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RE: Nomnomnom - The Food Thread - 1/4/2010 5:38:15 PM   
Kilo_T_Mortal


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Skiba

So my question to you guys is: what's your favourite cheese?  Which do you avoid?



Used to (you should only use 'use to' before did, otherwise your grammar is wrong) hate Red leicester because I had only every had the plastic supermarket type. Then I found Sparkenhoe Red Leicester which is fucking wicked. If you can find a deli that sells it (you might have to go to leicester though) buy it, it tastes a bit like pond water but in a really, really good way. I miss it.


Me and my mate always end up arguing about which Stilton is the best as well, I reckon Quenby hall.

Leicester is cracking for cheese.


(Edited for poor English teacher grammar)

< Message edited by Kilo_T_Mortal -- 19/4/2010 5:29:19 PM >


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Post #: 91
RE: Nomnomnom - The Food Thread - 1/4/2010 6:30:40 PM   
TheManWithNoShame


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Obviously Roquefort.

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Post #: 92
RE: Nomnomnom - The Food Thread - 1/4/2010 6:31:12 PM   
TheManWithNoShame


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quote:

ORIGINAL: TheManWithNoShame

Obviously Roquefort.


This would be a really shit name for a band.


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Post #: 93
RE: Nomnomnom - The Food Thread - 2/4/2010 12:28:53 AM   
ilovebeerme


Posts: 4531
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From: Magic Beans

quote:

ORIGINAL: Skiba

quote:

ORIGINAL: ilovebeerme


quote:

ORIGINAL: Skiba

So my question to you guys is: what's your favourite cheese?  Which do you avoid?



One of the main brands of cheese in Oz is called 'Coon'. I tend to avoid that. Donkey raping shit eaters.

If it's bright fucking orange then it's not cheddar, how about that as a start. Also, Edam is the cheese equivalent of fucking a blow up doll with crabs. Don't do it.

If you live in Edinburgh then go to Mellis cheese shop on Victoria Street or down Stockbridge way. If you don't live in Edinburgh then I don't have a fucking clue, go find a decent cheesemonger yourself you lazy shit,

Bit harsh...was only asking!



Sorry, I was shit faced

In my drunken mind it was fabulously witty and aimed at everybody not just you. Not sure that helps.

The Aussie cheese called 'Coon' is true though. It comes in 'tasty' and 'bitey' varieties. I wish I was making that up.



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RE: Nomnomnom - The Food Thread - 2/4/2010 3:34:05 PM   
TheManWithNoShame


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After numerous glowing reviews on chowhound, I ventured out to East Ham yesterday to a small Keralan restaurant called Thattukada, website here: http://www.thattukada.co.uk/eastham/index.php

From the outside it's excatly the same as any other Indian restaurant on the High Road stretch but on the inside, well, it's pretty much the same. At the most it could seat about 25 people. Despite being part Goan, I really don't know much about Keralan cuisine, so I asked the waiters (who were friendly and seemed very pleased anyone non-Keralan was interested) about it, and it turned out they had some specials going: some sort of fish dish, and something called 'roast coil - a small chicken' which I worked out as being 'quail' They have specials everyday, so if you do go, ask before you order.

For starters me and my dining partner (my Indian mother who I had dragged out of the house) had Netholi Fry, which are fried pieces of whitebait fried up with the crispiest onions you'll ever have and curry leaves. For £6 it could feed 3 people and leave them fairly satisifed, but we had already ordered the quail, a mutton curry, and a mixed vegetable curry so we had much more to go. The quail was incredible, if a bit finicky (all the pieces of meat were quail legs you had to tear apart accurately with your teeth), and served in a very hot sauce (even by my standards) with roast tomatoes, onions and small curry leaves. The mutton was good, if less amazing than the quail, but went very well with the miscellaneous vegetable curry which contained - among other things - figs, cashews, coconut, peas, peppers and carrots. As you can imagine the sweetness of the figs and coconut balanced the spicyness of the other two curries very well.
Also, you wont get Naan (a north Indian bread) here, so you can choose between chapatis, parotha (a lovely, buttery thick unleavened bread, sometimes stuffed with savoury goodies), but we went for the appoms, an incredible cocunut rice bread which is thin and crispy on the outside and fluffy and sweet on the inside. I could seriously come here and just order the appoms, and maybe some chutney, and leave a happy man  - they were that good.

I'm going to try to come here again to sample some of the other dishes - the biriyani's are massive and cheap, and are cooked in layers with sweet fruit in, and the thalis at the next table included a curry, rice, pickled vegetables, chutney and sauces for a very reasonable price. Also sometimes they serve a whole fried fish steamed in banana leaves, which I've heard is incredible, but only on certain days - same with the rest of their specials which include various fries, crab curry, mutton liver, mussels, basically anything they have on the day.

For the starter, the three mains, two portions of appom, rice, a large beer and two thick salt lassis, the bill came to £33, but that was very reasonable considering the price of the quail (I think £10 or £12) and more than worth it. I'd recommend it if you live anywhere in the London area, as long as you're comfortable eating like an Indian (with your hands) since  there are no knives or forks, just jugs of water and tissues!


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Post #: 95
RE: Nomnomnom - The Food Thread - 16/4/2010 8:51:21 PM   
Spider


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A little bounce here, a slightly new topic to go on...

What's everyone's most treasured cookbooks here?

Thing is, I love cookbooks even if I don't actually cook much from them. I have quite a few of Jamie Oliver's and I like reading them and dreaming about cooking some of the stuff in them, but realistically as a student I'm not going to be buying kilgrams of beef fillet or whole sea bass very frequently!

Bought myself Nigel Slater's Appetite, which I absolutley love to read and has some really good recipes in, in fact as a book and an ethos it's the best I own, but again there's a fair amount of unrealistic stuff in there and also as someone who is watching their calorie intake/lazily dieting (ie eat proper meals but don't eat shit) there's SO much stuff in there that people just can't eat regularly (eg. Potato gratin with 600mls of double cream or bearnais sauce with 150g of butter!!!!!!!!!!!).

I have to admit I'm a bit of a sucker and like the picture filled, celebrity cookbooks. I'm planning on getting Jamie's Ministry of Food, a lot of the stuff in there I already know (I can cook, I just find it hard to find inspiration), but I'd like a book full of stuff I will actually use. I'm also going to buy as much of Nigel Slater's stuff as I can as even if half of his recipes are far too fattening they're still good to read and there's some gems.

So, I'm putting this out there...

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RE: Nomnomnom - The Food Thread - 17/4/2010 12:12:44 PM   
ilovebeerme


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Nigel Slater's books are awesome. Anybody who thinks cooking is hard or complicated should pick up a copy of Real Food or Appetite. I think I've bought four or five copies of each to give as presents. I agree some of his recipes are a little excessive on the cream and butter but you can often cut back without any problems.

His new (mostly) veggie book 'Tender' is also sublime. Follows the seasons and offers hundreds of simple veggie recipes that are just beautiful. Volume 2 is out later this year.

Hugh Fearnley Whittingstall's books are also outstanding. His Meat book is my cookery bible for anything that came from an animal. It's one of the only cook books I've read from cover to cover; recipes make up about 50% with the rest a wealth of information on farming, meat production and provenance. As well as covering the usual it goes into detail about all those tasty meats we should eat but don't - shin, offal, hare, grouse etc. Can't recommend it highly enough.

He's also done a great book called River Cottage Everyday, which is all simple, quick recipes using good ingredients. Worth it for the crudités dipping sauce alone.

Georgio Locatelli's 'Made in Italy' is also brilliant. Like 'Meat' it's a book you can easily sit and read for a couple of hours even when you're not planning on cooking anything at all. It's inspiring like no other cook book I've come across. So many times I've been bored and idly flicking through it, only to see something I have to cook and then spend the rest of the day going from grocer to fishmonger to deli. It's that sort of book.

At the moment I've got a soft spot for pretty much anything north African or Lebanese. All those dips and roast meats with sesame, lemons, nuts and saffron.



< Message edited by ilovebeerme -- 17/4/2010 12:14:30 PM >


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RE: Nomnomnom - The Food Thread - 19/4/2010 3:58:47 PM   
Funkyrae


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I'm a big fan of this one:



Unlike most Buddhist recipes, this one does follow the "little of everything" rule and contains recipes with meat. It's just the way the book is written that's brilliant. Zen cooking.

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Post #: 98
RE: Nomnomnom - The Food Thread - 19/4/2010 5:31:21 PM   
Kilo_T_Mortal


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Rick Stein normally does some pretty good recepies, they can take a bit of fiddling but you normally get the gist and can add your own certain something to the recepies.

If you are starting out, I highly recomend Deliah, she's good for basic and consistent. How to cook, is very good.

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Post #: 99
RE: Nomnomnom - The Food Thread - 19/4/2010 5:33:44 PM   
TheManWithNoShame


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I second ilovebeerme's Locatelli recommendation. It's really superbly written, and the chapters on specific ingredients are so useful I rarely use any of the actual recipes since they give you a good idea of what ingredients work together and what ingredients will not, which leaves you free to improvise quite a bit. The chapter on risottos may be my most flicked through pages of any book I have (since he's from north Italy, they really are indispensible). The recipes are fantastic too, if a little above my skill level to pull off at the moment.

If you're into Chinese food, but sick of Cantonese then I'd recommend both of Fuschia Dunlop's books on Sichuan and Hunan cuisine - Land of Plenty and Revolutionary Chinese Cookbook. They're great entry level books, and the recipes I've followed from either have been better than any take-away I've had (the Kung-Pao chicken in particular puts any variation of it I've had at a non-Sichuanese restaurant to shame). You'll have to search around Chinese shops to find the Sichuan peppercorns (which pop invariably in the ingredients sections of both books), but once you find them they'll become an indispensible part of your ingredients section (and a good way to exploit drunk housemates by offering it to them raw and then watching them slowly lose all sensation in their mouth).

< Message edited by TheManWithNoShame -- 19/4/2010 5:36:03 PM >


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RE: Nomnomnom - The Food Thread - 19/4/2010 5:39:54 PM   
Kilo_T_Mortal


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On another note has anyone ever had any lessons? Are they interesting/useful or damn annoying? I'm seriously tempted to do a language/cooking exchange with some Taiwanese cooks.

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Post #: 101
RE: Nomnomnom - The Food Thread - 29/4/2010 2:53:01 PM   
Skiba


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From: London
This sounds very interesting

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/wordofmouth/2010/apr/29/manchester-egg

I do love a scotch egg and he's right that it lacks a vinegary element to it


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Post #: 102
RE: Nomnomnom - The Food Thread - 29/4/2010 6:31:53 PM   
TheManWithNoShame


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Skiba

This sounds very interesting

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/wordofmouth/2010/apr/29/manchester-egg

I do love a scotch egg and he's right that it lacks a vinegary element to it



There's a few good gastropubs in London that do some incredible scotch eggs. The Bull and Last in Kilburn make them fresh and serve them warm with the egg still runny inside, and the Harwood Arms do a venison scotch egg which you can view in ludicrously unnecessary close up here:





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Post #: 103
RE: Nomnomnom - The Food Thread - 2/5/2010 6:11:23 PM   
UTB


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Had a go at making pizza today (including the dough, which I made yesterday, and the sauce), and it came out quite well... tasted excellent as was quite inexpensive to make!



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Post #: 104
RE: Nomnomnom - The Food Thread - 3/6/2010 6:18:56 PM   
sanchia


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I have recently discovered.

It is a great book with food I actually want to eat and is very easy to prepare.

Anyway. With barbecue season upon us, does anyone have any tips for marinades etc? I tried out asparagus on the barbecue a couple of weeks ago and was pleasantly surprised in that it was sweeter than when steamed and far, far tastier.

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RE: Nomnomnom - The Food Thread - 3/6/2010 8:02:45 PM   
Goodfella


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Kilo_T_Mortal

On another note has anyone ever had any lessons? Are they interesting/useful or damn annoying? I'm seriously tempted to do a language/cooking exchange with some Taiwanese cooks.


I have an NVQ in Catering but I wouldn't reccomend it if you want to become a chef. Well I would but not at college like I did, do it as a work placement course. That way you get to work in the industry for real whilst learning and being paid. Colleges will push for you to do it in-house but several of my friends have done it through work placements and I certainly regret not doing it.

You can usually pick up some good one-day or week-long cookery classes and courses. Usually you need some prior cooking experience but only very basic, like don't enrol if you don't know how to fry an egg. Avoid the ones that are intermediate if you don't know how to do things like making a stock or how to fry a steak as they usually expect you to know those things straight off.

Or I could teach you but I charge £50 an hour and you have to travel...

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RE: Nomnomnom - The Food Thread - 28/8/2010 11:10:47 AM   
ilovebeerme


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Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Magic Beans
Been cooking a lot lately. We've moved away from Sydney to a place in the country and there are bugger all restaurants (worth eating in) near by, so the pots and pans are being used a great deal.

I made an ox tail stew and beef stock last weekend. The bones for the stock and the tail was from the same animal. The stock simmered away for 6 hours in my 15 litre stock pot, stuffed full of onion, celery, carrots and half and half roasted and non roasted bones. I reduced the lot to get a litre of primo stock and reduced a further litre down to about 100ml of the most unbelievably intense beefy goodness to be used in sauces. It's a great way to spend a lazy Saturday. The ox tail was slow cooked for three hours with mushrooms some of the stock and a few herbs. By the time it was done it was falling off the bone and meltingly tender. The sauce was thick with marrow bone and one of the finest things I've ever eaten.

Tonight it's a rack of lamb with cous cous spiced with cumin, preserved lemons, chick peas and cranberries. Nom.

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RE: Nomnomnom - The Food Thread - 28/8/2010 8:07:55 PM   
sanchia


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I've just made a nice Stair cake to take to my parents tomorrow. It's a holiday, a good time to indulge.

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RE: Nomnomnom - The Food Thread - 29/8/2010 12:57:39 AM   
Kilo_T_Mortal


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Been having some joy with this site, for making something vaguely homley feeling (Indian curry in Taiwan is shit).
http://www.curryhouse.co.uk/index.html

Love to hear about other people's curry recepies, I'll try and post my dry beef curry recipe, soon. It's similar to Rendang but without the cocount milk.


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Post #: 109
RE: Nomnomnom - The Food Thread - 1/9/2010 9:16:55 AM   
Kilo_T_Mortal


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Right I only have a gas hob, what can I cook with some chicken breast beside curry and stew? Give me some inspiration, some nice pasta sauces would be good.

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RE: Nomnomnom - The Food Thread - 1/9/2010 5:29:13 PM   
Skiba


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From: London
quote:

ORIGINAL: Kilo_T_Mortal

Right I only have a gas hob, what can I cook with some chicken breast beside curry and stew? Give me some inspiration, some nice pasta sauces would be good.

I'm not a big fan of chicken pasta dishes so can't help you there but this poached chicken salad is really good...had soemthing very similar in a Vietnamese and Thai cooking book I got a few years ago but maybe you've had enough of Asian food?

http://www.vietnamese-recipes.com/vietnamese-recipes/salad/vietnamese-poached-chicken%20salad.php

Also have done this a few times in the last few weeks and it's very good and would highly recommend giving it a go.  I don't tend to make curries with coconut milk but this is great...the tamarind and spinach are the stars of this

http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/goan_chicken_curry_70520

Getting the paste right is key but I don't tend to follow any real method for the most part but I usually use black mustard seed, fenugreek seeds, ginger and garam masala as essential...then either spinach or tomatos depending on what takes my fancy or whatever I have


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RE: Nomnomnom - The Food Thread - 5/10/2010 11:05:22 AM   
ilovebeerme


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From: Magic Beans
Yum!



The contents of so many of those fast food 'chicken' snacks. Tasty stuff

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/10/04/mechanically-separated-meat-chicken-mcnugget-photo_n_749893.html

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RE: Nomnomnom - The Food Thread - 5/10/2010 11:06:41 AM   
Hobbitonlass

 

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Ewww

That is why you'd never see me in a fast food joint.......

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RE: Nomnomnom - The Food Thread - 5/10/2010 11:08:18 AM   
ilovebeerme


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"There's more: because it's crawling with bacteria, it will be washed with ammonia, soaked in it, actually. Then, because it tastes gross, it will be reflavored artificially. Then, because it is weirdly pink, it will be dyed with artificial color.

But, hey, at least it tastes good, right?"

This is my favourite bit. Combined with the picture it's snack heaven.

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RE: Nomnomnom - The Food Thread - 6/10/2010 11:18:24 PM   
Rebenectomy


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Bit of a debate regarding your nugget pick....

http://www.good.is/post/chicken-nuggets-is-that-how-they-re-made-a-good-fact-check/

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RE: Nomnomnom - The Food Thread - 12/10/2010 9:45:32 AM   
John The Grudge


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One of my favourite things to eat is southern fried chicken mini fillets and salsa sauce wraps.  I like to use Mission wraps as they're quite big and tasty.  Iceland do the best southern fried chicken mini fillets and the best (by a huge margin) salsa sauce is Pain Is Good Smoked Jalapeno Batch #218 Salsa.

Cook the chicken in the oven.  Chuck about 4 wraps in the microwave for the right amount of time.  Then chuck a couple of dollops of salsa on a wrap, followed by two bits of chicken, wrap and eat.  Heavenly.

< Message edited by John The Grudge -- 12/10/2010 9:47:01 AM >


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RE: Nomnomnom - The Food Thread - 12/10/2010 3:48:18 PM   
Kilo_T_Mortal


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I'm worried about the food nazis.

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RE: Nomnomnom - The Food Thread - 12/10/2010 3:50:12 PM   
Your Funny Uncle


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quote:

ORIGINAL: ilovebeerme

Yum!



The contents of so many of those fast food 'chicken' snacks. Tasty stuff

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/10/04/mechanically-separated-meat-chicken-mcnugget-photo_n_749893.html


Strawberry Ice Cream! Yum!

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RE: Nomnomnom - The Food Thread - 12/10/2010 11:01:02 PM   
ilovebeerme


Posts: 4531
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From: Magic Beans
quote:

ORIGINAL: Rebenectomy

Bit of a debate regarding your nugget pick....

http://www.good.is/post/chicken-nuggets-is-that-how-they-re-made-a-good-fact-check/


I actually missed the bit where they said 'whole chicken crushed through a sieve' or I'd have flagged that as dubious. To be fair the article did say it's not how McDonalds make their nuggets.

I'm also not, in principal, against using as much of the bird as possible; the only thing left when I roast a chicken is bones and a bit of skin (sometimes ) and even then the bones go in the stock pot. It's the whole process that concerns me. They take mutant chickens (cause they are mutants), kill them inhumanely, process them to the point where they need to add flavour and then market them, principally, to kids and parent's with not much cash. It's cruel and it produces crap food that only has flavour due to the added 'flavour' and salt. Adult's can eat it by all means, but feeding it to kids is, in my opinion, a large part of the reason why so many kids are fat wee lethargic bastards.

Processed food is marketed as cheap and easy when it's actually just as or even more expensive to buy a lot of these products than to make them yourself. Making enough chicken nuggets, for example, for ten kids dinners takes about 30 minutes from start to finish and you can get your kids to help you do it, which has the double benefit of getting them to spend time with you and teaching them about food. That's just common sense surely?

If people are really worried about money then they should be buying rabbit (2-3 quid will feed a family of four easily), pheasant, pigeon or some of the less well known fish instead of chicken. The real problem is they often have no idea what to do with a fresh ingredient.

Edit - There is an interesting (if a little old) article on the farming process here - click

It's interesting because it's not arguing that all chickens have to be free range and organic, but highlights the small changes in the farming process that can change an unimaginably grim life for these animals into something with a scrap of dignity.

The farmers themselves say they grow the mutant birds due to market pressure where for a pound or two more they could grow better birds, which are treated (slightly) more ethically and end up tasting better. The public don't care though and that's what I don't get. Food is the only area I can think of where we are happy with the minimum acceptable standard. We pay more for cars, clothes, TV's etc because we understand that 'you get what you pay for' but people seem to be blinkered to that when it comes to food. It's weird.

I'm not suggesting that everybody needs to switch to a 100% organic diet and start wearing sandals, but surely to God that doesn't automatically mean they have to go to the other extreme and look for the cheapest, bottom of the barrel product going?

< Message edited by ilovebeerme -- 12/10/2010 11:26:54 PM >


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Post #: 119
RE: Nomnomnom - The Food Thread - 13/10/2010 12:10:21 PM   
shatnerhamster

 

Posts: 183
Joined: 19/3/2007

quote:

ORIGINAL: Kilo_T_Mortal


Used to (you should only use 'use to' before did, otherwise your grammar is wrong)




I use to did understand what you were talking about, but now I don't.

(in reply to Kilo_T_Mortal)
Post #: 120
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