Register  |   Log In  |  
Sign up to our weekly newsletter    
Follow us on   
Search   
Forum Home Register for Free! Log In Moderator Tickets FAQ Users Online

RE: My Favourite 100 Movies - #78 Singin' in the Rain

 
Logged in as: Guest
  Printable Version
All Forums >> [Film Forums] >> Lists and Top 10s >> RE: My Favourite 100 Movies - #78 Singin' in the Rain Page: <<   < prev  3 4 [5] 6 7   next >   >>
Login
Message << Older Topic   Newer Topic >>
RE: My Favourite 100 Movies - #78 Singin' in the Rain - 26/10/2009 12:47:45 PM   
rick_7


Posts: 6151
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: The internet
Yeah, obvious, but what can you do?.. it obviously deserves to be in there. The two MGM musicals I've placed higher are probably a bit more surprising.
 
elab - I know that collection (the "Sweetheart Pack", isn't it?) it's got quite a good mix of stuff - Lady on a Train I did in DVD of the Week in the guide a while back, First Love is nice as well, though it's also too hurried in the final third. It's synonymous with sleeping on the floor when we first moved into our new place and the bed hadn't arrived. Back pain, sentiment and light opera - a heady concoction.

_____________________________

*Wendy Hiller fanboy*

Blog: DJANGO! DUMBO! DESPICABLE ME 2! Plus: other stuff.

"Nothin's really been right since Sam the Lion died."

(in reply to Pigeon Army)
Post #: 121
RE: My Favourite 100 Movies - #78 Singin' in the Rain - 26/10/2009 12:50:30 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54616
Joined: 1/10/2005
Amazing what you link films and music too - we tend to do it with the ones we went to see when we first started going out

Also - re not liking films. You'd have thought PA would have realised the problem with that statement every time he read his sig (Sorry, just noticed it!)

_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to rick_7)
Post #: 122
RE: My Favourite 100 Movies - #78 Singin' in the Rain - 26/10/2009 12:52:07 PM   
rick_7


Posts: 6151
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: The internet
quote:

ORIGINAL: Harry Lime

quote:

ORIGINAL: rick_7


 
"Doo doo doo doo, doo doo doo doo doo doo doo doo doo..."
78. Singin' in the Rain (Stanley Donen and Gene Kelly, 1952)

Have you got access to my computer Mr.7?
 
My half finished essay/ opus for HoF begins in exactly the same way.

Yeah, it does now.  Absolutely shameless...
 
Thanks, re: the list. Naked is the next entry I've got to write a review for, bizarrely! You're going to bust with excitement (please, not near the keyboard) over #s 49, 38, 33 and 10, and perhaps with rage at the peculiar omission of Black Narcissus.

_____________________________

*Wendy Hiller fanboy*

Blog: DJANGO! DUMBO! DESPICABLE ME 2! Plus: other stuff.

"Nothin's really been right since Sam the Lion died."

(in reply to Harry Lime)
Post #: 123
RE: My Favourite 100 Movies - #78 Singin' in the Rain - 26/10/2009 12:54:14 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54616
Joined: 1/10/2005
quote:

Naked is the next entry I've got to write a review for, bizarrely


Ooo - very bizarrrely. That was the other of my final 2 choices for this HoF. I even wrote the essay and everything!

_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to rick_7)
Post #: 124
RE: My Favourite 100 Movies - #78 Singin' in the Rain - 26/10/2009 12:57:06 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
quote:

ORIGINAL: elab49

quote:

Naked is the next entry I've got to write a review for, bizarrely


Ooo - very bizarrrely. That was the other of my final 2 choices for this HoF. I even wrote the essay and everything!


You know I need to read that essay, right? I want to steal from it when I write my Naked review.

(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 125
RE: My Favourite 100 Movies - #78 Singin' in the Rain - 26/10/2009 12:58:04 PM   
Pigeon Army


Posts: 14612
Joined: 29/1/2006
From: Pixar HQ, George Lucas' Office.
quote:

ORIGINAL: elab49

Also - re not liking films. You'd have thought PA would have realised the problem with that statement every time he read his sig (Sorry, just noticed it!)


Elab, I've come to the opinion that you don't like your top 100. You just hate them slightly less than the rest.


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rinc
She's supposed to be 13! I'd want her to be very attractive though


quote:

ORIGINAL: MonsterCat
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army
Stop being mean to Deviation

No.

(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 126
RE: My Favourite 100 Movies - #78 Singin' in the Rain - 26/10/2009 1:00:08 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54616
Joined: 1/10/2005
quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

quote:

ORIGINAL: elab49

quote:

Naked is the next entry I've got to write a review for, bizarrely


Ooo - very bizarrrely. That was the other of my final 2 choices for this HoF. I even wrote the essay and everything!


You know I need to read that essay, right? I want to steal from it when I write my Naked review.


Since I've technically viewed it this year and the next HoF isn't this year, I thought I'd put it in the top 100 thread at some point.

quote:

  Elab, I've come to the opinion that you don't like your top 100. You just hate them slightly less than the rest.




_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 127
RE: My Favourite 100 Movies - #78 Singin' in the Rain - 26/10/2009 1:07:56 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
quote:

ORIGINAL: elab49

quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

quote:

ORIGINAL: elab49

quote:

Naked is the next entry I've got to write a review for, bizarrely


Ooo - very bizarrrely. That was the other of my final 2 choices for this HoF. I even wrote the essay and everything!


You know I need to read that essay, right? I want to steal from it when I write my Naked review.


Since I've technically viewed it this year and the next HoF isn't this year, I thought I'd put it in the top 100 thread at some point.


You should.

(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 128
RE: My Favourite 100 Movies - #77 Lawrence of Arabia - 29/10/2009 6:03:13 PM   
rick_7


Posts: 6151
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: The internet


77. Lawrence of Arabia (David Lean, 1962)
- David Lean's epic vision remains as marvellous as ever: a bold and brilliant film, at once grand and personal. In telling the story of T.E. Lawrence, a British researcher and traveller who aided the Arab Revolt of 1916 to '18, it marries character study and spectacle, drama and wonder like nothing before or since. Lean makes the most of the vast canvas, filling the wide screen with breathtaking imagery, including the oft-celebrated "mirage" sequence. As Lawrence, Peter O'Toole gives the performance of a lifetime: an intense, utterly human turn. He shakes with indignation, doubt, righteousness, rage and self-pity, as he turns from bold adventurer to callous, murderous wreck. Alec Guinness, Claude Rains, Omar Sharif and Anthony Quinn are all fine, but one can barely find time to watch them.

Favourite bit: O'Toole races across the plains on horseback to defy the fates. Returning to the group, he admonishes their philosophy, barking: "Nothing is written".

See also: Lean's other widescreen epics: the soapy Doctor Zhivago which is excellent but could do with a better leading man than Omar Sharif and the very, very long Ryan's Daughter, which relocates the story of Madame Bovary to the Dingle Peninsula and takes 17 days to tell it; I like it a lot, though: the scenery, music and performances are all exceptional. A Passage to India is quite goos as well.


_____________________________

*Wendy Hiller fanboy*

Blog: DJANGO! DUMBO! DESPICABLE ME 2! Plus: other stuff.

"Nothin's really been right since Sam the Lion died."

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 129
RE: My Favourite 100 Movies - #77 Lawrence of Arabia - 29/10/2009 9:05:20 PM   
Miles Messervy 007


Posts: 6884
Joined: 11/2/2009
'Orrence rocks hard. Singin' not so much.

_____________________________

quote:

jamesbondguy:
Miles is clearly the finest film theorist of his generation

quote:

Deviation:
if it isn't ham, I'll eat a living pig.

(in reply to rick_7)
Post #: 130
RE: My Favourite 100 Movies - #77 now up - 30/10/2009 11:18:10 AM   
Professor Moriarty

 

Posts: 10462
Joined: 6/10/2005
From: the waters of Casablanca

quote:

ORIGINAL: rick_7

Hello there, I'm Rick - short on brains and curly of hair. I compiled a Top 100 for the Top 1000 poll, so I thought I'd write it up a bit and stick it in here (and in the weekly film thing). The only change is that I had to cut Affliction, as I realised I'd omitted The Red Balloon. Here we go...



100. His Girl Friday (Howard Hawks, 1940) is among the greatest comedies to emerge from classic Hollywood. Cary Grant was the most gifted light comedian on the planet throughout the late '30s and early '40s. Here he resembles a whirlwind, playing Walter Burns, an unscrupulous newspaper editor scheming to keep ex-wife - and star reporter - Hildy Johnson (Rosalind Russell) from walking out on him and the paper. Meanwhile, corrupt local lawmakers plot to put to death an insane convict (John Qualen). This is a smart variation on the classic Hecht-MacArthur play 'The Front Page', with furiously fast banter that's the stuff of legend, and a perfect ensemble. Grant and Russell are superb, Ralph Bellamy simply wonderful reprising his Awful Truth routine (as a hapless hayseed), and the supporting cast is stuffed with great character actors, B-movie regulars and cult favourites. There's the great mouse-like John Ford stock player John Qualen, bug-eyed coward Porter Hall - who lent his villainous presence to films as diverse as The General Died at Dawn and The Miracle of Morgan's Creek, Helen Mack (Lee Tracy's leading lady in You Belong to Me), multi-purpose ethnic hood and future director Abner Biberman, the voice of Jiminy Cricket - Ukulele Ike, and laconic comic Roscoe Karns, as well as Alma Kruger and Gene Lockhart. It's warm and funny, but also devilishly satirical, with plenty to say about the role of press and police and the dehumanisation of adulthood. Moving along at the cracking pace associated with directed Howard Hawks, it's one of the most enjoyable films you'll ever see - and gets better with each viewing.

Favourite bit: Grant hides convict John Qualen in a wooden desk and tells him to keep covered unless he hears three taps. A gaggle of reporters and lawmen burst in and Grant starts grandstanding. In a fit of pique he thumps the desk three times...

See also: For more screwball Grant goodness, try The Awful Truth, My Favourite Wife and Bringing Up Baby - the latter teamed him with Hawks for the first time. Like newsroom movies? Bogart plays a crusading editor in the cynical, marvellous Deadline - U.S.A..


Am I late to this thread?

I saw Wilder's The Front Page for the first time just a couple of weeks ago. Which I enjoyed and will have to watch again when I can sit in a comfy seat, haven't been awake for 20 hours and have seen something resembling food in the last however long.

His Girl remains one of my favourites. My favourite bit is when Bruce, Walter and Hildy go for lunch and poor old Ralph Bellamy gets pretty beaten up by Walter Burns. Or when Bruce had been pick-pocketed and arrested. Or the bit when they are singing at the leopard.

(in reply to rick_7)
Post #: 131
RE: My Favourite 100 Movies - #86 Ghost World - 30/10/2009 11:34:07 AM   
Professor Moriarty

 

Posts: 10462
Joined: 6/10/2005
From: the waters of Casablanca

quote:

ORIGINAL: chris_scott01
I often find myself asking "how does Visconti give his melodrama such emotional weight?". Is it his attention to detail? the way he directs the actors? His keen sense of music or visual flourishes? Or simply a good premise to start with?


I spend my time asking myself "how are the Grimes twins still in X-Factor?"

I'm starting to see why I might be lacking as a film critic.

(in reply to chris_scott01)
Post #: 132
RE: My Favourite 100 Movies - #86 Ghost World - 30/10/2009 12:23:58 PM   
paul_ie86


Posts: 11422
Joined: 4/1/2007
From: Chelsea Hotel #2

quote:

ORIGINAL: rick_7





Hooray!

_____________________________

My Group Project's facebook page. Please like

(in reply to rick_7)
Post #: 133
RE: My Favourite 100 Movies - #85 Sunset Blvd. - 2/11/2009 1:16:06 PM   
rick_7


Posts: 6151
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: The internet

 
76. Sunset Blvd. (Billy Wilder, 1950) was the apex of the writer-director's purple patch and the definitive "insider" picture: a brutal, bitter assault on Hollywood now accepted more as documentary than fiction. It's a dark, delicious portrait of self-delusion and festering wealth, which limits its searing focus to Hollywood, and is all the better for it. Wilder's handling is magnificent: sympathetic enough to the broken lives of its characters to engender pity and sorrow, but abrasive and acerbic enough to nail its targets every time. Gloria Swanson stars as Norma Desmond, a tragic, repulsive silent movie queen forgotten by time itself. Not too dissimillar to Swanson herself, then. Her performance was the last, magnificent cry of a legend - somehow William Holden matches her. Previously an ineffectual, slightly weedy leading man, Sunset Blvd. began his transformation from watchable lightweight to grizzled titan of the silver screen. And as is customary with Wilder, the script is sublime: every utterance lethal, no word wasted. Sunset Blvd. dominates the landscape. Not only the landscape of its director's filmography, but of its decade, its genre and of Hollywood itself. It is history lesson, ghost story and noir all in one: chilling, moving and unforgettable.
 
Favourite bit: Holden's introduction to faded silent star Swanson in her sprawling, dilapidated mansion. Macabre, weird and blackly funny.
 
See also: For more of Wilder at his most cutting, how about his indictment of the yellow press Ace in the Hole. For a more easy-to-take portrait of screenwriting (and the fun of it), try the classic Warner Bros screwball comedy Boy Meets Girl, with James Cagney and Pat O'Brien as scripters based on Ben Hecht and Charles MacArthur, and a supporting cast including Ralph Bellamy, Marie Wilson and Dick Foran at their best. Want more examples of Hollywood licking - and devouring - the hand that feeds it? Then keep an eye out for our #56.

< Message edited by rick_7 -- 2/11/2009 1:17:24 PM >


_____________________________

*Wendy Hiller fanboy*

Blog: DJANGO! DUMBO! DESPICABLE ME 2! Plus: other stuff.

"Nothin's really been right since Sam the Lion died."

(in reply to paul_ie86)
Post #: 134
RE: My Favourite 100 Movies - #85 Sunset Blvd. - 2/11/2009 1:24:48 PM   
great_badir


Posts: 4662
Joined: 6/10/2005
From: A breaking rope bridge in the middle of the jungle
Rick - I've just spent the last 40 odd minutes reading through this.  Brilliant stuff.  I hypocritically tend to ignore most of the stuff that goes on in the Top/Lists thread (despite the fact I've got my own going!.......perhaps it's also why not too many people read mine) because it's often just a list, or the usual suspects, but you're clearly thinking about yours properly.

Even if I have massive personal problems with some of your choices (I would rather eat my own balls than sit through Citizen Kane, Singin' In the Rain or Ryan's Daughter again), this is a great read.  Well done!

_____________________________

FAVE FILMS
BO BOMBS

(in reply to rick_7)
Post #: 135
RE: My Favourite 100 Movies - #84 Le Samourai - 3/11/2009 11:24:18 AM   
rick_7


Posts: 6151
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: The internet
Thank you, sir, that's really nice of you.  I think I half-inched the "see also" bit from your top movies list (uncredited, of course)!
 

 
75. Le Samourai (Jean-Pierre Melville, 1967) is one of the director's greatest, a quiet, affecting slice of pure cool. Alain Delon is the taciturn, trenchcoated hitman whose meticulous work goes awry when he falls in love. Melville, shooting with a palette of blues, whites and greys, uses a minimum of dialogue to get the story across, focusing instead on the minutiae of life as an assassin. Delon is terrific.
 
Favourite bit: A mysterious crook turns up in Delon's apartment and offers him a new job, at gunpoint. Bad move.
 
See also: Melville's heist epic, Le cercle rouge, which utilises all of the key situations (I think there were 17) he'd identified in his favourite film, The Asphalt Jungle. It's not nearly as clinical or cold as that sounds, with engrossing characters, tense set pieces and sumptuous cinematography. His Resistance movie, Army in the Shadows, is another I would like to have included. Lino Ventura and Simeon Signoret are the leaders of a Resistance cell in occupied France ("Occupied France!"). This immensely powerful film has at least one unbearably tense sequence, in which Ventura faces a firing squad. Oddly, the film doesn't show any of the Resistance's actual sabotage work surely an editorial decision, given Melville's innate knowledge of the movement.

< Message edited by rick_7 -- 3/11/2009 11:35:40 AM >


_____________________________

*Wendy Hiller fanboy*

Blog: DJANGO! DUMBO! DESPICABLE ME 2! Plus: other stuff.

"Nothin's really been right since Sam the Lion died."

(in reply to great_badir)
Post #: 136
RE: My Favourite 100 Movies - #84 Le Samourai - 3/11/2009 11:32:41 AM   
elab49


Posts: 54616
Joined: 1/10/2005
I might nick the 'see also' as well. Having also nicked bits from Homer. And anyone else with great lists

I rewatched Le Samourai before putting up This Gun for Hire in my noir list (although I realise that, yet again, I forgot to add it to my 100 ). My personal ranking would have Army of Shadows above it (and Le Silence de la Mer and Cercle Rouge and a couple of others). But it is undeniably influential and influenced.

I have just discovered that a common exam question in my next course is French film - style over substance. I think I'm going to have fun with that one

_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to rick_7)
Post #: 137
RE: My Favourite 100 Movies - #76 now up - 3/11/2009 11:17:43 PM   
Miles Messervy 007


Posts: 6884
Joined: 11/2/2009
Agreed, See Also is a great idea. Le Samourai is a bit empty IMO. Fine technically, but I don't get what's supposed to be great about it.
elab, I always forget to ask: what course are you taking?


_____________________________

quote:

jamesbondguy:
Miles is clearly the finest film theorist of his generation

quote:

Deviation:
if it isn't ham, I'll eat a living pig.

(in reply to rick_7)
Post #: 138
RE: My Favourite 100 Movies - #76 now up - 4/11/2009 9:36:00 AM   
elab49


Posts: 54616
Joined: 1/10/2005
I'm taking a second degree in history - finally decided to take a plunge with a level 3 Film and TV History but only because I realised I'll be viewing Fassbinder as an historical artefact in context - and the fact I loathe his films are irrelevant. Also - I'll take the risk of the normal Citizen Kane question and refuse to rewatch Titanic on principle.

_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to Miles Messervy 007)
Post #: 139
RE: My Favourite 100 Movies - #74 Out of the Past - 9/11/2009 9:27:31 AM   
rick_7


Posts: 6151
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: The internet

 
"You say to yourself, 'How hot can it get?' Then, in Acapulco, you find out."
74. Out of the Past (Jacques Tourneur, 1947) is film noir at its most transcendent, a hypnotically hip, loquaciously lyrical crime movie about a man trying to escape his past. Robert Mitchum plays a former P.I. whose murky dealings catch up with him, threatening his burgeoning relationship with good girl Virginia Hudson. Three years back he double-crossed a greasy millionaire (Kirk Douglas) to shack up with his big-eyed floozy (Jane Greer) and now he's got to square the deal. Vivid direction from former horror helmer Jacques Tourneur and a script bursting with quotable, hilarious noir patter ("My feelings? About ten years ago I hid them somewhere and I haven't been able to find them") make this one bristle with excitement and danger from first frame to last. Mitchum was rarely better, while Roy Webb's score is an all-time classic.

 
Favourite bit: *SOME SPOILERS* Greer comes clean with Mitchum and pleads for clemency: "I didn't know what I was doing. I... I didn't know anything except how much I hated him. But I didn't take anything. I didn't, Jeff. Don't you believe me?" "Baby, I don't care," says Mitchum, leaning in for the clinch. *END OF SPOILERS*
 
See also: In this reviewer's opinion, Mitchum only topped his work here in the rodeo classic The Lusty Men, though he's just as good in '70s classics The Yakuza and The Friends of Eddie Coyle. For more fine noir and I really have skimped on the noir in this Top 100 try Moonrise, Cry Danger, Murder, My Sweet, Fallen Angel, Crossfire and Double Indemnity.

< Message edited by rick_7 -- 9/11/2009 9:46:03 AM >


_____________________________

*Wendy Hiller fanboy*

Blog: DJANGO! DUMBO! DESPICABLE ME 2! Plus: other stuff.

"Nothin's really been right since Sam the Lion died."

(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 140
RE: My Favourite 100 Movies - #74 Out of the Past - 9/11/2009 9:37:25 AM   
elab49


Posts: 54616
Joined: 1/10/2005
Boooooooo.

Readers - just watch the mainly brilliant see also (the ones at the start and the end - or also Fallen Angel to keep Rick happy, which I'm kind of surprised isn't in the list itself) !

Friends of Eddie Coyle >>>> Yakuza.

_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to rick_7)
Post #: 141
RE: My Favourite 100 Movies - #73 Kiss Me Kate - 10/11/2009 5:14:49 PM   
rick_7


Posts: 6151
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: The internet
Yeah, I agree on Eddie Coyle, though The Yakuza is also fantastic. I saw it at the cinema with Mrs_7 and Harry Lime a few years back, forum trivia fans.
 
I should probably have plugged the imperfect Cornered as a must-see noir, for Dick Powell's greatest performance. How is it possible to dislike Out of the Past?
 

The film's in colour, incidentally, I just like this number and there aren't many stills from it about.
 
73. Kiss Me Kate (George Sidney, 1953) - This is a bold claim, but I think Kiss Me Kate is the second greatest of all the MGM musicals (wait till we get to the greatest!), a touch finer than Meet Me in St. Louis, An American in Paris and even Singin' in the Rain. It's based, ingeniously, on The Taming of the Shrew, as warring former lovers Howard Keel and Kathryn Grayson are brought together for a musical take on Shakespeare's ode to spanking, and find life imitating art. The film mixes the best of the old - a peerlessly witty set of songs from the legendary Cole Porter - and the new, like Bob Fosse's outrageous, possessed, earth-shaking choreography to 'From This Moment On', the funky climactic ballet. Despite many changes to Porter's censor-baiting lyrics, some of the smuttiness remains, along with all of the loveliness ('From This Moment On' is one of the sweetest songs around) and a clutch of unforgettable melodies. With the possible except of Lorenz Hart, who else could - or would - rhyme "Padua" with "cad you are"? The film's two light opera stars belt out the numbers with what I'm contractually obliged to refer to as "gusto", with the underrated Keel giving a particularly attractive, charismatic performance. MGM also packed the supporting cast with superb specialist dancers like Tommy Rall, Bobby Van and regular B-movie player Ann Miller (who had also appeared in Easter Parade and On the Town), whilst giving a pair of non-musical contract players, Keenan Wynn and James Whitmore, a crack at song and dance in 'Brush Up Your Shakespeare'. Everything about the film comes together, from the exultant music to the eye-popping hoofing. This was one of the last big productions from MGM's extraordinary musical unit and their first in 3-D, which accounts for Keel periodically whizzing towards the camera.

Favourite bit: 'From This Moment On' - an ode to monogamy (and the joy of coupling off), which begins as a straight production number then positively explodes with invention, as Bob Fosse and Carol Hainey rip up the rulebook with 48 seconds of jazzy, finger-clicking goodness.

See also: Seven Brides for Seven Brothers, also starring Keel, which is a muscular, robustly entertaining musical. He's also pleasant in a pair of Western musicals: Annie Get Your Gun and Calamity Jane. Grayson's big break was in the wonderful 1942 film The Vanishing Virginian, another favourite in the "Americana" bracket, where she plays the tuneful daughter of the central character - an idiosyncratic judge and pillar of the community played by Frank Morgan.


< Message edited by rick_7 -- 10/11/2009 5:15:39 PM >


_____________________________

*Wendy Hiller fanboy*

Blog: DJANGO! DUMBO! DESPICABLE ME 2! Plus: other stuff.

"Nothin's really been right since Sam the Lion died."

(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 142
RE: My Favourite 100 Movies - #72 After the Thin Man - 11/11/2009 3:54:10 PM   
rick_7


Posts: 6151
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: The internet

 
72. After the Thin Man (W.S. Van Dyke II, 1936) - The runaway success of mystery-comedy The Thin Man saw MGM produce a run of sequels. This first follow-up is by far the best, as soused sleuths William Powell and Myrna Loy investigate a murder unusually close to home. A raffish ladies' man is shot and the cops think they know whodunnit: the man's estranged wife, Loy's cousin Selma. Our avuncular heroes aren't so sure, of course, and - trading banter at every turn - set about uncovering the truth. This phenomenally entertaining blend of laughs and suspense has delicious dialogue, unmatchable Loy-Powell chemistry (they made 14 films together) and a supporting ensemble that includes Joseph Calleia, Teddy Hart (Lorenz's brother) Penny Singleton (of the Blondie series) and a fresh-faced Jimmy Stewart.
 
Favourite bit: "Walk this way," a doddering butler tells Powell. "I'll try," says Powell, shuffling into dinner behind him, apeing his walk.
 
See also: The next four entries, though be warned that Song of the Thin Man is a disappointing, slightly desperate outing. The Fast Company/Fast and Loose/Fast and Furious trilogy, all released in 1939, was reminiscent of The Thin Man, though it changed its leads with each entry. Fast Company is the first and best, with Melvyn Douglas and Florence Rice making a great team.

_____________________________

*Wendy Hiller fanboy*

Blog: DJANGO! DUMBO! DESPICABLE ME 2! Plus: other stuff.

"Nothin's really been right since Sam the Lion died."

(in reply to rick_7)
Post #: 143
RE: My Favourite 100 Movies - #72 After the Thin Man - 11/11/2009 4:51:12 PM   
MOTH

 

Posts: 3479
Joined: 3/10/2005
From: Sittin' on the dock of the bay
quote:

ORIGINAL: rick_7

 
72. After the Thin Man (W.S. Van Dyke II, 1936) - The runaway success of mystery-comedy The Thin Man saw MGM produce a run of sequels. This first follow-up is by far the best, as soused sleuths William Powell and Myrna Loy investigate a murder unusually close to home. A raffish ladies' man is shot and the cops think they know whodunnit: the man's estranged wife, Loy's cousin Selma. Our avuncular heroes aren't so sure, of course, and - trading banter at every turn - set about uncovering the truth. This phenomenally entertaining blend of laughs and suspense has delicious dialogue, unmatchable Loy-Powell chemistry (they made 14 films together) and a supporting ensemble that includes Joseph Calleia, Teddy Hart (Lorenz's brother) Penny Singleton (of the Blondie series) and a fresh-faced Jimmy Stewart.
 



Third on my list of the best films i've watched this year - falls just short of the original because i felt the script favoured Powell with the best lines this time, whereas the first shared them equally between him and Loy.
Still brilliant - even the dog is funny.

_____________________________

I've only gone and set up a blog! This week I've been mostly reviewing The Lego Movie and Wadjda. Click: The Fast Picture Show

(in reply to rick_7)
Post #: 144
RE: My Favourite 100 Movies - #72 After the Thin Man - 11/11/2009 5:10:28 PM   
rick_7


Posts: 6151
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: The internet
quote:

ORIGINAL: MOTH

Third on my list of the best films i've watched this year - falls just short of the original because i felt the script favoured Powell with the best lines this time, whereas the first shared them equally between him and Loy.
Still brilliant - even the dog is funny.

Hurray! I've just been trying to find your list, but with no success. What are the top two?

_____________________________

*Wendy Hiller fanboy*

Blog: DJANGO! DUMBO! DESPICABLE ME 2! Plus: other stuff.

"Nothin's really been right since Sam the Lion died."

(in reply to MOTH)
Post #: 145
RE: My Favourite 100 Movies - #72 After the Thin Man - 11/11/2009 5:21:24 PM   
TheDudeAbides


Posts: 783
Joined: 15/1/2006
From: In the neighbourhood, feeling a bit daffy.
quote:

ORIGINAL: rick_7
 
72. After the Thin Man (W.S. Van Dyke II, 1936) - The runaway success of mystery-comedy The Thin Man saw MGM produce a run of sequels. This first follow-up is by far the best, as soused sleuths William Powell and Myrna Loy investigate a murder unusually close to home. A raffish ladies' man is shot and the cops think they know whodunnit: the man's estranged wife, Loy's cousin Selma. Our avuncular heroes aren't so sure, of course, and - trading banter at every turn - set about uncovering the truth. This phenomenally entertaining blend of laughs and suspense has delicious dialogue, unmatchable Loy-Powell chemistry (they made 14 films together) and a supporting ensemble that includes Joseph Calleia, Teddy Hart (Lorenz's brother) Penny Singleton (of the Blondie series) and a fresh-faced Jimmy Stewart.
 
Favourite bit: "Walk this way," a doddering butler tells Powell. "I'll try," says Powell, shuffling into dinner behind him, apeing his walk.
 
See also: The next four entries, though be warned that Song of the Thin Man is a disappointing, slightly desperate outing. The Fast Company/Fast and Loose/Fast and Furious trilogy, all released in 1939, was reminiscent of The Thin Man, though it changed its leads with each entry. Fast Company is the first and best, with Melvyn Douglas and Florence Rice making a great team.


You know where I stand on The Thin Man, and this is definitely the best of the sequels (although of them I've only seen this, Another Thin Man and Goes Home). It feels so comfortable in itself, and the banter is very, very polished. My only quibble would be that, as always with the series, they are occasionally a little too generous to the supporting actors and to that dreadful idea of 'plot' at the expense of Powell-Loy interaction. But even that's an especially minor complaint here, when your support included Jimmy Stewart... ;D

_____________________________

Reviews, film chat and the like at http://resilientlittlemuscle.blogspot.com

The Oxford Student - proud home of a film section somewhere between Siskel and Ebert: http://oxfordstudent.com/?cat=11

"Hammy is a stretch, I personally think he was just over zealous."
- IMDb reviewer on Dick Powell

"Good night, Papa. Machs gut."

(in reply to rick_7)
Post #: 146
RE: My Favourite 100 Movies - #72 After the Thin Man - 11/11/2009 5:25:42 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54616
Joined: 1/10/2005
Clearly the best of the Thin Man series although the first one still got my vote in the HoF.

Kiss Me Kate - I quite like, but more for the backstage shenanigans and, in particular, Wynn and Whitmore who are fabulous!

_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to rick_7)
Post #: 147
RE: My Favourite 100 Movies - #72 After the Thin Man - 11/11/2009 8:29:11 PM   
MOTH

 

Posts: 3479
Joined: 3/10/2005
From: Sittin' on the dock of the bay
quote:

ORIGINAL: rick_7

quote:

ORIGINAL: MOTH

Third on my list of the best films i've watched this year - falls just short of the original because i felt the script favoured Powell with the best lines this time, whereas the first shared them equally between him and Loy.
Still brilliant - even the dog is funny.

Hurray! I've just been trying to find your list, but with no success. What are the top two?




Play it Again, Sam and The Gold Rush pip After the Thin Man to the post, the order based on little more than how much i laughed during watching - but to be honest, there's feck all to choose between the top 5 or 6

full list is about halfway down Page 247 of the Top 100 films i've seen this year - i suspect one of the lower ranked films will cause you to splutter a bit!

_____________________________

I've only gone and set up a blog! This week I've been mostly reviewing The Lego Movie and Wadjda. Click: The Fast Picture Show

(in reply to rick_7)
Post #: 148
RE: My Favourite 100 Movies - #72 After the Thin Man - 11/11/2009 9:58:09 PM   
rick_7


Posts: 6151
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: The internet
You sick monkey. Did John Wayne die for nothing? I don't understand the question.

I've got to say Play It Again, Sam isn't one of my favourite Allen films. Great to see Radio Days up there, though. Top list, you watch a nice variety of stuff. Perhaps one day I'll see a movie that wasn't made in America between 1932 and 1949...


_____________________________

*Wendy Hiller fanboy*

Blog: DJANGO! DUMBO! DESPICABLE ME 2! Plus: other stuff.

"Nothin's really been right since Sam the Lion died."

(in reply to MOTH)
Post #: 149
RE: My Favourite 100 Movies - #72 After the Thin Man - 11/11/2009 10:14:25 PM   
Rinc


Posts: 12838
Joined: 2/10/2005
From: A park bench, with a newspaper quilt
rick really enjoying this list, although there's a fair few i haven't seen. But as with any of your positive reviews it makes me want to watch them. Is your film column back this week?

_____________________________

No spoilers please:

Invisiotext:
[ color=#F1F1F1 ]text[ /color ]

(in reply to rick_7)
Post #: 150
Page:   <<   < prev  3 4 [5] 6 7   next >   >>
All Forums >> [Film Forums] >> Lists and Top 10s >> RE: My Favourite 100 Movies - #78 Singin' in the Rain Page: <<   < prev  3 4 [5] 6 7   next >   >>
Jump to:





New Messages No New Messages
Hot Topic w/ New Messages Hot Topic w/o New Messages
Locked w/ New Messages Locked w/o New Messages
 Post New Thread
 Reply to Message
 Post New Poll
 Submit Vote
 Delete My Own Post
 Delete My Own Thread
 Rate Posts


Movie News|Empire Blog|Movie Reviews|Future Films|Features|Video Interviews|Image Gallery|Competitions|Forum|Magazine|Resources
Forum Software © ASPPlayground.NET Advanced Edition 2.4.5 ANSI

0.109