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RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 14/3/2009 11:23:49 AM   
Jasiri


Posts: 2496
Joined: 23/10/2005
quote:

ORIGINAL: chris_scott01

quote:

ORIGINAL: Jasiri

On a similar note Chris have you seen Hou Hsiao-hsien's Cafe Lumiere ? Commissioned by Shochiku to mark the centenary of Ozu's birth.



I haven't seen it, I'd really like to get into some Korean films, I've only seen a couple.  I haven't seen Tokyo-Ga either. Film takes up so much time   I take it Cafe Lumiere is worth a look?


HHH is from Taiwan but this one was made in Japan with a Japanese cast including Tadanobu Asano.I think the idea was to make a film that tries to capture something of the feeling of an Ozu film,there are a lot of trains but thankfully it doesn't try to replicate his style.I really liked it but then I think HHH is a great director and haven't seen anything from him I haven't liked,it's not among his best but certainly worth a rent.

(in reply to chris_scott01)
Post #: 1171
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 14/3/2009 12:10:16 PM   
Pigeon Army


Posts: 14612
Joined: 29/1/2006
From: Pixar HQ, George Lucas' Office.
16. Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975, Gilliam & Jones) - 4.5/5*****
Given the choice of The Host, The Prestige, Hot Fuzz and this, my friends chose this to watch tonight. And so another three people are brought into the Python fold. Still as hilarious as ever, and I'm still picking up on new jokes six viewings in (this time - among others, the woman who gets "Ni'd" by Arthur and Bedevere beating the cats against the wall during the "Bring out your dead!" scene, and I finally got the joke behind the names of the girls at Castle Anthrax). A timeless piece of comedy genius.

111. Mamma Mia! (2008, Lloyd) - 3/5
Really, I brought this on myself. One of the aforementioned friends has it on DVD, and I asked her to put it in the DVD drive to satisfy a morbid desire I had to see this. She did so. I was subsequently left with my head spinning for five minutes after the film ended. It looks very good, yes, and there's some good acting - Amanda Seyfried makes for a likable and ridiculously cute lead, and Dominic Cooper, Julie Walters, Stellan Skarsgard and Colin Firth all offer solid, enjoyable support performances. However, the spectacle of people randomly breaking out into Abba songs, songs by a band I've always found irritatingly twee, is amusing and exacerbating at the same time - Lloyd's direction is occasionally misdirected ('Winner Takes All' is painfully static in its choreography and filming), the singing ranges from good (Seyfried, Streep - who is decent but not without fault - Walters, Cooper) to average (Skarsgard, Firth) to dear-god-what-were-the-casters-thinking (BROSNANBROSNANBROSNAN), and the songs themself are just annoying. Then there's the cookie-cutter dialogue, the lack of characterisation, the grating 'life lessons', the extreme performance of Streep (who goes from completely bland to hyperactive in seconds most of the time), Brosnan, and the general mockability of the film. In fact, one whole point is added to this film's score because it's such a gleefully demented group experience when you and two of your friends aren't afraid to take the roles of Brosnan, Skarsgard and Firth during 'Our Last Summer' and sing along (we had the singalong option playing - turns out, the person in the flat who wasn't watching the film got pissed off with that). As a film, it's not very good; as a group experience, it's demented fun, and surprisingly enjoyable regardless of the shockingness.


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rinc
She's supposed to be 13! I'd want her to be very attractive though


quote:

ORIGINAL: MonsterCat
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army
Stop being mean to Deviation

No.

(in reply to Jasiri)
Post #: 1172
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 14/3/2009 12:30:24 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54624
Joined: 1/10/2005
quote:

ORIGINAL: Jasiri

quote:

ORIGINAL: chris_scott01

quote:

ORIGINAL: Jasiri

On a similar note Chris have you seen Hou Hsiao-hsien's Cafe Lumiere ? Commissioned by Shochiku to mark the centenary of Ozu's birth.



I haven't seen it, I'd really like to get into some Korean films, I've only seen a couple.  I haven't seen Tokyo-Ga either. Film takes up so much time   I take it Cafe Lumiere is worth a look?


HHH is from Taiwan but this one was made in Japan with a Japanese cast including Tadanobu Asano.I think the idea was to make a film that tries to capture something of the feeling of an Ozu film,there are a lot of trains but thankfully it doesn't try to replicate his style.I really liked it but then I think HHH is a great director and haven't seen anything from him I haven't liked,it's not among his best but certainly worth a rent.



I've had this sitting on my Tesco list for ages. Perhaps I should bump it up the priority list? (It doesn't help that it has been on there so long - with some others - that I often have to click the link to remind myself what it is and why it is there!)

_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to Jasiri)
Post #: 1173
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 14/3/2009 4:56:30 PM   
DCMaximo


Posts: 992
Joined: 5/1/2007
From: Nottingham via Aidy Boothroyd's Palace of Wisdom
New entries:

28. Watchmen (2009, Snyder) 8/10
I went into the film having read the first 30 or so pages of the comic, which I feel stood me well (I knew who the characters were and a bit about their personalities, but didn't know how the story would progress). As a director, Zak Snyder had the visual side of the film nailed- everything looked really impressive and the fight scenes were suitably hard-hitting, while the opening credits, complete with Bob Dylan soundtrack, served as a good introductions to the film. Storywise, although I hear that a whole sub-story was cut-out, everything made sense and at no point did I feel that I was missing something important. However, some characters are short-changed in the story department- Matthew Goode tried his best, but we were told very little about his Adrian Veidt except that he was very rich and smart. Likewise, although I thought Patrick Wilson gave the best performance in the film as Dan Dreiberg, we were told very little about why or how he became a crime-fighter. In spite of this, the performances, especially Wilson and Billy Crudup were all good (even Malin Ackerman, who seems to be suffering the worst reviews) and at no point did it drag. I should add though that my housemate, who has read all the book, hated it.

62. Rambo (2008, Stallone) 5/10
On the DVD for Rambo: First Blood Part II, Stallone claims that Rambo is a more complex character than Rocky, a point totally disproven by the film and it's sequel. The fourth in the series doesn't change this, for, while it is very brutal and packed with explosions, Rambo himself is about as deep as a puddle, a far cry from the sympathtic portrayal from the original First Blood. The plot was very basic and there was an uncomfortable sense, especially with the opening shots with genuine footage of atrocities in Burma, that Stallone was exploiting real events to crack out another action film. That said, it was curiously enjoyable in parts and, probably because I was drinking while watching it, the climactic battle scenes were pretty exciting.

71. Johnny Mnemonic (1995, Longo) 3/10
I started watching this a year ago, but fell asleep after half-an-hour. However, I was very much enjoying it at the time. A year later and that has totally changed. Mind-numbingly tedious "cyber-thriller" with Keanu Reeves on all-time worst form (even non-actors Ice-T and Henry Rollins outshine Reeves here) and a ridiculous plot about cyber-couriers, who download important data in their heads. Things marginally improve when Dolph Lundgren turns up as an over-the-top street preacher (how bad is it when Dolph is the best performance in a film?), but when a futuristic thriller has graphics that would look out of date with Roy Walker on Catchphrase, it's always on to a loser.

_____________________________

The Spanish Inquisition of the 'Get Carlton Banks a TV Spin-off' Association

"Carlotta was the kind of town where they spell trouble T-R-U-B-I-L, and if you try to correct them, they kill you"

(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 1174
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 15/3/2009 11:22:44 AM   
Pigeon Army


Posts: 14612
Joined: 29/1/2006
From: Pixar HQ, George Lucas' Office.
Short Films
7. La Jetee (1962, Marker) - 4.5/5
It's pretty obvious about five minutes in how the film is going to end, and it's not exactly the least pretentious work ever devised, but somehow, none of this matters when Marker's twenty-five minute dystopic time-travel slideshow is on screen. The black and white photography, the seamless-but-not-too-seamless editing, the lighting design, the music and the disjointed, G-Man-meets-David-Attenborough voiceover all contribute to the film's overarching sense of unease. The tale it weaves is simultaneously uplifting and depressing, with our hero - who is both self-serving and courageous in his using of the time-travel machine crafted by his captors to connect with a distant memory of what he perceives to be purity - being exploited because he has a poignant memory from his childhood. Also, the images of a bombed-out Paris are very chilling.


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rinc
She's supposed to be 13! I'd want her to be very attractive though


quote:

ORIGINAL: MonsterCat
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army
Stop being mean to Deviation

No.

(in reply to DCMaximo)
Post #: 1175
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 15/3/2009 11:59:28 AM   
jamesbondguy


Posts: 6238
Joined: 6/1/2007
From: The Village Green
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army

not exactly the least pretentious work ever devised, but somehow,



I'm very glad you liked it as much as you did, but oddly enough, I'd argue that it was one of the least pretentious films ever made. But anyway, hurry up and watch Sans Soleil- I watched it again last night, and I really can't pimp that film enough. It's remarkable.

< Message edited by jamesbondguy -- 15/3/2009 12:00:25 PM >


_____________________________

Just like Geoffrey Ingram.

(in reply to Pigeon Army)
Post #: 1176
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 15/3/2009 12:06:57 PM   
Pigeon Army


Posts: 14612
Joined: 29/1/2006
From: Pixar HQ, George Lucas' Office.
quote:

ORIGINAL: jamesbondguy

quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army

not exactly the least pretentious work ever devised, but somehow,



I'm very glad you liked it as much as you did, but oddly enough, I'd argue that it was one of the least pretentious films ever made. But anyway, hurry up and watch Sans Soleil- I watched it again last night, and I really can't pimp that film enough. It's remarkable.


The "museum of his memories" begs to differ. It might be one of the least pretentious films you've ever seen (giving your viewing habits, I would say this is an accurate assessment), but I'd be willing to bet half the films I've watched this year are less pretentious than La Jetee.

When I have a spare 100 minutes sometime in the near future (it'll probably be two months or so away), I'll go up and watch Sans Soleil at the uni, seeing as they have it. Just for you, jbg.

< Message edited by Pigeon Army -- 15/3/2009 12:08:46 PM >


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rinc
She's supposed to be 13! I'd want her to be very attractive though


quote:

ORIGINAL: MonsterCat
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army
Stop being mean to Deviation

No.

(in reply to jamesbondguy)
Post #: 1177
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 15/3/2009 12:37:12 PM   
jamesbondguy


Posts: 6238
Joined: 6/1/2007
From: The Village Green
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army

The "museum of his memories" begs to differ. It might be one of the least pretentious films you've ever seen (giving your viewing habits, I would say this is an accurate assessment), but I'd be willing to bet half the films I've watched this year are less pretentious than La Jetee.


Ugh. The word 'pretentious' is such an awful, catch-all phrase that is used so often to deride anything that attempts anything a little different- not necessairly the definition you're using, but I've genuinely grown to hate the word when it's used to describe anything outside of the accepted intellectual and stylistic limits of the average Hollywood film. If we take the word by this definition:
"expressive of affected, unwarranted, or exaggerated importance, worth, or stature" or ": making usually unjustified or excessive claims (as of value or standing)
than I don't think many of the films I watch are pretentious at all, and certainly not Marker's work. His films are philosophical and poetic, but then so is he himself- and his documentaries make such good use of humour, wit and irony that he's a hugely entertaining commentator. La Jetee is not pretentious- it dissolves the cinema in order to suggest a new way to go with it. In fact, you could see it as saying 'why isn't the cinema done this way?', or, alternatively, 'this is cinema' for what is a film but a succession of images, like La Jetee? Marker's work is not pretentious for he does not suggest that what he is saying is defintive, completley true- in fact, many of his works are musings that are designed to make the audience think in whatever which way they please. That's not pretentious at all, and many great filmmakers do the exact same thing. Also, for example, Histoire(s) Du Cinema is not pretentious for it's an attempt by a person to come to terms with the medium they have dedicated their life too, and an attempt to express a viewpoint to the world. I would say that the films I mainly watch are more worthy of this definition of pretentious, which is rarely used: "making demands on one's skill, ability, or means". But this is no bad thing- it's what many classic novels and other masterpieces of other mediums do. The use of philosophy, poetry, intellectual commentary etc. does not fit into the first definition of pretension, not at all. It's simply a different way. Perhaps the execution could be pretentious, but the act or the idea of itself certainly isn't. I would say that the Oscar-hunting films of the likes of The Reader or Benjamin Button are pretentious, but the work of many great film artists isn't.

quote:


When I have a spare 100 minutes sometime in the near future (it'll probably be two months or so away), I'll go up and watch Sans Soleil at the uni, seeing as they have it. Just for you, jbg.


Sweeeet. It's my favourite documentary.

< Message edited by jamesbondguy -- 15/3/2009 12:42:45 PM >


_____________________________

Just like Geoffrey Ingram.

(in reply to Pigeon Army)
Post #: 1178
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 15/3/2009 1:44:55 PM   
DCMaximo


Posts: 992
Joined: 5/1/2007
From: Nottingham via Aidy Boothroyd's Palace of Wisdom
quote:

ORIGINAL: chris_scott01


 
27. Torrid Zone
(1940, William Keighley)

39. The Bride Came C.O.D.
(1941, William Keighley)  
53. The Fighting 69th
(1940, William Keighley)



I assume from these entries you've got the second James Cagney Signature Collection boxset? I was sad to read that Cagney didn't think too much to Torrid Zone (which is excellent) or Bride Came COD (also pretty good). Have you seen the West Point Story yet? It's pretty unspectacular story-wise, but the musical numbers are really good and more than make up for it.

_____________________________

The Spanish Inquisition of the 'Get Carlton Banks a TV Spin-off' Association

"Carlotta was the kind of town where they spell trouble T-R-U-B-I-L, and if you try to correct them, they kill you"

(in reply to chris_scott01)
Post #: 1179
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 15/3/2009 2:34:13 PM   
chris_scott01


Posts: 3081
Joined: 5/1/2006
quote:

ORIGINAL: DCMaximo

quote:

ORIGINAL: chris_scott01


 
27. Torrid Zone
(1940, William Keighley)

39. The Bride Came C.O.D.
(1941, William Keighley)  
53. The Fighting 69th
(1940, William Keighley)



I assume from these entries you've got the second James Cagney Signature Collection boxset? I was sad to read that Cagney didn't think too much to Torrid Zone (which is excellent) or Bride Came COD (also pretty good). Have you seen the West Point Story yet? It's pretty unspectacular story-wise, but the musical numbers are really good and more than make up for it.


Alas my shopping habits are unveiled!  I haven't watched The West Point Story yet no, I'm waiting for the opportune moment.  Torrid Zone was a real surprise, I thought the dialogue was hilarious, almost worthy of the same applause as His Girl Friday.  Ann Sheridan's dialogue became a bit repetitive in tone but Cagney offered a really good, funny performance.

_____________________________

rapidite! rapidite!

(in reply to DCMaximo)
Post #: 1180
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 15/3/2009 2:53:59 PM   
DCMaximo


Posts: 992
Joined: 5/1/2007
From: Nottingham via Aidy Boothroyd's Palace of Wisdom
quote:

ORIGINAL: chris_scott01

quote:

ORIGINAL: DCMaximo

quote:

ORIGINAL: chris_scott01


 
27. Torrid Zone
(1940, William Keighley)

39. The Bride Came C.O.D.
(1941, William Keighley)  
53. The Fighting 69th
(1940, William Keighley)



I assume from these entries you've got the second James Cagney Signature Collection boxset? I was sad to read that Cagney didn't think too much to Torrid Zone (which is excellent) or Bride Came COD (also pretty good). Have you seen the West Point Story yet? It's pretty unspectacular story-wise, but the musical numbers are really good and more than make up for it.


Alas my shopping habits are unveiled!  I haven't watched The West Point Story yet no, I'm waiting for the opportune moment.  Torrid Zone was a real surprise, I thought the dialogue was hilarious, almost worthy of the same applause as His Girl Friday.  Ann Sheridan's dialogue became a bit repetitive in tone but Cagney offered a really good, funny performance.


In his autobiography, Cagney describes the film as "Hildy Johnson Goes Bananas" because of it's similarity to His Girl Friday/The Front Page, but that's no bad thing and the Cagney/Pat O'Brien interplay is terrific.

_____________________________

The Spanish Inquisition of the 'Get Carlton Banks a TV Spin-off' Association

"Carlotta was the kind of town where they spell trouble T-R-U-B-I-L, and if you try to correct them, they kill you"

(in reply to chris_scott01)
Post #: 1181
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 15/3/2009 6:13:28 PM   
Jasiri


Posts: 2496
Joined: 23/10/2005
quote:

ORIGINAL: elab49

quote:

ORIGINAL: Jasiri

quote:

ORIGINAL: chris_scott01

quote:

ORIGINAL: Jasiri

On a similar note Chris have you seen Hou Hsiao-hsien's Cafe Lumiere ? Commissioned by Shochiku to mark the centenary of Ozu's birth.



I haven't seen it, I'd really like to get into some Korean films, I've only seen a couple.  I haven't seen Tokyo-Ga either. Film takes up so much time   I take it Cafe Lumiere is worth a look?


HHH is from Taiwan but this one was made in Japan with a Japanese cast including Tadanobu Asano.I think the idea was to make a film that tries to capture something of the feeling of an Ozu film,there are a lot of trains but thankfully it doesn't try to replicate his style.I really liked it but then I think HHH is a great director and haven't seen anything from him I haven't liked,it's not among his best but certainly worth a rent.



I've had this sitting on my Tesco list for ages. Perhaps I should bump it up the priority list? (It doesn't help that it has been on there so long - with some others - that I often have to click the link to remind myself what it is and why it is there!)



Have you seen any of his other films? There's very little available on R2.I love Three Times and would recommend that more highly than Cafe Lumiere.His last film was also released here but I haven't seen that yet.Another foreign production,this time based in France Le Voyage du ballon rouge (Flight of the Red Balloon) inspired by Albert Lamorisse's Le ballon rouge and starring Julliette Binoche.

Added
Fat City (1972,John Huston)
Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004,Michel Gondry)
D.O.A. (1950,Rudolph Matť)


(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 1182
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 15/3/2009 7:12:35 PM   
Deviation


Posts: 27284
Joined: 2/6/2006
From: Enemies of Film HQ
quote:

ORIGINAL: jamesbondguy

quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army

The "museum of his memories" begs to differ. It might be one of the least pretentious films you've ever seen (giving your viewing habits, I would say this is an accurate assessment), but I'd be willing to bet half the films I've watched this year are less pretentious than La Jetee.


Ugh. The word 'pretentious' is such an awful, catch-all phrase that is used so often to deride anything that attempts anything a little different- not necessairly the definition you're using, but I've genuinely grown to hate the word when it's used to describe anything outside of the accepted intellectual and stylistic limits of the average Hollywood film. If we take the word by this definition:
"expressive of affected, unwarranted, or exaggerated importance, worth, or stature" or ": making usually unjustified or excessive claims (as of value or standing)
than I don't think many of the films I watch are pretentious at all, and certainly not Marker's work. His films are philosophical and poetic, but then so is he himself- and his documentaries make such good use of humour, wit and irony that he's a hugely entertaining commentator. La Jetee is not pretentious- it dissolves the cinema in order to suggest a new way to go with it. In fact, you could see it as saying 'why isn't the cinema done this way?', or, alternatively, 'this is cinema' for what is a film but a succession of images, like La Jetee? Marker's work is not pretentious for he does not suggest that what he is saying is defintive, completley true- in fact, many of his works are musings that are designed to make the audience think in whatever which way they please. That's not pretentious at all, and many great filmmakers do the exact same thing. Also, for example, Histoire(s) Du Cinema is not pretentious for it's an attempt by a person to come to terms with the medium they have dedicated their life too, and an attempt to express a viewpoint to the world. I would say that the films I mainly watch are more worthy of this definition of pretentious, which is rarely used: "making demands on one's skill, ability, or means". But this is no bad thing- it's what many classic novels and other masterpieces of other mediums do. The use of philosophy, poetry, intellectual commentary etc. does not fit into the first definition of pretension, not at all. It's simply a different way. Perhaps the execution could be pretentious, but the act or the idea of itself certainly isn't. I would say that the Oscar-hunting films of the likes of The Reader or Benjamin Button are pretentious, but the work of many great film artists isn't.




Or also in other words, Batman Begins.

_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Dpp1978
There are certainly times where calling a person a cunt is not only reasonable, it is a gross understatement.

quote:


ORIGINAL: elab49
I really wish I could go down to see Privates

(in reply to jamesbondguy)
Post #: 1183
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 15/3/2009 9:57:52 PM   
Pigeon Army


Posts: 14612
Joined: 29/1/2006
From: Pixar HQ, George Lucas' Office.
quote:

ORIGINAL: jamesbondguy

quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army

The "museum of his memories" begs to differ. It might be one of the least pretentious films you've ever seen (giving your viewing habits, I would say this is an accurate assessment), but I'd be willing to bet half the films I've watched this year are less pretentious than La Jetee.


Ugh. The word 'pretentious' is such an awful, catch-all phrase that is used so often to deride anything that attempts anything a little different- not necessairly the definition you're using, but I've genuinely grown to hate the word when it's used to describe anything outside of the accepted intellectual and stylistic limits of the average Hollywood film. If we take the word by this definition:
"expressive of affected, unwarranted, or exaggerated importance, worth, or stature" or ": making usually unjustified or excessive claims (as of value or standing)
than I don't think many of the films I watch are pretentious at all, and certainly not Marker's work. His films are philosophical and poetic, but then so is he himself- and his documentaries make such good use of humour, wit and irony that he's a hugely entertaining commentator. La Jetee is not pretentious- it dissolves the cinema in order to suggest a new way to go with it. In fact, you could see it as saying 'why isn't the cinema done this way?', or, alternatively, 'this is cinema' for what is a film but a succession of images, like La Jetee? Marker's work is not pretentious for he does not suggest that what he is saying is defintive, completley true- in fact, many of his works are musings that are designed to make the audience think in whatever which way they please. That's not pretentious at all, and many great filmmakers do the exact same thing. Also, for example, Histoire(s) Du Cinema is not pretentious for it's an attempt by a person to come to terms with the medium they have dedicated their life too, and an attempt to express a viewpoint to the world. I would say that the films I mainly watch are more worthy of this definition of pretentious, which is rarely used: "making demands on one's skill, ability, or means". But this is no bad thing- it's what many classic novels and other masterpieces of other mediums do. The use of philosophy, poetry, intellectual commentary etc. does not fit into the first definition of pretension, not at all. It's simply a different way. Perhaps the execution could be pretentious, but the act or the idea of itself certainly isn't. I would say that the Oscar-hunting films of the likes of The Reader or Benjamin Button are pretentious, but the work of many great film artists isn't.



An interesting reaction to what amounted to a joke.

You have a point, and I'm not denying that, say, Benjamin Button is less pretentious than La Jetee (I still like Benjamin Button, but I see where you're coming from). But, for what essentially amounts to a sci-fi film pondering on the nature of humanity and their connection to memories, the museum of memories sequence (which is pretty much the only thing in the film that I feel is, well, pretentious) was a little bit of an ineffective, obtuse, grandstanding 'metaphor' that seemed a little bit out of place. Marker departs from the narrative style of slideshow filmmaking for one minute, and he never does it again, and it feels like he wants this scene to be important as a result - it must be deep, nothing else in the film is like it, etc etc. I just feel you're being a little bit presumptuous and disparaging that people, including myself, have no idea what the word means and just use to mock that which "tries to be a little different". Some people have no idea, sure, but some do, and when I use the word, I mean it. And that sequence takes me out of the film for a bit with its departure from the film's general tone with seemingly no good reason other than being 'deep'.

And look, now you're making me argue against La Jetee. See what you've done? I'm forced to argue against a film I love because of this. That's your fault.

And you can say Histoires du Cinema isn't pretentious (I haven't seen it, I can't judge), and Breathless pretty much isn't, but 2 or 3 Things is pretentious guff, Godard demanding we appreciate his philosophy and politics by shoving it into every character's mouth and having them lecture us.

So yeah.


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rinc
She's supposed to be 13! I'd want her to be very attractive though


quote:

ORIGINAL: MonsterCat
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army
Stop being mean to Deviation

No.

(in reply to Deviation)
Post #: 1184
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 15/3/2009 10:14:47 PM   
jamesbondguy


Posts: 6238
Joined: 6/1/2007
From: The Village Green
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army

But, for what essentially amounts to a sci-fi film pondering on the nature of humanity and their connection to memories, the museum of memories sequence (which is pretty much the only thing in the film that I feel is, well, pretentious) was a little bit of an ineffective, obtuse, grandstanding 'metaphor' that seemed a little bit out of place.


That's bullshit. Sorry, but that is. Isn't a sci-fi film the perfect one to comment on humanity, since it can view it from any point? The future, the past, the present. What genre of films are allowed to comment on humanity and memory if sci-fi isn't?! Putting philosophy behind ficitional stories, no matter how otherworldly, has been a feature of storytelling for generations. This isn't Star Wars. It's as much a poem, a musing, as anything else.

quote:


Marker departs from the narrative style of slideshow filmmaking for one minute, and he never does it again, and it feels like he wants this scene to be important as a result - it must be deep, nothing else in the film is like it, etc etc.


If you mean the bit with the girl blinking, then I love that moment. It says a lot about the magic of cinema, for me, personally, and I found the resonance of it in comparison to the rest of the film very moving.

quote:


I just feel you're being a little bit presumptuous and disparaging that people, including myself, have no idea what the word means and just use to mock that which "tries to be a little different". Some people have no idea, sure, but some do, and when I use the word, I mean it. And that sequence takes me out of the film for a bit with its departure from the film's general tone with seemingly no good reason other than being 'deep'.


I'm sorry, I should have been clearer. I wasn't really attacking you, but rather people who use the phrase all the time and completley in the wrong way, as if saying it suddenly means that something can be ridiculed. In a way, all art is pretentious. Not necessairly a bad thing. One mention of the word is enough to set me off.

quote:


And look, now you're making me argue against La Jetee. See what you've done? I'm forced to argue against a film I love because of this. That's your fault.


Cool! That's hard to do.

quote:


And you can say Histoires du Cinema isn't pretentious (I haven't seen it, I can't judge), and Breathless pretty much isn't, but 2 or 3 Things is pretentious guff, Godard demanding we appreciate his philosophy and politics by shoving it into every character's mouth and having them lecture us.



Well, I can see where you're coming from. I like Godard's method in 2 or 3 Things, but I prefer La Chinoise for it's a lot more objective, and he's detached from the characters, and is making us view them critically. I don't really see it as pretentious, though, but rather an attempt to get his world view out there. It's a cinematic essay, effectively. An attempt to do cinematically what someone like Sartre or another great philosopher do in their essays. Oddly enough, I find it quite liberating. Many films are one-sided, it's just their better at hiding it. I find his work with the Dziga Vertov group pretentious, but that was just a couple of years, and a body of work that Godard himself swore off in his next film after he left the group. But whatever, this has nothing to do with main argument.

< Message edited by jamesbondguy -- 15/3/2009 10:18:57 PM >


_____________________________

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Post #: 1185
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 15/3/2009 10:24:10 PM   
jamesbondguy


Posts: 6238
Joined: 6/1/2007
From: The Village Green
Man, we do argue a lot don't we? We're a two-man debating society.  I hope you don't think this is some kind of personal hatred.

Sans Soleil
Director: Chris Marker
The other day, someone asked me who I thought the greatest living film-maker was. Without really thinking, the words ĎChris Markerí came out of my mouth. I hastily backtracked and gave the honour back to Jean-Luc Godard, but both seem comfortable in the position, no matter that I, obviously, prefer Jean-Luc. How many of the greats left are French, and part of the same time period? (Namely 1955-1969 or so.) Quite a number- Godard and Marker, as well as Jacques Rivette, Eric Rohmer, Claude Chabrol, Alain Resnais, Philippe Garrel, Agnes Varda. All responsible for masterpieces.
Sans Soleil is the culmination of a life-time of work and a life-time of travelling and contemplating. For a film so preoccupied with memory, it moves like a string of them- sudden bursts or drawn-out dwellings on certain events. Itís also oddly like a dream fused with recreated memories (and I would suggest Marker realised this as well), which is unique for a film so rooted in reality and the real world, and history and time. So many films nowadays try to fob us off with cheap, second-rate superficial emotional manipulation. They attempt to make us think, but only in the most conservative, comforting ways. Markerís film moves us much more subtly- itís poetic imagery and poetic commentary offer several new ways in which to penetrate and view the world, and the nature and trickery of human memory, and itís massive impact on history, both broad and singular. But for all itís universality, itís also deeply personal- like a great perceptive poem, itís as much a collection of personal experiences and thoughts as it is a way of suggesting a way of seeing to the masses. Itís message is a true one, and one which is delivered lucidly and with emotion. Perhaps the film tries to move in too many different directions at once- but then again, on the first viewing I saw it more chronologically, as if it was following a straight road, and allowing the sensuality of the image and the genius and all important Marker wit of the commentary from the outside, to seep into the car. This time it seemed more like a travelogue detailing many different things, all of them connected either clearly or obliquely, but all diverse and offering different experiences. This is one of the reasons itís taken me so long to write properly about the film- this was the second time Iíd seen it all the way through, but I have dipped into multiple times in the past. Each time it felt the same and it felt different. I think I prefer the first half of footage, mostly assembled from Markerís filming in Tokyo. Thereís something about that city, that country, that suits Markerís eye perfectly, and intensifies his effect and his power on the audience. He is obviously fascinated by the country- The Mystery of Koumiko was an earlier film based entirely around the country and a young girl/guide, and then there was other projects like A.K. (about Kurosawa), Level Five etc. But thereís also the superb section of the film where Marker traces the route of Stewart in Vertigo- a film which Marker sums up so perfectly, and which fits so well with philosophy and musings of this movie. What else can I say? Films are perhaps perfect when they fulfil their promises, their expectations and transcend the limitations of other films similar or different. Sans Soleil is a perfect film. Itís the perfect cinematic musing, the perfect cinematic mounting of the process of memory, and the perfect sensual documentary- just witness the scene on the train, or the one where Marker films and comments on clips of Japanese TV, the dogs on the beach, the lighthouse in what appears to be a landlocked desert but is rather one which stretches out to sea, the dances on the streets of Japan, the footage in San Francisco. As Jonathan Rosenbaum put it, itís like the film which one would expect to find in a time capsule. Itís complex message is treated simply and lucidly, and itís utterly hypnotic. Perhaps thereís more here than youíll ever truly get a handle on- unless you happen to be Chris Marker. But this mystery is just an addition to the filmís quality- each time you see it, your perception of it will be different, as will your response. But the best thing that can be said in itís favour is that it makes one want to be Marker- to travel the world and film, to have his mind and his keen sense of perception, to have his memory and his vision, and to be able to communicate the thoughts which are lodged at the back of our head. As, I think, Godard put it, cinema should exist for the words stuck in the throat. Marker realises this. Most images certainly arenít worth a thousand words- but Markerís are. Itís influence on me, like all of Markerís work which effectively builds into one huge portrait of the world and of philosophy, is big.  At the same time, it seems to feel as if itís on the outside of the cinema and of the world, but also at the heart and core of it. Thatís special.

W (2008)
Director: Oliver Stone
A film needs to be made about Bush. A proper film, not this TV-drama style hack-job, another below-average film from a hardly valuable political film-maker. As in WTC, Stoneís direction and thinking is corny, predictable and empty of individuality, intelligence, or profundity. Bush was a disaster, of course, a purely ridiculous parody of a man, a venomous little prick, another Reagan brown-noser who thought it was God given right to rule not just a country, but the entire world. He was the neoconservativeís wet dream, and thus humanity suffered. Anti-Americanism has been growing, and I predict it will continue once Obama disappoints, which he probably will. Americaís in a sticky mess, a grave dug by itís own leaders, and a moderate also interested in imperialism will not change that enough . What can I say? Iím deeply pessimistic and cynical, and I wonít be happy until someone like Noam Chomsky is running America. Of course, since Bush is already parody, he was manipulated like a puppet by his advisors- the equally hateful and hate-worthy Dick Cheney, for one.
The latter is how Stone mostly views Bush, but the film at times comes close to a Frank Capra-esque tale of a good olí boy who miraculously came to power, but whom was corrupted by other forces. Itís an oddly sympathetic stance to take, and the simple fact and truth is that a fuckwit frat boy, born with the silver spoon in his mouth, and devoid of intelligence or the ability to think well politically, is dangerous if heís allowed out of an extremely limited range of power. He should be allowed to vote and take part in the democratic process. Thatís all. He shouldnít be taking any kind of major power when heís clearly not made out for it. Perhaps Stone feels this as well- but it almost feels like he sees Bush as a nice guy at heart. Anyone who can willingly go along with the Guantanamo Bay program is not a nice guy. Heís someone who deserves a war crimes trial.
Of course, people have always said one should laugh in order to heal, or help with our problems. But since Bushís policies are so disastrous, abroad and at home, so anti-humanitarian, and are incredibly, infinitely important right here and right now, this kind of comedy isnít needed. Satire is. But this isnít satire- itís something more like political Capra or Kramer. Itís bland, dull, rushed, badly structured, ham-fisted, and completely and utterly blunt. Stone has never been a penetrating thinker, but heís embarrassed himself here more than ever.

Histoire(s) Du Cinema (1988-1998, Jean-Luc Godard)
Une Femme est Une Femme (1961, Jean-Luc Godard)
Une Partie Campagne (1936, Jean Renoir)
The Singing Detective (1986, Aimel) -
Dans Paris (2005, Honore)
The Roaring Twenties (1939, Walsh)
Sans Soleil (1982, Marker) 
Chat Perches (2004, Marker)
Detour (1945, Ulmer)
Sweet Sixteen (Loach)
Paris Nous Appartient (1961, Rivette)
Radio On (1979, Petit)  
Gun Crazy (1950, Lewis)
Happy-Go-Lucky (2008, Leigh)
Tickets (Olmi, Kiarostami, Loach)
The Filth and The Fury (2003, Temple)
Joy Division (Gee, 2007)
My Name is Joe (Loach, 2003)
Love Meetings (Pasolini, 1965)  
Raining Stones (Loach, 1993)
Somers Town (2007, Meadows)
This is England (2006, Meadows)

The Girl Who Lept Through Time (2006)

Election (1999, Payne)

High Hopes (Leigh)
Barton Fink (1991, Coen)
Slumdog Millionaire (2008, Boyle)
Carrie (1976, De Palma)
King of Kong (2007)

Twilight Zone: The Movie (Spielberg, Landis, Dante, Miller)
Burn After Reading (2007, Coen)
W (2008, Stone)

Shorts:
Antoine et Colette (1962, Truffaut)

Blue Jeans (Jacques Rozier, 1958)
Meetin' WA (Godard, 1986)
Bread And Ally/Breaktime (1970-72, Kiarostami)


_____________________________

Just like Geoffrey Ingram.

(in reply to jamesbondguy)
Post #: 1186
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 15/3/2009 10:25:14 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54624
Joined: 1/10/2005
quote:

ORIGINAL: jamesbondguy

quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army

But, for what essentially amounts to a sci-fi film pondering on the nature of humanity and their connection to memories, the museum of memories sequence (which is pretty much the only thing in the film that I feel is, well, pretentious) was a little bit of an ineffective, obtuse, grandstanding 'metaphor' that seemed a little bit out of place.


That's bullshit. Sorry, but that is. Isn't a sci-fi film the perfect one to comment on humanity, since it can view it from any point? The future, the past, the present. What genre of films are allowed to comment on humanity and memory if sci-fi isn't?! Putting philosophy behind ficitional stories, no matter how otherworldly, has been a feature of storytelling for generations. This isn't Star Wars. It's as much a poem, a musing, as anything else.



JBG - I don't think PA is querying the use of SF here - it seems to be a straight description of the film as a SF pondering the nature of humanity - not a questioning of the use of the genre.

Edit - BTW, congrats on finding something you dislike more than Burn After Reading!

< Message edited by elab49 -- 15/3/2009 10:27:18 PM >


_____________________________

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quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to jamesbondguy)
Post #: 1187
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 16/3/2009 12:42:26 AM   
Pigeon Army


Posts: 14612
Joined: 29/1/2006
From: Pixar HQ, George Lucas' Office.
quote:

ORIGINAL: elab49

quote:

ORIGINAL: jamesbondguy

quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army

But, for what essentially amounts to a sci-fi film pondering on the nature of humanity and their connection to memories, the museum of memories sequence (which is pretty much the only thing in the film that I feel is, well, pretentious) was a little bit of an ineffective, obtuse, grandstanding 'metaphor' that seemed a little bit out of place.


That's bullshit. Sorry, but that is. Isn't a sci-fi film the perfect one to comment on humanity, since it can view it from any point? The future, the past, the present. What genre of films are allowed to comment on humanity and memory if sci-fi isn't?! Putting philosophy behind ficitional stories, no matter how otherworldly, has been a feature of storytelling for generations. This isn't Star Wars. It's as much a poem, a musing, as anything else.



JBG - I don't think PA is querying the use of SF here - it seems to be a straight description of the film as a SF pondering the nature of humanity - not a questioning of the use of the genre.

Edit - BTW, congrats on finding something you dislike more than Burn After Reading!


Elab's pretty much got it on the nose here. I wasn't criticising the film for being SF at all - that'd be narrow-minded and writing off a whole genre for silly reasons, and I think Godard does that enough to any cinema that isn't French for all of us. I was just saying that the "museum of his memories" sequence felt out of place within the philosophical and intelligent context of the film, a hamfisted metaphor, if you will.

quote:


quote:

Marker departs from the narrative style of slideshow filmmaking for one minute, and he never does it again, and it feels like he wants this scene to be important as a result - it must be deep, nothing else in the film is like it, etc etc.
If you mean the bit with the girl blinking, then I love that moment. It says a lot about the magic of cinema, for me, personally, and I found the resonance of it in comparison to the rest of the film very moving.


I actually mean the "museum of his memories" part, which just comes out of nowhere, shows a bunch of statues, and then leaves again. It lacks the poetry and the coherence with the narrative that the later, much more effective natural history museum has, and it jars because it just feels like an attempt at going deep for the sake of going deep. The bit with the girl blinking took me by surprise, and it was actually quite beautiful within the context of the film.

quote:


quote:


I just feel you're being a little bit presumptuous and disparaging that people, including myself, have no idea what the word means and just use to mock that which "tries to be a little different". Some people have no idea, sure, but some do, and when I use the word, I mean it. And that sequence takes me out of the film for a bit with its departure from the film's general tone with seemingly no good reason other than being 'deep'.



I'm sorry, I should have been clearer. I wasn't really attacking you, but rather people who use the phrase all the time and completley in the wrong way, as if saying it suddenly means that something can be ridiculed. In a way, all art is pretentious. Not necessairly a bad thing. One mention of the word is enough to set me off.


While I would never say all art is pretentious, your point is valid re: people who use it in the wrong way. I guess the comparison can be drawn with my argument re: my dissatisfaction with "Godard will change your life" in your Godard thread. Or, for that matter, your writing off of Jurassic Park.

quote:

Man, we do argue a lot don't we? We're a two-man debating society.  I hope you don't think this is some kind of personal hatred.


If only my real debating society ever debated about film. I know it isn't some irrational hatred (funnily enough, I had Incanus reassuring me that he wasn't engaging in a vendetta after the row in your Godard thread - everyone seems to think I think everyone hates me ), and I'm sure everyone enjoys these arguments.

Nothing's going to match the Coen brothers argument in the Awards Contenders thread, though.

< Message edited by Pigeon Army -- 16/3/2009 12:43:14 AM >


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rinc
She's supposed to be 13! I'd want her to be very attractive though


quote:

ORIGINAL: MonsterCat
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army
Stop being mean to Deviation

No.

(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 1188
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 16/3/2009 8:44:30 AM   
TheManWithNoShame


Posts: 6767
Joined: 1/8/2006
quote:

I was just saying that the "museum of his memories" sequence felt out of place within the philosophical and intelligent context of the film, a hamfisted metaphor, if you will.


Really? It is a sequence that lasts no more than 10 seconds and hardly breaks the narrative at all, so I dont see how you've come to the conclusion that Marker is putting added significance on it or 'trying to be deep'. Its a throwaway remark that prefigures the later museum sequence where Marker nudges the viewer to consider  the link between the way he is presenting images and the memories linked to them, and the way the couple observe the dead animals in the museum. It's hardly a big signposted metaphor. You could watch the film and not even notice it, or even the whole thread of thought Marker is suggesting in the later museum sequence. He lets his ideas flow with the narrative, not deliberately breaking it to call attention to themselves. I find it odd you would then mention the film's 'pretentiousness' in your review entirely based on this sequence.

Besides, I find it an pregnant analogy. Resnais makes a similar comparison in Tout le Memoire de Monde, where he views a library as the collective memory of mankind - just like the museum of dead animals might be a collective memory of the natural world, or the images contained inside the mind of the man in La Jetee a museum of dead memories. You could take any section of La Jetee and find similar streams of thought to row away on - it's one of the most thoughtful sci-fi films I've ever seen. That's why I find it frustrating that a man with as many good ideas as Marker is now being labelled as pretentious for one throwaway remark.

I'll also take issue with this:

quote:

It might be one of the least pretentious films you've ever seen (giving your viewing habits, I would say this is an accurate assessment), but I'd be willing to bet half the films I've watched this year are less pretentious than La Jetee.


Perhaps it's a joke, but these frequence nudges at jbg have become a bit tiresome and more than a bit unfunny. I mean, if you actually look at his viewing habits you'll find they are probably more eclectic than anyone elses. Plus when we start ordering films according to pretentiousness and start to make meaningless statements like 'half of all the films I've seen are more pretentious than so or so' then we have really gone wrong somewhere.


quote:

ORIGINAL: Jasiri

quote:

ORIGINAL: chris_scott01

quote:

ORIGINAL: Jasiri

On a similar note Chris have you seen Hou Hsiao-hsien's Cafe Lumiere ? Commissioned by Shochiku to mark the centenary of Ozu's birth.



I haven't seen it, I'd really like to get into some Korean films, I've only seen a couple. I haven't seen Tokyo-Ga either. Film takes up so much time I take it Cafe Lumiere is worth a look?


HHH is from Taiwan but this one was made in Japan with a Japanese cast including Tadanobu Asano.I think the idea was to make a film that tries to capture something of the feeling of an Ozu film,there are a lot of trains but thankfully it doesn't try to replicate his style.I really liked it but then I think HHH is a great director and haven't seen anything from him I haven't liked,it's not among his best but certainly worth a rent.




To my shame I actually fell asleep during Cafe Lumiere, although what I did catch of it was lovely, and the collision of Ozu's themes and Hou's natural style was as graceful as you could hope for. I felt overall though that Three Times was the more interesting film.

Have you seen The Puppetmaster? I have heard it's his best though all I can find so far are video copies. Also have you seen Mizoguchi's Sisters of the Gion? I reviewed it briefly a couple of pages back and I thought you might be interested seeing as you appreciate how hard 1930s Japanese cinema is to come across.

< Message edited by TheManWithNoShame -- 16/3/2009 11:40:47 AM >


_____________________________

sorry jbg :( i promise to stop being such a silly boy.

(in reply to Jasiri)
Post #: 1189
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 16/3/2009 9:42:32 AM   
elab49


Posts: 54624
Joined: 1/10/2005
quote:

ORIGINAL: TheManWithNoShame


Have you seen The Puppetmaster? I have heard it's his best though all I can find so far are video copies.


I've been considering picking it up at HKflix - as well as an 8 film Hou boxset, they do have the films on individual discs as well.

_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to TheManWithNoShame)
Post #: 1190
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 16/3/2009 10:16:58 AM   
Jasiri


Posts: 2496
Joined: 23/10/2005
quote:

ORIGINAL: TheManWithNoShame

quote:

ORIGINAL: Jasiri

quote:

ORIGINAL: chris_scott01

quote:

ORIGINAL: Jasiri

On a similar note Chris have you seen Hou Hsiao-hsien's Cafe Lumiere ? Commissioned by Shochiku to mark the centenary of Ozu's birth.



I haven't seen it, I'd really like to get into some Korean films, I've only seen a couple. I haven't seen Tokyo-Ga either. Film takes up so much time I take it Cafe Lumiere is worth a look?


HHH is from Taiwan but this one was made in Japan with a Japanese cast including Tadanobu Asano.I think the idea was to make a film that tries to capture something of the feeling of an Ozu film,there are a lot of trains but thankfully it doesn't try to replicate his style.I really liked it but then I think HHH is a great director and haven't seen anything from him I haven't liked,it's not among his best but certainly worth a rent.




To my shame I actually fell asleep during Cafe Lumiere, although what I did catch of it was lovely, and the collision of Ozu's themes and Hou's natural style was as graceful as you could hope for. I felt overall though that Three Times was the more interesting film.

Have you seen The Puppetmaster? I have heard it's his best though all I can find so far are video copies. Also have you seen Mizoguchi's Sisters of the Gion? I reviewed it briefly a couple of pages back and I thought you might be interested seeing as you appreciate how hard 1930s Japanese cinema is to come across.


Haven't seen Puppetmaster but also heard it often mentioned as being one of his best.Those I've seen in rough order of preference are..
A City of Sadness
Millennium Mambo
The Time to Live and the Time to Die
Dust in the Wind
Three Times
A Summer at Grandpa's
The Boys from Fengkuei/All the Youthful Days
Cafe Lumiere

Didn't see your review of Sisters of Gion but will have a look.I haven't even bought that Eclipse,Mizoguchi set yet,just cause I know I don't have time to enjoy it right now.My birthday soon though so maybe should start droping hints.I've had the Japanese release of the same set of Hiroshi Shimizu films that's coming on Eclipse for ages and so far only watched Japanese Girls at the Harbour which was excellent and tops my list for this year.The rest of the set is 2 other films from the 30's and one from early 40's.

(in reply to TheManWithNoShame)
Post #: 1191
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 16/3/2009 10:34:11 AM   
TheManWithNoShame


Posts: 6767
Joined: 1/8/2006
I didn't even know there was an Eclipse set! I will have to look into that. Anyway, I had 5 minutes to write that bit I wrote so I've just re-edited it a bit.

_____________________________

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Post #: 1192
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 16/3/2009 11:00:45 AM   
elab49


Posts: 54624
Joined: 1/10/2005
If you watch only a couple of parts - separately - of a portmanteau film do they count as shorts? If so, I was reminded of the following over the weekend from If I Had a Million (various, 1932). The story is a dying tycoon randomly choosing people for $1m windfalls.

Road Hogs (McLeod)

Norman Z McLeod made many wonderful comedies but this segment is one of my favourites, and also one of my favourite WC Fields pieces. Their new car ruined by a road hog, Fields and partner take delicious revenge using their $1m. They get increasingly disshevelled, their victims are interestingly despatched, and at around 10 minutes I can only recommend you head over to Youtube now.

But it isn't as good as

The Clerk (Lubitsch)

An absolutely sublime short (only 2mins) starring a man who really never did look young - Mr Charles Laughton. He receives his payout at his desk - for office set-up think The Apartment. He pauses. He looks. And then he sets off for a truly fabulous pay-off. I can't belive how long it has been since I'd seen this.

_____________________________

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quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to TheManWithNoShame)
Post #: 1193
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 16/3/2009 11:14:45 AM   
Jasiri


Posts: 2496
Joined: 23/10/2005
quote:

ORIGINAL: TheManWithNoShame

I didn't even know there was an Eclipse set! I will have to look into that. Anyway, I had 5 minutes to write that bit I wrote so I've just re-edited it a bit.


Glad to see you think so highly of it,it's one that reading about Mizoguchi's films from this period has always intrigued me.Part of it too is I'd love to see more of Isuzu Yamada in leading roles.She's great but only seen her in later films from 50's-70's.The other films in the set are Osaka Elegy,Woman of the Night and then slightly dissapointingly cause it was already available in a good edition but a great film all the same Street of Shame.

quote:

ORIGINAL: elab49

If you watch only a couple of parts - separately - of a portmanteau film do they count as shorts?


No. You're cheating...again.



(in reply to TheManWithNoShame)
Post #: 1194
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 16/3/2009 12:59:52 PM   
MOTH

 

Posts: 3479
Joined: 3/10/2005
From: Sittin' on the dock of the bay
The Parallax View (1974)
An edgy and downbeat conspiracy thriller with a solid central performance from Warren Beatty as the reporter who's not quite as smart as he thinks he is. And the Parallax 'testing' montage is still pretty cool. (8/10)

DOA (1950)
A terrific premise is let down a bit by hammy acting from Edmond O'Brien and some flat direciton, but it's satisfyingly plotted and never less than watchable (7/10)

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(in reply to Jasiri)
Post #: 1195
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 16/3/2009 1:03:24 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54624
Joined: 1/10/2005
quote:

ORIGINAL: Jasiri

quote:

ORIGINAL: elab49

If you watch only a couple of parts - separately - of a portmanteau film do they count as shorts?


No. You're cheating...again.


Shazbat - rumbled

_____________________________

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quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


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(in reply to Jasiri)
Post #: 1196
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 16/3/2009 1:04:30 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54624
Joined: 1/10/2005
quote:

ORIGINAL: MOTH

The Parallax View (1974)
An edgy and downbeat conspiracy thriller with a solid central performance from Warren Beatty as the reporter who's not quite as smart as he thinks he is. And the Parallax 'testing' montage is still pretty cool. (8/10)


Was this a repeat view? I recall being pretty disappointed when I rewatched it for HoF as I used to really like it. I felt it had dated more.

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Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to MOTH)
Post #: 1197
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 16/3/2009 1:28:32 PM   
MOTH

 

Posts: 3479
Joined: 3/10/2005
From: Sittin' on the dock of the bay
quote:

ORIGINAL: elab49

quote:

ORIGINAL: MOTH

The Parallax View (1974)
An edgy and downbeat conspiracy thriller with a solid central performance from Warren Beatty as the reporter who's not quite as smart as he thinks he is. And the Parallax 'testing' montage is still pretty cool. (8/10)


Was this a repeat view? I recall being pretty disappointed when I rewatched it for HoF as I used to really like it. I felt it had dated more.


yeah, seen it years ago and remember thinking it was excellent. It didn't have the same impact this time and is a bit choppy in the middle particularly, but i still thought it was satisfyingly paranoid and I liked the downbeat 70s feel. In fact, I was more disappointed upon watchingThe Manchurian Candidate recently, which is still good, but nowhere near the masterpiece I had made it to be in my memory

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(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 1198
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 16/3/2009 1:31:11 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54624
Joined: 1/10/2005
I had a similar problem with that. Of all the conspiracy films of that type, offhand, I'd say All the President's Men and The Conversation stand up best. And I still like Three Days of the Condor.

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Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to MOTH)
Post #: 1199
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 16/3/2009 1:40:17 PM   
MOTH

 

Posts: 3479
Joined: 3/10/2005
From: Sittin' on the dock of the bay
yeah, i'd go along with those two - unlike many others, they actually get better upon rewatching.

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I've only gone and set up a blog! This week I've been mostly reviewing The Lego Movie and Wadjda. Click: The Fast Picture Show

(in reply to elab49)
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