Register  |   Log In  |  
Sign up to our weekly newsletter    
Follow us on   
Search   
Forum Home Register for Free! Log In Moderator Tickets FAQ Users Online

RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010

 
Logged in as: Guest
  Printable Version
All Forums >> [Film Forums] >> Lists and Top 10s >> RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 Page: <<   < prev  300 301 [302] 303 304   next >   >>
Login
Message << Older Topic   Newer Topic >>
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 17/8/2010 9:45:50 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 77554
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo
I haven't posted that much in here recently as I was waiting until I'd seen the following and hoped to do some epic review. But that'd take too long, so I'd doing a sentenced or less for each!

2. Schindler's List (5th view, 1993,Steven Spielberg) - 5/5
After LOTR, my second favourite film and I can't see that changing anytime soon

3. Jaws (8th view, 1975, Steven Spielberg) - 5/5
Awesome in every way

4. Duel (19th view, 1971, Steven Spielberg) - 5/5
Sheer, bloody desperate panic have never been portrayed so brilliantly as here

5. Indiana Jones & The Last Crusade (24th view, 1989, Steven Spielberg) - 5/5
The best of the Indy films

6. Jurassic Park (20th+ view, 1993, Steven Spielberg) - 5/5
Awesome

8. Saving Private Ryan (12th view, 1998, Steven Spielberg) - 5/5
I've never understood the hate for this

9. Close Encounters Of The Third Kind (7th view, 1977, Steven Spielberg) - 5/5
Awesome

11. Raiders Of The Lost Ark (16th view, 1981, Steven Spielberg) - 5/5
Awesome

13. E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial (8th view, 1982, Steven Spielberg) - 5/5
Used to hate it when I was younger, but I love it now

14. A.I.: Artificial Intelligence (5th view, 2001, Steven Spielberg) - 5/5
Visually one of the mist enchanting films I've seen

15. War Of The Worlds (4th view, 2005, Steven Spielberg) - 5/5
Set-piece cinema at its best

All these are very good

24. Minority Report (6th view, 2002, Steven Spielberg) - 4/5
Best innocent man on the run film I've seen except for North By Northwest

36 The Color Purple (4th view, 1986, Steven Spielberg) - 4/5.
Hugely overlooked

45. Amistad (5th view, 1997, Steven Spielberg) - 4/5
As is this

48. Munich (3rd view, 2005, Steven Spielberg) - 4/5
51. The Terminal (3rd view, 2004, Steven Spielberg) - 4/5
53. Indiana Jones and The Temple Of Doom (10th view, 1984, Steven Spielberg) - 4/5
63. The Lost World: Jurassic Park (8th view, 1997, Steven Spielberg) - 4/5
67. The Sugarland Express (2nd view, 1974, Steven Spielberg) - 4/5
74. Catch Me If You Can (5th view (2002, Steven Spielberg) - 4/5
82. Empire Of The Sun (3rd view, 1987, Steven Spielberg) - 4/5

90. Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull (4th view, 2008, Steven Spielberg) - 4/5

The weakest Indy, but there are moments of brilliance to match the original and Ford just is Indiana Jones.


But these aren't so good.


166. Always (2nd view, 1989, Steven Spielberg) - 3/5
A trio of fine lad performances though, and one of Williams' finest scores.

185. 1941 (2nd view, 1979, Steven Spielberg) - 3/5
207. Hook (3rd view, 1991, Steven Spielberg) - 3/5



_____________________________

So, sir, we let him have it right up! And I have to report, sir, he did not like it, sir.

Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

(in reply to impqueen)
Post #: 9031
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 17/8/2010 9:50:03 AM   
Pigeon Army


Posts: 14612
Joined: 29/1/2006
From: Pixar HQ, George Lucas' Office.
Soooo...you voted in the Best Directors poll, Gimli? 

_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rinc
She's supposed to be 13! I'd want her to be very attractive though


quote:

ORIGINAL: MonsterCat
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army
Stop being mean to Deviation

No.

(in reply to Gimli The Dwarf)
Post #: 9032
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 17/8/2010 9:59:08 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 77554
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo
I may have

It was really enjoyable seeing them all again, many I haven't watched in well over 5 years. I'm tempted to so Spielberg moments list after I've finished my Rings one, but it seems so daunting.

_____________________________

So, sir, we let him have it right up! And I have to report, sir, he did not like it, sir.

Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

(in reply to Pigeon Army)
Post #: 9033
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 17/8/2010 10:26:15 AM   
elab49


Posts: 54577
Joined: 1/10/2005
quote:

ORIGINAL: Epiphany Demon
Top of the list are Claude Rains and Peter Lorre, both absolutely astonishing in smaller roles (Lorre's is notable for being almost a cameo - with M also seen this year, I'm very impressed with him. Recommendations


A similar question about Lorre came up years ago and it occurred to me nearly all my recommendations began with M!

Man Who Knew Too Much (the best version)
the Mr Moto films are well worth looking out
Mask of Dimitrious if you can find it
Maltese Falcon

and Crime and Punishment, one Lorre was very involved in himself.

And Man From The South - a Dahl story in Alfred Hitchcock Presents also starring Steve McQueen. It used to be up on youtube.

_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to Epiphany Demon)
Post #: 9034
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 17/8/2010 12:10:32 PM   
Piles


Posts: 5545
Joined: 6/8/2007
From: Whalley Range
I have to admire your Spielberg commitment, Gimli! Crazy stuff. I think Empire of the Sun is probably his best, though.

_____________________________

Top 100 Moz Songs / Top 100 Films

(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 9035
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 17/8/2010 12:18:16 PM   
Miles Messervy 007


Posts: 6884
Joined: 11/2/2009
Hook > Schindler's List, that's all.

_____________________________

quote:

jamesbondguy:
Miles is clearly the finest film theorist of his generation

quote:

Deviation:
if it isn't ham, I'll eat a living pig.

(in reply to Piles)
Post #: 9036
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 17/8/2010 12:21:23 PM   
shool


Posts: 10063
Joined: 24/3/2006
From: In The Pipe, Five by Five.
quote:

ORIGINAL: Gimli The Dwarf

I haven't posted that much in here recently as I was waiting until I'd seen the following and hoped to do some epic review. But that'd take too long, so I'd doing a sentenced or less for each!

2. Schindler's List (5th view, 1993,Steven Spielberg) - 5/5
After LOTR, my second favourite film and I can't see that changing anytime soon

3. Jaws (8th view, 1975, Steven Spielberg) - 5/5
Awesome in every way

4. Duel (19th view, 1971, Steven Spielberg) - 5/5
Sheer, bloody desperate panic have never been portrayed so brilliantly as here

5. Indiana Jones & The Last Crusade (24th view, 1989, Steven Spielberg) - 5/5
The best of the Indy films

6. Jurassic Park (20th+ view, 1993, Steven Spielberg) - 5/5
Awesome

8. Saving Private Ryan (12th view, 1998, Steven Spielberg) - 5/5
I've never understood the hate for this

9. Close Encounters Of The Third Kind (7th view, 1977, Steven Spielberg) - 5/5
Awesome

11. Raiders Of The Lost Ark (16th view, 1981, Steven Spielberg) - 5/5
Awesome

13. E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial (8th view, 1982, Steven Spielberg) - 5/5
Used to hate it when I was younger, but I love it now

14. A.I.: Artificial Intelligence (5th view, 2001, Steven Spielberg) - 5/5
Visually one of the mist enchanting films I've seen

15. War Of The Worlds (4th view, 2005, Steven Spielberg) - 5/5
Set-piece cinema at its best

All these are very good

24. Minority Report (6th view, 2002, Steven Spielberg) - 4/5
Best innocent man on the run film I've seen except for North By Northwest

36 The Color Purple (4th view, 1986, Steven Spielberg) - 4/5.
Hugely overlooked

45. Amistad (5th view, 1997, Steven Spielberg) - 4/5
As is this

48. Munich (3rd view, 2005, Steven Spielberg) - 4/5
51. The Terminal (3rd view, 2004, Steven Spielberg) - 4/5
53. Indiana Jones and The Temple Of Doom (10th view, 1984, Steven Spielberg) - 4/5
63. The Lost World: Jurassic Park (8th view, 1997, Steven Spielberg) - 4/5
67. The Sugarland Express (2nd view, 1974, Steven Spielberg) - 4/5
74. Catch Me If You Can (5th view (2002, Steven Spielberg) - 4/5
82. Empire Of The Sun (3rd view, 1987, Steven Spielberg) - 4/5

90. Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull (4th view, 2008, Steven Spielberg) - 4/5

The weakest Indy, but there are moments of brilliance to match the original and Ford just is Indiana Jones.


But these aren't so good.


166. Always (2nd view, 1989, Steven Spielberg) - 3/5
A trio of fine lad performances though, and one of Williams' finest scores.

185. 1941 (2nd view, 1979, Steven Spielberg) - 3/5
207. Hook (3rd view, 1991, Steven Spielberg) - 3/5







_____________________________

Invisio Text for Spoilers
[ color=#F1F1F1 ] Spoiler text [ /color ] , remove spaces between square brackets

"No one knows what it means, but it's provocative... It gets the people going!"

(in reply to Gimli The Dwarf)
Post #: 9037
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 17/8/2010 6:35:07 PM   
Miles Messervy 007


Posts: 6884
Joined: 11/2/2009
FILMS WATCHED IN JULY 2010


Features:


1. The Apartment (1960, Wilder) RW 10 imdb review


2. Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966, Nichols) 9 imdb review


3. Annie Hall (1977, Allen) RW 9 imdb review


4. La salaire de la peur [The Wages of Fear] (1953, Clouzot) 9 imdb review


5. Koyaanisqatsi (1982, Reggio) 9 imdb review


6. Splendor in the Grass (1961, Kazan) 8 imdb review


7. Bakha satang [Peppermint Candy] (1999, Lee) 8 imdb review


8. Toy Story 3 (2010, Unkrich) C 8 imdb review


9. Two for the Road (1967, Donen) 8 imdb review


10. Chocolat [Chocolate] (1988, Denis) 8 imdb review


11. Le mépris [Contempt] (1963, Godard) 8 imdb review


12. À bout de souffle [Breathless] (1960, Godard) C RW 8 imdb review


13. Tôkyô nagaremono [Tokyo Drifter] (1966, Suzuki) 8 imdb review


14. I tre volti della paura [Black Sabbath] (1963, Bava) 8 imdb review


15. White Material (2009, Denis) C 8 imdb review


16. The 39 Steps (1935, Hitchcock) 8 imdb review


17. All That Heaven Allows (1955, Sirk) 8 imdb review


18. The Palm Beach Story (1942, P. Sturges) 8 imdb review


19. Le beau Serge [Handsome Serge] (1958, Chabrol) 8 imdb review


20. Halloween (1978, Carpenter) 7 imdb review


21. 4 luni, 3 saptamâni si 2 zile [4 Months, 3 Weeks, and 2 Days] (2007, Mungiu) 7 imdb review


22. Le petit soldat [The Little Soldier] (1963, Godard) 7 imdb review


23. Shadows (1959, Cassavetes) 7 imdb review


24. Juno (2007, J. Reitman) 7 imdb review


25. Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory (1971, Stuart) 7 imdb review


26. Jokôsei: tenshi no harawata [Angel Guts: High School Co-Ed] (1978, Sone) 7 imdb review


27. Jour de fête [Festival Day] (1949, Tati) 7 imdb review


28. The Great Moment (1944, P. Sturges) 6 imdb review


29. Match Point (2005, Allen) 6 imdb review

Shorts:

1. Begone Dull Care (1949, McLaren) {8 mins} RW 10 imdb review
2. The Skeleton Dance (1929, Disney) {6 mins} 8 imdb review
3. Day & Night (2010, Newton) {6 mins} C 8 imdb review
4. Une histoire d’eau [A Story of Water] (1961, Godard/Truffaut) {12 mins} 7 imdb review



See code, ratings, and a brief explanation on shorts in the initial post.

Stats:
Films seen by decade (+shorts)
20s: 0 (+1)
30s: 1 (+0)
40s: 3 (+1)
50s: 4 (+0)
60s: 7 (+1)
70s: 4 (+0)
80s: 2 (+0)
90s: 1 (+0)
00s: 4 (+0)
10s: 1 (+1)

Average rating for features: 7.8
Average rating for shorts: 8.3
Average rating for cinema viewing: 8.0
Average rating for re-watches: 9.3

Directors with more than one feature:
Jean-Luc Godard - 3
Woody Allen, Claire Denis, Preston Sturges - 2

Directors with one feature:
Billy Wilder, Mike Nichols, Henri-Georges Clouzot, Godfrey Reggio, Elia Kazan, Lee Chang Dong, Lee Unkrich, Stanley Donen, Seijun Suzuki, Mario Bava, Alfred Hitchcock, Douglas Sirk, Claude Chabrol, John Carpenter, Cristian Mungiu, John Cassavetes, Jason Reitman, Mel Stuart, Chûsei Sone, Jacques Tati


< Message edited by Miles Messervy 007 -- 17/8/2010 6:46:23 PM >


_____________________________

quote:

jamesbondguy:
Miles is clearly the finest film theorist of his generation

quote:

Deviation:
if it isn't ham, I'll eat a living pig.

(in reply to GoodBadGroovy)
Post #: 9038
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 17/8/2010 6:36:06 PM   
Miles Messervy 007


Posts: 6884
Joined: 11/2/2009
I forgot about this, and decided not to break the tradition

_____________________________

quote:

jamesbondguy:
Miles is clearly the finest film theorist of his generation

quote:

Deviation:
if it isn't ham, I'll eat a living pig.

(in reply to Miles Messervy 007)
Post #: 9039
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 17/8/2010 7:05:33 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54577
Joined: 1/10/2005
Ealing triple bill thanks to the Brit list

Passport to Pimlico (Cornelius, 1949)
 
The first two Ealing comedies proper (this and Hue and Cry) came from the pen of TEB Clarke, a great British writer who would go on to write Lavender Hill Mob, The Titfield Thunderbolt and also the Blue Lamp. This particular gem is, IMO, the best of his Ealing scripts – a bomb reveals a cache of papers that include proof that Pimlico was once signed over to Burgundy and the secession had never been revoked. Which meant that the government had no authority over this little patch of London – in particular it meant no more rationing! Flooded with jack the lads and outright crooks, the plucky little borough has to deal with a rather annoyed government, the loss of utilities and the loss of their food supply. With twists and capers afoot, the independents come to realise that, difficult though life currently is in Britain, they are better off there than anywhere else.
 
Passport is an amazingly apt entry for the current times – a film born out of the last 'austerity Britain' under Clement Attlee with Chancellor Stafford Cripps a symbol of a country where the weekly ration looked more like the average modern breakfast and voices were being raised louder against a need for rationing made more extreme after the war than during. Because Passport is more than just light comedy – fantasy it may be but it's a film that captures the political and economic times as perfectly as any piece of social realism. Think it's imagination? Just look at them joyously ripping up their ration books or the anti-Cripps placard outside the border. Or the food thrown over the walls replicating the contemporary support given to squatters appropriating property of their own during the shortages – an organised squatters revolt in Kensington under the auspices of the Communist Party saw the kind of support and food parcels in real life that Clarke later wrote into his script.
 
Passport is a brilliantly written and played comedy – Stanley Holloway, Margaret Rutherford are joys to watch. But it is also an acutely observed piece of social politics.

Man in the White Suit (Mackendrick, 1951)
 
As promised, another film from one of the writers of Went the Day Well – John Dighton (also creator of The Happiest Days of Your Life. This one a tale of a thwarted dream – a new invention, suppressed by vested interests.
 
A case of mistaken identity gives research scientist Sidney Stratton an in to the experimental section at a textile mill, after the cost of his work causes him to lose his previous job (and after a lovely scene when the lab staff realise one by one that they haven't a clue who built the bubbling test tubes in the corner). Determined to develop a new material – everlasting and dirt-proof – he doesn't consider the consequences to the fat cats or the workers. It doesn't occur to boss Cecil Parker either until word gets out – and then, with the prices of shares falling and the workers revolting, Sidney escapes and the chase is on.
 
Sidney is a wonderful character – absolutely oblivious to everything but his obsessive pursuit of his invention. There's a wonderful reaction to the first explosion when he looks on the smouldering remains 'that shouldn't have happened' – as if disappointed at a recalcitrant child. He should be far less sympathetic than he is, but Guinness plays him as an innocent with a hint of physical comedy that puts as firmly in his corner from the start. The girl in the film as so often with Ealing is the Joan Greenwood, she of the wonderfully husky voice, as Birnley's rebellious daughter who swots up on chemistry after taking an interest in Sidney and sees the altruistic possibilities for his work.
 
There are some glorious scenes in the film – the escape itself, the gradual build-up of sandbags in the exploding factory and my favourite, a wonderful procession of fat cat cars at the top of the hill in the Milltown with the factory in the background, Mackendrick's best shot in the film.
 
Man in the White Suit follows Ealing's normal pattern of supporting the little man but this one is a little different in mood to most of the comedies, particularly in the final scenes. Shot like a noir round the streets of the town Sidney first encounters a young girl (Frankenstein's monster anyone?), and the voice of the common people reminds us that maybe the mob might be in the right in this one but that makes the beautifully pitched final scene of the chase no less heartbreaking for Sidney.
 
Went the Day Well (Cavalcanti, 1942)
 
Welcome to the Battle of Bramley End, the film John Patterson refers to as the 'homegrown version of Red Dawn'!
 
Directed by the gifted Brazilian, Went the Day Well is one of my favourite films of WWII. Cavalcanti wasn't just a great director though. He's the man who taught directors how to direct at Grierson's GPO (Humphrey Jennings amongst others owed him a great debt, and possibly more directly as this film is clearly an influence on Jenning's later Silent Village with some scenes of senseless slaughter). Moving to Ealing he not only made films for the studio, he worked with Balcon to develop what Ealing films actually became. So as well as a gifted director in his own right, Cavalcanti is one of the most important figures in British film history and it's only right that his own best film should be placed so well in this list, although not nearly high enough!
 
Harking back to the phoney war, the film gives us another - based on a Graham Greene short story, Went the Day Well is a fantasy that considers how a normal English village would actually handle an initially covert Nazi invasion. Scripted by two writers with entries in the last update, John Dighton and Angus MacPhail (and, indeed, further up in this), with the help of Diane Morgan, it perfectly balances thriller elements with human drama as the unlikeliest of people show their mettle and, intriguingly for a film released in 1942, some very harsh outcomes. Demonising the Nazis, there is a good deal more violence in the film than you'd expect, some quite ruthless and shockingly so. Children are fair game, woman and priests. Annoying old fusspots plot with condiments and wield axes. There is a genuinely weird and wonderful quality to the film. But it is also a stirring and very effective story of sacrifice and bravery and the audience would be expected to leave the cinema that bit more steadfast at a difficult time before the war turned.
 
Michael Caine's enjoyable The Eagle Has Landed owes more than a little to this film too.


_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to Miles Messervy 007)
Post #: 9040
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 18/8/2010 1:18:55 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 77554
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo

quote:

ORIGINAL: Miles Messervy 007

Hook > Schindler's List, that's all.




quote:

ORIGINAL: shool






Why, thankyou There's not enough Spielberg love on here!


_____________________________

So, sir, we let him have it right up! And I have to report, sir, he did not like it, sir.

Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

(in reply to Miles Messervy 007)
Post #: 9041
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 18/8/2010 9:26:00 AM   
MOTH

 

Posts: 3479
Joined: 3/10/2005
From: Sittin' on the dock of the bay
Kick-Ass (Matthew Vaughan, 2010)
A colourful, action-packed affair, nicely played and with tongue firmly in cheek. The media hoo-ha over Hit-Girl's profanity proved laughably over-the-top - you'd hear much worse down the local playground. However, there is something slightly uncomfortable about the casual violence, probably because the film initially establishes a world where violence is real and has consequences, but then progresses into increasingly cartoon violence. That inconsistency in tone means the action (in particular Hit Girl's fight with D'amico) can't really be laughed off so easily. But, despite the slightly muddy morality, the action is well-handled and the whole thing is gently satirical and enjoyable. (8/10)

_____________________________

I've only gone and set up a blog! This week I've been mostly reviewing The Lego Movie and Wadjda. Click: The Fast Picture Show

(in reply to Gimli The Dwarf)
Post #: 9042
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 18/8/2010 9:50:39 AM   
Miles Messervy 007


Posts: 6884
Joined: 11/2/2009

quote:

ORIGINAL: Gimli The Dwarf


quote:

ORIGINAL: Miles Messervy 007

Hook > Schindler's List, that's all.




Yup.

_____________________________

quote:

jamesbondguy:
Miles is clearly the finest film theorist of his generation

quote:

Deviation:
if it isn't ham, I'll eat a living pig.

(in reply to Gimli The Dwarf)
Post #: 9043
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 18/8/2010 9:51:45 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 77554
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo
Our Last Crusade agreement was just a fluke, wasn't it?

_____________________________

So, sir, we let him have it right up! And I have to report, sir, he did not like it, sir.

Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

(in reply to Miles Messervy 007)
Post #: 9044
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 18/8/2010 9:55:34 AM   
Miles Messervy 007


Posts: 6884
Joined: 11/2/2009
Probably Nah, I do think Schindler's List is a better film than Hook, but it's way too manipulative for my liking, and Hook is a childhood favourite.

_____________________________

quote:

jamesbondguy:
Miles is clearly the finest film theorist of his generation

quote:

Deviation:
if it isn't ham, I'll eat a living pig.

(in reply to Gimli The Dwarf)
Post #: 9045
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 18/8/2010 10:32:18 AM   
Rgirvan44


Posts: 19049
Joined: 10/3/2006
From: Punishment Park
quote:

ORIGINAL: Miles Messervy 007


quote:

ORIGINAL: Gimli The Dwarf


quote:

ORIGINAL: Miles Messervy 007

Hook > Schindler's List, that's all.




Yup.


I TOTALLY AGREE!!!

_____________________________

It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to, than I have ever known.


(in reply to Miles Messervy 007)
Post #: 9046
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 18/8/2010 10:38:19 AM   
elab49


Posts: 54577
Joined: 1/10/2005
I probably do to. I mean, I do admire chunks of List, but even with the fact some of the bits go on way too long and he harps on way too long about his normal loss of childhood obsession, Hoffman just has so much damn fun.

< Message edited by elab49 -- 18/8/2010 11:29:06 AM >


_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to Rgirvan44)
Post #: 9047
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 18/8/2010 11:13:59 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 77554
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo
Hoffman's the best thing about Hook by a long way, but there's just too much about the film I really don't like. The Lost Boys don't help. Rarely have a less appealing group of kids appeared in a film.


_____________________________

So, sir, we let him have it right up! And I have to report, sir, he did not like it, sir.

Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 9048
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 19/8/2010 11:01:40 AM   
MOTH

 

Posts: 3479
Joined: 3/10/2005
From: Sittin' on the dock of the bay
I Love You Phillip Morris (Ficarra & Requa, 2010)
An astonishing couldn't-make-it-up true story, adpated in quirky and involving fashion for the screen, with a nice soundtrack to boot. Jim Carrey stays just the right side of his crazy schtick in a fine central performance and there's some good chuckles throughout, even though it isn't an outright comedy. Thoroughly entertaining. (8/10)

_____________________________

I've only gone and set up a blog! This week I've been mostly reviewing The Lego Movie and Wadjda. Click: The Fast Picture Show

(in reply to Gimli The Dwarf)
Post #: 9049
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 19/8/2010 11:39:46 AM   
Piles


Posts: 5545
Joined: 6/8/2007
From: Whalley Range
Miles, Juno four places above Jour de Fete is a travesty.

_____________________________

Top 100 Moz Songs / Top 100 Films

(in reply to MOTH)
Post #: 9050
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 19/8/2010 2:31:46 PM   
paul_ie86


Posts: 11422
Joined: 4/1/2007
From: Chelsea Hotel #2
Features

103.
Weekend (Jean-Luc Godard, 1967)
The worst Godard film I've seen so far. Like La chinoise, except without the satire.

Shorts

32. Morgan and Destiny's Eleventeenth Date (Joseph Gordon-Levitt, 2010)

Average enough short.

< Message edited by paul_ie86 -- 19/8/2010 2:32:20 PM >


_____________________________

My Group Project's facebook page. Please like

(in reply to Piles)
Post #: 9051
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 19/8/2010 2:33:06 PM   
Miles Messervy 007


Posts: 6884
Joined: 11/2/2009

quote:

ORIGINAL: Piles

Miles, Juno four places above Jour de Fete is a travesty.
Juno is a film rather than an extended short, and it's much funnier.

_____________________________

quote:

jamesbondguy:
Miles is clearly the finest film theorist of his generation

quote:

Deviation:
if it isn't ham, I'll eat a living pig.

(in reply to Piles)
Post #: 9052
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 19/8/2010 3:24:54 PM   
Piles


Posts: 5545
Joined: 6/8/2007
From: Whalley Range
Epic update incoming! This takes my total for the year to 310...



#24.Man With a Movie Camera (1929, Dziga Vertov, Russia)
“Man With a Movie Camera” begins with a black screen with a text passage, telling us that this is an experiment in early film, shunning all plot and character and instead trying to communicate its message through images alone. Over the next sixty six minutes, Dziga Vertov (who, until now, I was only aware of as the name for the group which the likes of Godard and Gorin went by in the 1970s) contrasts images of impoverished working class and rich, affluent upper class, pointing out the inherent and obvious unfairness of the social gulf that lies between them. In this, it is a clear forerunner and key influence on Jean Vigo’s wonderful “A Propos De Nice”, as well as an apparent anticipation of the techniques used over fifty years later in “Koyaanisqatsi”. Also, though, it’s about the thrills that came with filmmaking in the early stretches of the medium. The film’s titular character – if you can call him that – is a man who carts around his movie camera, filming Russia as it lives and breathes. In this way, you could probably call “Man With a Movie Camera” a documentary about, well, itself. It is about the thrill of early cinema and the lengths that filmmakers will go to get that one exquisite shot, with the titular ‘man with a movie camera’ climbing, ducking, and diving to achieve his filmic goals. Aesthetically it’s quite wonderful too, with Vertov’s shots short and sweet, constantly flitting between images, wonderfully complementing (and juxtaposing) each other. And then there’s the score, done – on the 2002 re-release I saw – by British jazz/electronic outfit “The Cinematic Orchestra”, which is wonderfully emotive and evocative. It really is a fantastic film, devoid of story and characters but filled with bright thematic ideas and sublime aesthetics. 5/5.

#34. Late Autumn (1960, Yasujiro Ozu, Japan)
Ayako (Yoko Tsukasa) is the 24-year-old daughter of the widow Akiko (Setsuko Hara). It is time, according to the friends of Akiko’s widower Miwa (played by Shin Saburi, Nobuo Nakamura, and Ryuji Kita), for the young girl to get married, but she does not wish to abandon her lonely mother. Miwa’s old friends, then, hatch a plot to marry off both mother and daughter, and introduce a potential suitor, Goto (Keiji Sada), into Ayako’s life. Probably one of the lightest and most comedic of Yasujiro Ozu’s many, many dramatic films, “Late Autumn” – which is shot in colour and devoid of any camera movement whatsoever – wonderfully plays with the plotting of the three old men and watches it have a wild impact (sometimes a good one, sometimes quite a volatile one) on the lives of the two women, who are probably the film’s main characters. It seems quite deliberate, then, that “Late Autumn” has these men plot out the women’s lives in potentially comedic manners, when – in actual fact – it’s really not very funny at all that these males think that they have the right to decide these females’ fates. By doing this, Ozu is able to give us, as viewers, a slow burning realization that these men are not comedic characters at all, and – for all their honest intentions – are yet more examples of the domineering men who force women into submission that often populate Ozu’s films. I’m probably making it seem like a bit of a slog with oh-so-serious themes, but – all in all – “Late Autumn” is probably the lightest of the Ozu sound films that I’ve seen (although none of his films, really, have the witty, free-wheeling comic-ness of “I Was Born, But…” or “Tokyo Chorus”), and it’s probably the only one I’d recommend to a casual film fan with no interest in Japanese art house cinema. Ozu films from low, stationary angles and never encroaches on his characters’ lives, and it is yet another directional triumph for him, but it’s the performances of the two women which elevate the film to masterpiece level. Yoko Tsukasa is brilliant as a woman who has honed a deep-seeded immaturity and naivety through her unwillingness to progress in life, and Setsuko Hara – as always – is brilliant as the slightly melancholic but hopeful for her daughter’s future mother, delivering yet another powerful performance that is as powerful as it is self-contained. 5/5.

#43. Jeanne Dielman, 23 Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles (1975, Chantal Akerman, Belgium/France)
There’s no real plot to speak of in “Jeanne Dielman, 23 Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles” (I’m not going to keep repeating that, let’s call it “Jeanne Dielman” for short). Instead, it simply watches the titular housewife (played by Delphine Seyrig) as she goes about her daily chores, prepares a meal, prostitutes herself in the afternoon to make end’s meet, and feeds her son in the evening. That this goes on for over three hours (!!) will test even the most devoted fan of avant-garde cinema’s endurance. There are, obviously, moments when it becomes a slog, but it is one that always – for some reason – feels worthwhile. That it is a piece of feminist cinema is obvious (director Akerman worked with an entirely female cast, which she later described unfavourably), but how powerful it is in its depiction of monotony and suppressed emotions that come with the repetitive roles that society, by convention, hands to females came as quite a shock (almost as shocking as its brilliant ending, which I shall not spoil and won’t talk about further, other than to say that if you haven’t seen this film, don’t read about it as most reviews and even the Wiki/IMDB plot blurbs give away this ending). After watching quite a few feminist films made my males (particularly the films of Ozu, Naruse, and Mizoguchi, but also Godard and Rohmer), it was wonderful to see a film about the struggles of women made by a woman, and – as a result of this – it feels all-the-more truthful, honest, and real, not to mention positively scathing. And then there’s the fact that the camera (wielded by Babette Mangolte, who would become a constant Akerman collaborator) seems to keep its distance from Seyrig’s Jeanne, as if it knows, somehow, that her patience is about to reach its end. It’s also interesting that there is barely any camera movement, Mangolte’s lens simply staring listlessly at Seytig, as if there is nothing to really see her. This is the accepted norm, regardless of whether it should be, and the camerawoman has just accepted that. An intelligent avant-garde feminist masterpiece, then, and one that manages to stretch a housewife doing chores into a three-hour film without really becoming tedious. And that, not the wonderful themes that run through it or Mangolte’s wonderful camera work, is the ture success of the film. 5/5.

#84. Vengeance is Mine (1979, Shohei Imamura, Japan)
Iwao Enokizu (Ken Ogata) commits violent, extreme, and insane murders and goes on the run. The police end up chasing him all over Japan, but he manages to elude them for seventy eight days, in the process meeting a woman who owns a brothel and falling in love with her. “Vengeance is Mine” is the first Shohei Imamura I’ve seen, and I was quite impressed by its visceral nature, its extreme, ruthless, and realistic portrayal of violence, and its superb handling of both challenging subject matter and a challenging un-chronological narrative. I think there are flaws – most notably that it felt about a quarter of an hour overlong, which is quite shocking when I watched it in-between an Ozu film and “Jeanne Dielman” – but most of them are easy to overlook, especially when you consider the scale and the episodic nature of such a story. It could have been messy, it could have jarred, but, for the most part (and there is the occasional blip), it really works, and it feels like a fluent yet visceral experience. First and foremost, it’s a character study, separating itself from the majority of them by attempting to delve into the mind of a murder who is, almost by his own will, uncontrollable, volatile, and perhaps un-understandable. Imamura attempts to look at why this man is doing these things, but his eventual conclusion seems to be that you can’t always understand such events and crimes, and you can’t always investigate them methodically. Mainly, though, it’s a thriller, and a very good one at that, with a superb central performance from Ken Ogata, who presents this volatile and unpredictable murderer as cagey, paranoid, and tragic in his inability to understand the world. I think, though, that my favourite thing about the film was the subplot between Enokizu’s wife and his father, who hide a secret love – and lust - from the world, constantly trapped by this volatile, hateful figure that plagues both of their lives. Their scenes together are often tender, as suppressed emotion pours out of both of them, but offset by the violent presence that bombards in and out of the film, never allowing them to safely relish their love. It really is a remarkable film, even if ever so slightly flawed. 4/5.

#112. The Flavour of Green Tea Over Rice (1952, Yasujiro Ozu, Japan)
Takeo (Michiyo Kogure) is a capricious wife who is used to fine living, who has become bored by her ‘dull’ husband, Mokichi (Shin Saburi), who is used to the quiet life that comes with a youth in the country. They go through a kind of marital crises, just as their young niece, Aya (Chikage Awashima), is rebelling against the Japanese tradition of arranged marriages. This was the first Ozu film that I saw after reading a bit about Ozu (I’d seen five or six before that), and – after learning that the director himself never took a wife – his work becomes even more remarkable. For a director to understand marriage so well whilst being distanced from it himself is truly quite impressive, and “Flavour of Green Tea Over Rice” is yet another meditated and thoughtful musing on the nature of marriage in his native Japan. It questions, as his later (and better) “Late Autumn” does, whether love and marriage always go hand in hand, juxtaposing these two parallel storylines, one in which a couple have gone too far along in their dull relationship, and one where a young woman is being forced to start along a similar path. There’s quite a lot of emotion flying around in this film, particularly in the subplot surrounding the young niece, as she fights against what she sees as a pointless tradition but eventually gets boxed in by a group of people – who mostly seem like slight hypocrites, moaning about their own marriage whilst forcing this young and unwilling girl into a similar one - who are against her. Awashima’s performance as this woman is at times breathtaking, playing off our emotions and her helpless plight, whilst Shin Saburi’s turn as the aging gentleman who is losing grasp of his wife (and is happy to lose it) is superbly melancholic and reflective. At times, though, you do wonder if there is any point to this film, especially when Ozu made his masterpiece “Late Spring” (yeah, I said it, it’s better than “Tokyo Story”) three years earlier in 1949, that plays off similar themes and muses upon them better, and when the finale kind of goes against a lot of the feminist thought often inherent in Ozu’s films (security and tradition kind of win out over a woman doing what she wants to do, particularly in the older couple’s storyline). Still, I was quite moved by both tales, most notably because of the performances and Ozu’s ever dependent, classical, stationary direction. 4/5.

#123. The Passenger (1975, Michelangelo Antonioni, Italy)
Reviewed in my Italian cinema thread, click here for the link. 4/5.

#267. Meet Me in St Louis (1944, Vincente Minnelli, USA)
Judy Garland plays Esther Smith, a St Louis socialite besotted with her gentlemanly next door neighbour, John Truett (Tom Drake). This film follows her efforts to make him hers, as well as her sister Tootie’s (Margaret O’Brien) seemingly doomed but perennially on-off relationship with a bumbling New Yorker. “Meet Me in St Louis”, the third Vincent Minelli film I’ve seen after the really sublime “An American in Paris” and “The Band Wagon”, came as a slight disappointing. For all its good will and good natured homeliness, it feels far too sweet to the point of sickliness, and – as Judy Garland continued with her bloody ‘butter wouldn’t melt’ performance – I couldn’t stand the lead character. Perhaps these are flaws with me rather than flaws of the film, but I’d like to think I can handle the odd overtly-sweet, good natured film, like those of Frank Capra or Ernst Lubitsch, but here the whole thing just feels so forced and so unnatural. The only threat which the characters face is, well, moving home, from one  American city where the patriarch has a fine job to, well, another American city where the patriarch has a fine job. The whole thing seems a bit pointless, a bit overly patriotic and simple in its ‘home is where the heart is’ philosophy. It’s not completely without its merit; the songs are all quite good, the use of colour is nice, and the moment where the Grandfather asks a dateless Esther to the ball is incredibly sweet and uplifting (in a good way!), but they are helpless when they come up against the endless barrage of sickliness. It also lacks a set piece like the ballet sequence in “An American in Paris” and the re-invented stage musical in “The Band Wagon”, and instead of those unpredictable and inventive films, this thing comes across as slightly plain and slightly turgid, and not really a recommendable experience at all. 2/5.


_____________________________

Top 100 Moz Songs / Top 100 Films

(in reply to GoodBadGroovy)
Post #: 9053
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 19/8/2010 3:54:10 PM   
Deviation


Posts: 27284
Joined: 2/6/2006
From: Enemies of Film HQ
Nice reviews. 

_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Dpp1978
There are certainly times where calling a person a cunt is not only reasonable, it is a gross understatement.

quote:


ORIGINAL: elab49
I really wish I could go down to see Privates

(in reply to Piles)
Post #: 9054
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 19/8/2010 4:09:55 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54577
Joined: 1/10/2005
Overlong comment apart, it's a much better review of Vengeance is Mine than mine was, and it's one of my favourite films!

_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to Deviation)
Post #: 9055
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 19/8/2010 4:14:20 PM   
Deviation


Posts: 27284
Joined: 2/6/2006
From: Enemies of Film HQ
The Triplets of Belleville is excellent. And so is The Long Good Friday. Also excellent is The Passion of Joan of Arc. All 5/5.




_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Dpp1978
There are certainly times where calling a person a cunt is not only reasonable, it is a gross understatement.

quote:


ORIGINAL: elab49
I really wish I could go down to see Privates

(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 9056
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 19/8/2010 4:16:17 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54577
Joined: 1/10/2005
I see you're going for the Paul stylings now. Are you in shock that we stole your reviews for the Brit List?

< Message edited by elab49 -- 21/8/2010 10:54:33 AM >


_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to Deviation)
Post #: 9057
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 19/8/2010 4:21:53 PM   
Piles


Posts: 5545
Joined: 6/8/2007
From: Whalley Range
quote:

ORIGINAL: elab49

Overlong comment apart, it's a much better review of Vengeance is Mine than mine was, and it's one of my favourite films!


Ah, I am now going to plague you (as usual) for recommendations, then! I have Endless Desire, The Flesh is Hot, and Ballad of Narayama ready to watch, are any of these a good place to go next with Imamura? Are there any others that you would recommend? Thanks for the kind words about my review. I found it hard to put my finger on what was so captivating about the film, so just rambled about its good points and hoped for the best! .


_____________________________

Top 100 Moz Songs / Top 100 Films

(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 9058
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 19/8/2010 4:59:56 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54577
Joined: 1/10/2005
Narayama certainly, I don't know the other 2. There's this really odd split in Imamura's work between the really harsh anger you see in Vengeance to a wryer often knockabout and sometimes surreal take later with the likes of Warm Water Under the Red Bridge.

I'd go for The Eel and A Man Vanishes. And Warm Water.

_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to Piles)
Post #: 9059
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 20/8/2010 4:30:30 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 77554
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo
174. Man of the Year (1st view, 2006, Barry Levinson) - 3/5*
183. Knight and Day (1st view, 2010, James Mangold) - 3/5*

253. Donkey Punch (1st view, 2008, Oliver Blackburn) - 2/5*

I actually think this was just a really bad comedy. There's no way this could have been intended as anything serious. It was like a Carry On version of Dead Calm or something.


_____________________________

So, sir, we let him have it right up! And I have to report, sir, he did not like it, sir.

Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 9060
Page:   <<   < prev  300 301 [302] 303 304   next >   >>
All Forums >> [Film Forums] >> Lists and Top 10s >> RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 Page: <<   < prev  300 301 [302] 303 304   next >   >>
Jump to:





New Messages No New Messages
Hot Topic w/ New Messages Hot Topic w/o New Messages
Locked w/ New Messages Locked w/o New Messages
 Post New Thread
 Reply to Message
 Post New Poll
 Submit Vote
 Delete My Own Post
 Delete My Own Thread
 Rate Posts


 
Movie News  |  Empire Blog  |  Movie Reviews  |  Future Films  |  Features  |  Video Interviews  |  Image Gallery  |  Competitions  |  Forum  |  Magazine  |  Resources
 
Forum Software © ASPPlayground.NET Advanced Edition 2.4.5 ANSI

0.467