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RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 8/4/2010 8:53:24 PM   
Rinc


Posts: 12819
Joined: 2/10/2005
From: A park bench, with a newspaper quilt

quote:

ORIGINAL: swordsandsandals

Can someone precis the 3D thread for me?


Everyone sane agrees with Mark Kermode that 3D is mainly a gimmick/fad and doesn't make up for lack of plot/decent script.
Some mad people say it's brilliant and the money taken by Avatar will change the course of cinema.
Sane people disagree.
Mad person (now arguing on their own) cites Clash of the Titans 3D and Paul WS Anderson as reasons why Avatar and 3D is so completely like wow influential.
Sane people disagree.
Mad person says Paul WS Anderson is a better person than all of us minions because he has money, directs shit films and is married to Milla Jovovich, whereas we all sift through our own sad filth trying to find a reason for our existance.
Sane people disagree.

_____________________________

No spoilers please:

Invisiotext:
[ color=#F1F1F1 ]text[ /color ]

(in reply to swordsandsandals)
Post #: 4321
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 8/4/2010 8:59:42 PM   
swordsandsandals


Posts: 12571
Joined: 6/1/2006
From: A magical forest

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rinc


quote:

ORIGINAL: swordsandsandals

Can someone precis the 3D thread for me?


Everyone sane agrees with Mark Kermode that 3D is mainly a gimmick/fad and doesn't make up for lack of plot/decent script.
Some mad people say it's brilliant and the money taken by Avatar will change the course of cinema.
Sane people disagree.
Mad person (now arguing on their own) cites Clash of the Titans 3D and Paul WS Anderson as reasons why Avatar and 3D is so completely like wow influential.
Sane people disagree.
Mad person says Paul WS Anderson is a better person than all of us minions because he has money, directs shit films and is married to Milla Jovovich, whereas we all sift through our own sad filth trying to find a reason for our existance.
Sane people disagree.


I'm proud to count myself as sane in that list.

_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rawlinson

Swords is right about everything.



quote:

ORIGINAL: Hood_Man

Swords smells like bum.



(in reply to Rinc)
Post #: 4322
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 8/4/2010 9:46:38 PM   
Deviation


Posts: 27284
Joined: 2/6/2006
From: Enemies of Film HQ
quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

That thread made me




Amazing gif.

And Rinc called me sane.


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Dpp1978
There are certainly times where calling a person a cunt is not only reasonable, it is a gross understatement.

quote:


ORIGINAL: elab49
I really wish I could go down to see Privates

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 4323
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 8/4/2010 9:56:21 PM   
Rinc


Posts: 12819
Joined: 2/10/2005
From: A park bench, with a newspaper quilt
That's how desperate it is in that thread. Even you appear to be sane compared to certain individuals in there.

_____________________________

No spoilers please:

Invisiotext:
[ color=#F1F1F1 ]text[ /color ]

(in reply to Deviation)
Post #: 4324
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 8/4/2010 10:19:47 PM   
homersimpson_esq


Posts: 20118
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Springfield
PA, you fool, Gran Torino is ace. And Piles, you bandwagonjumping eejit, trying to hang with the cool* kids when actually you rated it highly. Pah.




*not actually cool


_____________________________

That deep-browed Homer ruled as his demesne.


Bristol Bad Film Club
A place where movie fans can come and behold some of the most awful films ever put to celluloid.

(in reply to Rinc)
Post #: 4325
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 8/4/2010 10:21:15 PM   
swordsandsandals


Posts: 12571
Joined: 6/1/2006
From: A magical forest

quote:

ORIGINAL: homersimpson_esq

PA, you fool, Gran Torino is ace. And Piles, you bandwagonjumping eejit, trying to hang with the cool* kids when actually you rated it highly. Pah.




*not actually cool



Homer: The voice of reason since 30/09/2005

_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rawlinson

Swords is right about everything.



quote:

ORIGINAL: Hood_Man

Swords smells like bum.



(in reply to homersimpson_esq)
Post #: 4326
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 9/4/2010 12:43:38 AM   
Miles Messervy 007


Posts: 6884
Joined: 11/2/2009

quote:

ORIGINAL: rick_7


#50. Casino Royale (Martin Campbell, 2006) - I don't really get Bond. I always want these spy yarns to be like The Spy Who Came in From the Cold and of course they never are - and never could be. So, having been duped time and again by promises of a back-to-basics approach (back to which basics - Dr. No?!), with earthy combat and psychological complexity (that was the sell for For Your Eyes Only and countless others), I decided to sit at home and count my gold, rather than spanking it on Daniel Craig's debut outing as 007. That says something about my judgement, as this belated viewing marks it out as the best Bond I've seen: intriguing and visceral, with the welcome stain of realism marking its more impressive moments.

A great, tough opening scene in monochrome sets the tone, with footage of Craig staking out an MI6 office intercut with snippets of a grisly kill in a public toilet. It's then offset by a largely idiotic credits sequence that looks like a spoof - and you wonder which of these two polar opposites is going to set the tone for the film. Actually, it's both, with bracing action sequences and fragments of fascinating characterisation spliced with superficial villainy and the usual tiresome fetishising of cars and planes. The first full action sequence is an absolute wow: gritty and exhilarating, as Bond pursues a bombmaker through the Ugandan bush (not a euphemism), past an industrial estate, up a crane and then into an embassy packed with gun-toting militia men. It ends with our hero completely losing the plot, prompting this pithy exchange with M (Judi Dench). Her: "You're supposed to display some kind of judgement." Him: "I did. I thought that one less bombmaker in the world was a good thing." Then we're into the story proper, with 007 being pitched against middle management criminal and blood-weeping card sharp Le Chiffre in a high-stakes poker game. Also along for the ride is treasury accountant Vesper Lynd (Eva Green) - who's surely so-named so he can do jokes about riding her, which doesn't happen.

Happily, while the film is essentially about cards, it knows that card games don't work on screen, so brief clips of the contest are alternated with punchy action and suspense sequences, each with a twist in the telling. There's also some sensitive interplay between Craig and Green that recalls the series' (few) emotional highpoints, but is undermined by slack writing, since the relationship isn't really explained by the action we see, the character development happening in jumps. Despite that, and the fact he runs like Forrest Gump, I think Craig is the best Bond we've seen - without the objectionable smugness of most other 007s. That self-satisfaction is replaced by an ambiguity that make the character much more interesting, even if such complexity isn't ramped up quite enough. His is also the first (J)A(ME)S BO(ND) to get an electronic tag, a sign of just how naughty he is in this film. A deft, intelligent score by David Arnold adds to the feel of this worthwhile, welcome reinvention of Bond which - for all its flaws - is hopefully a sign of things to come. So how come everyone says A Quantum of Solace is rubbish? (3)

Trivia note: The 1967 "comedy" loosely based on Ian Fleming's Casino Royale is one of the worst films of all time.

***


The martians look very funny, I just wish the script was better.

*SOME SPOILERS*
"Ak ak ak ak ak ak ak ak ak ak ak ak."
#65. Mars Attacks! (Tim Burton, 1996) - Wow, this is a mixed bag: a movie based on a series of trading cards that satirises the piousness of '50s sci-fi movies, wastes - in both senses - an immensely promising cast and treats us to several teeth-grindingly pointless interludes spoofing films as irrelevant (sorry, diverse) to its thesis as Apocalypse Now, Duel in the Sun and William Shakespeare's Romeo + Juliet. Its overarching premise is unquestionably hilarious. Whereas The Day the Earth Stood Still told us that humans were the real savages - irrational warmongers who needed to be taught a lesson by their advanced galactic neighbours - here we're back on less preachy ground, with big-brained martian invaders who only pretend to come in peace so they can wipe out all of Congress in one go.

Usually spotty films are rescued by the incidental pleasures, but here it's the subplots that are often found wanting. Give Burton '30s star Sylvia Sidney and cult character actor Joe Don Baker and what does he do with them? Turns Baker into a stereotypical TV-loving trailer park hick, and Sidney into a one-joke sideshow. The joke? She's got dementia! Chortle. In her last film, Sidney has just a single funny line ("They blew up Congress, ahahahaha!"), though there is one absolutely lovely moment between the veteran former leading lady and screen grandson Lukas Haas that utilises the memory loss gag in a worthwhile way. The put-upon teenage misfit tells her that he is the kid she's just been chuntering on about. "I know, Thomas," she says. "Richie always was the best one." It's an unexpectedly affecting bit of Wes Anderson-esque sentiment amidst much offensive tedium - a contrast that just about sums up the film's maddeningly uneven tone.

The production design is inspired, but the (admittedly very amusing) martians would have been better in stop-motion as originally planned. The Congress set-piece, including cautionary signs intended to prevent causing further offence to the visitors that read "no applause" and "no birds", is quite well-handled and the film has a nice subplot featuring Jim Brown and Pam Grier, but then there's all that rubbish with Jack Nicholson's casino promoter and his hippie wife (Annette Bening, who's given nothing to work with), and a dozen other diversions designed to eat up the running time, or satisfy Burton's penchant for self-indulgence. Mars Attacks! also has the distinction of being perhaps the first film I've seen that's avowedly in favour of nuclear war, even if the weapons are ultimately replaced by Slim Whitman. In the end it's not a bad film, just wildly inconsistent. (2.5)

***


Ah. Things make sense now. Rick is as wrong as he's ever been.

_____________________________

quote:

jamesbondguy:
Miles is clearly the finest film theorist of his generation

quote:

Deviation:
if it isn't ham, I'll eat a living pig.

(in reply to rick_7)
Post #: 4327
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 9/4/2010 12:55:26 AM   
Pigeon Army


Posts: 14612
Joined: 29/1/2006
From: Pixar HQ, George Lucas' Office.
quote:

ORIGINAL: homersimpson_esq

PA, you fool, Gran Torino is ace.



It is horrific. I was watching it in the communal lounge of my apartment building (only TV in the building with Sky) and when it finished, the guy sitting on the opposite couch goes, "Well...that was a shit film." He was pretty much right.

Of course, it's much better viewing on Sky tonight - if there isn't a rugby game on and I can lock the TV down for my nefarious purposes, there's a Myrna Loy marathon on TCM - Petticoat Fever, After the Thin Man and Love Crazy. I'll hopefully be watching the latter two, if not all three.


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rinc
She's supposed to be 13! I'd want her to be very attractive though


quote:

ORIGINAL: MonsterCat
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army
Stop being mean to Deviation

No.

(in reply to homersimpson_esq)
Post #: 4328
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 9/4/2010 1:42:49 AM   
TheManWithNoShame


Posts: 6767
Joined: 1/8/2006
quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation

quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

That thread made me




Amazing gif.

And Rinc called me sane.



A challenger appears:




_____________________________

sorry jbg :( i promise to stop being such a silly boy.

(in reply to Deviation)
Post #: 4329
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 9/4/2010 11:09:37 AM   
Gram123

 

Posts: 5537
Joined: 19/1/2006
From: Reino Unido
023) Get Smart  (Peter Segal, USA, 2008, BD) - 6.0

Easy viewing and fairly funny. Better than expected, but nothing groundbreaking.


_____________________________

Gram123's Top Songs Project

(in reply to TheManWithNoShame)
Post #: 4330
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 9/4/2010 11:31:40 AM   
Gram123

 

Posts: 5537
Joined: 19/1/2006
From: Reino Unido
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army
81. Geung si sin sang (Mr. Vampire) (1985, Lau, HKG) - 3.5/5
I'd always figured the hopping vampires were a part of Chinese culture generally, but it appears not - unless I'm very much mistaken, their presence in Kung Fu Chaos is a reference to this silly and awesome 1985 action-horror-comedy

When films like Mr Vampire made it to the west, the Jiang shi were labelled "hopping vampires", but
more accurately, they're hopping zombies. They do have some root in Chinese folklore - see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jiang_Shi

They were first brought to the screen by Sammo Hung, in Encounters of the Spooky Kind and became a mainstay of HK comic-horrors. Lam Ching-ying appeared in his Taoist priest role opposite Jiang shi in many films, including all six original Mr Vampire films and two of the three New Mr Vampire films, plus Vampire vs Vampire and Crazy Safari and probably others, too.


_____________________________

Gram123's Top Songs Project

(in reply to Pigeon Army)
Post #: 4331
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 9/4/2010 3:32:57 PM   
matty_b


Posts: 14550
Joined: 19/10/2005
From: Outpost 31 calling McMurtle.
Zombieland (Ruben Fleischer)

Inevitably trailered as the spiritual and American successor to Shaun of the Dead, inevitably it isn't as good. It's not as funny, it doesn't look as good (despite probably being more expensive) and whereas Shaun blended in some moments of genuine emotion perfectly, Zombieland's one attempt to do that falls very, very flat. However, there's still a lot to like about. Fleischer's direction is sharp and inventive and the characters are all pretty good from Jesse Eisenberg's nerdy phobic college kid, Columbus, to Woody Harrelson's psychotic zombie killer,  Tallahasse. There are some very funny moments in there and at 81 moments it's a film that never outstays its welcome. Oh, and I don't know if anyone has ever mentioned this, but there's a pretty funny cameo at one point. (7.5/10)


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Cool Breeze
Mattyb is a shining example of what the perfect Empire Forum member is.


(in reply to Gram123)
Post #: 4332
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 9/4/2010 6:19:58 PM   
swordsandsandals


Posts: 12571
Joined: 6/1/2006
From: A magical forest
Zombieland is amazing. Love it.

_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rawlinson

Swords is right about everything.



quote:

ORIGINAL: Hood_Man

Swords smells like bum.



(in reply to matty_b)
Post #: 4333
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 9/4/2010 11:10:54 PM   
Deviation


Posts: 27284
Joined: 2/6/2006
From: Enemies of Film HQ
 
quote:

ORIGINAL: matty_b

Zombieland (Ruben Fleischer)

Inevitably trailered as the spiritual and American successor to Shaun of the Dead, inevitably it isn't as good. It's not as funny, it doesn't look as good (despite probably being more expensive) and whereas Shaun blended in some moments of genuine emotion perfectly, Zombieland's one attempt to do that falls very, very flat.



If we are referring to the scene where we discover about Tallahasse's "dog", than I thought that it worked betterit should have, both as a joke and as an emotional moment. And blended in better in the third act of Shaun of the Dead.


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Dpp1978
There are certainly times where calling a person a cunt is not only reasonable, it is a gross understatement.

quote:


ORIGINAL: elab49
I really wish I could go down to see Privates

(in reply to matty_b)
Post #: 4334
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 9/4/2010 11:35:08 PM   
MOTH

 

Posts: 3479
Joined: 3/10/2005
From: Sittin' on the dock of the bay
Il Conformista (Bernardo Bertolucci, 1970)
Sumptuous visuals, sublime cinematography and arresting camerawork make up for a narrative that seems tricksy, but turns out to be rather blunt and contrived in its attempts to make political points. The eye will be fully stimulated, the brain less so, but still a fine film (8/10)

_____________________________

I've only gone and set up a blog! This week I've been mostly reviewing The Lego Movie and Wadjda. Click: The Fast Picture Show

(in reply to Deviation)
Post #: 4335
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 9/4/2010 11:39:16 PM   
Miles Messervy 007


Posts: 6884
Joined: 11/2/2009
I don't think it's a political film, it's more about the character himself, IMO. Still, glad you liked it, as the cinematography is indeed unbelievable.

_____________________________

quote:

jamesbondguy:
Miles is clearly the finest film theorist of his generation

quote:

Deviation:
if it isn't ham, I'll eat a living pig.

(in reply to MOTH)
Post #: 4336
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 9/4/2010 11:40:58 PM   
Deviation


Posts: 27284
Joined: 2/6/2006
From: Enemies of Film HQ
Kick Ass (Matthew Vaughn, 2010)- USA/UK - 4/5

It's a satire, black comedy, drama, and at the same time an action film. It doesn't all gell well, but it works much better than it should (and the back-story about Big Daddy proves you don't need two hour long origin stories to introduce a superhero), while not really going in depth in its satiric elements, it does well, very well in all the other elements. Some unneeded Lost references aside (in the most inopportune of moments), Big Daddy and Hit Girl being far more engaging than the actual protagonists and the unfocused script prove minor distractions on what is at the end, a fresh, very entertaining film. And Vaughn finally proving as a director to watch.

Shutter Island
(Martin Scorsese, 2010)- USA - 3/5

The fantasy sequences are the best thing Scorsese has done in a long time (which did remind me stylistically of Kundun), the film has atmosphere, his choice of music and match with visuals are mostly excellent, shame he did not re-check the clunky, predictable script he was working with.

Freaks (Tod Browning, 1932)- USA - 5/5

The film is still incredible to this day, and even if hindered by some poor acting and lost scenes eliminating some of the tension, it still remains an unforgettable, creepy horror.

The Men who Stare at Goats (Grant Heslov)- USA/UK- 3/5

A solid, unimpressive but noble attempt at showing a rather bizarre true story while attacking conformity, showing the need of believing and slightly touching at the end on the torture perpetrated by the US army. It's rather undeveloped and the choice to make it a road film is not really a wise one or a creative one. The intent however is a noble one and it never really is, in any way imaginable, a bad film.


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Dpp1978
There are certainly times where calling a person a cunt is not only reasonable, it is a gross understatement.

quote:


ORIGINAL: elab49
I really wish I could go down to see Privates

(in reply to swordsandsandals)
Post #: 4337
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 10/4/2010 9:49:30 AM   
matty_b


Posts: 14550
Joined: 19/10/2005
From: Outpost 31 calling McMurtle.
quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation

quote:

ORIGINAL: matty_b

Zombieland (Ruben Fleischer)

Inevitably trailered as the spiritual and American successor to Shaun of the Dead, inevitably it isn't as good. It's not as funny, it doesn't look as good (despite probably being more expensive) and whereas Shaun blended in some moments of genuine emotion perfectly, Zombieland's one attempt to do that falls very, very flat.



If we are referring to the scene where we discover about Tallahasse's "dog", than I thought that it worked betterit should have, both as a joke and as an emotional moment. And blended in better in the third act of Shaun of the Dead.



Are we missing a "than" in a couple of places there, by any chance?

But, yes, that's the moment, and I really don't think it works - certainly not the Titanic joke, anyway. If the moment had been left alone, then it might have just worked.


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Cool Breeze
Mattyb is a shining example of what the perfect Empire Forum member is.


(in reply to Deviation)
Post #: 4338
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 10/4/2010 6:06:20 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54577
Joined: 1/10/2005
Oceans 11 (Soderbergh, 2001)
 
Enjoyable caper movie with the worst English accent this side of Mary Poppins. And, although Garcia is very good in this, you can't help but think they missed a trick. Enticing Elliott Gould into the robbery using his hatred of Terry Benedict, a man who did him out of his own casino, can you imagine how choice it would have been to add another old hand to the cast and include George Segal? And then add a scene between them show Heat exactly what a face-off looks like. That would just have been so much fun.
 
Cashback (Ellis, 2006)
 
Another feature extended from a short. Problem was the short was a bit of wish fulfilment and didn't generate the kind of interest a more successful short to feature District 9 did. A young man wigs out after being dumped and stops sleeping and, on using his extra time taking nightshifts in Sainsburys, discovers he can actually stop time. But writer/director Ellis doesn't really know what to do with his scenario other than the tacky stripping woman montage in the shop. He introduces the possibility that others can do it, then leaves it. He starts another love story and tries to turn the story into a bog standard dumped and finds new girlfriend, which only emphasises how slight the whole thing is and how poor the dialogue becomes.
 
Not much of note in the performances Jared Harris turns up in cameo to support his wife and Nick Hancock has another one as a 5 a side captain. Michelle Ryan adds little as usual. The lead Biggerstaff is fair enough, but as uninvolved as his character for the most part.
 
Comes a Horseman (Pakula, 1978)
 
An odd film Pakula in the west and Caan as a cowboy (with normal accent intact!).
 
Coming to the end of WWII the world is changing Ella Connors farm is threatened by oil while the big man next door Jason Robards has lost his powerful position to the money men back east and is emasculated on his own homestead. Ex-soldier Caan turns up to buy his own parcel of land and help Ella and old hand Richard Farnsworth try to keep things running.
 
I'm guessing it was the oil angle that intrigued Pakula and certainly that story is more interesting than the cliched western side that he doesn't handle nearly as well (although Farnsworth's performance as a wonderful old timer is the only match to Robard's performance in the film). Robards, rattling round his mansion (think the end of There Will Be Blood), trailed by businessman George Grizzard, continually represented swanning round in a silk dressing gown, is a man on a downward spiral leading to his final attack on a woman he's been obsessed with since she was a teen.
 
Jane Fonda certainly tries to convince as a taciturn outdoorswoman her unmade up skin looks like she's been outdoors for years, although I think the make-up people might occasionally make it a little too bright and ruddy. A withdrawn performance that doesn't really make much of an impact, although Caan has the attitude right for his role, if not the accent!

 
Wings (Wellman, 1927) Spoilers
 
Famous now as the first Oscar winner for Best Picture, Wings takes 2 young men from the same town in the US to Europe to fly against the Germans. Jack is the boy next door, beloved of Clara Bow (who also heads to France to help out ending up in a compromising position with Jack to drunk to recognise her), and David the rich boy in town. Both love the same woman, city girl Sylvia (how much conflict was there between town and city in the 20s? it seems thrown up quite a lot in fiction and film of the time).
 
It isn't the most imaginative silent you'll ever see there is one attempt to visually impress with battlefield scenes - but the impact was more technological. There are extended scenes of battle in the sky, with plenty of dogfights and crashes and the occasionally cheering section on the ground. Rivals Jack and David become good friends (in fact, some of this probably turned up again in Pearl Harbour) but, amusingly, the real love story is between the men, with the final touching yet lingering embrace even ending in a kiss.
 
It's quite difficult, really, to understand the appeal of Clara Bow from this film unless you are keen on the quick topless shot. She isn't a particularly compelling screen presence, nor is the final match convincing. Gary Cooper has a very short role as an unfortunate flying ace.

_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to matty_b)
Post #: 4339
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 11/4/2010 1:54:29 AM   
DCMaximo


Posts: 992
Joined: 5/1/2007
From: Nottingham via Aidy Boothroyd's Palace of Wisdom
New entries:

7. Fletch (1985, Ritchie) 9/10
Fletch is one of those films I like to revisit at least once a year to remind myself how much I love it. Starring Chevy Chase on the top of his game, it tells the story of undercover reporter Irwin "Fletch" Fletcher who, while pretending to be a bum for a story, is approached by a stranger offering him $50,000 to kill him. This draws Fletch into an investigation where he discovers there is more to this offer than meets the eye. The film works on two levels: the mystery element is strong enough to leave the audience guessing as to how it will be solved, while the jokes are more than funny enough to make the film work as a comedy. There is good support from Joe Don Baker and Tim Matheson who both are fun in shady roles, as well as some smaller roles for George Wendt and M. Emmet Walsh. However, this is Chase's show and he is excellent throughout, with deft comic timing and perfect delivery.

14. Kick-Ass (2010, Vaughn) 9/10
I was really worried this couldn't live up to the hype, but I was entertained from start to finish. Everyone in the film puts in a really strong performance, but Aaron Johnson is especially good, making the most of the least flashy role and ensuring that the lead character is still likable and entertaining enough to carry the film when the zanier characters are off-screen. Indeed, one of the wisest things about the film is that they don't overuse the more over-the-top characters which could have led to them outstaying their welcome. Instead Nicolas Cage's Big Daddy and Chloe Moretz's Hit Girl are used sparingly, resulting in them being more entertaining when they do appear. Mark Strong, as the main bad guy, gets the lion's share of the best lines and, barring Johnson, is the best thing in it. Violent, but not excessively, sweary, but not irritatingly so, it's the most fun I've had in the cinema for ages.

Performance additions:
11. Chevy Chase as Irwin "Fletch" Fletcher (Fletch)
17. Aaron Johnson as Dave Lizewski/Kick-Ass (Kick-Ass)
19. Mark Strong as Frank D'Amico (Kick-Ass)

_____________________________

The Spanish Inquisition of the 'Get Carlton Banks a TV Spin-off' Association

"Carlotta was the kind of town where they spell trouble T-R-U-B-I-L, and if you try to correct them, they kill you"

(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 4340
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 11/4/2010 11:52:32 AM   
Miles Messervy 007


Posts: 6884
Joined: 11/2/2009
13. Rumble Fish (1983, F. Coppola)
I've had this recorded for ages. Coppola already has 3 lists on my top 10 of the year list, now he has 4 on my top 13. This is however, pretty much nothing like The Godfather. Rumble Fish is an expressionistic film in which mood prevails over plot. The former is achieved by many things. Firstly, the cinematography is fantastic. Taking inspirations from German Expressionism, noirs, and even Koyaanisqatsi, Rumble Fish is one of the most memorable films I've seen this year, visually. The Godfather films and Apocalypse Now also have amazing cinematography, mind, but they look totally different, as for starters this is in black-and-white, unusually for Coppola. The second thing that establishes the mood is the experimental score. Guaranteed to alienate some, it gives the film a unique and urgent feel. But what really makes the film's feel wonderful for me is the fact that it's a personal film for Coppola, and this is felt in every frame.
The casting also happens to be impeccable. The film features a lot of people who went on become stars: Matt Dillon and Mickey Rourke are both fantastic, Chris Penn and Lawrence Fishburne (whose first film was of course Apocalypse Now) are great in their small roles. Also, the film features Nic Cage, which automatically makes it awesome as we all know. Very young Sofia Coppola is credited as Domino and is a whole lot better here than in The Godfathe Part III. Dennis Hopper is also brilliant, and the cherry on top of the icing would be the inclusion of Tom Waits, who doesn't say much but has one brilliant line (I'm not gonna spoil it for you). The line is about the passing of time, and this is one of the film's most important themes. A clock features in nearly every scene. Another theme of the film is of course brotherhood (Coppola dedicated the film to his brother, Cage's father). Returning to the mood, the film has a wonderful feel of heat (seems to be a common theme in great 80s films - see Body Heat and Do The Right Thing). I can't believe this was actually booed by critics, BTW. The ending is the only moment which was a bit WTF, but the very ending is great. Anyway, I think I've rambled on enough. If you want to see a 90-minute masterpiece, few films I've seen surpass this. 9, but as well as all the 9s above it is almost certain to become a 10 on a re-watch.

27. L'ami de mon amie [Boyfriends and Girlfriends] (1987, Rohmer)
And so I'm finished with Rohmer's Comedies and Proverbs. This is not as good as The Green Ray, but I think I finally got totally adapted to Rohmer's style and already look forward to re-watching them all (not right now, but perhaps at the end of the year). While most of his films deal with loners, this one is great at depicting couples. It has an incredibly natural flow. Nice low-key cinematography as usual, and this time, not even a non-diegetic score if I remember correctly. What's great about Rohmer is that even though his characters are weak people, he doesn't satirise them, but obviously cares for them (annoying characters were my problems with the earlier Comedies and Proverbs, but I understand these were silly complaints now). The film is not laugh-out-loud funny but has moments of gentle comedy, the ending being the most obvious one. It's also nice to have a SPOILERS positive ending unlike the ones in the first 4 Comedy and Proverbs films. The casting is great - Rohmer uses the little sister (a non-role) from A Good Marriage as one of the female protagonists, a total unknown as another one, and the improbably cute girl from The Aviator's Wife as a supporting character (featuring an interesting hairdo). The chemistry between the leads is undeniable. What I noticed this time is that Rohmer channels Ozu in using establishing shots whcih are not important for the action, but help create the mood. My only problem with this was the quality of the DVD, which had a lot of unpleasant displacement. Still, as it stands it's the 2nd best Comedy and Proverb film. 8

29. In the Loop (2009, Iannucci)
I haven't seen The Thick of It, but after a while I got tired of not being in on the joke, seeing as this film is championed by many people around here, and bought it for a fiver. A great investment. The script is undoubtedly one of the freshest of the decade. People insulting each other has rarely been as funny. I don't think the film achieves the status of a serious satire - its primary purpose is to point out how chaotic politics is (the situation in the film obviously channels the Iraq war and points out how incompetent everyone involved was, but that's hardly a deep message) and get as many laughs as possible out of that. The cast certainly helps - even the bit players couldn't be any better. Pop-culture references are abound, swear words have never been used as beautifully. There are no sympathetic characters - they are either assholes or losers, sometimes sandwhiched in between the both. The dynamics of the film thus work really well. Technically, the film is nothing special but it has a mockumentary feel and thus doesn't need visual splendor. This claustrophobic quality is probably a left-over from its TV origins. Speaking of which, In the Loop would work better as a TV show, and I certainly intend to check that out very soon, but its pacing is so brilliant that it doesn't matter that it feels like a condensed series. Overall, one of the best films of the last year. 8, guaranteed to rise with re-watches.

44. Romeo, Julia a tma [Romeo, Juliet and Darkness] (1960, Weiss)
Like its title implies, this is a tragic story. Set during German occupation of Czechoslovakia (my first Czech film, for that matter), it depicts a life of constant fear. The performances are great, the cinematography is alternatively poetic and claustrophobic, and even though the film lacks a bit of coherence, I recommend it highly, as it has some scenes that will scare you and others that will melt even the coldest heart. 8

58. Our Hospitality (1923, Blystone/Keaton)
My 2nd Keaton feature is not as good as the first, but few films are, so I'm definitely not complaining. It's actually his 2nd feature (that he (co)directed, that is), and I think it shows a little as the film feels like a mash-up of shorts. That doesn't make it bad, though, not at all. It has wonderful moments like the farmer near the train, the chemistry between Buster and the girl (of course she was his actual wife) is great, Joe Roberts in his last role is as huge/moustache-y as ever, and that stunt at the end is fantastic. Great, great fun. 8

_____________________________

quote:

jamesbondguy:
Miles is clearly the finest film theorist of his generation

quote:

Deviation:
if it isn't ham, I'll eat a living pig.

(in reply to Rinc)
Post #: 4341
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 11/4/2010 11:55:46 AM   
Miles Messervy 007


Posts: 6884
Joined: 11/2/2009
That Rumble Fish is longer than anything I used to post in my thread, how ironic

_____________________________

quote:

jamesbondguy:
Miles is clearly the finest film theorist of his generation

quote:

Deviation:
if it isn't ham, I'll eat a living pig.

(in reply to Miles Messervy 007)
Post #: 4342
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 11/4/2010 12:21:34 PM   
Piles


Posts: 5545
Joined: 6/8/2007
From: Whalley Range
What ever happened to your thread?

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Top 100 Moz Songs / Top 100 Films

(in reply to Miles Messervy 007)
Post #: 4343
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 11/4/2010 12:24:05 PM   
Miles Messervy 007


Posts: 6884
Joined: 11/2/2009
The banter's dead and I can post the normal reviews here now unlike last year where I was too late to the party. I could still post in my thread, but I only do that with substantial reviews and I didn't know that one'd be substantial before I started typing... I'll revive it with the next film, maybe.

_____________________________

quote:

jamesbondguy:
Miles is clearly the finest film theorist of his generation

quote:

Deviation:
if it isn't ham, I'll eat a living pig.

(in reply to Piles)
Post #: 4344
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 11/4/2010 12:24:53 PM   
Piles


Posts: 5545
Joined: 6/8/2007
From: Whalley Range
Fair enough. I guess this thread here is pretty much a giant unseen films thread.

_____________________________

Top 100 Moz Songs / Top 100 Films

(in reply to Miles Messervy 007)
Post #: 4345
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 11/4/2010 12:26:15 PM   
Miles Messervy 007


Posts: 6884
Joined: 11/2/2009
Yeah you could say that. Of course in my thread I'd be the king but I'd still have to re-post (at least) the link here... I'm gonna revive it for the sake of old times though.
EDIT: The last post in there was exactly a month ago, seems like a good time to re-start it Not sure what I'll watch though...

< Message edited by Miles Messervy 007 -- 11/4/2010 12:28:15 PM >


_____________________________

quote:

jamesbondguy:
Miles is clearly the finest film theorist of his generation

quote:

Deviation:
if it isn't ham, I'll eat a living pig.

(in reply to Piles)
Post #: 4346
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 11/4/2010 12:55:53 PM   
DCMaximo


Posts: 992
Joined: 5/1/2007
From: Nottingham via Aidy Boothroyd's Palace of Wisdom

quote:

ORIGINAL: Miles Messervy 007

13. Rumble Fish (1983, F. Coppola)
I've had this recorded for ages. Coppola already has 3 lists on my top 10 of the year list, now he has 4 on my top 13. This is however, pretty much nothing like The Godfather. Rumble Fish is an expressionistic film in which mood prevails over plot. The former is achieved by many things. Firstly, the cinematography is fantastic. Taking inspirations from German Expressionism, noirs, and even Koyaanisqatsi, Rumble Fish is one of the most memorable films I've seen this year, visually. The Godfather films and Apocalypse Now also have amazing cinematography, mind, but they look totally different, as for starters this is in black-and-white, unusually for Coppola. The second thing that establishes the mood is the experimental score. Guaranteed to alienate some, it gives the film a unique and urgent feel. But what really makes the film's feel wonderful for me is the fact that it's a personal film for Coppola, and this is felt in every frame.
The casting also happens to be impeccable. The film features a lot of people who went on become stars: Matt Dillon and Mickey Rourke are both fantastic, Chris Penn and Lawrence Fishburne (whose first film was of course Apocalypse Now) are great in their small roles. Also, the film features Nic Cage, which automatically makes it awesome as we all know. Very young Sofia Coppola is credited as Domino and is a whole lot better here than in The Godfathe Part III. Dennis Hopper is also brilliant, and the cherry on top of the icing would be the inclusion of Tom Waits, who doesn't say much but has one brilliant line (I'm not gonna spoil it for you). The line is about the passing of time, and this is one of the film's most important themes. A clock features in nearly every scene. Another theme of the film is of course brotherhood (Coppola dedicated the film to his brother, Cage's father). Returning to the mood, the film has a wonderful feel of heat (seems to be a common theme in great 80s films - see Body Heat and Do The Right Thing). I can't believe this was actually booed by critics, BTW. The ending is the only moment which was a bit WTF, but the very ending is great. Anyway, I think I've rambled on enough. If you want to see a 90-minute masterpiece, few films I've seen surpass this. 9, but as well as all the 9s above it is almost certain to become a 10 on a re-watch.



Great review of a great film. Haven't watched Rumble Fish in a few years, think it's long overdue a rewatch. I've bolded my favourite part of your review for truth

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The Spanish Inquisition of the 'Get Carlton Banks a TV Spin-off' Association

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(in reply to Miles Messervy 007)
Post #: 4347
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 11/4/2010 1:13:08 PM   
Miles Messervy 007


Posts: 6884
Joined: 11/2/2009
Thanks I still need to check out The Weather Man based on your recommendation. I think Nic Cage would easily make my top 10 actors of all time.

_____________________________

quote:

jamesbondguy:
Miles is clearly the finest film theorist of his generation

quote:

Deviation:
if it isn't ham, I'll eat a living pig.

(in reply to DCMaximo)
Post #: 4348
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 11/4/2010 1:36:01 PM   
DCMaximo


Posts: 992
Joined: 5/1/2007
From: Nottingham via Aidy Boothroyd's Palace of Wisdom
Ditto, even in his bad films (and there are many), he's always fun to watch. You never get a half-arsed Nic Cage performance. You should check out Bad Lieutenant when it comes out (my housemate *cough*acquired*cough* it early), it's Cage unleashed. The Weather Man is plenty good too.

_____________________________

The Spanish Inquisition of the 'Get Carlton Banks a TV Spin-off' Association

"Carlotta was the kind of town where they spell trouble T-R-U-B-I-L, and if you try to correct them, they kill you"

(in reply to Miles Messervy 007)
Post #: 4349
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 11/4/2010 2:37:22 PM   
Pigeon Army


Posts: 14612
Joined: 29/1/2006
From: Pixar HQ, George Lucas' Office.
09. 2046 (2004, Wong, CHN/FRN/GER/HKG) - 4.5/5
If there's one thing that can always be said about Wong Kar-Wai, it's that his aesthetic vocabulary is one of the most developed in modern cinema. No ordinary human could produce a work of such breathtaking visual beauty as 2046, but with the assistance of cinematographers Christopher Doyle and Kwan Pung-Leung, Wong Kar-Wai has done that. It's a masterpiece of imagery, every facet of his production design carefully realised and perfected. From the evocative use of widescreen to the startlingly good colour choices (the simultaneously garish and tasteful greens of the Oriental Hotel, the whites and browns of Singapore standing in contrast with the shadows encroaching on every corner, the multicoloured madness of Chow Mo-wan's fictional future-world), from the impeccable costume design by William Chang to the surprisingly excellent use of slow motion, everything about 2046 feels right and looks spectacular, and it is just as much a key to the film's success as the winding, jumping narrative. Wong's narrative plays to his strengths - storytelling in segments, emotionally-scrabbling protagonists, ruminations on love and the loss of it - but feels as fresh as it did when I first saw Chungking Express. His dialogue is top-notch, if occasionally repetitive, the score is one of the best I've ever heard, and the star-studded cast gives impeccable performances, in particular Tony Leung Chiu-Wai as the aforementioned pulp sci-fi writer and part-time womaniser Chow Mo-wan and Zhang Ziyi as call girl Bai Ling. However, what's most important is that, unlike Ashes of Time Redux or Chungking Express, 2046 doesn't get hurt by overloading on a good thing - where Ashes of Time's visuals ultimately engulf the plot and make it unnecessarily hard to follow, and while Chungking Express is hurt by the constant playing of that fucking California Dreaming song, 2046 has none of this. It does feel a bit scrappy occasionally, and Wong's episodic approach does mean some stories aren't as well fleshed out as they should be (namely the story involving the second Su Li-zhen), but Wong hits all the right notes here. It is an experience-and-a-half.

12. Ran (1985, Kurosawa, JPN/FRN) - 4.5/5

As a massive fan of King Lear, I approached Ran with a certain degree of trepidation, trepidation I initially thought would be justified when I saw how Kurosawa was approaching his substitute for Cordelia in this adaptation displaced to feudal Japan, making Cordelia/Saburo brusque and disrespectful. However, I needn't have worried, as while Ran does away with some of my favourite parts of Lear - the Gloucester subplot, in particular, is cut up and doled out like it was pie a dinner party hosted by a Roman general - it is ultimately just as thrilling and tragic a drama as the play it derives inspiration from. Over two-and-a-half hours, Kurosawa takes Shakespeare's text and fleshes it out, expounding on the motives of everyone from Hidetora/Lear to the Fool to even made-for-the-film minor character Prince Tsurumaru. It's grand in scale and yet a work that thrives on humanity and the dissipation thereof, as we're riveted to the screen watching people stab each other in the back and the goodness of the world slowly dissolve. However, Kurosawa understands exactly what makes Lear tragic, and it's here in spades - Hidetora's infallible pride, the machinations of vengeance-seeking Lady Kaede (assumedly the film's Edmund), the loyalty-to-a-fault of characters like the Fool, Tango and Kurogane, the last-minute tragedies, etc. etc. It's a depressing work despite its riveting nature, and Kurosawa manages all this while putting together some spectacular visuals (the siege on the third castle), crafting some brilliant action sequences (again, that siege) and soliciting some outstanding performances, not in the least Tatsuya Nakadai as Hidetora and Peter as Hidetora's loyal, sardonic jester. Ran is an epic film that puts a surprisingly excellent spin on Shakespeare's Lear, and while it may not improve on the source material, it's certainly not inferior to that masterpiece.

111. Alle Anderen (Everyone Else) (2009, Ade, GER) - 3/5

There's been some small buzz around the festival circuit about Maren Ade's acerbic dramedy-romance, a film about a mismatched couple whose relationship unravels spectacularly as they bond with another couple while on holiday in Sardinia. While it's hard to say the buzz isn't warranted - the performances from Birgit Minichmayr and Lars Eidinger as PR girl Gitti and architect Chris are pitch-perfect for their characters, and Ade certainly knows her way around self-destructing relationships - it's a lot harder to say I found the film to be good, simply due to how difficult it is to endure the film. There's no doubt it's doing what it does well and soliciting the desired reaction - it's clear as the pre-existing cracks in Chris' and Gitti's relationship begin to show and expand that they're not good for each other and yet deserving of each other, volatile, moody, snarky and unlikable as they are - but when that desired reaction is essentially a painful grimace for the film's entire running time, it becomes harder to like what Ade is doing. These are two people whose mere presence on the screen is an ordeal, and while that is the point, and while we are meant to sympathise more with Hans and Sana, the genuinely likable couple the pair 'bond' with, it's Gitti and Chris who dominate proceedings. In that sense, it's difficult to justify watching them self-destruct over a painfully prolonged period of time, because, as Thom Yorke once sung, they do it to themselves, they do, and that's what really hurts. Everyone Else does what it sets out to do with aplomb - but what it sets out to do is not something I necessarily have the patience for. At least Hans and Sana get you through.

_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rinc
She's supposed to be 13! I'd want her to be very attractive though


quote:

ORIGINAL: MonsterCat
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army
Stop being mean to Deviation

No.

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