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RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 3/6/2009 12:13:47 AM   
chris_scott01


Posts: 3081
Joined: 5/1/2006
quote:

ORIGINAL: Spengo

I feel like relaunching the yearly consensus threads out of sheer boredom. Would you folks be willing to participate?


You went AWOL before you completed the last one, I was remember because I was annoyed I didn't get to vote for Gun Crazy in the 1950 one.

_____________________________

rapidite! rapidite!

(in reply to Spengo)
Post #: 2821
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 3/6/2009 12:13:58 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
quote:

ORIGINAL: Rinc

Are people still talking about Godard?


Apart from the detour when James admitted to a Stallone admiration.

(in reply to Rinc)
Post #: 2822
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 3/6/2009 12:15:45 AM   
Spengo


Posts: 412
Joined: 22/5/2009
quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

quote:

ORIGINAL: Spengo

I feel like relaunching the yearly consensus threads out of sheer boredom. Would you folks be willing to participate?


Sure. What are they?


Heh. Here's an example of one of the original threads:
http://www.empireonline.com/forum/tm.asp?m=1532453

I was thinking of reducing the number of films to 5 due to low participation for a lot of the earlier years, but the rules would generally be the same.


_____________________________

Antichrist (von Trier, 2009) - 8
The Road to God Knows Where (Schuppel, 1990) - 2
The Elephant Man (Lynch, 1980) - 10
Ran (Kurosawa, 1985) - 7
Manhunter (Mann, 1986) - 6

spengo.wordpress.com

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 2823
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 3/6/2009 12:16:23 AM   
Spengo


Posts: 412
Joined: 22/5/2009
quote:

ORIGINAL: chris_scott01

quote:

ORIGINAL: Spengo

I feel like relaunching the yearly consensus threads out of sheer boredom. Would you folks be willing to participate?


You went AWOL before you completed the last one, I was remember because I was annoyed I didn't get to vote for Gun Crazy in the 1950 one.

I'll start off with the years ending in '0.


_____________________________

Antichrist (von Trier, 2009) - 8
The Road to God Knows Where (Schuppel, 1990) - 2
The Elephant Man (Lynch, 1980) - 10
Ran (Kurosawa, 1985) - 7
Manhunter (Mann, 1986) - 6

spengo.wordpress.com

(in reply to chris_scott01)
Post #: 2824
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 3/6/2009 12:17:39 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
quote:

ORIGINAL: Spengo

quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

quote:

ORIGINAL: Spengo

I feel like relaunching the yearly consensus threads out of sheer boredom. Would you folks be willing to participate?


Sure. What are they?


Heh. Here's an example of one of the original threads:
http://www.empireonline.com/forum/tm.asp?m=1532453

I was thinking of reducing the number of films to 5 due to low participation for a lot of the earlier years, but the rules would generally be the same.



Cool. I'd be in.

(in reply to Spengo)
Post #: 2825
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 3/6/2009 12:21:35 AM   
Rhubarb


Posts: 24509
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: No Direction Home

quote:

ORIGINAL: chris_scott01

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rhubarb


quote:

ORIGINAL: jamesbondguy

quote:

ORIGINAL: Dantes Inferno

I'll watch Ŕ Bout de Suffle. And like it.


Make that Pierrot le Fou and you might have a deal.



While you were typing this I was watching Pierrot le Fou on the big screen.


Was that at Bfi Southbank?  I was considering going to see while I was in London a couple of days ago.


Nope, my local arthouse was showing it. I did see Breathless at the BFI Southbank last month though while I was swinging through London for Bob Dylan (JBG's ideal weekend?)

_____________________________

Team Ginge
WWLD?


quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan

You organisational skills sicken me, Rhubarb.



(in reply to chris_scott01)
Post #: 2826
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 3/6/2009 12:24:34 AM   
Spengo


Posts: 412
Joined: 22/5/2009
Speaking of Gun Crazy, I saw that on the big screen last week. As well as Wild Strawberries and Suspiria.


_____________________________

Antichrist (von Trier, 2009) - 8
The Road to God Knows Where (Schuppel, 1990) - 2
The Elephant Man (Lynch, 1980) - 10
Ran (Kurosawa, 1985) - 7
Manhunter (Mann, 1986) - 6

spengo.wordpress.com

(in reply to Rhubarb)
Post #: 2827
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 3/6/2009 12:26:41 AM   
TRM


Posts: 4797
Joined: 20/10/2006
From: Bristol
quote:

ORIGINAL: Spengo

I feel like relaunching the yearly consensus threads out of sheer boredom. Would you folks be willing to participate?


Yeah sure


_____________________________

I'm going out to the states to redeem the social outcasts. My only real ambition is to cultivate Texas. I love Texas. You must watch "The last picture show". That film! It was my first real sexual relationship.

(in reply to Spengo)
Post #: 2828
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 3/6/2009 12:46:21 AM   
Rinc


Posts: 12841
Joined: 2/10/2005
From: A park bench, with a newspaper quilt

quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rinc

Are people still talking about Godard?


Apart from the detour when James admitted to a Stallone admiration.


I don't blame him, Stallone is better than Godard.

_____________________________

No spoilers please:

Invisiotext:
[ color=#F1F1F1 ]text[ /color ]

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 2829
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 3/6/2009 12:56:06 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
They should make a film together, Nom de famille Rambo.

(in reply to Rinc)
Post #: 2830
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 3/6/2009 1:11:23 AM   
Rinc


Posts: 12841
Joined: 2/10/2005
From: A park bench, with a newspaper quilt
It'd probably be better than La Chinoise.

_____________________________

No spoilers please:

Invisiotext:
[ color=#F1F1F1 ]text[ /color ]

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 2831
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 3/6/2009 1:42:34 AM   
Deviation


Posts: 27284
Joined: 2/6/2006
From: Enemies of Film HQ
quote:

ORIGINAL: Rinc


quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rinc

Are people still talking about Godard?


Apart from the detour when James admitted to a Stallone admiration.


I don't blame him, Stallone is better than Godard.


A Piece of crap is a better artist than Stallone.

_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Dpp1978
There are certainly times where calling a person a cunt is not only reasonable, it is a gross understatement.

quote:


ORIGINAL: elab49
I really wish I could go down to see Privates

(in reply to Rinc)
Post #: 2832
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 3/6/2009 5:58:39 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 78115
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo
quote:

ORIGINAL: Spengo

I feel like relaunching the yearly consensus threads out of sheer boredom. Would you folks be willing to participate?


Yep!

I did try bumping the last one once or twice in the hope we'd finish them off

_____________________________

So, sir, we let him have it right up! And I have to report, sir, he did not like it, sir.

Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

(in reply to Spengo)
Post #: 2833
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 3/6/2009 11:21:07 AM   
Piles


Posts: 5545
Joined: 6/8/2007
From: Whalley Range
I still have to review 'Ugetsu' and 'La Belle et la Bete', and I'm going to see 'Terminator: Salvations' tonight, but here's a big update for now...
 
American Psycho (2001, Mary Harron)
I'll give away something here, in saying that if my top 100 films of the 21st century had made it down to its finish (which it was a long way away from doing), then this film would have been sitting right at the top of it. The story of Patrick Bateman, whose nightly bloodlust is spilling over into his days where he's also a high powered stock broker for his father's company, is one that is told with brilliant skill and cutting satire. Mary Harron's handling of Bret Easton Ellis' book – which happens to be one of my favourite of all time – is sublime, turning what was an ridiculously controversial, un-linear, and sprawling narrative into a cinematic story. The overly violent bits from the book (which would probably result in the film getting banned) are left out completely along with the irrelevant subplots, and what's left is the essential moments that make up Ellis' character study. Christian Bale's performance as Bateman is sublime – verging between the utterly serious and the utterly ridiculous with great skill. He's backed up by a whole plethora of great supporting actors, including Reese Witherspoon, Willem Dafoe, Justin Theroux, Jared Leto, and Chloe Sevigny, but none of them make quite the impact that Bale does as the lead. A fine character study, a biting satire on consumerism, conformity, and the yuppie revolution, or a tense thriller – whichever way you look at "American Psycho”, it remains a brilliantly made and expertly portrayed film. 5/5.

Zoolander (2001, Ben Stiller)
Another film that would have featured highly (too highly, some might say), on my top 100 films of the noughties, Zoolander is a comedy about male models. The titular character, played by director/co-writer Stiller, wants to get out of the business and help underprivileged kids, but he's pulled back in by mogul Mugatu (Will Ferrell) and an international fashion conspiracy to exploit cheap labour and kill the Malaysian Prime Minister. I'm not going to talk about the satirical side of it past this sentence, because although it has a lot to say about the fashion industry, deceptive appearances, and exploitation of cheap labour, the best thing about "Zoolander” is how excruciatingly funny it is. Stiller has created a film that is both clever and stupid, a paradox that works to great effect. The jokes come thick and fast, and the high majority of them do manage to stick. Most of the comedy stems from Zoolander's stupidity, including the ridiculous amount of one-liners and running gags, but there's also a few 'high brow' jokes thrown in just for the fun of it (and to prove how film literate Stiller is), like the excellent '2001: A Space Odyssey' spoof. It's visually astounding, too, with the pseudo-modernistic fashion (coupled with the childish look of the models' houses which reflects the humour well) and use of colour complementing the film's playful and free-wheeling nature. Owen Wilson is on top form, and this may be the best Ferrell performance to date (he's watchable!), but the true star is Stiller, who has never been better and could never hope to be. 4/5.
 
Les Doulos (1962, Jean-Pierre Melville)
"Les Doulos" is the first Jean-Pierre Melville film I've seen, and it didn't disappoint. It's the story of two crooks, one honourable and the other with a less than clean reputation, played by the sublime Jean-Paul Belmondo and Serge Reggliani, and the fallout of a job they pull which goes sour quickly. The key to the film's success is the dynamic set up between the two characters. Although they're only on screen together for very little of the film's slender run time, when they are they set up a relationship that consumes the whole film. Maurice Faugel (Reggliani) trusts Silien (Belmondo) unconditionally, despite the better judgement of many of the people around him, and it's nail-biting as the complex, downbeat plot unravels as to whether Silien has actually been a faithful friend or whether he's dropped Faugel in the deep end. There's also an exploration of the theme of brotherhood, and whether honour amongst themes can actually exist, with some killer silent interludes thrown in for good measure. 4/5.
 
The March of the Penguins (2005, Luc Jacquet)
Jacquet's "March of the Penguins" is the story of the titular Antarctic creatures who make their anual migration to breed, look after the egg, and then the baby that subsequently hatches from it. It's a documentary, yes, but it's approached as a cinematic drama with a conventional, linear storyline. It may not have characters (although the foreign versions of this film did dub the penguins with actors so that it would be a more accessible documentary, and it was basically remade as the all-singing, all-dancing Hugh Jakman animation "Happy Feet" which obviously did have characters), but it remains utterly engrossing despite that. It pulls you in from the get go, and the nameless Emporers have a nack of making you care without us having to decipher one of the things from the next. The only problem is the music, which verges on cabaret on more than several occasions, but for the most part, "the March of the Penguins" is a thoroughly engrossing film - sometimes witty, sometimes tragic, but always interesting. Awesomely unneeded penguin fact that I learned from a friend at uni; the word penguin comes from the welsh words 'pen' and 'gwyn', which translate to 'head' and 'white' respectively. Etymology ftw. 4/5

The Killer (1989, John Woo)
Ah Jong (Chow Yun Fat) is an efficient assassin who falls for Jenny (Sally Yeh), a girl that he nearly blinded on his last job. She needs a cornea transplant if she's ever to see again, which Jong plans to pay for with the money from his last ever job. However, he has Inspector Li Ying (Danny Lee) on his tale as well as half the Hong Kong police force. This could really have gone either way, because the Killer has bits that I loved and bits that I hated, so I'll quickly run through both sets of points, beginning with the negatives. It's awfully cheesy at times, and we actually started to watch it - accidentally -in its dubbed glory, which was hilarious and painstakingly cringe worthy at the same time. The music also doesn't help, and it's often annoyingly 80s and annoyingly Japanese, which doesn't complement the images on screen. At all. The subtitling isn't great, either, but someone on the HOF thread braced me for that. I understand that Cantonese is a very difficult language to translate, but it doesn't really help my enjoyment when the dialogue - intentional or not - is so corny and horribly put across that I find myself embarrassed to be watching it. But there's also good points. The violence is brilliantly handled, with a stark visual style about it that - although sometimes over the top - is often fantastically portrayed with flare, style, and uniqueness. There's also some genuine emotion in there, with the climactic moment where Jenny and Jong 'miss each other' (I don't want to be too vivid with description and spoil the film) being utterly tragic and heartbreaking. The study of brotherhood is great, the performances are beautifully crafted, and it's visually perfect, but the negatives outlined before can't help but drag it down. 3/5.

The Shawshank Redemption (1994, Frank Darabont)
Hugely unpopular opinion; I've kind of gone off 'the Shawshank Redemption', a film I used to think was the best thing since sliced bread. Please, don't think of this as an attempt to be high brow, because if you look at the top of this post you'll see 'Zoolander', which could possibly be as low brow as you could hope to get. I still enjoyed it, and I think it's a fine dramatic piece of filmmaking with two astoundingly good performances from Tim Robbins and – in particular – Morgan Freeman. The set deco of the prison is great, and it's as emotive as it has ever been, but I can no longer think of it as the deep, psychologically affecting behemoth of filmmaking that I used to. There's no real depth here, and although that doesn't exactly make it a bad film, I can't bring myself to give it five or even four stars like I used to. Although the characters – even Red and Andy – are pleasant enough, there's no denying that they are two dimensional, and there's no progression whatsoever. The support is lumped into two stereotypical categories; hardnosed guards who just want to knock lumps out of the prisoners, and the lovable rogues who live behind the bars. It's also over long, with a hell of a lot of filler and unnecessary subplots, and the one thing that I could have loved about it was the undecided nature of Andy's innocence, and even that's lost in favour of clarity and un-ambiguity (is that a word?) for the mass public. 3/5.

Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery (1997, Jay Roach)
Yes, it spawned a lesser sequel and an absolutely awful threequel, but there's no denying that "International Man of Mystery" - the first in Jay Roach's trilogy of Brit Spy Spoofs starring Mike Myers as the titular agent - is an excruciatingly funny film. Starting out at break neck speed and never really letting up, "Austin Powers I" lives and dies on the success of its high gag count, and - for the most part - it manages to get away with it. The best stretch is the first hour, which has moments of absolute genius (the best line; Dr Evil's description of his father, "he would make bold, sweeping claims like that he invented the question mark"). The last twenty five minutes (it's short, which obviously works to its advantage) are patchy at best, and as the mayhem begins to escalate I'm not sure if Roach is entirely sure of himself. The jokes dry up, and all that's left seems childish and almost dull, leading to you question whether the first hour is actually as good as you remember it. But every rewatch re-affirms the fact that it is. 3/5.
 
Meet the Parents (2000, Jay Roach)
I (against my better judgement) accidentally stumbled into a Jay Roach double bill when my family put "Meet the Parents" on soon after "Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery", and it's obviously more of exactly the same. Greg "Gaylord" Focker (Ben Stiller) is about to propose to his girlfriend (Teri Polo), when she tells him that her dad, Jack Byrnes (Robert de Niro), is a stickler for tradition and would be annoyed if he wasn't asked for permission. Cue a weekend of prat falls and ridiculous escalating embarrassment. For what it is, it's good, and it has some moments that have become almost iconic nowadays (the fire in the yard, the lie detector test, the water volleyball incident). The performances are all okay, with De Niro doing some fine self parody and Stiller remaining witty throughout in an angry Woody Allen style role. I enjoyed it, but hardly dwelt upon it for long after the credits rolled. 2/5.

The Cooler
(2003, Wayne Kramer)
Bernie (William H Macy) is a cooler – someone who works in a casino to turn winners into losers just by their presence. That is until he meets Natalie (Maria Bello), who he falls in love with and also happens to turn his luck, much to the despair of casino owner Shelly Kaplow (Alec Baldwin). The very nature of the Empire Hall of Fame makes every film a worthy nomination, but I can honestly say that I'll never watch "the Cooler” again. Frankly, I didn't enjoy it very much at all. There were bits that I liked, sure, in particular the very presence of Alec Baldwin. His performance is excellent, and the whole subplot surrounding him is riveting as well. He's losing everything he thought he had as new, Disney-esque casinos taking over from the old school gambling haunts that he has helped build from the ground up. He's a hard man, but he's driven to that violent nature by the people surrounding him, all – inadvertently or on purpose – chipping away from his dream of restoring Vegas to what it once was. Apart from Baldwin, there was nothing I liked very much. The themes of luck and chance aren't very well done at all, and rather than asking whether luck exists, he answers the question for us. Some of the moments when Bernie's luck changes – most notably the milk constantly running out and the horribly handled ending – are cheesy and sometimes even worth a cringe. It gains marks for Baldwin, but that's about it.
2/5.

Brimstone and Treacle
(1982, Richard Loncraine)
Sting plays Martin Taylor, a troubled young man who pries on the welcoming nature of his fellow beings. When he's taken in by a family consisting of wary Dad Tom Bates (Denholm Elliot), his welcoming wife Norma (Joan Plowright), and their bedridden daughter Patricia (Suzanna Hamilton), his effect on the family ranges between that of a miracle worker and that of a demon. I thought that "Brimstone and Treacle” was watchable, and was easily as sinister as it promised to be, but it all seemed rather shallow and pointless. It may just have leaped over my head altogether, but I couldn't find any real moral message besides the obvious; don't talk to strangers and never let them into your house when you've got a semi-catatonic daughter on display. It was troubling, yes, and it did leave you with lots of questions to ponder, like whether Sting's Taylor actually healed the girl or whether that happened by chance, and what on earth the very end is about, but there's nothing actually worth pondering. None of it matters. Sting performs well, and even if he does verge on amateur dramatics every now and again, one of his classier co-actors is always there to rein him in, but Potter's heavy-handed irony coupled with his caricature characters gets quite tiring. 2/5.


< Message edited by Piles -- 3/6/2009 11:28:29 AM >


_____________________________

Top 100 Moz Songs / Top 100 Films

(in reply to Gimli The Dwarf)
Post #: 2834
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 3/6/2009 11:36:48 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 78115
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo

quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army

196. Aguirre, der Zorn Gottes (Aguirre, Wrath of God) (1972, Herzog) - 2.5/5
How interesting that it's the two-and-a-half-hour Herzog that I find fascinating and gripping, and the ninety-minute one that I find dull, uninteresting, and generally disappointing. The film looks very good, and it's clear Herzog sunk a lot of work into this, but one can't help but feel Herzog and his editors were drunk, on drugs, or just didn't care, because it's one of the most horribly edited and paced films I've ever seen. Compounding the awkward pacing issues is the fact that the cast clearly can't improvise, as reactions are slow and there are shitloads of awkward silences where you get the feeling all of the actors are trying desperately to find something to say. The performances are decent despite this clear lack of improvisational ability, though they aren't a patch on the performances in Fitzcarraldo, and the characters they're given are often shallow and underdeveloped, making matters worse. It doesn't help that the film is completely aimless plot-wise and devoid of any kind of interesting happenings - to echo a certain Mr. Inferno's criticisms of Kieslowski a while back, it feels like he's just plotted points of action and shot everything that happens in between those points. Add to that some of the worst on-screen deaths I've ever seen in my life, and this film, which I've waited so long to see and have been so excited to see for some time, becomes one of my biggest disappointments this year, right up there with The Red Desert, Dont Look Back, Two or Three Things I Know About Her, Until the End of the World and Dogma. 




I've just seen this now and I pretty much agree with what you said, except I'd knock off half a mark and would't praise the acting, especially Kinski who is rapidly becoming by German Brando. I did the see subtitled version but I can't imagine how dubbed would make it worse, and I can only hope that Fitzcarraldo is better.







_____________________________

So, sir, we let him have it right up! And I have to report, sir, he did not like it, sir.

Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

(in reply to Pigeon Army)
Post #: 2835
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 3/6/2009 11:43:27 AM   
Deviation


Posts: 27284
Joined: 2/6/2006
From: Enemies of Film HQ
quote:

ORIGINAL: Gimli The Dwarf


quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army

196. Aguirre, der Zorn Gottes (Aguirre, Wrath of God) (1972, Herzog) - 2.5/5
How interesting that it's the two-and-a-half-hour Herzog that I find fascinating and gripping, and the ninety-minute one that I find dull, uninteresting, and generally disappointing. The film looks very good, and it's clear Herzog sunk a lot of work into this, but one can't help but feel Herzog and his editors were drunk, on drugs, or just didn't care, because it's one of the most horribly edited and paced films I've ever seen. Compounding the awkward pacing issues is the fact that the cast clearly can't improvise, as reactions are slow and there are shitloads of awkward silences where you get the feeling all of the actors are trying desperately to find something to say. The performances are decent despite this clear lack of improvisational ability, though they aren't a patch on the performances in Fitzcarraldo, and the characters they're given are often shallow and underdeveloped, making matters worse. It doesn't help that the film is completely aimless plot-wise and devoid of any kind of interesting happenings - to echo a certain Mr. Inferno's criticisms of Kieslowski a while back, it feels like he's just plotted points of action and shot everything that happens in between those points. Add to that some of the worst on-screen deaths I've ever seen in my life, and this film, which I've waited so long to see and have been so excited to see for some time, becomes one of my biggest disappointments this year, right up there with The Red Desert, Dont Look Back, Two or Three Things I Know About Her, Until the End of the World and Dogma. 




I've just seen this now and I pretty much agree with what you said, except I'd knock off half a mark and would't praise the acting, especially Kinski who is rapidly becoming by German Brando. I did the see subtitled version but I can't imagine how dubbed would make it worse, and I can only hope that Fitzcarraldo is better.








Listen, you like Angels and Demons, we are not listening to you.


Anyway. Piles is still alive! And he likes American Psycho YAY!

_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Dpp1978
There are certainly times where calling a person a cunt is not only reasonable, it is a gross understatement.

quote:


ORIGINAL: elab49
I really wish I could go down to see Privates

(in reply to Gimli The Dwarf)
Post #: 2836
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 3/6/2009 11:46:27 AM   
MOTH

 

Posts: 3479
Joined: 3/10/2005
From: Sittin' on the dock of the bay
i'm another of the philistines who doesn't think much of Aguirre, Wrath of God (except the raft with the monkeys - that was cool), but Fitzcarraldo is a very fine film - still mad, but in a good way - which sits near the top of my list for this year.

_____________________________

I've only gone and set up a blog! This week I've been mostly reviewing The Lego Movie and Wadjda. Click: The Fast Picture Show

(in reply to Gimli The Dwarf)
Post #: 2837
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 3/6/2009 11:48:36 AM   
Deviation


Posts: 27284
Joined: 2/6/2006
From: Enemies of Film HQ
You philistines!!!!!!!

_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Dpp1978
There are certainly times where calling a person a cunt is not only reasonable, it is a gross understatement.

quote:


ORIGINAL: elab49
I really wish I could go down to see Privates

(in reply to MOTH)
Post #: 2838
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 3/6/2009 11:54:53 AM   
jamesbondguy


Posts: 6238
Joined: 6/1/2007
From: The Village Green
quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rinc

Are people still talking about Godard?


Apart from the detour when James admitted to a Stallone admiration.


Don't put it like that.

quote:


Nope, my local arthouse was showing it. I did see Breathless at the BFI Southbank last month though while I was swinging through London for Bob Dylan (JBG's ideal weekend?)


I can't think of many better. Pierrot is showing at my local arthouse cinema next month. As well as 400 Blows. Hooray!

_____________________________

Just like Geoffrey Ingram.

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 2839
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 3/6/2009 12:27:36 PM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 78115
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo
quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation
Listen, you like Angels and Demons, we are not listening to you.



Free will's great, isn't it?


June list here!



1. The Long Day Closes (1st view, 1992, Terence Davies) - 5/5*
2. Man On Fire (1st view, 2008, James Marsh) - 4/5*
3. Hell In The Pacific (2nd view, 1968, John Boorman) - 4/5
4. The Indian Runner (1st view, 1991, Sean Penn) - 4/5*
5. Man Of A Thousand Faces (1st view, 1957, Joseph Pevney) - 4/5*
6. Fitzcarraldo (1st view, 1982, Werner Herzog) - 4/5*
7. The Boy In The Striped Pyjamas (1st view, 2008, Mark Herman) - 4/5*
8. Terminator Salvation (1st view, 2009, McG) - 4/5*
9. Seven Pounds (1st view, 2008, Gabriele Muccino) - 4/5*
10. The Killing (1st view, 1955, Stanley Kubrick) - 4/5*

11. The War Bride (1st view, 2001, Lyndon Chubbuck) - 4/5*
12. The Victors (1st view, 1963, Carl Foreman) - 3/5*
13. Yanks (1st view, 1979, John Schlesinger) - 3/5*
14. Night At The Museum (2nd view, 2006, Shawn Levy) - 3/5
15. The Last Temptation Of Christ (1st view, 1988, Martin Scorcese) - 3/5*
16. Hard Luck (1st viewm 2006, Mario Van Peebles) - 3/5*
17. Starship Troopers (2nd view, 1997, Paul Verhoeven) - 3/5
18. On Her Majesty's Secret Service (2nd view, 1969, Peter R. Hunt) - 3/5
19. Scarface (1st view, 1932, Howard Hawks) - 3/5*
20. Journey To the Center Of The Earth (1st view, 2008, Eric Brevig) - 3/5*

21. Twilight (1st view, 2008, Catherine Hardwicke) - 3/5*
22. La Belle et la Bęte (1st view, 1946, Jean Cocteau) - 3/5*
23. Transformers: Revenge Of The Fallen (2009, Michael Bay) - 3/5*
24. Top Gun (2nd view, 1986, Tony Scott) - 3/5
25. Sniper 2 (1st view, 2002, Craig R. Baxley)- 3/5*
26. Ignition (1st view, 2001, Yves Simoneau) - 3/5*
27. Cursed (1st view, 2005, Wes Craven) - 2/5*
28. Aguirre, Wrath Of God/Aguirre, der Zorn Gottes (1st view, 1972, Wener Herzog) - 2/5*




20. Black Narcissus (1st view, `947, Michael Powell/Emeric Pressburger) - 4/5*
I didn’t love this as much as it seems that I should, but it’s still an excellent film.

65. Becket (1st view, 1964, Peter Glenville) - 4/5*
Peter O’Toole and Richard Burton star in this historical epic. Both are worth watching, and the oscar winning screenplay is a treat.

74. The War Bride (1st view, 2001, Lyndon Chubbuck) - 4/5*
Wartime drama that sees Anna Friel get shipped off to Canada to live with the family of her military husband. Surprisingly enjoyable.

141. Scarface (1st view, 1932, Howard Hawks) - 3/5*
My Radio Times film guide calls this the best gangster film ever made. I don’t think it comes close, and there are ertainlu many others from the era I prefer. My least favourite Howard Hawks film, but a whole lot better than the 80s version.

197. Aguirre, Wrath Of God/Aguirre, der Zorn Gottes (1st view, 1972, Wener Herzog) - 2/5*
The second film I’ve seen from Werner Herzog after Grizzly Man, and the second starring Klaus Kinski after the awful jack The Ripper. The use of real locations Amazonian locations does look impressive, but it ones of the most tiresome and dreary films I’ve seen in a long time, and Kinski seems to Germany’s answer to Marlon Brando; vastly overrated.







< Message edited by Gimli The Dwarf -- 25/6/2009 6:38:40 AM >


_____________________________

So, sir, we let him have it right up! And I have to report, sir, he did not like it, sir.

Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

(in reply to jamesbondguy)
Post #: 2840
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 3/6/2009 12:31:18 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54673
Joined: 1/10/2005
quote:

ORIGINAL: Gimli The Dwarf

141. Scarface (1st view, 1932, Howard Hawks) - 3/5*
My Radio Times film guide calls this the best gangster film ever made. I don't think it comes close, and there are ertainlu many others from the era I prefer. My least favourite Howard Hawks film, but a whole lot better than the 80s version.


That would be the important part

_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to Gimli The Dwarf)
Post #: 2841
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 3/6/2009 12:41:16 PM   
jamesbondguy


Posts: 6238
Joined: 6/1/2007
From: The Village Green
I don't think I've updated my list in ages....

Les Demoiselles de Rochefort (1967)
Director: Jacques Demy
The first time I watched Demy’s film I was lost for words- and for a fixed opinion. To be honest, I still am now. It’s a simpler work than Umbrellas of Cherbourg, the film before and still his most famous, but yet it somehow manages to become an even more overwhelming work- both aesthetically and emotionally. Needless to say, it’s an indefinable work- it goes like a rocket, and yet not much really happens. The pacing is both slow and fast at the same time, and Demy’s incredible eye for and skill with cinematic movement and editing, combined with Legrand’s plunging, swift music, creates a work that is explosive and always on the point of exploding into a mess of colour, light and sound. It rests on the actors to ground it- but since Deneuve, Dorleac, Gene Kelly, Perrin and everyone else seems to be as carried away as Demy the film is nothing more than a hyper-musical of sorts, where emotion is perhaps more exuberantly expressed than in any other film, and where the whole thing is like the fever dream of a fan of French and Musical cinema. Thus, we get songs about love, existential dilemmas of sorts and axe murders- all done in the traditional Demy-Legrand way, a triumph of feeling, wit, movement and colour which is like a new drug- it may well make you rot, but it’s an incredible high- but afterwards you wonder if it really happened.
So I think it’s a more difficult film than Umbrellas of Cherbourg and Lola, despite the fact it may immediately appear more simple and easier. It doesn’t have much of an epic scope- the whole film takes place in just a few locations with a few characters who’s lives criss-cross in the search for love. But then since life for most takes place in a limited number of spaces, and the two sisters long to escape their hum-drum existence, this makes sense. But yet it’s no ordinary musical- Demy’s lyrics are agile, and incredibly diverse- they take in references to abstract art theory (the young sailor’s an artist you see) and Truffaut films, there’s a song about an axe-murder, and on multiple occasions one of the characters walks down the street through a musical routine which is taking place around them on the edges of the screen and in which they occasionally participate.
Jonathan Rosenbaum (I was reluctant to quote him again in case people think I have an obsession with him, but since Demoiselles is his favourite musical his review has some good quotes) said “This curious mix produces powerful, deeply-felt emotions- an exuberance combined with a sense of absurdity shot throughout with an almost constant sense of loss, yearning, tragedy.” I see no reason to argue with this quote- in fact, it touches the exact reason why the film is so powerful- because Demy is the cinema’s greatest poet of yearning. We have poets of love and of loneliness, of course, but Demy is able to create something extraordinary out of desperate waiting and melancholy. This combined with the joy of Legrand’s song and the achieved and failed connections so vital to the film “leaves a unique manic-depressive state, a kind of poetic fugue in which boundless despair and exuberant optimism coexist.”
Each character is looking for someone and something throughout the film, but by far the most touching storyline is that of the sailor, Maxence, who longs after the feminine ideal he painted- and this storyline allows for maybe the most powerful moment in any of Demy’s storyline, when Maxence and Deneuve (whom looks just like the woman in the painting) miss meeting each other by a few seconds in the café. Of course, there’s a happy ending, but it’s still somewhat ambiguous- we never see the couple meet, but rather we see them enter the same lorry on it’s way to Paris. Demy, as usual, is far too smart to tie life and story up in a neat little bow, preferring instead the effects of the imagination. Indeed, Demy is not really making escapist films- he prefers instead to make films that enhance reality, and recognise it’s strength and power are more moving than any contrived, fictional situation. One more quote to end on:
“A poetic realist as well as a dreamer, Demy confused some audiences and critics throughout his career, much as his mentor Tati did, by keeping a firmer grip on the realities he was filming than many were prepared to see at the time. For viewers trained to regard fantasy as an alternative to reality rather than part of the reality of consciousness, Demy's mixture is bound to seem jarring--though it may also jar one into perceiving a richer reality than most entertainments acknowledge.”

Diner
Decent-enough stuff from a director who moved on to much lesser stuff. The friendships between the characters is captured well, and the performances are good, which is surprise considering a couple of the names in the list. Nothing special, a little strained at times, but pleasant. Good music, too. Any film which references both Eddie Cochran and Charlie Parker gets my thumbs-up.

Duel
Duel is basically the Spielberg film for people who don’t do Spielberg films. As such, I think it’s maybe his best, and a sign that he squandered some genuine talent. It’s a somewhat contrived set-up, but Spielberg and Matheson manage to milk it for all it’s work, stretching the tension perhaps a little too far, as the ending is a disappointment, revolving around a trick so simple that one can hardly believe the seemingly-intelligent truck driver of before fell for it. But whatever, for it’s lead’s anxiety and despair is well-done and convincing, the tension effective, and the colour superb. It could have done with a little bit of personality, already displaying typical Spielbergian gloss, but there’s enough exemplary horror-film-made-for-TV rawness to get it through, and it shows that Spielberg actually does have balls, and he isn’t always content simply to be patronising or childish. A good film.

Manos: The Hands of Fate
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7GLkJFLkHS8
Watch it. ‘Nuff said.

I haven't updated this list in a month or so, and I've forgotten half of the stuff I've seen, I think, but I'll try my best:

Histoire(s) Du Cinema (1988-1998, Jean-Luc Godard)
L'Atalante (1934, Jean Vigo)
Shoot the Pianist (1960, Truffaut)
Une Partie Campagne (1936, Jean Renoir)
The Umbrellas of Cherbourg (1964, Demy)
The Wind Will Carry Us (1999, Abbas Kiarostami)
Une Femme est Une Femme (1961, Jean-Luc Godard)
The Singing Detective (1986, Aimel)
Dans Paris (2005, Honore)
The Roaring Twenties (1939, Walsh)
Sans Soleil (1982, Marker)
Les Demoiselles de Rochefort (1967, Demy)
Goodbye, Dragon Inn (Tsai Ming-Liang, 2003)
Chat Perches (2004, Marker)
Sweet Sixteen (Loach)

Paris Nous Appartient (1961, Rivette)
Radio On (1979, Petit)

The Birds (1963, Hitchcock)
Tout Va Bien (197, Godard, Gorin)

Happy-Go-Lucky (2008, Leigh)
Tickets (Olmi, Kiarostami, Loach)

The Filth and The Fury (2003, Temple)
Joy Division (Gee, 2007)
My Name is Joe (Loach, 2003)
Duel (1971, Spielberg)
Riff-Raff (Loach)
Love Meetings (Pasolini, 1965)
Raining Stones (Loach, 1993)
Somers Town (2007, Meadows)
This is England (2006, Meadows)
The Girl Who Lept Through Time (2006)
Election (1999, Payne)
Diner (Levinson, 1982)
High Hopes (Leigh)
Saturday Night and Sunday Morning (Reisz, 1960)
Barton Fink (1991, Coen)
Cape Fear (Scorsese)
Slumdog Millionaire (2008, Boyle)
Carrie (1976, De Palma)
King of Kong (2007)
Twilight Zone: The Movie (Spielberg, Landis, Dante, Miller)
Burn After Reading (2007, Coen)
Star Trek (2009)

Monsters Vs Aliens (Who Cares?, 2009)
W (2008, Stone)

Shorts:
Suzanne's Career (1963, Rohmer)
La Ricotta (1963, Pasolini)
Blue Jeans (Jacques Rozier, 1958)
Ici et Ailleurs (1974, Godard)
Antoine et Colette (1962, Truffaut)
Meetin' WA (Godard, 1986)
Bread And Ally/Breaktime (1970-72, Kiarostami)

Outside of the realms of criticism: Manos The Hands of Fate

_____________________________

Just like Geoffrey Ingram.

(in reply to Gimli The Dwarf)
Post #: 2842
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 3/6/2009 12:45:33 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54673
Joined: 1/10/2005
Barefoot Contessa (Mankiewicz, 1954)

Not a great film that still has some interesting bits relating to the film industry and a very disturbed millionnaire producer with mummy issues. Bogart and O'Brien are the reasons to watch along with a wonderfully bitchy turn from Marius Goring in a tale very much of two halves. Gardner, whose only reasonably acceptable performance was in Seven Days in May, is as stiff an unconvincing as usual as the ingenue, a role that she doesn't look young enough for anymore. Mankiewicz's messes with her character badly though - she is initially presented as a very aware young woman who is wise to the showbiz jungle and then second half is even called pretty stupid in a pointless 'cinderella' story featuring 2 lousy actors, Brazzi and Cortese. Best bit is the start. Realising he can't sell the audience on her apparent stunning beauty and amazing affect on men if he actually shows her dancing, Mankiewicz focusses on the audience in the taverna - the sheer animal lust for the provider of the floorshow coming through convincingly. Still - if it hadn't been for my bum knee I'd have been able to reach the control to turn over.

Cavallette (Grasshoppers) (Bozzetto, 1980)

Efficient retelling of history from evolution to now focussing on religion, war, and civilisations fall and civilisations rise. The only anachronism now is the implication the earth will still be there to paper over till the restart.

_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 2843
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 3/6/2009 12:48:34 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54673
Joined: 1/10/2005
quote:

ORIGINAL: jamesbondguy

director who moved on to much lesser stuff.


In direction I'd still cite eg Tin Men - but his backing and work on Oz and Homicide knock all his film work out on the street.

_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to jamesbondguy)
Post #: 2844
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 3/6/2009 12:54:22 PM   
Ste7enForever


Posts: 323
Joined: 25/8/2008
From: Holding up a lampost....
Mystery Science Theatre 3000 do a great episode ripping into Manos: Hands of Fate.

_____________________________

www.facebook.com/deadevent - A zombie/wrestling movie what I (and loads infinitely more talented people) made...

http://www.loonybinforum.com/forum/index.php - A fun wrestling/ everything forum. Always looking for new members!

(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 2845
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 3/6/2009 1:01:22 PM   
jamesbondguy


Posts: 6238
Joined: 6/1/2007
From: The Village Green
quote:

ORIGINAL: Ste7enForever

Mystery Science Theatre 3000 do a great episode ripping into Manos: Hands of Fate.


Yeah, that's my favourite episode of that show. That or Hobgoblins (or Pumaman). But I was lucky enough to see it without the MST3K commentary, and it somehow manages to become even funnier. I genuinely don't think I've laughed at a film so much in a long time.

_____________________________

Just like Geoffrey Ingram.

(in reply to Ste7enForever)
Post #: 2846
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 3/6/2009 1:26:08 PM   
Pigeon Army


Posts: 14612
Joined: 29/1/2006
From: Pixar HQ, George Lucas' Office.
First - thank you to Dantes for reposting the link to EP's Top 15. I just had a good hour rereading that. Much hilarity was to be had.

quote:

ORIGINAL: Piles

Meet the Parents (2000, Jay Roach)
I (against my better judgement) accidentally stumbled into a Jay Roach double bill when my family put "Meet the Parents" on soon after "Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery", and it's obviously more of exactly the same. Greg "Gaylord" Focker (Ben Stiller) is about to propose to his girlfriend (Teri Polo), when she tells him that her dad, Jack Byrnes (Robert de Niro), is a stickler for tradition and would be annoyed if he wasn't asked for permission. Cue a weekend of prat falls and ridiculous escalating embarrassment. For what it is, it's good, and it has some moments that have become almost iconic nowadays (the fire in the yard, the lie detector test, the water volleyball incident). The performances are all okay, with De Niro doing some fine self parody and Stiller remaining witty throughout in an angry Woody Allen style role. I enjoyed it, but hardly dwelt upon it for long after the credits rolled. 2/5.



Even though you didn't appear to like it, those three words in bold make me feel sick to even look at your avatar.

quote:

ORIGINAL: jamesbondguy

quote:

ORIGINAL: Ste7enForever

Mystery Science Theatre 3000 do a great episode ripping into Manos: Hands of Fate.


Yeah, that's my favourite episode of that show. That or Hobgoblins (or Pumaman). But I was lucky enough to see it without the MST3K commentary, and it somehow manages to become even funnier. I genuinely don't think I've laughed at a film so much in a long time.


I will never forgive for duping me into watching Hobgoblins, jbg. Never. Manos is amazingly, hilariously bad, though. How long was that couple making out for?


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rinc
She's supposed to be 13! I'd want her to be very attractive though


quote:

ORIGINAL: MonsterCat
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army
Stop being mean to Deviation

No.

(in reply to Piles)
Post #: 2847
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 3/6/2009 2:08:31 PM   
Pigeon Army


Posts: 14612
Joined: 29/1/2006
From: Pixar HQ, George Lucas' Office.
146. Mr. Brooks (2007, A. Evans) - 3.5/5
A surprisingly decent serial killer film, with Kevin Costner and William Hurt's performances, and some stylish direction, elevating it above the DTV hell it was probably going to be doomed to if Costner hadn't decided to produce it. The film's full of intriguing twists and turns, and despite some groan-worthy performances (Dane Cook isn't unbearable, but he seems like he's trying to be a serious actor, rather than the character; and as much as I have a crush on Danielle Panabaker, she's just not very good here) and some clunky scenes (the hallway shoot-out between Demi Moore's character and Thornton Meeks, the 'dream' finale, which isn't as bad as it sounds but is still a clunky way to end the film), it still manages to be interesting and relatively gripping. Worth a watch, if only for Costner showing why he doesn't deserve the flak he gets. Also, Michelle Dessler from 24 is in it! Yay!

150. Bringing Out the Dead (1999, Scorsese) - 3.5/5
Bringing Out the Dead has a lot going for it. It has some fantastic performances - Cage is good here, and Ving Rhames, Tom Sizemore (where's he gone?), John Goodman and Cliff Curtis are all excellent, Rhames and Goodman especially. It's also very stylish, with lots of fantastic, stunning cinematography (the scenes when Cage is riding with Sizemore are amazing to look at, if nothing else). It's also very funny. However, it lacks any kind of emotional clout or depth, Patricia Arquette is dull (which seems to be her 'thing'), there's an overuse of that lighting technique that makes white glow and everyone look fucking angelic, and the soundtrack, while occasionally good, is overloaded with pop and rock tracks being played over each other and generally doing nothing good for the film. It should be better than it is, but while it's funny and a bit hopeful, it's generally inconsequential. The second worst Scorsese feature film I've seen (after the always-slipping-in-my-estimation Departed).


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rinc
She's supposed to be 13! I'd want her to be very attractive though


quote:

ORIGINAL: MonsterCat
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army
Stop being mean to Deviation

No.

(in reply to Pigeon Army)
Post #: 2848
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 3/6/2009 2:10:27 PM   
TheManWithNoShame


Posts: 6767
Joined: 1/8/2006
Is Manos really as bad as Troll 2? Has anyone seen both of them to compare?

_____________________________

sorry jbg :( i promise to stop being such a silly boy.

(in reply to Pigeon Army)
Post #: 2849
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 3/6/2009 2:30:14 PM   
MOTH

 

Posts: 3479
Joined: 3/10/2005
From: Sittin' on the dock of the bay
At this moment Tom Sizemore is either in jail, drunk, high, smuggling drugs or assaulting somebody.
Probably all of the above - the man simply hasn't got time for acting.

_____________________________

I've only gone and set up a blog! This week I've been mostly reviewing The Lego Movie and Wadjda. Click: The Fast Picture Show

(in reply to Pigeon Army)
Post #: 2850
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