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Thin Red Line, The - 27/1/2006 3:42:32 PM   
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RE: Thin Red Line, The - 30/1/2006 2:04:02 PM   
shifty_powers


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I can see why some people really like this movie, but personally it really wasn't my cup of tea!

It was beautifully shot and has some great actors in it, but thats about all the positive things i have to say about it!

It was just a rambling mess and none of the characters grabbed me. I eventually got sick of all the shots of the swaying grasses, birds in trees and picturesque streams.

Give me Saving Private Ryan, Kelly's Heroes, Platoon or Apocalypse now any day!

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Something for a Video Art Exhibition - 30/6/2006 8:27:14 PM   
Keyden

 

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This, in my opinion, does not classify as a film. If I had been informed from the start that there would be almost no character development, no emotional attachment, no story, but rather just a series of mundane events mixed with absolutely beautiful and colourful scenery shots, then I would have given this piece of art a better rating. I felt quite confused watching this as it had been advertised to me as a film. This is something to look at, admire in a pretentious sort of way. Maybe with a glass of wine. As a film it is an incomprehensible mess (albeit a very pretty one).

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- 11/7/2006 3:17:50 PM   
dazz

 

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this film is beautiful, although not a complete anti-war film, it is still beautiful. the shots of the fields, and the multicoloured birds are amazing. for all this, i thank you Terrence Malick

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Thin Red Line - 5/6/2007 10:46:46 PM   
cerebusboy


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Slamming a filmaker for relying on visuals is like criticising a poet for relying on words. A truly beautiful, brilliant movie.

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The most poetic depiction of life and war on film - 1/7/2007 2:24:51 PM   
KPNuts74

 

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This film is one of those greats which can absorb you entirely if you let it. As with many of my favourite films of all time I was not too impressed on first viewing. This was probably due to my expectations being different to the type of film it is. It has a fantastic ensemble of cast including Jim Caviezel on top form, the brilliant Nick Nolte, Sean Penn and a best to date outing for Ben Chaplin. Woody Harrelson, John Travolta and George Clooney make cameo appearances.

The photography in this picture is amongst the most beautiful and artistic ever to be seen, the stark contrast between nature's beauty and the evil of war is thought provoking. The voice over, fantastic soundtrack and abstract scenes add to make this film an amazing experience. The scene when the marines storm the Japanese camp is a monumental one showing the true terror of war, this one scene is worth more than the whole of "Saving Private Ryan".

Well that is my view, if you have not seen this film then make sure you do. If you've seen it once and were not too impressed, give it another go like I did, you may be surprised.


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The Thin Red Line - 14/3/2008 11:40:03 AM   
Fluke Skywalker


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Being a fan of war films and Terence Malick (after seeing The New World) this was high on my list of movies needing to be seen.

I was wondering how his famous cinematography would sit aside the harsh realities of war but he managed it to great effect. The Pacific battles against the Japanese probably were his ideal location due to the ample greenery as opposed to the greyer colder war in Europe.

I personally thought the initial battle uphill showed the contrast between war/ nature most starkly. The sunlit long grasses positively shimmered as the wind swept across them and were wonderfully shot - not your typical battleground but most typical of Malick's eye for the beautiful.

The battle scenes were really well handled and said a lot about his versatility - I haven't seen all of his films but I didn't expect him to pull them off so effectively.

The story was pretty straightforward and acting wise Nick Nolte stood out as the semi-crazed commander desperate for recognition at any cost. I don't know how Malick got so many stars together but it was nice to see loads of well known actors in one place, although some had such small roles you had to wonder what was the point.

Overall it goes down as one of the better war films I've seen and Malick's touch makes it stand out from what we've come to expect from this genre


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RE: The Thin Red Line - 14/3/2008 12:58:21 PM   
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Hans Zimmer's best score in my opinion, just brilliant.

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RE: The Thin Red Line - 14/3/2008 1:10:56 PM   
Lightfoot

 

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One of the great films of our time and Malick's masterpiece. The effects of other favorites dull over time. Not this one. Every time I watch it I'm an introspective mess for the rest of the day.

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RE: The Thin Red Line - 14/3/2008 1:15:15 PM   
Tech_Noir

 

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Jim Caviezel really should have been a bigger star after this film, his performance was just haunting.

SPOILERS
















Elias Koteas was also great, you really feel for him when he's discharged.  Same with Ben Chaplin when his wife leaves him.

< Message edited by Tech_Noir -- 14/3/2008 5:14:03 PM >

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RE: The Thin Red Line - 14/3/2008 1:27:24 PM   
Piles


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Tech_Noir

Jim Caviezel really should have been a bigger star after this film, his performance was just haunting.

Elias Koteas was also great, you really feel for him when he's discharged.  Same with Ben Chaplin when his wife leaves him.


No point me watching this one now then, eh?

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RE: The Thin Red Line - 14/3/2008 2:49:42 PM   
Fluke Skywalker


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Tech_Noir

Hans Zimmer's best score in my opinion, just brilliant.


*** SPOILERS ***

Yeah I was thinking that the score was great as well while watching. I also agree that  Cazaviel should be a bigger star. His haunted semi-slacker character stood out and even though he seemed like a deserter/ coward he actually ended up being incredibly courageous in the end.

I thought Sean Penn was super as well as poor old Woody Harleson. That moment when he realises he's pulled the pin and left the grenade attached to himself was so sad - that split second realisation between him and his fellow soldier as they both realise he's just killed himself.

< Message edited by Fluke Skywalker -- 14/3/2008 2:52:56 PM >

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RE: The Thin Red Line - 14/3/2008 5:13:42 PM   
Tech_Noir

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: Piles

quote:

ORIGINAL: Tech_Noir

Jim Caviezel really should have been a bigger star after this film, his performance was just haunting.

Elias Koteas was also great, you really feel for him when he's discharged.  Same with Ben Chaplin when his wife leaves him.


No point me watching this one now then, eh?


Oops sorry, I assumed most people who read this read would have seen the film.

Those aren't big spoilers though, there's bigger ones I won't mention.

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RE: The Thin Red Line - 14/3/2008 10:42:20 PM   
dracovir


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This is one of my all time favourite War movies ever.  Beautifully shot, excellently paced, gorgeous music (I agree, probably Zimmer's best), merging raging battles with anti-war meditations.  The characters are great, in fact it is possible to latch onto one character, keep an eye out for him throughout the picture, follow his story to the end, then re-watch and do again with a different character - it is almost like watching a different film each time, although obviously Jim Cavaziel's character arc is the film's primary thread - his search for immortality in the calmness before death, as that he had witnessed in his mother, searching for meaning in this until he too could find the same immortality in his own death (invisotext as it seems some people here are not liking spoilers).  There is even quite the game of spotting those whose roles had been cut back into cameos - George Clooney, Thomas Jane, Nick 'John T3 Connor' Stahl, to name a few....

It achieved a greater sense of how war is Hell without resorting to the pornographic violence that opened Saving Private Ryan, the other WWII film of that same year, with some top notch performances from such a hugely expansive ensemble.  I have heard tell that Terence Malick's original workprint was pushing twenty hours, so I would really like to see a new dvd release with deleted scenes, even a director's cut (hell, I would more than happily sit through all 20 hours!).  Truly amazing - in fact, almost everything about this film is exactly that.  Amazing.


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RE: The Thin Red Line - 15/3/2008 12:39:09 PM   
Piles


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Sorry if I sounded snide, Tech-Noir and dracovir, I'm not that upset. I actually just rented this but haven't seen it, and clicking the thread I knew I'd encounter some spoilers. It's my own fault ;).

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RE: The Thin Red Line - 16/3/2008 12:46:16 AM   
DanCurley


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This is one of the worse films I've ever seen. The combat scenes are basically one-second shots welded together rather than proper choreographed battle and the morality is hilariously tries to cough up (someone shoots an enemy in combat then thinks to himself "I'm a murderer, worse than a rapist") is shameful and pointless beyond imagineation.

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RE: The Thin Red Line - 16/3/2008 1:17:17 AM   
dracovir


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quote:

ORIGINAL: DanCurley

This is one of the worse films I've ever seen. The combat scenes are basically one-second shots welded together rather than proper choreographed battle and the morality is hilariously tries to cough up (someone shoots an enemy in combat then thinks to himself "I'm a murderer, worse than a rapist") is shameful and pointless beyond imagineation.


When is warfare ever choreographed?  Sometimes, by making a scene like this obviously set up, takes you out of the war movie, often losing the ideas and the themes that the film makers want to impart on their audience.  Saving Private Ryan's infamous 24 minutes was likewise chaotic, but it was served better as being a lengthy scene of just one (albeit huge) action.  Many of the battle scenes in this film were deliberately cut back on, as it is essentially an anti-war meditation rather than an action film (not that the studio marketeers would have you believe).  As for the soldiers' thoughts displayed, Malick based his screenplay on a novel which, to the best of my knowledge, was based on interviews with the soldiers who had been there, and thought those things.  To me at least, these disembodied musings were essential to the anti war message, hence those questions of why they were there, why they were fighting, how had the world come to this.  It's powerful stuff, and maybe I was wrong saying that this is my favourite war film, as essentially it is arguable to label it as such.

@Piles:  No worries, I tend to hide anything I would think as being super spoilerific anyways


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RE: The Thin Red Line - 16/3/2008 10:01:38 AM   
DanCurley


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quote:

ORIGINAL: dracovir

When is warfare ever choreographed?



Right... Saving Private Ryan's end bit as well as start bit. The new Rambo. The Lord of The Rings... wait a sec, there's no point in my writing a big list. I'll just give you a typical example of why the combat is so dreadfully shot in this film.

Shot 1: "Men running into village screaming"
Shot 2: "Close up shot of beyonets going into torsos"
Shot 3: "A different shot of men running into village"
Shot 4: Shot 2 repeat.

Result - no sense of combat. Just badly editing shots that don't piece together. It makes the insanely messy city fight in Transformers look like that awesomely followably corridor fight in OldBoy.

Yeah, it has some lovely shots. It's shot in the jungle with posh cameras, I should hope so.

EDIT - I've just realised, when you say "When is warfare ever choreographed?" you mean Real war. It's never choreographed - don't confuse the horror and randomness of humanity's conflicts with shitty camera work on this crappy film.

< Message edited by DanCurley -- 16/3/2008 10:03:52 AM >


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RE: The Thin Red Line - 16/3/2008 12:42:11 PM   
gunstar


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quote:

Right... Saving Private Ryan's end bit as well as start bit. The new Rambo. The Lord of The Rings... wait a sec, there's no point in my writing a big list. I'll just give you a typical example of why the combat is so dreadfully shot in this film.

Shot 1: "Men running into village screaming"
Shot 2: "Close up shot of beyonets going into torsos"
Shot 3: "A different shot of men running into village"
Shot 4: Shot 2 repeat.

Result - no sense of combat. Just badly editing shots that don't piece together. It makes the insanely messy city fight in Transformers look like that awesomely followably corridor fight in OldBoy.

Yeah, it has some lovely shots. It's shot in the jungle with posh cameras, I should hope so.

EDIT - I've just realised, when you say "When is warfare ever choreographed?" you mean Real war. It's never choreographed - don't confuse the horror and randomness of humanity's conflicts with shitty camera work on this crappy film.


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RE: The Thin Red Line - 16/3/2008 1:06:17 PM   
DanCurley


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So you think "When is war choregraphed?" when talking about the quality of war films is that intelligent and measured? Eh?

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RE: The Thin Red Line - 16/3/2008 1:20:42 PM   
gunstar


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Of course it is. This is a forum about films. 'Ladies and gentlemen - we have a winner for non-argument of the day!

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RE: The Thin Red Line - 16/3/2008 1:36:14 PM   
DanCurley


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This happened on the Shaving Ryan's Privates forum when talking about the quality of the film, someone started on about real life war... check it out - all real life war is shit, doesn't mean if a war film is shit it's authentic...

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RE: The Thin Red Line - 16/3/2008 2:55:27 PM   
dracovir


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Re watched it earlier, and I have to say I'm getting a little lost here.  Even with limited choreography, the battle scenes are still pretty good.  The first assault on the hill, with the Japanese bunkered in near the top, still a great sequence.  you have a rough idea where people are, as close as the characters know where they are in relation to the others.  The small party assaulting these bunkers, again a great little sequence.

If by choreography you are talking about camaera positions in time with the action being filmed, then is the criticism for the fact that most camera work is static/on rails/crane as opposed to the rapid moving steadicam work of other films?  By the shot by shot analysis given, it sounds like you are criticising the editing, but then there are many other films that cut action (not just war films) in similiar way: wider shots of what's going on, intercut with close-ups of the violence.

The general thing thats happening is the men running (I think that bit would be when the Americans are assaulting the Japanese camp after making it past the bunkers after the morning mist fades) into the camp, they were expecting close-quarters combat (hence the bayonets) whilst having been out in the field for some time and ammo would be becoming scarce, the Japanese might have been likewise out of ammo / have nothing left to fight with (perhaps one criticism could be levelled at the lack of a Japanese perspective in the film, but then the film is not about that).  That there was not a lot else going on in those moments, what else is there to throw in?  Besides, this element did not last long, it was mainly the beginning of the assault.  If you would prefer that they 'cook up' proceedings for the sake of making it more of an actioner, then I think you missed the point of the film.  It's not an action film per se, it is not aiming to glorify warfare, it's not about explosions and kick-ass gunplay.  It's not meant to be enjoyable in that way - hence the slower pacing, lingering shots of the world around the characters, the pensive musings of the characters amid the chaos.  They could easily have pushed for the gung-ho approach, making for more enjoyable action cinema, but this would have belied the characters and themes of the novel, and thus Malick's reasoning behind making the film.


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RE: The Thin Red Line - 16/3/2008 3:33:41 PM   
Deviation


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I have to rewatch this masterpiece any time soon.

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RE: The Thin Red Line - 17/3/2008 10:11:41 AM   
Fluke Skywalker


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quote:

ORIGINAL: DanCurley

This is one of the worse films I've ever seen. The combat scenes are basically one-second shots welded together rather than proper choreographed battle and the morality is hilariously tries to cough up (someone shoots an enemy in combat then thinks to himself "I'm a murderer, worse than a rapist") is shameful and pointless beyond imagineation.


While the combat scenes didn't do anything new or compete with something like Saving Private Ryan (but then again who can?) at no point did I actually think they were weak. The hilltop battle by the unit of seven men especially was an excellent piece of action as was the running raid into the Japanese camp.

While admittedly the line you mentioned did jar a bit, to call it one of the worst films you've ever seen says a lot more about your taste in movies then than the quality of The Thin Red Line

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Post #: 25
RE: The Thin Red Line - 17/3/2008 10:41:10 AM   
Lightfoot

 

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quote:

If you would prefer that they 'cook up' proceedings for the sake of making it more of an actioner, then I think you missed the point of the film.


This pretty much sums it up. Anyone who watches The Thin Red Line looking to masturbate thrillingly to war porn is going to be disappointed. You're judging the film on a set of imposed criteria that it never attempted to fill in the first place.

Now, I don't have a problem with peeps not liking this film. A lot of film-loving friends of mine whose opinion I have time for just didn't find this film worked for them. Jim Caviezel's inner monologues have been described as sophomoric, which rather misses the whole point that the guy is a bright but uneducated AJ grunt. I thought Nick Nolte's voice-overs didn't fit his character and were the only real suspect ones, but it didn't affect the power of the film at all.

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RE: The Thin Red Line - 17/3/2008 10:56:20 AM   
DanCurley


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From: London
quote:

ORIGINAL: Lightfoot

quote:

If you would prefer that they 'cook up' proceedings for the sake of making it more of an actioner, then I think you missed the point of the film.


This pretty much sums it up. Anyone who watches The Thin Red Line looking to masturbate thrillingly to war porn



Aye.

< Message edited by DanCurley -- 17/3/2008 10:57:12 AM >


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RE: The Thin Red Line - 19/3/2008 12:01:07 PM   
munro7


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Dull, dull dull.

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RE: The Thin Red Line - 19/3/2008 1:07:05 PM   
DanCurley


Posts: 1371
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quote:

ORIGINAL: munro7

Dull, dull dull.


That's because it has no War Porn that we can masterbait over. Or so it would seem.

I can only pray people don't start using that horrid term with every genre. I'd hate for people to refer to Eternal Sunshine as a "Nice slice of Memory Erasing Porn" or Goodfellas as "Fantastic Mafia Porn".

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RE: The Thin Red Line - 30/3/2008 1:27:18 PM   
Citizen Dildo

 

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I watched this for the 1st time a few days ago and thought it was terrific.

Great performances, especially from Caviezel, Koteas and Nick Nolte.  I can only disagree with Curley's shout about the "action" sequences.  Thought the raid into the Japanese camp was a really haunting scene.  My only criticism would be the nature or Caviezel swimming with natives scenes were slightly repetitive and overdone.

As an aside, comparisons with Saving Private Ryan are pointless IMHO.  The Thin Red Line falls firmly into the "War is Hell" canon like Full Metal Jacket for example, whereas Ryan is misguided IMHO or suffers from a Spielbergised view of the world.  What I mean by that is that Matt Damon's character as an old man, visits the grave of Tom Hanks in the end with his family.  This seems to suggest that their sacrifice was worthwhile, that there was some point to it all, as Ryan has lived to raise a lovely family.  Rather than just leave the story that war is futile as was their mission.

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