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RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 6/1/2010 1:47:57 PM   
chris_scott01


Posts: 3081
Joined: 5/1/2006
quote:

ORIGINAL: doncopey1

2) Marathon Man (John Schlesinger, 1976) (4)- Superb paranoia/espionage thriller, typical from the 1970's. Powerful stuff aided by an unbearable score.


You must be Schlesinger's biggest fan on this forum.  I wasn't too interested in this one, I don't know why, same with Midnight Cowboy, there's just something about those two films that didn't click with me.  Sunday, Bloody Sunday on the other hand...

Odd Man Out (1947, Carol Reed)

Superb British noir set in Ireland with the ever amazing James Mason as terrorist Johnny McQueen, who gets shot during a heist, seperated from his gang and has to dodge, wounded and dying through the shadows of the city and the police dragnet to safety. I’d argue that this is better looking than The Third Man, with some of the finest cinematography you could find. Nice performance from Kathleen Ryan, but Robert Newton was a tad over the top.


La Strada (1954, Federico Fellini)

Still a powerful and touching favourite.

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Post #: 301
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 6/1/2010 1:56:47 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54589
Joined: 1/10/2005
I like Marathon Man. But, even more, I love the story about Olivier's suggestion in response to method actors everywhere. Although Hoffman seems to know try to suggest it wasn't method but lifestyle. I don't buy it.

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quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to chris_scott01)
Post #: 302
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 6/1/2010 2:51:14 PM   
doncopey1


Posts: 4997
Joined: 29/11/2005
From: Liverpool: Age 25
quote:

ORIGINAL: chris_scott01

quote:

ORIGINAL: doncopey1

2) Marathon Man (John Schlesinger, 1976) (4)- Superb paranoia/espionage thriller, typical from the 1970's. Powerful stuff aided by an unbearable score.


You must be Schlesinger's biggest fan on this forum.  I wasn't too interested in this one, I don't know why, same with Midnight Cowboy, there's just something about those two films that didn't click with me.  Sunday, Bloody Sunday on the other hand...




Hi Chris.. been a while, hope all is well. I am a big Schlesinger fan, I just find something unique about his films. His creates a raw authenticity but also cinematic panache, I will forever love Midnight Cowboy.


_____________________________

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(in reply to chris_scott01)
Post #: 303
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 6/1/2010 3:06:20 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
quote:

ORIGINAL: Gimli The Dwarf

16. The Additional Capabilities of the Snout (2008, Ivan Maximov)

What the flaming heck was that about?



 

quote:

Bit of a mess, isn't it? But I still cant see how you think IB should be on the same sort of score as this.


The scene where the cannibal leader comes out, does a bit of a dance and slaps the girls arses = Any scene with the Groundhog Jew for sheer idiocy.  Although that scene is the only reason why I bumped Escape from Kirkcaldy up to a 1.5. It was a pity bump.

quote:

You're not exactly having a fair build-up to rewatching Dog Soldiers, are you  Mind you, even I would give it a tad more than that. Not much, mind. I was pretty disappointed.


You should be happy. I think it's worse than Dog Soldiers right now. Dog Soldiers probably won't be bottom of my list.

quote:

SHORT FILMS
01. The Cat Piano (2009, Gibson & White) - 5/5
I don't think I've been quite so enraptured by a short as I have by this one. Eddie White's dark, fascinating poem is delivered by God himself, Nick Cave, with a hypnotic rhythm and an innate feel for the material, and his low-key delivery, belying the pain of memories best forgotten, complements Ari Gibson's impressive animation with aplomb. Rendering the cat city, one that thrives on music and the life it provides, in appropriate and noir-ish blues and blacks, this tale of a downtrodden feline who falls in love with a heavenly club singer while a spate of kidnappings of singers occur across town is rendered vividly and with an incredibly captivating style. It's quite possibly the closest to a perfect short I've encountered.


Co-inky-dink or did you check it out after I reviewed it? Glad you loved it either way.

(in reply to Gimli The Dwarf)
Post #: 304
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 6/1/2010 5:11:54 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.

Shorts
 
6. Famous Last Words (2007; Ransom Riggs)

A man and his cat fall from a tall building and are met by the Grim Reaper. Thinking their last words aren't up to snuff, Death sings them a song about famous last words to try and get them to come up with something more inspiring before they get splattered. The animation is pretty uninspiring and the song is terrible. It feels like one of those pointless little cutaways in a regular Family Guy episode. So, bloody awful then. Also, why does Dylan Thomas sound Irish?

2/10

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 305
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 6/1/2010 6:34:41 PM   
Miles Messervy 007


Posts: 6884
Joined: 11/2/2009
4. Jackie Brown (1997, Tarantino) 8
Review here.
5. Akira (1988, Ôtomo)
Only my 3rd anime, and so far all of them have been good if not excellent. This is pretty amazing visually, no doubt, and has some nice action scenes (in many ways due to music), but just doesn't sit quite right with me. It's unsure about what it's trying to say (beyond 'control your power' maybe), and the plot is hit-and-miss. It could have benefited from being a lot shorter, though given that it's adapted from a gigantic manga (which I haven't read, in fact I have never read any manga), that wouldn't work well either. Overall a 7.

_____________________________

quote:

jamesbondguy:
Miles is clearly the finest film theorist of his generation

quote:

Deviation:
if it isn't ham, I'll eat a living pig.

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Post #: 306
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 6/1/2010 9:26:06 PM   
Philly501

 

Posts: 1
Joined: 6/1/2010
Philly501's 2010 Movies





No Country for Old Men (Ethan & Joel Cohen, 2007)
The Hurt Locker (Kathryn Bigelow, 2008)
The Hangover (Todd Phillips, 2009)
The Departed (Martin Scorsese, 2006)




Paranormal Activity (Oren Peli, 2009)
Law Abiding Citizen (F. Gary Gray, 2009)
Inglorious Basterds (Quentin Tarantino, 2009)




Rat Race (Jerry Zucker, 2001)
There's Something About Mary (Bobby & Peter Farrelly, 1998)








< Message edited by elab49 -- 6/1/2010 9:46:56 PM >

(in reply to culliford)
Post #: 307
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 6/1/2010 9:40:53 PM   
KnightofZyryab


Posts: 5840
Joined: 26/12/2005

quote:

ORIGINAL: MOTH

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation

quote:

ORIGINAL: MOTH

Romanzo Criminale (Michele Placido, 2005)
Comparisons with Goodfellas or City of God are probably inevitable, but this can hold it's head up high in such company, not least because of the excellent performances across the board. It could possibly have gone further in its comdemnation of political corruption and there's a slightly unlikely plot development late on, but this is still a slick (but gritty) crime drama worth seeing. (8/10)


This is definitely not the messy, cliched, dull, uninteresting (five minutes of Il Divo prove more interesting and informative than all of this), by the numbers film I've seen.



Funny, I was just browsing a few reviews of it this morning (from sources i find most reliable) and i was surprised to see it had generated a real split in opinion along these lines, with half of them shairng my opinion and the other half yours. Anyhoo, I liked it.


I'm the other half along with Deviation, I just found it complex and uninteresting from what I recall. And I bought the steelbook at full price when it came out as well. Nonetheless I shall have to give it a rewatch this year to see if I engage with it a bit more this time, and added to that I must view Il Divo, been on my to see list for a while now.

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(in reply to MOTH)
Post #: 308
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 6/1/2010 9:41:44 PM   
Deviation


Posts: 27284
Joined: 2/6/2006
From: Enemies of Film HQ
Manhattan (Woody Allen, 1979)- USA - 9/10

My first "classic" on a proper big screen, and what an experience. Allen's tale of romance in a place of insecurity, changing and fallen of values yet free and sophisticated is beautiful, self-critical and self-aware, witty, warm, funny, poignant, sad and sophisticated. Acting is great (aside from slightly unconvincing performances from Streep and Hemmingway) and the pacing flows smoothly never dropping. One great scene follows the next, all well shot, bueatifully choreographed, well acted, filled with life and motion, it's a film both about love and in love with its landscape. And the opening is one of the greatest I've ever seen and features one of the best arrangement between music and image I've ever seenm, up there with 2001: A Space Odyssey.

The Cat Paino ( Ari Gibson & Eddie White, 2009)- AUS - 9/10

A tale about a city of cats, where its singers are stolen by a human to be used for a paino. Beautifully animated like a film noir with gothic, surreal stylings, splendidly narrated. Cave's voice is great (DUH!) as he narrates this fantastic poem (which reminds me of The Avdentures Baron Muncheasen) and gives extra layers to the plot and images. It's great, really great.


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Dpp1978
There are certainly times where calling a person a cunt is not only reasonable, it is a gross understatement.

quote:


ORIGINAL: elab49
I really wish I could go down to see Privates

(in reply to Miles Messervy 007)
Post #: 309
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 6/1/2010 9:47:27 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
If we redid the shorts poll, I'm getting the feeling The Cat Piano might place quite highly.  Maybe we've found this year's Kiwi!

(in reply to Deviation)
Post #: 310
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 6/1/2010 9:54:07 PM   
Deviation


Posts: 27284
Joined: 2/6/2006
From: Enemies of Film HQ
Did it remind you of the Human Organ of The Adventures of Baron Muncheaen?

_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Dpp1978
There are certainly times where calling a person a cunt is not only reasonable, it is a gross understatement.

quote:


ORIGINAL: elab49
I really wish I could go down to see Privates

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 311
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 6/1/2010 9:58:54 PM   
Miles Messervy 007


Posts: 6884
Joined: 11/2/2009

quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

If we redid the shorts poll, I'm getting the feeling The Cat Piano might place quite highly.  Maybe we've found this year's Kiwi!
I haven't seen The Cat Piano, but it can't be that bad, surely

_____________________________

quote:

jamesbondguy:
Miles is clearly the finest film theorist of his generation

quote:

Deviation:
if it isn't ham, I'll eat a living pig.

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 312
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 6/1/2010 10:06:08 PM   
Epiphany Demon


Posts: 6497
Joined: 14/11/2007
1. Kung Fu Hustle (Chow, 2004, CHN/HKG) Jan *

I forgot just how entertaining this film is before I watched it today; it's just two hours of madcap brilliance. Chow directs with ferocity and pace, writes like he's on crystal meth and acts totally fucking cool. Highlight of the film has to be the Axe Gang's dance; it's not that funny in itself, but so effortlessly cool. I love this film.

4. Sherlock Jr. (Keaton, 1924, USA) Jan

This made me lol.

Performances Of The Year

2. Projectionist - Buster Keaton (Sherlock Jr.)
5. Sing - Stephen Chow (Kung Fu Hustle)

< Message edited by Epiphany Demon -- 6/1/2010 10:20:15 PM >


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Post #: 313
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 6/1/2010 10:13:02 PM   
homersimpson_esq


Posts: 20118
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Springfield
#10. My Beautiful Laundrette (Frears, 1985)

First in my Daniel Day Lewis back catalogue viewing. (I've only seen Last Of The Mohicans, Gangs Of New York, There Will Be Blood and Nine of his films.) Stephen Frears is a strange beast - his films are rarely outstanding, but they're rarely below average. Rather than directors like, say, Ridley Scott, who have some outstanding highs (do I need to name them?) and some pitiful lows (1492: Conquest of Paradise to name just one), Frears chugs along at a respectable rate doling out films as diverse as The Queen, High Fidelity, and most recently the misstep that was Cheri. My Beautiful Laundrette marks Frears' first significant film, and as admirable for the issues it addresses, and the heartwarming yet never twee way in which it manages it.

The film concerns the life of Omar (Gordon Warnecke) and his extended Pakistani family living in London. While he has grown up in Britain, and much of his family embrace British life, there is still a sense of a family divided between two countries, two lives. His father, a successful journalist in Pakistan, but a drunk mourning his wife in Britain, is both eloquent and useless, angry and coherent. He sends Omar to his uncle to find gainful employment before ideally going to college: his father still believes in the importance of an education, even through the fog of rampant alcoholism.

Intertwining this burgeoning professional life, as Omar first works at his uncle's car sales shop, and then takes over the titular laundrette, is his friendship with childhood friend Johnny (Daniel Day-Lewis) and a hesitant working relationship with his cousin Salim and his illicit activities. The film deals with the intrinsic racism aimed at the Pakistani family, the group of disaffected youths from whom the racism stems, the relationship between Johnny and the youths of which he was once a definitive member, Salim's drug-dealing, the significance of marriage to the older family members, and at the centre of this all, the gradual revealing of the homosexual relationship between Omar and Johnny. And while, individually, all these aspects are dealt with well, it is the very scope of the film that is its weakness. In its desire to deal with so many important issues, and to also be a light and entertaining film, it ends up being too scattershot in its approach, and there is no real impact on the audience of any of these subplots. The only possible exception is the inevitable release of tension between the white youths and the young Asians, with Johnny caught in the middle.

It's an entertaining film, but it spreads itself too thin, and consequently - to mix metaphors - we only really scratch the surface of the issues at its heart. Which is a shame, because I was genuinely invested in the characters, and would have liked to have been more emotionally involved as well.


#12. The Corporation (Abbott, Achbar, 2003)

I was quite looking forward to a fascinating documentary on the relative evils of the corporate world, and a genuine look at all angles. Sadly, from what I took in, this seemed to be two and a half hours of poorly edited film, which seemed to be lots of angry people effectively saying - in the tone of Mr Mackay from "South Park" - "corporations are bad, m'kay?"

Maybe I shouldn't have watched it at 3am when pulling an all-nighter, but documentaries spark a different part of one's brain to fictional stories, and I foolishly thought it would keep me involved. Sadly not. It gets points for the interesting points it makes, and the sheer wealth of evidence on show. It looses lots of points for being dull and in this reviewer's opinion, poorly made.



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Bristol Bad Film Club
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(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 314
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 6/1/2010 10:36:46 PM   
Piles


Posts: 5545
Joined: 6/8/2007
From: Whalley Range
#02. Eight and a Half (1963, Federico Fellini)
Guido (Marcello Mastroianni) is a film director who is preparing for his next movie. However, he is constantly plagued by his producers and his private life, and he quickly begins to retreat into memories, dreams, and fantasies. "8 ½” is primarily a film about filmmaking, and secondly an exercise in narrative. The creative block that Mastroianni's Guido is going through leads to a time of crisis; he's unable to relate to his subjects, and he's not even sure what he wants to say anymore. His creative juices aren't flowing, and it has its effects within the rest of his life, too. His personal relationships begin to crumble, most notably with his mistress and his wife. With his art suffering and his relationships crumbling, he is forced to re-evaluate the rest of his life. Perhaps the best scenes in the film come when he retreats into his past, or into a fantasy dream world. His Roman Catholic upbringing accounts for many of his philosophies on life, with the lack of a strong female figure being the primary instigator for his general disrespect (or rather apathy) towards women. The best scene in the film, though, comes about ninety minutes in, when Guido begins to fantasize about a harem of women hanging on his every word. It begins as a sordid fantasy, and an envisioning of the filmmaker's wildest dreams, before slowly revealing itself as nothing more than a condemnation of Guido's shortcomings as a man. There may be little narrative involved in the way of an overarching story, but what "8 ½” lacks in plot it makes up for in expert character development. Over the course of two and a half hours, we begin to learn everything we need to know about this man. It's a life story told in a structurally inventive way, using this mid-life crisis as an instigator of his life's re-appraisal. The fantasies and flashbacks that I've already spoken about are certainly a highlight, but it's Fellini's treatment of the character in the 'real world' that is impressive. He introduces him as a layered, complex character who is almost impenetrable in his mystery and intrigue. Over the generous runtime, the director unravels him, stripping the layers away until what we're left with is simply a man, down to the bare essentials, with no style, sunglasses, or women to hide behind. 5/5.

#04. La Notte
(1961, Michelangelo Antonioni)
Lidia (Jeanne Moreau) and Giovanni (Marcello Mastroianni) are a married couple who are slowly falling out of love. Together, they visit a book launch, a private party, and a night club, flirting with other potential sexual partners. As you can see from that brief – but not really restrictive – plot synopsis, "La Notte” is not a film about convoluted plot and complex narrative. Indeed, there is virtually no narrative present at all, only a series of events which chart the sun setting on a couple's love. I'm not sure if that's a good thing or a bad thing, to be honest. The only negative you could put against this divine film is that it's not really engaging on the narrative level, and (I hate the phrase I'm about to use) "not a lot happens” to justify its two hour running time. And this is partly true, because "La Notte” could be a ninety minute film, and an excellent one at that. Instead, Antonioni draws it out slightly, including a little superfluous walking, pouting, and posturing. There is indeed a bit of flack here and there that could certainly have been cut, but what is left behind is in fact a mysterious and dazzling portrayal of modern life and romance. And these, along with an in-depth study of the creative process and writer's block, are the three main themes that account for "La Notte”'s one hundred and twenty minute runtime. This more-than-long-enough length allows Antonioni to get under the skin of his subjects, finding out why they are becoming more and more disaffected with the world, its inhabitants, and each other. Antonioni portrays inner-city life as every bit as hostile and foreboding as he did the volcanic island in his earlier film "L'Avventura”. These surroundings only amplify the feelings being felt by our characters; alienation, despair, and disaffection. They wander between trendy surroundings, finding superficial Italian 'style' and 'cool', but nothing beneath the surface. These themes of failing to adapt to a modern world that one can't relate to are furthered by the sequences and moments that Antonioni indulges in. The one scene in the film which actually holds human emotion (even the climactic sex scene is carried out swiftly and efficiently, with no discernable feeling between the instigators) is the opening exchange between Mastroianni's writer and his old, severely ill friend Tommaso (Bernhard Wicki). It's packed with human drama and genuine tension, and for a moment you begin to think that "La Notte” will be a step towards more conventional, dramatic fare for Antonioni after the existentialist masterpiece that is "L'Avventura”. However, the stark and striking presence of a nymphomaniac who attempts to seduce Mastroianni's Giovanni is telling of the rest of the film, and the place and time that it inhabits; this is a world where common decency is ignored, humanity is unimportant, and status is king. 4/5.

#06. The Tarnished Angels (1958, Douglas Sirk)
The films that Douglas Sirk makes are very agreeable on an entertainment level. They are melodramas in every sense of the word, with outlandish emotions, romantic plots, and charismatic performers involved. "The Tarnished Angels”, then, fits in perfectly with the rest of Sirk's oeuvre (or at least the six films that I've seen). The story follows Rock Hudson's newspaper man as he gets involved in the world of stunt aerobatics. He meets Roger Schumann (Robert Stack), a former war hero who has been reduced to flying in a death-defying race, and his parachuting wife Laverne (Dorothy Malone). Not only does "The Tarnished Angels” pick up on all of the melodramatic fun of, say, "All I Desire” and "Imitation of Life”, but it's also Sirk's most ambitious film. It merges the believable – but incredibly overacted – romantic relationships on the ground with some pretty impressive action sequences up in the air, and the film is all the more riveting for it. The performances are all fine, with Rock Hudson delivering an uncharacteristically nuanced performance as a newspaper man fighting for what he believes in. There's an air of James Stewart about him as he mooches around the screen, becoming a sort of New Age Yojimbo to bring opposing camps together, and creating great chemistry with just about everybody involved. Dorothy Malone is infuriatingly devoted to Schumann, and Jack Carson is predictably amiable as the every man mechanic. The star, though, is Robert Stack, who was so watchable in 1956's "Written in the Wind” and continues that trend here. He's hardly likeable, but he has a raw charisma about him that you just can't fault. The only flaws are the little predictable moments, and – particularly – the clunky dialogue ("I need to fly like…. An alcoholic needs a drink”) sometime impedes on the tangible drama. Still, it's mostly immaculate entertainment, with some wonderful sequences and some perfectly over-the-top acting to boot. 4/5.


< Message edited by Piles -- 6/1/2010 10:50:48 PM >


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Top 100 Moz Songs / Top 100 Films

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Post #: 315
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 6/1/2010 10:50:06 PM   
Miles Messervy 007


Posts: 6884
Joined: 11/2/2009
5. Germania anno zero [Germany Year Zero] (1948, Rossellini)
HEAVY SPOILERS
Released around the same time as Bicycle Thieves. Watched it because KGB said it was superior. Well, I'm not a huge fan of the latter, but this is just not a good film. It feels like a TV drama, thinking that putting unlikeable characters in depressing situations is involving. The acting is solid for amateurs but quite bland. For some reason I thought the boy would be seduced by a pedophile, maybe I confused it with another film. This would have actually made for a better setup for his suicide. What we get instead is an absolutely inane story: boy visits dad in hospital, the nurse leaves a tray by the father's side which contains a bottle marked poison, walks away, the boy steals it and later poisons his dad's tea cause a guy the boy knows tells him his father would be better off dead. LOL. It should get props for showing a period not usually shown in cinema (to my knowledge) though. A 5
EDIT: Turns out the father and the teacher were not amateur actors, sorry.

< Message edited by Miles Messervy 007 -- 6/1/2010 11:14:41 PM >


_____________________________

quote:

jamesbondguy:
Miles is clearly the finest film theorist of his generation

quote:

Deviation:
if it isn't ham, I'll eat a living pig.

(in reply to Beetlejuice!)
Post #: 316
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 6/1/2010 10:56:05 PM   
Pigeon Army


Posts: 14612
Joined: 29/1/2006
From: Pixar HQ, George Lucas' Office.
quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

quote:

SHORT FILMS
01. The Cat Piano (2009, Gibson & White) - 5/5
I don't think I've been quite so enraptured by a short as I have by this one. Eddie White's dark, fascinating poem is delivered by God himself, Nick Cave, with a hypnotic rhythm and an innate feel for the material, and his low-key delivery, belying the pain of memories best forgotten, complements Ari Gibson's impressive animation with aplomb. Rendering the cat city, one that thrives on music and the life it provides, in appropriate and noir-ish blues and blacks, this tale of a downtrodden feline who falls in love with a heavenly club singer while a spate of kidnappings of singers occur across town is rendered vividly and with an incredibly captivating style. It's quite possibly the closest to a perfect short I've encountered.


Co-inky-dink or did you check it out after I reviewed it? Glad you loved it either way.


I checked it out after you reviewed it, because, dude, it's Nick Cave.


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rinc
She's supposed to be 13! I'd want her to be very attractive though


quote:

ORIGINAL: MonsterCat
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army
Stop being mean to Deviation

No.

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 317
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 6/1/2010 11:22:47 PM   
Olaf


Posts: 23701
Joined: 26/2/2007
From: 41°N 93°W
quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

If we redid the shorts poll, I'm getting the feeling The Cat Piano might place quite highly.  Maybe we've found this year's Kiwi!


You underestimate The Nick Cave Factor.

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(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 318
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/1/2010 2:28:10 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.

10. Alabama's Ghost (1973; Fred C. Hobbs)
 
SPOILERS

Blaxploitation meets horror meets arthouse with music, mad scientists, vampires, drugs, black magic and ghosts thrown in to the mix. And that's barely beginning to describe how insane this film actually is. One of those films that's just so audacious and so entertaining that you can't help but fall a little in love with it. Alabama works at a music club but dreams of being a magician. A forklift accident in the club's basement leads to Alabama discovering the magical possessions of 'Carter the Great' a long dead magician. He finds magical herbs called Raw Zeta that he smokes (wonder what they could be) He blackmails Carter's relatives into teaching him to become a magician himself and soon Alabama is billing himself as 'King of the Cosmos' and he finds himself battling various forms of the undead. Either utterly awful or rather wonderful, depending on, well, how cool you are really. 

8/10


< Message edited by rawlinson -- 26/2/2011 8:40:39 PM >

(in reply to Olaf)
Post #: 319
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/1/2010 3:22:28 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.

Shorts

7. Blue Pool (2004; Katerina Maximova)

A pig makes its way across the desert and encounters a psychedelic forest. Despite a warning from one of the forest creatures, he drinks from the blue pool. The pig mutates, as do all creatures who fall in the pool, and he travels to visit the vet to seek help. The animation is bright, the short is entertaining and the finale is very sweet, yet ultimately the whole thing is pretty slight. I'm all for weird animation, but I like it to be a little more inspired than this.

6.5/10

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 320
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/1/2010 8:49:39 AM   
paul_ie86


Posts: 11422
Joined: 4/1/2007
From: Chelsea Hotel #2
6. Atonement (Wright, 2007)
Not as good as I remembered it being.

7. Quantum of Solace (Forster, 2008)

It's alright, I suppose. Nothing special. Gemma Arterton made me laugh though.

< Message edited by paul_ie86 -- 7/1/2010 8:55:07 AM >


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Post #: 321
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/1/2010 9:59:07 AM   
MOTH

 

Posts: 3479
Joined: 3/10/2005
From: Sittin' on the dock of the bay
All That Heaven Allows (Douglas Sirk, 1955)
The impact of the story is inevitably lessened when we've seen this sort of melodrama played out in any number of soap-operas and films, but the themes and emotions are timeless and there's no denying Sirk's eye for visuals and colour, with impressive set design to boot. (7/10)



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Post #: 322
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/1/2010 11:15:58 AM   
Pigeon Army


Posts: 14612
Joined: 29/1/2006
From: Pixar HQ, George Lucas' Office.
01. Raging Bull (1980, Scorsese, USA) - 4.5/5
An early script draft of Raging Bull was reportedly vetoed on the basis that Jake La Motta was "a cockroach" - watching the version the studio finally gave the go-ahead, I fail to see how this is much of an improvement. La Motta does have sympathetic characteristics, but that mostly comes down to his lack of self-awareness. He's an abusive, violent, sleazy, unlikable lech, someone who doesn't learn from his mistakes even when they begin to come back to haunt him. Robert De Niro captures this reprehensible being perfectly, giving one of the best performances of his career as a man who was god-like inside the ring and hellish outside of it. De Niro delivers a tour-de-force of bitter anger, blind ambition and furious violence, giving the man a sympathetic edge while never shirking on just showing just how much of a bastard he was. As his brother, a man who stoked the bitter fires roaring inside the man until he realised just how fierce they roared, Joe Pesci is phenomenal. He's annoying, but as the film progresses and he learns how horrible the man he calls his brother is, Pesci reveals a much stronger sympathetic streak in Joey. The dynamic between the two is one of increasing tension, and it anchors the film and gives it its power. As La Motta experiences the highs of dominating the middleweight boxing world and creates the lows through his abuse of his family, there's one constant in Jake and Joey's relationship, and when that crumbles, La Motta has nothing left. Jake's trajectory alters and he propels himself into the ground, and he conducts himself outside the ring as he would inside - charismatic, aggressive, abusive, unpleasant, animalistic. While the way Scorsese shoots the ruthlessly brutal boxing matches is in heavy contrast to the way he shoots La Motta's world outside the ring, the two are more similar than they ever should have been because of La Motta's nature. He's a character that devastates everything around him, and watching him as the world of success and fame he's built up falls down around him because of his own internal ugliness is devastating for the audience. Scorsese has produced a powerful, unflinching portrayal of La Motta, and it's a powerful, enthralling experience.

05. À bout de souffle (Breathless) (1960, Godard, FRN) – 4/5.5*
OMG, this movie's opening is AWESOME, with Jean-Paul Belmondo (who was cool in Cartouche) and some hot chick totally JACKING A FUCKING CAR and then drives off WITHOUT HER. Lol what a womaniser. Then he SHOOTS A COP. KICK-ASS. Sadly, the shooting of the cop is a bit archaic in its editing, but there's a gun and Belmondo is cool, so it DOESN'T MATTER. However, once he gets to France, everything falls apart kinda; Jean Seberg's really really lovely and has AWESOME eyes, but she's the most annoying sidekick since that old woman in Army in the Shadows - why can't she be funny like Timon & Pumbaa or Sebastian the crab? Then there's that bald police guy - I hate bald people normally, because they remind me of my horrible time at a boarding school in intermediate, but he's got NO KICK-ASS VILLAIN SONG, which makes him worse than Dr. Facilier almost immediately. He intimidates Jean Seberg, and she goes all sadface, which makes her look SUPER-CUTE, and she and Belmondo spend lots of time talking in an apartment, which is BORING and doesn't have any AWESOME EXPLOSIONS. At the end of the day, I've seen better ruminations on the AWESOME themes of mid-life crises and hwo they affect those around us - The 400 Blows and Aguirre do it so miuch better, and that's a compliment - and Godard's misogyny is disturbing - how could Belmondo look at porn (my mum walked in while that part was on - tru fakts) and run around lifting up women's skirts like that? - and it just didn't click with me. But maybe next time.


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rinc
She's supposed to be 13! I'd want her to be very attractive though


quote:

ORIGINAL: MonsterCat
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army
Stop being mean to Deviation

No.

(in reply to MOTH)
Post #: 323
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/1/2010 11:33:50 AM   
ElephantBoy

 

Posts: 8533
Joined: 13/4/2006
Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy (Adam Mckay,2004, 94 Mins) 6/10
One of the better Will Farell creations, although it does blow the whole battle of sexe's theme quite early, and the film overall lacks the depth it think's it has.

Moliere (Laurent Tirard,2007, 120 Mins) 7.5/10
A lavish fance, with a flamboyiat turn from Romain Deuis i found it highly entertaining for most of it's two hour running time.

(in reply to Pigeon Army)
Post #: 324
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/1/2010 11:37:08 AM   
Piles


Posts: 5545
Joined: 6/8/2007
From: Whalley Range
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army

05. À bout de souffle (Breathless) (1960, Godard, FRN) – 4/5.5*
OMG, this movie's opening is AWESOME, with Jean-Paul Belmondo (who was cool in Cartouche) and some hot chick totally JACKING A FUCKING CAR and then drives off WITHOUT HER. Lol what a womaniser. Then he SHOOTS A COP. KICK-ASS. Sadly, the shooting of the cop is a bit archaic in its editing, but there's a gun and Belmondo is cool, so it DOESN'T MATTER. However, once he gets to France, everything falls apart kinda; Jean Seberg's really really lovely and has AWESOME eyes, but she's the most annoying sidekick since that old woman in Army in the Shadows - why can't she be funny like Timon & Pumbaa or Sebastian the crab? Then there's that bald police guy - I hate bald people normally, because they remind me of my horrible time at a boarding school in intermediate, but he's got NO KICK-ASS VILLAIN SONG, which makes him worse than Dr. Facilier almost immediately. He intimidates Jean Seberg, and she goes all sadface, which makes her look SUPER-CUTE, and she and Belmondo spend lots of time talking in an apartment, which is BORING and doesn't have any AWESOME EXPLOSIONS. At the end of the day, I've seen better ruminations on the AWESOME themes of mid-life crises and hwo they affect those around us - The 400 Blows and Aguirre do it so miuch better, and that's a compliment - and Godard's misogyny is disturbing - how could Belmondo look at porn (my mum walked in while that part was on - tru fakts) and run around lifting up women's skirts like that? - and it just didn't click with me. But maybe next time.



Brilliant!

quote:

ORIGINAL: MOTH

All That Heaven Allows (Douglas Sirk, 1955)
The impact of the story is inevitably lessened when we've seen this sort of melodrama played out in any number of soap-operas and films, but the themes and emotions are timeless and there's no denying Sirk's eye for visuals and colour, with impressive set design to boot. (7/10)



Love me a bit of Sirk. Have you seen more of his work? I've seen most of the films on the 'Directed By Douglas Sirk' box set, and was wondering if someone could help me out with recommendations of where to go from there?


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(in reply to Pigeon Army)
Post #: 325
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/1/2010 11:41:39 AM   
MOTH

 

Posts: 3479
Joined: 3/10/2005
From: Sittin' on the dock of the bay
quote:

ORIGINAL: Piles
quote:

ORIGINAL: MOTH

All That Heaven Allows (Douglas Sirk, 1955)
The impact of the story is inevitably lessened when we've seen this sort of melodrama played out in any number of soap-operas and films, but the themes and emotions are timeless and there's no denying Sirk's eye for visuals and colour, with impressive set design to boot. (7/10)



Love me a bit of Sirk. Have you seen more of his work? I've seen most of the films on the 'Directed By Douglas Sirk' box set, and was wondering if someone could help me out with recommendations of where to go from there?



I have Whistle down the Wind and Magnificent obsession on the DVD-R to watch - i'm pretty sure i've seen them back in the mists of time, but can't recall them in any great detail, so i'll give them another go, hopefully some time this year.

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(in reply to Piles)
Post #: 326
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/1/2010 11:45:39 AM   
elab49


Posts: 54589
Joined: 1/10/2005
quote:

I have Whistle down the Wind


Im guessing Written on the Wind

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quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to MOTH)
Post #: 327
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/1/2010 12:03:42 PM   
Deviation


Posts: 27284
Joined: 2/6/2006
From: Enemies of Film HQ

quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army


05. À bout de souffle (Breathless) (1960, Godard, FRN) – 4/5.5*
OMG, this movie's opening is AWESOME, with Jean-Paul Belmondo (who was cool in Cartouche) and some hot chick totally JACKING A FUCKING CAR and then drives off WITHOUT HER. Lol what a womaniser. Then he SHOOTS A COP. KICK-ASS. Sadly, the shooting of the cop is a bit archaic in its editing, but there's a gun and Belmondo is cool, so it DOESN'T MATTER. However, once he gets to France, everything falls apart kinda; Jean Seberg's really really lovely and has AWESOME eyes, but she's the most annoying sidekick since that old woman in Army in the Shadows - why can't she be funny like Timon & Pumbaa or Sebastian the crab? Then there's that bald police guy - I hate bald people normally, because they remind me of my horrible time at a boarding school in intermediate, but he's got NO KICK-ASS VILLAIN SONG, which makes him worse than Dr. Facilier almost immediately. He intimidates Jean Seberg, and she goes all sadface, which makes her look SUPER-CUTE, and she and Belmondo spend lots of time talking in an apartment, which is BORING and doesn't have any AWESOME EXPLOSIONS. At the end of the day, I've seen better ruminations on the AWESOME themes of mid-life crises and hwo they affect those around us - The 400 Blows and Aguirre do it so miuch better, and that's a compliment - and Godard's misogyny is disturbing - how could Belmondo look at porn (my mum walked in while that part was on - tru fakts) and run around lifting up women's skirts like that? - and it just didn't click with me. But maybe next time.



That's better than your actual Aguirre review.

_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Dpp1978
There are certainly times where calling a person a cunt is not only reasonable, it is a gross understatement.

quote:


ORIGINAL: elab49
I really wish I could go down to see Privates

(in reply to Pigeon Army)
Post #: 328
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/1/2010 12:06:39 PM   
Gram123

 

Posts: 5537
Joined: 19/1/2006
From: Reino Unido
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army
05. À bout de souffle (Breathless) (1960, Godard, FRN) – 4/5.5*
OMG, this movie's opening is AWESOME, with Jean-Paul Belmondo (who was cool in Cartouche) and some hot chick totally JACKING A FUCKING CAR and then drives off WITHOUT HER. Lol what a womaniser. Then he SHOOTS A COP. KICK-ASS. Sadly, the shooting of the cop is a bit archaic in its editing, but there's a gun and Belmondo is cool, so it DOESN'T MATTER. However, once he gets to France, everything falls apart kinda; Jean Seberg's really really lovely and has AWESOME eyes, but she's the most annoying sidekick since that old woman in Army in the Shadows - why can't she be funny like Timon & Pumbaa or Sebastian the crab? Then there's that bald police guy - I hate bald people normally, because they remind me of my horrible time at a boarding school in intermediate, but he's got NO KICK-ASS VILLAIN SONG, which makes him worse than Dr. Facilier almost immediately. He intimidates Jean Seberg, and she goes all sadface, which makes her look SUPER-CUTE, and she and Belmondo spend lots of time talking in an apartment, which is BORING and doesn't have any AWESOME EXPLOSIONS. At the end of the day, I've seen better ruminations on the AWESOME themes of mid-life crises and hwo they affect those around us - The 400 Blows and Aguirre do it so miuch better, and that's a compliment - and Godard's misogyny is disturbing - how could Belmondo look at porn (my mum walked in while that part was on - tru fakts) and run around lifting up women's skirts like that? - and it just didn't click with me. But maybe next time.


I see you've started rating things out of 5.5, - is that to allow for an extra 0.5's worth of AWESOMENESS?

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(in reply to Pigeon Army)
Post #: 329
RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2010 - 7/1/2010 12:08:13 PM   
Pigeon Army


Posts: 14612
Joined: 29/1/2006
From: Pixar HQ, George Lucas' Office.
quote:

ORIGINAL: Gram123

quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army
05. À bout de souffle (Breathless) (1960, Godard, FRN) – 4/5.5*
OMG, this movie's opening is AWESOME, with Jean-Paul Belmondo (who was cool in Cartouche) and some hot chick totally JACKING A FUCKING CAR and then drives off WITHOUT HER. Lol what a womaniser. Then he SHOOTS A COP. KICK-ASS. Sadly, the shooting of the cop is a bit archaic in its editing, but there's a gun and Belmondo is cool, so it DOESN'T MATTER. However, once he gets to France, everything falls apart kinda; Jean Seberg's really really lovely and has AWESOME eyes, but she's the most annoying sidekick since that old woman in Army in the Shadows - why can't she be funny like Timon & Pumbaa or Sebastian the crab? Then there's that bald police guy - I hate bald people normally, because they remind me of my horrible time at a boarding school in intermediate, but he's got NO KICK-ASS VILLAIN SONG, which makes him worse than Dr. Facilier almost immediately. He intimidates Jean Seberg, and she goes all sadface, which makes her look SUPER-CUTE, and she and Belmondo spend lots of time talking in an apartment, which is BORING and doesn't have any AWESOME EXPLOSIONS. At the end of the day, I've seen better ruminations on the AWESOME themes of mid-life crises and hwo they affect those around us - The 400 Blows and Aguirre do it so miuch better, and that's a compliment - and Godard's misogyny is disturbing - how could Belmondo look at porn (my mum walked in while that part was on - tru fakts) and run around lifting up women's skirts like that? - and it just didn't click with me. But maybe next time.


I see you've started rating things out of 5.5, - is that to allow for an extra 0.5's worth of AWESOMENESS?


It is. Isn't it AWESOME?


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rinc
She's supposed to be 13! I'd want her to be very attractive though


quote:

ORIGINAL: MonsterCat
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army
Stop being mean to Deviation

No.

(in reply to Gram123)
Post #: 330
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