcia keeps hearing a crying baby, a mysterious threatening shape keeps turning up in the water and dead animals seem to be moving up the beach towards them.
 
This would work by itself – the constant references to motherhood and the destruction of the young would support a theory of nature in rebellion. There are separate hints, though, via radio broadcasts of some kind of general bird attacks and a bigger story of nuclear tests giving a second option of mother nature generally being slightly pissed off. Whichever it is, both Hargreaves and Behets are excellent, the use of sound genuinely creepy and Eggleston gives us a pretty nihilistic view of human nature along with a few effective shocks.
 
 
 
Anamorph (Miller, 2007)
 
Run of the mill serial killer film that copy/pastes from a variety of others and uses an arty term to pretend to some intelligence. It's quite a trial to drag yourself through it.
 
Horseman of the Apocalypse (Akerlund, 2009)
 
This serial killer one is sadder in many ways. There are a couple of decent actors wasting time in it (Quaid, Collins Jr). And because it thinks it's an ideas film – not one killer but many and the motive.
 
One of the many problems is that the ideas are communicated by Zhang Ziyi in heavily accented English and a sneer in place of an acting attempt. Add that to pretty poor writing and directing and you get something of a calumphing mess of a film that thinks it is far more interesting than it is. Somewhat worryingly, I got the impression watching it that the writer, who also gave us the highpoints of Doom and the Expendables, might inexplicably have run across Sion Sono's Suicide Club at some point.
 
Black Widow (Johnson, 1954)
 
A fair demonstration of some of the questionable definitions used in the Fox Noir releases – Black Widow isn't noir, it's a soapy murder mystery that thinks it is a successor to the likes of Laura – it isn't.
 
An insinuating young girl – the Black Widow of the title – apparently kills herself (and her unborn child) in the apartment of the married man. The man – Van Heflin – comes under suspicion when it turns out to be murder. On the run, he takes it upon himself to trace the girl's story in her travels through New York.
 
It's not a particularly good film and there's a pretty obvious vein of mysogyny through it. We're supposed to understand some out-of-place violence Heflin uses against a female witness and the hatchet job on the victim never quite holds together – lots of insinuations are made but they aren't supported by the actual story.
 
The performances aren't particularly noteworthy in general, and Ginger Rogers gives a quite awful hammy performance. Exceptions are Reginald Gardner as her overlooked husband and George Raft as the bright policeman in charge of the case.

_____________________________

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quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 9478
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 13/9/2010 12:26:21 AM   
Deviation


Posts: 27284
Joined: 2/6/2006
From: Enemies of Film HQ
The Navigator- 5/5

An hour long film by Keaton, full of charm and some witty sight gags as Keaton's sap rich boy ends up alone in a cruise liner in the middle of the sea with the girl he wants to marry. It's quite sweet, and has many memorable moments with an endearing relationship in the middle.

Cure- 5/5

Kiyoshi Kurosawa's excellent slow-paced chiller about a killer who hypnotizes his victims into murdering people horribly. Excellent performances, camerawork and shots, stunning faded out visuals, pacing and mood, with an original, enigmatic plot.

Magnificent Obsession- 3/5

Melodramatic and OTT to a level I never thought imaginable, well acted and visually stunning, with some clever editing and camerawork.

Journey to Italy- 5/5

This was better than I expected, with the plot dealing primarily with the decaying and then reunification of a married couple while traveling in Italy. Great performances and tight direction by Rosselini, giving quite an amount of complexity to what should have been a thin plot.

Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time
- 2/5

I've ended up watching two mediocre films today, which I had imagined to find rather terrible. The first was this, a filled with some stunning sets and cinematography (and Gemma Artenton, PHWOARRRR etc...). The rest is a slightly entertaining, horribly frenetically edited, formulaic and generic, poorly acted, directed and sometimes downright stupid plot. But it was mildly fun and PHWOARRRRRR Gemma Artenton etc......

The Expendables- 2/5

By Vishnu's balls, this wasn't terrible. It had a mostly fun first hour (with the non-existent characters, the terribly misconceived Statham girlfriend subplot and the other Expendables being almost a non-entity) with some quotable lines, some fun action scenes and an extremely entertaining Eric Roberts as a murderous, high class, capitalist asswipe who's probably the biggest bastard I've seen since the yuppie from Naked. The rest is dumb and poorly developed, which makes itself clear when the film runs out of steam in the final thirty minutes and I stopped caring. Still, for the first hour and Eric Roberts, it is worth a watch, just a shame it becomes dull and lingering afterwords. ALSO WORST CGI BLOOD EVER SERIOUSLY FUCKING EVER


< Message edited by Deviation -- 13/9/2010 12:37:34 AM >


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ORIGINAL: Dpp1978
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ORIGINAL: elab49
I really wish I could go down to see Privates

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Post #: 9479
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 13/9/2010 1:19:37 AM   
Miles Messervy 007


Posts: 6884
Joined: 11/2/2009
First, I'll update the features:

6. Reservoir Dogs (1992, Tarantino)
Still awesome, and Tarantino's 2nd best film. Unlike the follow-up, it's never too much of a good thing, a very efficient piece of work, which is as fresh as a film with a ripped off plot can be. The acting is uniformly fun (I even like Tarantino's cameo in this, he's such a dork), the heist film without a heist approach totally works, and a film that can make you laugh one minute and then gasp the next is surely a ripping yarn. 10

22. La double vie de Vιronique [The Double Life of Veronique] (1991, Kieślowski)
Initial response: Jacob is the most beautiful woman ever (and if only gay people like her, according to a certain forum member, then I'm the gayest person ever, hence paul's sig quote #1) and this is one of the most beautiful films ever. Doesn't quite live up to Three Colours. I can safely say this is not going to be my last watch of this potential masterpiece though. 9

43. Scott Pilgrim vs. the World (2010, Wright)
Film doesn't suck, surprising no-one. 9
Better than the books which I read after watching this. I do get people's problems with it (the third act is rushed, which leads to some underdevelopment), but I thought the casting and the acting were perfect, the editing monumental (that shoelace is the best cinema moment since God knows when for me), and the humour right on target.

64. Gregory's Girl (1981, Forsyth)
Lovely. 8

93. Lola rennt [Run Lola Run] (1998, Tykwer)
MTV does Blind Chance with guns? The film is much reviled in "movie snob" circles, and I can certainly see why, but I disagree. Despite the fact that the film is startlingly nonsensical at times and the clashing nature of the cartoonish video game nature of it with the more heartfelt moments, this is fun. It's short, which helps, but I wouldn't say I was at all bored. On the other hand, I'm not sure I'd go out of my way to see it again. The film has some great moments (the centerpiece of the second segment being the highlight) which off-set the slightly preposterous "and then" flash-forwards, and the actors' engaging performances do likewise to the pretty annoying score. It probably could have done more with the concept (the ending, for instance, is too positive), but I'm not complaining - this has originality and kinetic power in spades. 8 Wanna see more Tykwer for sure.

107. La femme infidιle [The Unfaithful Wife] (1969, Chabrol)
111. Les biches [The Does] (1968, Chabrol)
First of all, RIP. Secondly, both of these show a man confident with his style at work, and the style is similar, with over-the-top music and down-to-earth camerawork (albeit with a passion for reflecting sunlight) mixing in with moments of black humour (better done in Les Biches) and infidelity and murder as centerpieces (better done in La femme infidιle). Definitely intrigued me enough to explore more, and there really isn't a bad thing to single out (though Trintignant is shamefully underused in the latter), but not really amazing. 8

117. The Great Dictator (1940, Chaplin)
Uneven. The Hitler parody is brilliant (and Napoloni steals the show), and the war segment is pretty great, but the barber scenes range between fantastic (the Brahms shave) and boring (Goddard's elevated speeches [literally, on the roof]). Also, like Chaplin himself said, the film didn't survive the knowledge of what really happened to Jews in WWII really well. So, it's his 2nd weakest film I've seen but there isn't a bad one amongst the bunch. 8

133. Moulin Rouge! (2001, Luhrmann)
Well, I watched it with an audio description thinking it was an ironic voiceover (hence, paul's sig quote #2), which means I'm not really in a position to review it, but I'll do so in one sentence. Pop-art nonsense; butchers Queen; Elephant Love Medley is awesome; Kidman is hawt; I like McGregor; visuals are cool; poor Latrec what has he done to deserve it; the music on the soundtrack albums is torture for the ears but works in the film. That's all. 8

158. Mrs. Doubtfire (1993, Columbus)
Hadn't seen it until now for some reason. Fun stuff. It's odd seeing Williams in this after I just watched his Homicide guest role. He's pretty great and I haven't seen Tootsie which seems to weigh people's opinions of this down somewhat, but it still wasn't great. The use of music was great, and I like how Brosnan isn't a villain in any sense, and the kids are much better than most child actors in Hollywood movies, but the plotting is just dumb and I didn't like the ending. 7

165. Rebel Without a Cause (1955, N. Ray)
The score is great and James Dean (first film of his I've seen) is awesome, the rest... meh. I can see where people see the greatness, I just don't see it myself. Dated stuff with a boring second half if you ask me. The only reason this isn't lower is because Wood is pretty* 7

* self-parody, geddit?

< Message edited by Miles Messervy 007 -- 17/9/2010 12:05:58 AM >


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jamesbondguy:
Miles is clearly the finest film theorist of his generation

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Deviation:
if it isn't ham, I'll eat a living pig.

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