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RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 11/6/2010 3:07:44 AM   
Miles Messervy 007


Posts: 6884
Joined: 11/2/2009
55. Mou gaan dou [Infernal Affairs] (2002, Lau/Mak)
I hate to say this, but the Pig is right. The boss in this > Nicholson, the mole in this > Damon, and Leung>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>+10^100000*>>>>>>>>>>>>>>DiCaprio. At times sparse, at others over-the-top, but manages to intricately maintain the balance. The violence is unflinching, but not over-dramatised like in a Woo film. Although I definitely have more time for The Depahted than some people, it baffles me why something as efficient as this (the characters are all barely memorable, but memorable nonetheless) would need to be remade as a 2.5 hour film. Although I haven't seen Scorsese's remake for ages, this actually brought it down in my estimation. Mind, the original is not without problems, but it's still a solid 8

< Message edited by Miles Messervy 007 -- 11/6/2010 3:08:08 AM >


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jamesbondguy:
Miles is clearly the finest film theorist of his generation

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RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 11/6/2010 10:55:45 AM   
matty_b


Posts: 14550
Joined: 19/10/2005
From: Outpost 31 calling McMurtle.
(500) Days of Summer (Marc Webb)
 
(500) Days of Summer is definitely not a love story, but more a tale about how Tom (Joseph Gordon Leavitt) needs 500 days to work out that Summer (Zooey Deschanel) is not the girl for him. The film see-saws back and forth through time exploring the beginning of the relationship whilst concluding it at the same time, and it's actually rather brave for a usually timid genre. It quickly becomes clear that Summer is a bit of a cow and that (as the stern opening voice-over tells us) this isn't a love story and it's certainly not going to end up with a rain-swept reunion or a last minute dash to an airport. Instead, it nails the highs and lows of love and relationships pretty well, and while there are problems - needless quirks such as Tom's pretnaturally wise ten-year-old sister doling out love advice and a script that doesn't really have that much originality to it - Webb's direction is witty and consistently interesting from a morning-after-the-first-sex stroll from Tom turning into a joyous dance routine to Hall and Oates in the city streets and parks to a none-more-Allen-asque split-screen scene detailing the expectation versus reality of a meeting between them. Deschanel is an irritant, but Leavitt has a surplus of charisma that papers over the thinness of the script. (8/10)

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RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 11/6/2010 10:57:51 AM   
elab49


Posts: 54575
Joined: 1/10/2005
quote:

ORIGINAL: Miles Messervy 007

55. Mou gaan dou [Infernal Affairs] (2002, Lau/Mak)
I hate to say this, but the Pig is right. The boss in this > Nicholson, the mole in this > Damon, and Leung>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>+10^100000*
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>DiCaprio
. At times sparse, at others over-the-top, but manages to intricately maintain the balance. The violence is unflinching, but not over-dramatised like in a Woo film. Although I definitely have more time for The Depahted than some people, it baffles me why something as efficient as this (the characters are all barely memorable, but memorable nonetheless) would need to be remade as a 2.5 hour film. Although I haven't seen Scorsese's remake for ages, this actually brought it down in my estimation. Mind, the original is not without problems, but it's still a solid 8


Nought wrong with Miles opinions generally that I can see.

EDIT: Because you were breaking the page. - PA


< Message edited by Pigeon Army -- 11/6/2010 11:30:53 AM >


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to Miles Messervy 007)
Post #: 6153
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 11/6/2010 12:12:27 PM   
rick_7


Posts: 6151
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: The internet
quote:

ORIGINAL: DCMaximo

New entries:

6. The Searchers (1956, Ford) 9/10
Hadn't watched the Searchers for nearly three years, but I enjoyed it far more on this viewing. The first time I watched it was my first ever John Wayne film, so I didn't realise what a change of character it was for him. His Ethan Edwards is believably three-dimensional: while he's a bit of a vindictive bigot, he's also got a human side, shown by his eventual softening towards Jeffrey Hunter. It also looks spectacular, beautifully shot in the sprawling Monument Valley. Not my favourite western (I'd rate Stagecoach, The Wild Bunch and possibly Ride The High Country slightly above it), it is undoubtedly a masterpiece of it's genre.

Yes it is.

quote:

30. The Damned United (2009, Hooper) 8/10
One of the best films I saw in the cinema last year and it's still excellent on repeat viewing. Any film with Michael Sheen, Timothy Spall and Colm Meaney is unlikely to be poor, and luckily it lives up to it's cast with a clever, touching script that is less to do with football and more to do with the "love story" between Sheen's Brian Clough (excellent in the role) and Spall's Peter Taylor.

I like that film too. Sheen is such a good actor. Nice reviews.

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RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 11/6/2010 1:06:56 PM   
Piles


Posts: 5545
Joined: 6/8/2007
From: Whalley Range

quote:

ORIGINAL: Miles Messervy 007

the characters are all barely memorable, but memorable nonetheless


urm, what?

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Top 100 Moz Songs / Top 100 Films

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RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 11/6/2010 1:09:29 PM   
Pigeon Army


Posts: 14612
Joined: 29/1/2006
From: Pixar HQ, George Lucas' Office.
quote:

ORIGINAL: Piles


quote:

ORIGINAL: Miles Messervy 007

the characters are all barely memorable, but memorable nonetheless


urm, what?


Barely =/= not.

Still a shitty sentence in a review whose general sentiment I otherwise agree with, though.


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ORIGINAL: Rinc
She's supposed to be 13! I'd want her to be very attractive though


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ORIGINAL: MonsterCat
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army
Stop being mean to Deviation

No.

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RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 11/6/2010 4:04:51 PM   
DCMaximo


Posts: 992
Joined: 5/1/2007
From: Nottingham via Aidy Boothroyd's Palace of Wisdom

quote:

ORIGINAL: rick_7

quote:

ORIGINAL: DCMaximo

New entries:

6. The Searchers (1956, Ford) 9/10
Hadn't watched the Searchers for nearly three years, but I enjoyed it far more on this viewing. The first time I watched it was my first ever John Wayne film, so I didn't realise what a change of character it was for him. His Ethan Edwards is believably three-dimensional: while he's a bit of a vindictive bigot, he's also got a human side, shown by his eventual softening towards Jeffrey Hunter. It also looks spectacular, beautifully shot in the sprawling Monument Valley. Not my favourite western (I'd rate Stagecoach, The Wild Bunch and possibly Ride The High Country slightly above it), it is undoubtedly a masterpiece of it's genre.

Yes it is.

quote:

30. The Damned United (2009, Hooper) 8/10
One of the best films I saw in the cinema last year and it's still excellent on repeat viewing. Any film with Michael Sheen, Timothy Spall and Colm Meaney is unlikely to be poor, and luckily it lives up to it's cast with a clever, touching script that is less to do with football and more to do with the "love story" between Sheen's Brian Clough (excellent in the role) and Spall's Peter Taylor.

I like that film too. Sheen is such a good actor. Nice reviews.


Aw shucks..

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Post #: 6157
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 11/6/2010 7:15:42 PM   
Piles


Posts: 5545
Joined: 6/8/2007
From: Whalley Range
Taking me past 200 for the year...

#10. The Mouse That Roared
(1959, Jack Arnold, UK)
The plot of this film is sheer awesomeness, and I shall recite it to you now. Peter Sellers plays three parts in Jack Arnold's comedy; the Grand Duchess Gloriana XII of Grand Fenwick, Prime Minister Count Rupert Mountjoy of Grand Fenwick, and Tully Buscombe, general of Grand Fenwick's modest army. Fenwick is the smallest country in the world, located somewhere in the French Alps, and – impoverished as it is – it decides to wage a war against the USA, hoping to lose and reap the rewards of rehabilitation. However, Tully accidentally wins, capturing General Snippet (MacDonald Parke), Professor Alfred Kokintz (David Kossoff), his daughter Helen (Jean Seberg), and the dread, potentially devastating Q-bomb. The reason I've taken great lengths to recite the plot (or at least the plot of the first twenty five minutes of the film; there is plenty more afterwards) is because it's absolutely genius, a fantastic concept with brilliant possibilities. I almost expected the film to be disappointing or unable to live up to its promise, but it is really a classic, with three fantastic Sellers performances (particularly as the hapless Tully) and some really quite brilliant gags. The 'this isn't the end of our film' gag is the highlight of the film, beautifully done and hilariously irrelevant, but there's high, prolific, and (most importantly) efficient gag rate in this film that meant I was laughing every couple of minutes. The script is superb, particularly when the troops of Grand Fenwick 'invade' New York with hilarious consequences, and one of the soldiers is determined to win and claim his rewards ("See that building there?”… "Yeah”… "Well I saw it first. It's mine.”). Most of all, though, it's Sellers who is the heart of this film, giving three very different performances as the hopeless hero Tully, the malevolent Count Rupert, and the surreally clueless Gloriana, showcasing his wide range of comedic talent. It also has Jean Seberg, which is enough to make any film awesome. 5/5.

#37. Zidane: A 21st Century Portrait (2006, Douglas Gordon and Phillipe Parreno, France)
"Zidane: A 21st Century Portrait” is an odd proposition. Part sports documentary and part art installation, the film is pretty much images of French footballing legend Zinedine Zidane during the Real Madrid vs Villareal game of April 2005. Almost in real time, the film flits between television footage and images of Zidane filmed by Parreno and Gordon's camera crew, accompanied by music from Mogwai and subtitled extracts from a sit-down interview with the player himself. Obviously, this film will not be for everyone. Those who have little or no interest in football will find ninety minutes of a player-cam a little frustrating and, no doubt, baffling, but to those who love the beautiful game it will be hypnotic and entrancing. Perhaps the greatest plaudit I can place on the film is that it will perhaps even lift your admiration of the game, because this pretty unique viewpoint gives you an insight into the emotion of the players which you just can't get from a camera positioned on top of a giant crane, or even from the stands. It's also odd that the film does, in a way, contain a narrative, and the finale is a more than suitable pay-off and emotional climax to accompany what went before. We also learn more about Zidane, one of football's greatest ever players, and it's surprising to see how little running the man does in comparison to his team-mates like David Beckham or Roberto Carlos. Another slightly cheaper thrill comes from watching Zidane converse with players like this, with Raul and with Ronaldo (the original), and seeing the inner mechanisms of one of the greatest ever teams will surely seem essential to any film-literate fan of football. And then there is the excellent Mogwai score, the insightful interview snippets, the incredible, shocking half-time entertainment; "Zidane: A 21st Century Portrait” is a strange, daring film, but it's most certainly a gamble that pays off. 5/5.

#50. The Lady Eve (1941, Preston Sturges, USA)
"The Lady Eve” is a very fun film starring Henry Fonda. Fonda's Charles plays a millionaire bachelor who is cornered on a cruise by Barbara Stanwyck's Jean, who attempts to woo Charles whilst simultaneously trying to con him – along with her 'father' Colonel Harrington (Charles Coburn) and loyal assistant Sir Alfred McGlennan Keith (Eric Blore) – out of a wad of cash. A film like this with such a high gag rate is bound to lend itself to inconsistency. Some of the jokes go a bit astray, and others fall flat on their faces (worst exchange in the film; "you shouldn't say things like that to a man who has been on safari for a year”… "just be grateful you weren't gone for two!”). However, when it does work, it really works, and it's mainly down to the chemistry between the two leads. Fonda is, obviously, brilliant at playing the nice guy, as seen (probably) best in "12 Angry Men” and as subverted brilliantly in "Once Upon a Time in the West”, often hilarious with his quick wit but always sympathetic, whether he's falling in love or having his heart broken. Barbara Stanwyck is equally as brilliant but has a more difficult role to play. Whilst Fonda's character remains quite static in his luckless, likeable fellow, Stanwyck's portrayal of a woman who goes from not believing in love to head over heels is actually quite inspiring. The chemistry between the leads is quite nicely developed too, and their romantic arc has actual unpredictability (more common place in the 40s, I guess, than it is nowadays), with the final twist in the tale being actually unexpected (how so, I'm not sure; it's a screwball comedy and I should have known it would all turn out alright), even if a little abrupt. Overall, then, it's a typical Sturges film; a little inconsistent here and there, but – usually – dependable in both the slapstick and the dialogue-based humour, with some wonderfully amiable performances by its leads. 4/5.

#73. Moon (2009, Duncan Jones, UK)
Duncan Jones, formally known as Zowie Bowie, delivered his debut film last year in the form of "Moon”. The plot sees Sam Bell (Sam Rockwell) working for a corporation that is mining Helium 3 from the moon, and who is almost at the end of his three year tenure. He is kept somewhat sane by Gerty (Kevin Spacey), a robotic presence on the ship, who can keep a conversation consciously going with his human ship-mate. There are a couple of flaws with Jones' debut. Firstly, the first half is certainly weaker than the second, and I feel that – maybe – the opening sequence (which shows the idea behind the company that Sam works for) is a little jarring against the rest of the film (although you can see why it was necessary). Worst of all, perhaps, are the distinct similarities between Jones' film and other, older, better sci-fi films, '2001: A Space Odyssey' being the obvious example. Not only are there aesthetic similarities between HAL and Gerty (even though their intentions to differ wildly), but the ship itself also bears a startling resemblance to that in Kubrick's film. I don't want to go on about this for too long, because Jones' film does manage to go on and carve its own identity and have its own ideas, but it's definitely the only major detracting factor. The main theme behind Jones's film is what it takes to be human, which he explores very well, and although this is a sci-fi film set on the dark side of the moon, anti-science fiction film fans shouldn't be put off because it's really a very human film at heart. And this is partly down to Rockwell, who delivers a fantastically nuanced and diverse performance as Sam, incredibly committed to a role that seems effortless when – if you think about it – must have been incredibly difficult. The film also looks impressive, which is incredible considering its comparatively meagre budget. Jones' film cost only a quarter of the budget for Danny Boyles' "Sunshine”, and is possibly even more impressive visually. The shots of the Moon, in and around the camp, Gerty's movements, and just about everything else in this film seem legitimate and almost hyper-real, which really adds to the film. And then there's the score, beautifully done by Clint Mansell, which ranks amongst the finest of the year, verging from the melodramatic to the enigmatic, without ever going overboard on sentiment or futuristic cliché. "Moon” is definitely a film you should see, even if it owes a lot of what's great about it to older, better ones. 4/5.

#120. The Great Moment (1944, Preston Sturges, USA)
"The Great Moment” tells the (somewhat true but certainly romanticized) story of William Thomas Green Morton (played by Joel McCrea), the man who is said to have discovered anaesthesia and created the opportunity for surgeons to actually take their time with operations, but never truly got the credit for his discovery during his own lifetime. "The Great Moment” is quite a difficult prospect; it's a film that is straighter than most of Sturges', and I'm not sure if the great director is entirely confident directing such serious (and possibly partly factual) subject matter. When he does let comedy seep into this drama, it's doubtlessly funny, but I'm not sure if it works, tonally, with the rest of the fun. There are also a few clunky moments, particularly the final line, which is delivered with a ridiculous sense of grandeur by Joel McCrea, who is – otherwise – fine in the lead role. It's a performance that, for the most part, is quite well constructed, delving into the psyche of a man clearly frustrated but always hopeful, until the last drip of personal ambition is driven out of him in favour of the right thing to do. The best bit about the film is certainly this treatment of its major theme of innovation, asking whether invention and creation should be greeted with anonymity or personal gain. When McCrea is on the screen, pushing this question down our throats, the film undoubtedly works, and some of the drama is actually quite touching. It's just a shame that quite a few other aspects of the film – Betty Field's poorly over-the-top performance as Williams' wife Elizabeth Morton is a major disappointment – let the good bits down, but I guess – overall – it's an enjoyable and very interesting comedy-drama about innovation and invention. 3/5.

#138. Christmas in July (1940, Preston Sturges, USA)
"Christmas In July” tells the story of Jimmy MacDonald (Dick Powell), a hopeful old soul who is stuck in a dead end job. However, when a competition comes up to come up with the slogan for a rival company, Jimmy's hopes to move up the ladder of the company and woo the girl of his dreams Betty (Ellen Drew) become a reality. An overly sentimental film in the Capra vain (in that it's difficult to dislike it), "Christmas in July” is a short (sixty seven minute) film about hopes and dreams, and about never giving up on them. Obviously, not everything goes to plan; the cheque Jimmy is sent from the competition runners turns out to be bogus and the money he has already spent turns out not to be his in the first place. But, unlike in Rohmer's "Signe du Lion” which operates a similar plot but follows up with tragedy and misery, Sturges continues down the same happy path, delivery his 'everything will be alright in the end' message and blasting the corporate fat cats in the process (some are blundering fools, some are incompetents who can't make decisions for themselves). The second of the two messages is delivered soundly, with Sturges' trademark mix of silly slapstick and sophisticated dialogue-based humour communicating the theme well. The first of them, though, is – albeit sweet – a little bit oversimplified and, of course, sugar-coated beyond all reckoning. It doesn't seem to work as well as the idyllic messages in other films like 'The Lady Eve', 'The Palm Beach Story', and 'Sullivan's Travels', and although the very final scene is a brilliant comical pay-off, I don't know if it's as good of an emotional one. Also, the performances are quite inconsistent too, with Ellen Drew being brilliant as the love interest Betty but Dick Powell not quite as impressive as lead Jimmy. He seems a little like a mopey sod when he should be a bright-eyed hopeful, and his performance sits tonally unsure against the rest of the film. Still, it's an interesting and enjoyable film, and one that at sixty seven minutes long never really has chance to outstay its welcome. 3/5.

#194. 4.3.2.1 (2010, Noel Clarke and Mark Davis, UK)
The trailer for "4.3.2.1” should be an indication of exactly what the film, directed by former music video creator Mark Davis and the apparent great hope for British cinema Noel Clarke, should be like; fast, silly, and fun. Its reviews suggested that it would be exactly that, with Sight and Sound claiming that it was at least self-aware rubbish. It isn't; it's just rubbish. The plot operates a Rashomon-esque approach where we see the three days prior to the film's opening – where Shannon (Ophelia Lovibond) is found teetering over a bridge – from each of the girls' perspectives. There's college drop-out Shannon, American Joanne (Emma Roberts), posh girl Cassandra (Tamsin Egerton), and sassy Kerrys (Shanika Warren-Markland), four women so defined by their characteristic stereotypes that it's almost impossible to see any character originality anywhere. And this dazzling unoriginality doesn't stop there, with Clarke's script being clunky to the extreme (one character actually says "Girls rule, bitch!”), and the general narrative not one per cent as intelligent as it thinks it is. Channelling Tarantino in the form of both Pulp Fiction (the narrative scheme, and certain situations, like the revenge had by a random black woman on a man who has wronged Cassandra, which bears a startling resemblance to Marcel Wallace "getting medieval” on Zed's ass) and Death Proof (girl powah, innit), Clarke actually brings nothing of his own to the picture, foregoing the apparent grit of "Kidulthood” and its sequel in favour of lavish but tacky set pieces, fast cars, and ridiculous shots of nude girls. In fact, each of the four leads have either sex scenes or shower scenes or 'getting changed' scenes thrown in just for the hell of it, and the level of misogyny is actually quite disappointing. In fact, the whole film is just that; disappointing, and not because I expected it to be Clarke's crowning as the new Loach, only because it's the dullest 'fun' film I've ever seen. 1/5.


< Message edited by Piles -- 11/6/2010 7:24:35 PM >


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RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 11/6/2010 8:33:34 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54575
Joined: 1/10/2005
quote:

ORIGINAL: Piles

Taking me past 200 for the year...

#10. The Mouse That Roared
(1959, Jack Arnold, UK)


 
Wonderful placing, it is a fabulous little film. QUite a bit of a drop to Mouse on the Moon, although that one's still perfectly enjoyable. I rate Lady Eve quite a bit higher though. How would that be placed in relation to other Sturges, for you?

< Message edited by elab49 -- 11/6/2010 8:39:28 PM >


_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to Piles)
Post #: 6159
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 11/6/2010 11:19:20 PM   
homersimpson_esq


Posts: 20118
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Springfield
Just saw Sunrise at the cinema. Faith duly restored. *sigh* 

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Post #: 6160
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 11/6/2010 11:35:42 PM   
swordsandsandals


Posts: 12571
Joined: 6/1/2006
From: A magical forest

quote:

ORIGINAL: homersimpson_esq

Just saw Sunrise at the cinema. Faith duly restored. *sigh* 


I'm feeling a lot of jealousy right now.


_____________________________

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ORIGINAL: Rawlinson

Swords is right about everything.



quote:

ORIGINAL: Hood_Man

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RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 11/6/2010 11:39:54 PM   
homersimpson_esq


Posts: 20118
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Springfield
You've seen it now, swords?

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Post #: 6162
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 11/6/2010 11:49:08 PM   
swordsandsandals


Posts: 12571
Joined: 6/1/2006
From: A magical forest
Get with the times, Homer. I saw it ages ago. I love it!

_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rawlinson

Swords is right about everything.



quote:

ORIGINAL: Hood_Man

Swords smells like bum.



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Post #: 6163
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 12/6/2010 8:13:30 AM   
Piles


Posts: 5545
Joined: 6/8/2007
From: Whalley Range
quote:

ORIGINAL: elab49

quote:

ORIGINAL: Piles

Taking me past 200 for the year...

#10. The Mouse That Roared
(1959, Jack Arnold, UK)


 
Wonderful placing, it is a fabulous little film. QUite a bit of a drop to Mouse on the Moon, although that one's still perfectly enjoyable. I rate Lady Eve quite a bit higher though. How would that be placed in relation to other Sturges, for you?


I've only seen eight Preston Sturges films but I would rate them like so:

1. The Palm Beach Story.
2. Sullivan's Travels.
3. Unfaithfully Yours
4. The Lady Eve
5. The Great McGinty
6. The Great Moment
7. The Miracle at Morgan Creek
8. Christmas in July

Any major disagreements? Are there any other essential ones I should search out?


_____________________________

Top 100 Moz Songs / Top 100 Films

(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 6164
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 12/6/2010 10:20:31 AM   
Miles Messervy 007


Posts: 6884
Joined: 11/2/2009
Your taste is shit, Piles. You still have Hail the Conquering Hero to watch.

_____________________________

quote:

jamesbondguy:
Miles is clearly the finest film theorist of his generation

quote:

Deviation:
if it isn't ham, I'll eat a living pig.

(in reply to Piles)
Post #: 6165
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 12/6/2010 10:57:05 AM   
TRM


Posts: 4797
Joined: 20/10/2006
From: Bristol
quote:

ORIGINAL: Piles

#37. Zidane: A 21st Century Portrait (2006, Douglas Gordon and Phillipe Parreno, France)
"Zidane: A 21st Century Portrait” is an odd proposition. Part sports documentary and part art installation, the film is pretty much images of French footballing legend Zinedine Zidane during the Real Madrid vs Villareal game of April 2005. Almost in real time, the film flits between television footage and images of Zidane filmed by Parreno and Gordon's camera crew, accompanied by music from Mogwai and subtitled extracts from a sit-down interview with the player himself. Obviously, this film will not be for everyone. Those who have little or no interest in football will find ninety minutes of a player-cam a little frustrating and, no doubt, baffling, but to those who love the beautiful game it will be hypnotic and entrancing. Perhaps the greatest plaudit I can place on the film is that it will perhaps even lift your admiration of the game, because this pretty unique viewpoint gives you an insight into the emotion of the players which you just can't get from a camera positioned on top of a giant crane, or even from the stands. It's also odd that the film does, in a way, contain a narrative, and the finale is a more than suitable pay-off and emotional climax to accompany what went before. We also learn more about Zidane, one of football's greatest ever players, and it's surprising to see how little running the man does in comparison to his team-mates like David Beckham or Roberto Carlos. Another slightly cheaper thrill comes from watching Zidane converse with players like this, with Raul and with Ronaldo (the original), and seeing the inner mechanisms of one of the greatest ever teams will surely seem essential to any film-literate fan of football. And then there is the excellent Mogwai score, the insightful interview snippets, the incredible, shocking half-time entertainment; "Zidane: A 21st Century Portrait” is a strange, daring film, but it's most certainly a gamble that pays off. 5/5.



I really like this film too. When thinking of Zidane, it is so easy to just remember his 2006 exit, and the great goals, but this really did show what he was all about on the pitch. Very little effort all the time, but would still have a great effect on the game. Btw, did you happen to watch Soccer Aid last week? I thought this film made him look like he put no effort into the game, but in that he showed just how slow he can be when he is unfit Still, it was amazing to see him playing again.


_____________________________

I'm going out to the states to redeem the social outcasts. My only real ambition is to cultivate Texas. I love Texas. You must watch "The last picture show". That film! It was my first real sexual relationship.

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Post #: 6166
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 12/6/2010 1:16:52 PM   
Pigeon Army


Posts: 14612
Joined: 29/1/2006
From: Pixar HQ, George Lucas' Office.
06. Bin-jip (3-Iron) (2004, Kim, K-D, SKR/JPN) - 4.5/5*
Revisiting it for an essay, I was figuratively hit for six again by this film. A beautiful, melancholic affair, Kim Ki-Duk puts his impartial camera to the best use it has ever been put to as he tracks our silent protagonists, the enigmatic Tae-suk, who breaks into peoples' houses and lives in them while they're away, and the battered woman, Sun-hwa, whom he 'rescues' from her abusive husband. Lee Seung-yeon and Lee Hyun-kyoon are amazing as Sun-hwa and Tae-suk respectively, evoking wells of emotion through their facial expressions and subtle changes in body language as they partake in the lives of others; in contrast, Kwon Hyuk-ko is deliberately uncomfortable as Sun-hwa's arrogant husband, a man who believes he can buy eternal fidelity from anyone and gets violent when he doesn't. Kim contrasts the lives of those who are out-of-touch with Korean traditions with those who have lost sight of them in favour of Western influences, appointing a hallowed identity to those following those traditions in some small way and suggesting that it doesn't matter what you have on your mantelpiece or what you can buy, just so long as you don't lose sight of what's important - people, relationships, heritage. Accompanied by Kim's stunningly subtle cinematography and a low-key soundtrack, a tale is woven of finding what is worth living for and sticking with it, of bringing constants to the transient.

14. Bom yeoreum gaeul gyeoul geurigo bom (Spring, Summer, Autumn, Winter…and Spring) (2003, Kim, K-D, SKR/GER) – 4.5/5*
The same as 3-Iron. I'm much more a fan of Kim's later works, it seems - there's less of a focus on the myriad wonders (I use the term loosely) of human cruelty and more a focus on the other ways we express ourselves and, here at least, the way we learn from those experiences of cruelty and otherwise. Kim captures the beauty of the remote valley in which the film takes place like nothing else, and those little touches of magic realism - the doors, the boat in Autumn, the ice Buddha - within it just make it that much more striking and genuinely astounding. On top of that, it's just a really, really poignant and contemplative film about life, spirituality, and how we reconcile the two, as told through the experiences of a young Buddhist monk learning from his master, and eventually the world of man (in the hardest way possible). It's a tremendously universal, if unconventional, coming-of-age story at the heart of it, but the age our young protagonist is coming to isn't adulthood or maturity - if anything, it's enlightenment, the one thing we all strive for.

41. Chûgoku no chôjin (The Bird People in China) (1998, Miike, JPN) – 4/5
I've seen three Miike films before this - Happiness of the Katakuris, Audition and Dead or Alive - and it's safe to say that none of them are like this in any way. Miike's idiosyncratically diverse output reaches a peak here, however, in that, while not perfect, The Bird People in China is the most fully-realised of all his films I've seen. It doesn't meander about like his other films, searching for a way to come to a the middle or end - it knows what it's doing and, while it takes its time, it never loses its way. As a result, The Bird People in China develops quite organically from a light fish-out-of-water comedy with a bit of a black streak to it into a moving and thoughtful film about the place of tradition and environmental and social 'purity' (so to speak) in a world where society marches ever on. As said, though, it takes a while for it to develop out of the slight comedy it begins as, and that carries to things like the performances (Renji Ishibashi's performance as a disgruntled Yakuza forced to tag along with Masahiro Motoki's salaryman is often painfully over-the-top at the start, and it takes a while to warm to Motoki generally) and the coherence of the narrative - it knows what it's doing, but the importance of things like the song often feels a little too trivial to be spending so much time on it. However, the last hour of the film is magical and enthralling, with stunning cinematography and an incredibly satisfying conclusion. It may not be perfect, but The Bird People in China is certainly Miike's best that I've seen, and I can see it growing on me in time.

58. South Park: Bigger Longer & Uncut (1999, Parker, USA) – 4/5*
Trey Parker and Matt Stone never bested the golden days of South Park in the late 1990s and early 2000s, and BL&U is (along with the 2004 episode Good Times with Weapons, possibly my most watched piece of television when I was in high school) the peak of their talents. Parts of it have dated quite horribly (Cartman's swear-bombing near the end feels more contrived than anything, and it does feel like it's attempting to fulfill some perceived obligation to old fans by giving characters like the hippy guy and the hunter guy - I don't even know their names - semi-substantial screentime) and it is rather on-the-nose with its whole 'individual responsibility' theme, but most of it is still incredibly funny, and it is without a doubt one of the finest musicals to come out of Hollywood in the last fifteen-twenty years. Songs like 'It's Easy, Mmmkay', 'La Resistance' and 'What Would Brian Boitano Do?' should be showtune standards by now, and 'Quiet Little Mountain Town' is a note-perfect pisstake of Disney openings. Despite its flaws, it's really just a great comedy and an excellent way to while away an hour and a half.

72. Shi gan (Time) (2006, Kim, K-D, JPN/SKR) – 4/5
Seh-hee is a horribly insecure woman who fears that she's losing her boyfriend because he's getting bored of her. Her boyfriend, Ji-woo, isn't getting bored of her and says as much, but his wandering eyes say otherwise. Desperate to resolve this issue, Seh-hee undergoes plastic surgery in order to make sure Ji-woo doesn't get bored of her, forcing both her and Ji-woo to come to terms with their relationship in the process. Kim (typically) refuses to take sides in this film, apportioning blame quite evenly to each party and making clear points about relationships, insecurity and uncertainty within them, and the cruel things people in relationships do to each other in order to prove their devotion - indeed, characters say quite overtly throughout the film that Seh-hee's undergoing plastic surgery and disappearing is a testament to her love for Ji-woo. It delves into quite an uncomfortable aspect of relationships in general - the way love and devotion can be quite interchangeable with feelings of possession - and is appropriately difficult to watch in that regard, the trials the two characters put themselves through cutting quite close and being quite painful to experience. However, unlike, say, Maren Ade's painfully overlong break-up film, Everyone Else, these are relatable and otherwise nice people - they frustrate each other and themselves while never being unlikable to the audience, and that's what makes it so easy to stay with and invest in the characters. It helps that Ha Jung-woo (the villain in The Chaser), Park Ji-yeong and someone else (IMDB doesn't help) are all excellent in their roles, enabling to stay with all the characters in the film and genuinely get involved in and feel their struggles. Time may be prone to histrionics, particularly in the opening sequence and in the film's score, but it's a compelling relationship drama nonetheless, one that probes important questions about love and its nature without driving the audience away from characters we're meant to empathise with.


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rinc
She's supposed to be 13! I'd want her to be very attractive though


quote:

ORIGINAL: MonsterCat
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army
Stop being mean to Deviation

No.

(in reply to TRM)
Post #: 6167
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 12/6/2010 2:05:33 PM   
Piles


Posts: 5545
Joined: 6/8/2007
From: Whalley Range
I did see 'Soccer Aid' actually, or at least most of it. It kind of annoyed me when Zidane and Giggs and the rest of the 'legends' turned down the celebs' offers to celebrate with the trophy. You'd have thought they'd have entered into the spirit of it! Also, it surprises me that the only football match you can get non-fans to watch is one with rubbish celebrities and players mostly well past their peak!

_____________________________

Top 100 Moz Songs / Top 100 Films

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Post #: 6168
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 12/6/2010 2:20:05 PM   
TRM


Posts: 4797
Joined: 20/10/2006
From: Bristol
quote:

ORIGINAL: Piles

I did see 'Soccer Aid' actually, or at least most of it. It kind of annoyed me when Zidane and Giggs and the rest of the 'legends' turned down the celebs' offers to celebrate with the trophy. You'd have thought they'd have entered into the spirit of it! Also, it surprises me that the only football match you can get non-fans to watch is one with rubbish celebrities and players mostly well past their peak!


Ah, I left half way through the penalties. Well Figo for instance, just seemed really bored by the whole thing, and it was a bit cheap having Giggs playing anyway.


_____________________________

I'm going out to the states to redeem the social outcasts. My only real ambition is to cultivate Texas. I love Texas. You must watch "The last picture show". That film! It was my first real sexual relationship.

(in reply to Piles)
Post #: 6169
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 13/6/2010 12:23:23 AM   
Miles Messervy 007


Posts: 6884
Joined: 11/2/2009
Features:

75. Breezy (1973, Eastwood)
I've seen 8 features directed by Clint now, and besides Unforgiven, which is probably in my top 10, they are all good but not quite great. This one is quite lightweight but also heartfelt. Holden is incredible. The film drips 70s, but it's understated, and all the right notes are hit. 8

82. Il gatto a nove code [The Cat O’Nine Tails] (1971, Argento)
Weakest Argento I've seen so far, but still very good. Homophobic perhaps, but then again not really. Morricone's score is great, and it has some good setpieces, but the reveal is anticlimactic unlike the one in the other two Argento gialli I've seen. Suspiria is something different altogether, of course - this has quite a laborious structure and is closer to an oldfashioned detective novel in some respects. Some good character-based humour, solid acting (I'll take Malden in this over Malden in On the Waterfront any day), but doesn't even approach the heights of Deep Red. 8

Shorts:

15. Plastic Bag (2009, Bahrani) {18 mins} youtube
"There is so much beauty in the world..." Oh wait, wrong film. This one is actually beautiful. A free-flowing poem narrated by Werner Herzog about the immortality of a plastic bag. Incredible. 9

18. The Horribly Slow Murderer with the Extremely Inefficient Weapon (2008, Gale) {10 mins} youtube
Forced cult. Hilarious forced cult. The Psycho homage had me literally rolling on the floor. 9

23. The Cat Piano (2009, Gibson/White) {8 mins} youtube
Nick Cave = awesome. Noir = awesome. Cats = not-so-awesome, but within the context of this, awesome. 8

27. The Ducksters (1950, Jones) {7 mins} youtube
Incredibly gruesome even for an animated short, but also hilarious. 8

_____________________________

quote:

jamesbondguy:
Miles is clearly the finest film theorist of his generation

quote:

Deviation:
if it isn't ham, I'll eat a living pig.

(in reply to TRM)
Post #: 6170
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 13/6/2010 1:01:38 AM   
Gram123

 

Posts: 5537
Joined: 19/1/2006
From: Reino Unido
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army
06. Bin-jip (3-Iron) (2004, Kim, K-D, SKR/JPN) - 4.5/5*

14. Bom yeoreum gaeul gyeoul geurigo bom (Spring, Summer, Autumn, Winter…and Spring) (2003, Kim, K-D, SKR/GER) – 4.5/5*

41. Chûgoku no chôjin (The Bird People in China) (1998, Miike, JPN) – 4/5




_____________________________

Gram123's Top Songs Project

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Post #: 6171
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 13/6/2010 1:04:28 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
quote:

ORIGINAL: Miles Messervy 007

Homophobic perhaps, but then again not really.


??

(in reply to Miles Messervy 007)
Post #: 6172
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 13/6/2010 1:06:49 AM   
Gram123

 

Posts: 5537
Joined: 19/1/2006
From: Reino Unido
050) Alice in Wonderland  (Tim Burton, USA, 2010, BD) - 5.0
Had some entertaining moments here and there, a couple of well portrayed characters and was visually imaginative, and it's probably fine for kids, but ultimately I thought this was a bit shite. Like most Tim Burton films.


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Gram123's Top Songs Project

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Post #: 6173
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 13/6/2010 1:08:09 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
quote:

ORIGINAL: Gram123
ultimately I thought this was a bit shite. Like most Tim Burton films.




(in reply to Gram123)
Post #: 6174
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 13/6/2010 1:10:28 AM   
Miles Messervy 007


Posts: 6884
Joined: 11/2/2009

quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

quote:

ORIGINAL: Miles Messervy 007

Homophobic perhaps, but then again not really.


??
SPOILERS FOR PEOPLE OTHER THAN RAWLS
Well, it stereotypes gay people in certain scenes but it doesn't go down the gay killer route (neither does Deep Red, actually). I just realised it's the first Argento film I've seen where the main killer isn't a woman though.

_____________________________

quote:

jamesbondguy:
Miles is clearly the finest film theorist of his generation

quote:

Deviation:
if it isn't ham, I'll eat a living pig.

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 6175
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 13/6/2010 1:11:22 AM   
Deviation


Posts: 27284
Joined: 2/6/2006
From: Enemies of Film HQ
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army

41. Chûgoku no chôjin (The Bird People in China) (1998, Miike, JPN) – 4/5
I've seen three Miike films before this - Happiness of the Katakuris, Audition and Dead or Alive - and it's safe to say that none of them are like this in any way. Miike's idiosyncratically diverse output reaches a peak here, however, in that, while not perfect, The Bird People in China is the most fully-realised of all his films I've seen. It doesn't meander about like his other films, searching for a way to come to a the middle or end - it knows what it's doing and, while it takes its time, it never loses its way. As a result, The Bird People in China develops quite organically from a light fish-out-of-water comedy with a bit of a black streak to it into a moving and thoughtful film about the place of tradition and environmental and social 'purity' (so to speak) in a world where society marches ever on. As said, though, it takes a while for it to develop out of the slight comedy it begins as, and that carries to things like the performances (Renji Ishibashi's performance as a disgruntled Yakuza forced to tag along with Masahiro Motoki's salaryman is often painfully over-the-top at the start, and it takes a while to warm to Motoki generally) and the coherence of the narrative - it knows what it's doing, but the importance of things like the song often feels a little too trivial to be spending so much time on it. However, the last hour of the film is magical and enthralling, with stunning cinematography and an incredibly satisfying conclusion. It may not be perfect, but The Bird People in China is certainly Miike's best that I've seen, and I can see it growing on me in time.



You fucking wanker I agree with you, Miike's best film.


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Dpp1978
There are certainly times where calling a person a cunt is not only reasonable, it is a gross understatement.

quote:


ORIGINAL: elab49
I really wish I could go down to see Privates

(in reply to Pigeon Army)
Post #: 6176
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 13/6/2010 1:11:31 AM   
Miles Messervy 007


Posts: 6884
Joined: 11/2/2009

quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

quote:

ORIGINAL: Gram123
ultimately I thought this was a bit shite. Like most Tim Burton films.




this would like a word with you.

_____________________________

quote:

jamesbondguy:
Miles is clearly the finest film theorist of his generation

quote:

Deviation:
if it isn't ham, I'll eat a living pig.

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 6177
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 13/6/2010 1:14:03 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
quote:

ORIGINAL: Miles Messervy 007


quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

quote:

ORIGINAL: Miles Messervy 007

Homophobic perhaps, but then again not really.


??
SPOILERS FOR PEOPLE OTHER THAN RAWLS
Well, it stereotypes gay people in certain scenes but it doesn't go down the gay killer route (neither does Deep Red, actually). I just realised it's the first Argento film I've seen where the main killer isn't a woman though.


I think it was the way you phrased it that was confusing.

quote:

this would like a word with you.


Vincent is awesome, as is Pee Wee's Big Adventure and Ed Wood and he deserves a lot of the acclaim for Nightmare (if Selick's other films are anything to judge by). And there's bits I like in lots of other films. He's just one of those directors where I feel his reputation is greater than his actual talent. Especially in recent years.

(in reply to Miles Messervy 007)
Post #: 6178
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 13/6/2010 1:16:36 AM   
Deviation


Posts: 27284
Joined: 2/6/2006
From: Enemies of Film HQ
But, but but but, Mars Attacks is awesome. And so is Batman Returns.


And Big Fish.  

_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Dpp1978
There are certainly times where calling a person a cunt is not only reasonable, it is a gross understatement.

quote:


ORIGINAL: elab49
I really wish I could go down to see Privates

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 6179
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 13/6/2010 1:20:15 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation

But, but but but, Mars Attacks is awesome. And so is Batman Returns.


And Big Fish.  


The aliens are awesome but the rest of the film doesn't deserve them. 

I should have loved Big Fish, it's the kind of idea that appeals to me, I just thought that it was all so weak.

(in reply to Deviation)
Post #: 6180
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