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RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 10/3/2009 9:44:42 PM   
chris_scott01


Posts: 3081
Joined: 5/1/2006

Kokoro

I just couldn't wait to watch this again. Kon Ichikawa's sublime meditation on the inner turmoil of guilt, isolation and repression. It's the story of Nobuchi, played by probably my favourite Japanese actor Masayuki Mori, who concludes early in adult life that he can't trust anyone, including himself. He visits the grave of an old friend regularly but not even his wife knows fully why, and suspects him of hiding something. Though there aren't many people in Nobuchi's life his relationships with others suffer greatly as he increasingly struggles with the past, isolating himself and closing off his thoughts and feelings. All these troubled, ambiguous feelings are so carefully portrayed by Mori's performance. Much of the film is told in flashback, including a chance meeting between Nobuchi and a young student called Hioki, who seeing him walking out into the sea suspects suicide. They become friends to some degree, Hioki questions Nobuchi about his past and asks to be confided in. His wife is just as inquisitive but because she is involved in the very reason why his past remains buried he never explicitly answers her. Hioki, as an external force, acts as a catalyst for Nobuchi's past to resurface as he begins to trust him. But as much as he unearths, the more he has to reface. This is a deft study of the weight of guilt and the tragic consequences that can result. Adapted from a novel by Natsume Soseki, Ichikawa's masterpeice wasn't well received by critics in Japan and he only really gained recognition from The Burmese Harp he made a year later. I wonder what other hidden gems lie in Ichikawa's ouvre.....

Alone Across The Pacific

Not in the same league as Kokoro but a film that pays less attention to the many physical challenges that would accompany one sailing solo across the Pacific Ocean and more to the phsychological torments.  Based on the real life story of Kenichi Horie who made the perilous journey from Japan to San Francisco in a small sailing boat a year before the film was made.

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RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 11/3/2009 12:47:44 AM   
paul_ie86


Posts: 11422
Joined: 4/1/2007
From: Chelsea Hotel #2
30. Jarhead (Mendes, 2005)- 8/10

Sam Mendes worst film, yet still a good entertaining film with good performances from Gyllenhaal and Foxx


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RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 11/3/2009 4:44:53 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 78115
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo
86. Nil By Mouth (1st view, 1997, Gary Oldman) - 3/5*
I can't deny that this isn't powerful stuff with some strong performances but, bloody hell, it's grim. Depressing isn't the world here, I felt like walking in front of a bus afterwards.


108. Fathom (1st view, 1967, Leslie H. Martinson) - 2/5*
Spy spoof that see stars Raquel Welch as a skydiver who gets wrapped up in a plot to steal a priceless Chinese antique. Ffun but instantly forgettable.


116. Christmas Carol: The Movie (2001, Jimmy T. Murakami) - 1/5*
Just plain awful.






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RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 11/3/2009 4:56:38 AM   
Pigeon Army


Posts: 14612
Joined: 29/1/2006
From: Pixar HQ, George Lucas' Office.
29. Jurassic Park (1993, Spielberg) - 4.5/5***
It's been ages since I saw this last, but it was one of my favourite films, if not my favourite film, as a kid, so I was understandably excited when I saw it on the viewing list for one of my film courses. While there are parts that jar a little when compared to how high I held them as a kid (the conversation between Ellie and Alan at the start about kids, the stealth T-rex at the end, Tim and the electric fence), and there are holes aplenty (what happened to B.D. Wong and his team of God-playing scientists? How did the T-Rex manage to master stealth like the Sam Fisher of dinosaurs? How did the Triceratops crap out a pile of shit taller than itself? How come Ellie knows so much about dinosaurs when she's a paleobotanist?), but the sheer awe-inspiring spectacle, the witty script, the largely great acting (despite the wandering accents from Attenborough and Neill), and the overwhelming fun of it all puts this at the top of the pile when it comes to blockbusters. Even if those precocious kids lived until the end.

60. Milk (2008, Van Sant) - 4/5
A question for all those who have seen this film - can you tell me exactly how a script where the only shining moments of brilliant writing are taken verbatim from the real life source, and the rest of it is generic, rather trite, standard relationship-drama fare, wins Best Original Screenplay Oscar over In Bruges and Wall-E? Dustin Lance Black's script has its heart in the right place, yes, but when Milk's not dabbling in politics, it's very tiresome and average, as the dialogue is pretty much the same as any dialogue you'll get in a substandard romance film. That said, Gus Van Sant's direction makes up for all of the script's deficiencies, an aesthetically-pleasing yet restrained directing style that gets the story across perfectly and manages to really make these characters and what they're doing human and unpredictable - for example, the scene in which Milk receives the postcard threatening his assassination at a rally if he goes onstage, and he does it anyway, is filmed in such a way that, even though you know he's going to live, it feels as if he could be shot any minute. Van Sant is supported well by a strong cast, with great performances from James Franco (easily the best performance in the film, a committed, subtle and consistent performance that sees Franco really lose himself in the otherwise-thankless role), Sean Penn (his performance is very good, but not Oscar-worthy in this year, as it's occasionally inconsistent - "NOOOO! NOOOOOOOOO!! NOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!" - and it can feel like it's Sean Penn playing Harvey Milk rather than Harvey Milk), and Josh Brolin (who does well with a role just as restricted as Franco's - and his drunken scene is darkly hilarious - "You just came out of nowhere...Latino man..."). It's not amazing, mainly due to the hamfisted script, but it is very good nonetheless.


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Rinc
She's supposed to be 13! I'd want her to be very attractive though


quote:

ORIGINAL: MonsterCat
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army
Stop being mean to Deviation

No.

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RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 11/3/2009 8:10:44 PM   
doncopey1


Posts: 5003
Joined: 29/11/2005
From: Liverpool: Age 25
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army

29. Jurassic Park (1993, Spielberg) - 4.5/5***
It's been ages since I saw this last, but it was one of my favourite films, if not my favourite film, as a kid, so I was understandably excited when I saw it on the viewing list for one of my film courses. While there are parts that jar a little when compared to how high I held them as a kid (the conversation between Ellie and Alan at the start about kids, the stealth T-rex at the end, Tim and the electric fence), and there are holes aplenty (what happened to B.D. Wong and his team of God-playing scientists? How did the T-Rex manage to master stealth like the Sam Fisher of dinosaurs? How did the Triceratops crap out a pile of shit taller than itself? How come Ellie knows so much about dinosaurs when she's a paleobotanist?), but the sheer awe-inspiring spectacle, the witty script, the largely great acting (despite the wandering accents from Attenborough and Neill), and the overwhelming fun of it all puts this at the top of the pile when it comes to blockbusters. Even if those precocious kids lived until the end.

60. Milk (2008, Van Sant) - 4/5
A question for all those who have seen this film - can you tell me exactly how a script where the only shining moments of brilliant writing are taken verbatim from the real life source, and the rest of it is generic, rather trite, standard relationship-drama fare, wins Best Original Screenplay Oscar over In Bruges and Wall-E? Dustin Lance Black's script has its heart in the right place, yes, but when Milk's not dabbling in politics, it's very tiresome and average, as the dialogue is pretty much the same as any dialogue you'll get in a substandard romance film. That said, Gus Van Sant's direction makes up for all of the script's deficiencies, an aesthetically-pleasing yet restrained directing style that gets the story across perfectly and manages to really make these characters and what they're doing human and unpredictable - for example, the scene in which Milk receives the postcard threatening his assassination at a rally if he goes onstage, and he does it anyway, is filmed in such a way that, even though you know he's going to live, it feels as if he could be shot any minute. Van Sant is supported well by a strong cast, with great performances from James Franco (easily the best performance in the film, a committed, subtle and consistent performance that sees Franco really lose himself in the otherwise-thankless role), Sean Penn (his performance is very good, but not Oscar-worthy in this year, as it's occasionally inconsistent - "NOOOO! NOOOOOOOOO!! NOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!" - and it can feel like it's Sean Penn playing Harvey Milk rather than Harvey Milk), and Josh Brolin (who does well with a role just as restricted as Franco's - and his drunken scene is darkly hilarious - "You just came out of nowhere...Latino man..."). It's not amazing, mainly due to the hamfisted script, but it is very good nonetheless.



er no

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RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 11/3/2009 8:55:12 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54673
Joined: 1/10/2005
I have problems with Wall-E being nominated for script when most of the talking was the worst part of the film. I also think Milk's own writing was pretty banal and a weak point of a film (although not of a documentary). My guess was the normal use of the writing awards to make up for a general lack of awards elsewhere or to award an interesting newbie. Your other suggestion - In Bruges - should have walked it IMO but they were in apology for no Best Film award mood.

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quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


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RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 11/3/2009 11:48:37 PM   
paul_ie86


Posts: 11422
Joined: 4/1/2007
From: Chelsea Hotel #2
16. Watchmen (Snyder, 2009)- 9/10

Great adaptation of the comic. Patrick Wilson & Jackie Earle Haley were especially good


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RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 12/3/2009 12:51:37 AM   
Rhubarb


Posts: 24509
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: No Direction Home

quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army

28. The General (1927, Bruckman & Keaton) - 4.5/5
My first viewing of Keaton's apparent masterpiece was, luckily, with an equally-appreciative audience, because I can imagine a dead one would be nowhere near as fun to watch the film with. The General is almost laugh-a-minute, Keaton's almost perpetually-baffled facial expressions, incredible physicality and brilliant eye and head for visual gags just fantastic to behold. It's almost impossible to single out scenes for praise, because every scene is just as hilarious and excellent as the next. While having to read detailed plans devised by the North at various points in the film does detract, and at times you wonder if Keaton's Gray is yelling "you stupid bitch!" at the woman of his dreams who seems unable to do anything right (the part when he strangles her and then kisses didn't real elicit laughter from me), but those are small blights on the film's fantastic execution.



Glad you enjoyed it PA

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RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 12/3/2009 2:39:21 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 78115
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo
I can't read about The General now without thinking of Homer's classic "Oh noes" comment

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RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 12/3/2009 5:51:08 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
quote:

ORIGINAL: elab49

I have problems with Wall-E being nominated for script when most of the talking was the worst part of the film.


I'm thrilled Wall-E was nominated because it showed that they were willing to look beyond dialogue and focus on story as a reason for a nomination. Wall-E was a minor miracle, creating two characters that memorable with such little dialogue.

The problem In Bruges had was that it had history against it. The last time a film won best original screenplay with no other Oscar nominations was Designing Women in 1957.

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RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 12/3/2009 6:13:10 AM   
Pigeon Army


Posts: 14612
Joined: 29/1/2006
From: Pixar HQ, George Lucas' Office.
quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

quote:

ORIGINAL: elab49

I have problems with Wall-E being nominated for script when most of the talking was the worst part of the film.


I'm thrilled Wall-E was nominated because it showed that they were willing to look beyond dialogue and focus on story as a reason for a nomination. Wall-E was a minor miracle, creating two characters that memorable with such little dialogue.

The problem In Bruges had was that it had history against it. The last time a film won best original screenplay with no other Oscar nominations was Designing Women in 1957.


Doesn't make it right.

Totally agree re: Wall-E, though. A script isn't just dialogue.


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Rinc
She's supposed to be 13! I'd want her to be very attractive though


quote:

ORIGINAL: MonsterCat
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army
Stop being mean to Deviation

No.

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RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 12/3/2009 6:42:48 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army

quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

quote:

ORIGINAL: elab49

I have problems with Wall-E being nominated for script when most of the talking was the worst part of the film.


I'm thrilled Wall-E was nominated because it showed that they were willing to look beyond dialogue and focus on story as a reason for a nomination. Wall-E was a minor miracle, creating two characters that memorable with such little dialogue.

The problem In Bruges had was that it had history against it. The last time a film won best original screenplay with no other Oscar nominations was Designing Women in 1957.


Doesn't make it right.



I actually think Milk was a great film, the only one of the best picture nominees that deserved to be there, (Slumdog had a great first hour, but I didn't care about Latika so the second hour was meaningless to me. Button was beautiful but the screenplay wasn't. The Reader and Frost/Nixon had great acting but little else) but In Bruges and Wall-E were both more deserving of the screenplay Oscar. It's just one of those Oscar rules - It's rare for an acting winner to win back to back Oscars. It's rare for a film to win best picture without a directing nomination. It's rare for a film to win a screenplay Oscar if that's its only nomination.

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RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 12/3/2009 10:07:35 AM   
elab49


Posts: 54673
Joined: 1/10/2005
That's why I tried to be very careful with the wording but, since it was assumed I don't get story is relevant too

While I could see the story taking it to a nomination (although lets be fair, it was hardly original, simply the setting), the talking parts - which were, later on, a fair whack of the film, should have been enough, in my opinion, to lose a potential nomination - particularly as, for many it seems, the attempt to kidify the film later on unbalances it quite badly. That was a choice in the script - I don't think it should be rewarded for that poor a choice when it lost the courage to maintain the story it started.

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quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

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Post #: 1153
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 12/3/2009 10:16:06 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
quote:

ORIGINAL: elab49

That's why I tried to be very careful with the wording but, since it was assumed I don't get story is relevant too



I think my wording must have been off as well, I didn't think for a second you thought story wasn't relevant. I just meant that I was impressed with the writers for actually nominating a film with so little dialogue. I think it deserved the nomination not so much for it being an original story, but for the fact that it created a (to me, at least) compelling story from little character moments that could have been throwaway jokes in a great many other films. I thought Wall-E was a more realistic character than a  great many live action creations last year, I certainly related to him a hell of a lot more.

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RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 12/3/2009 10:19:05 AM   
elab49


Posts: 54673
Joined: 1/10/2005
Is it sad that I agree with you? The movement of those little shutters over his eyes was absolutely perfect

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quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

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RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 12/3/2009 11:37:25 AM   
Piles


Posts: 5545
Joined: 6/8/2007
From: Whalley Range
Two very good films for yesterday. A very good day for film viewing;

09. Tireze sur le Pianiste (1960, Francois Truffaut)
 
Charlie Kohler (Charles Aznavour), a small-time piano player in a bar, used to be Eduoard Saroyan, a concert pianist with all of the wealth and fame he could ever wish for. But he gave it all up, and now he's stuck in his dead end job. His brother, Chico Saroyan (Albert Remy), shows up in his bar with two men puffing pipes on his tail. After hiding him, Charlie gets himself involved in the whole mess, and soon - after one thing leads to another in classic movie fashion - he's deeper in the shit than even his brothers are. Truffaut's second feature film is a much more ambitient effort than his debut, the 400 Blows. He's left the relative small settings, the intimacy, and the deeply personal story for something with a bit more scope and ambition. Here, we have flashbacks to different times where characters are seemingly different people, settings seemingly worlds apart, shootouts in the snow, and romantic subplots as strong as anything in any melodramatic Hollywood film. Indeed, it's easy to see, when watching Shoot the Piano Player directly after the 400 Blows, that Truffaut has come on as a filmmaker one film on. What's even more miraculous is that he's kept all of the traits that made 400 Blows marvolous - the intimacy and the personal story - and simply placed them in a new, bigger setting.

Indeed, Shoot the Piano Player is reminiscent of the noir films of the 40s and 50s, made a couple of years after the apparent end of the subgenre, 1958's Touch of Evil. Truffaut has taken that style, complete with femme fatale (Lena and Therese push the plot and the flashback's plot along almost to the point where Charlie is a bystander), rough and plain-talking private eye (this time in the form of an accidental criminal, Charle, who is rugged and grizzled in the Robert Mitchum vain), and sumptuous black and white photography (very similar to the Third Man). However, Truffaut stamps the film with his own personal style, with swish pans aplenty (they're simply wonderful, particularly the one from on top of a bridge as the car drives by, and the camera turns around 180 degrees to meet it), seemingly unimportant and bizzare events given equal footing with the actual plot (the zany, playful, and wonderful 'Framboise' song performed by Boby Lapointe that breaks up a chase, and the conversation about women that pursuers and pursued have in the car, almost becoming friends in the process), and his wonderful knowledge of off-kilter relationships (he's second to only Eric Rohmer in that respect). Truffaut has merged two very distinct styles, that of the New Wave and that of classic Film Noir, and it works wonderfully. 9/10.

44. Battleship Potemkin (1925, Sergei Eisenstein)

Sergei Eisentein's classsic, the Battleship Potemkin, is a story told in five parts. It's of the men in the Potemkin, who revolt against their cruel captains and ask the people of Russia to do so too. It's a simple story which is very thin on characterisation, but this was deliberate. Battleship Potemkin is a propaganda film, and is construed as an experiment by Eisenstein. He uses montage to try and get the most emotion possible from his viewers, and to very good effect. The film's best sequence is the Odessa Staircase, which is a barbaric and brutally violent scene in which the Tsarists soldiers massacre the Odessans. The now iconic image, referenced to great effect in De Palma's the Untouchables, of a baby's pram slowly falling down the stairs, is a highly emotive moment that is unrivaled in cinema. Intercut with images of people's despairing faces or corpses garrisoned on the stairway, here is where Eisentein's use of montage works best. It's a horrible scene, but one that is essential to the film's overall purpose; to gain sympathy for the people and antipathy for the rulers. Although I may not agree with the film's sentiment, character development is thin on its feet, and story development is almost non-existent, there's no denying that the Battleship Potemkin is a true testament to what the power of cinema can do. 8/10.

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RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 12/3/2009 12:14:02 PM   
Pigeon Army


Posts: 14612
Joined: 29/1/2006
From: Pixar HQ, George Lucas' Office.
16. Closer (2004, Nichols) - 4.5/5
Let's get this straight right off the bat - Closer has one of the best, if not the best, scripts I've ever had the pleasure of seeing come to life. This intensely engaging relationship drama may not exactly be stunningly filmed, but that's not the point - this film is a showcase for Marber's script and the four sensational actors in the lead roles. Marber's dialogue is sharp, incisive, emotional, poetic, insightful, everything that it should be and a million times more. It's, in a word or two, fucking phenomenal, and the script's structure - taking a series of integral moments in the relationships of these characters over four years - and pacing is equally brilliant. In the four lead roles, the actors and actresses do nothing short of sublime jobs. It's telling when assessing the film's performance, Julia Roberts is only the least-best, rather than the worst. Portman and Law are seven shades of fantastic, if faltering occasionally, but the show-stealer is Owen, who is absolutely fucking magnificent as Larry. It does help that everyone's characters are all incredibly multi-layered and deep, but Owen completely embodies his character in such a way that you can't help but be captivated by his performance over all the others. Closer's not perfect, but it often comes damn close.

42. Collateral (2004, Mann) - 4/5***
This used to be one of my favourite films, but it seems to suffer on repeat viewings as its flaws become more prevalent, particularly the final scene on the MTA train. The performances from Cruise and Foxx are still exceptional, and this is possibly the only time the digital camera will ever work for Mann, but it's a flawed film, and it just keeps dropping in my eyes with multiple viewings.

Performance List Additions
21.
Clive Owen as Larry (Closer, 2004)


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rinc
She's supposed to be 13! I'd want her to be very attractive though


quote:

ORIGINAL: MonsterCat
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army
Stop being mean to Deviation

No.

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Post #: 1157
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 12/3/2009 12:26:17 PM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 78115
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo

quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army

16. Closer (2004, Nichols) - 4.5/5
Julia Roberts is only the least-best, rather than the worst.


I wish Cate Blanchett hadn't had to drop out. She'd have been far better.

_____________________________

So, sir, we let him have it right up! And I have to report, sir, he did not like it, sir.

Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

(in reply to Pigeon Army)
Post #: 1158
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 12/3/2009 1:16:35 PM   
Professor Moriarty

 

Posts: 10469
Joined: 6/10/2005
From: the waters of Casablanca

quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

quote:

ORIGINAL: elab49

That's why I tried to be very careful with the wording but, since it was assumed I don't get story is relevant too



I think my wording must have been off as well, I didn't think for a second you thought story wasn't relevant. I just meant that I was impressed with the writers for actually nominating a film with so little dialogue. I think it deserved†the nomination†not so much for it being an original story, but for the fact that it created a (to me, at least) compelling story from little character moments that could have been throwaway jokes in a great many other films. I thought Wall-E was a more realistic character than a† great many live action creations last year, I certainly related to him a hell of a lot more.


I think my hugely controversial opinion is that I found Wall-E to be one of the most boring films I've ever failed to watch. I made about 20 minutes of it on 2 occasions. During which he moved a few pieces of scrap around, replaced the tracks on his propulsion system and went home to arrange his cutlery. And actually that was quite endearing in a very slow paced way. Then Marvin the Martian came and it all got a bit silly for me.

Sorry, I see the love all around for this, but the magic was very lost on me.

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RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 12/3/2009 4:03:29 PM   
Lex Romero


Posts: 412
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: southampton
quote:

ORIGINAL: Gimli The Dwarf


quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army

16. Closer (2004, Nichols) - 4.5/5
Julia Roberts is only the least-best, rather than the worst.


I wish Cate Blanchett hadn't had to drop out. She'd have been far better.


Blanchett was originally up for her role?  Oh man there's now an awesome version of the film playing in my head.  Julia Roberts is far too Julia Roberts to play anyone but Julia Roberts.


_____________________________

My Film list for 2009:

http://www.empireonline.com/forum/tm.asp?m=2164869&mpage=39

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RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 13/3/2009 5:07:49 AM   
Gimli The Dwarf


Posts: 78115
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Central Park Zoo
Yes, apparently so, but she dropped out due to her pregnancy.

Features

44. Drugstore Cowboy (1st view, 1989, Gus Van Sant) - 4/5*
Matt Dillon is excellent, one of the better Gus Van Sant films I've seen.

89. Jennifer Eight (1st view, 1992, Bruce Robinson) - 3/5*
Reasonable thriller with Andy Garcia as an obsessed cop after a serial killer, Uma Thurman as a blind woman who is the only witness.

113. Jack The Ripper (1976, Jesus Franco) - 2/5*
Starring Klaus Kinski. A mess of a film, but perhaps not helped by the fact I ended up watching the dubbed version, not subtitled.

Shorts

2. Day of the Fight (1st view, 1951, Stanley Kubrick) - 3/5*
Kubrick's first film, a documentary about the 12 hours before boxer Walter Cartier takes to the ring. Not bad

33. Ray Winstone as Ray in Nil By Mouth
38. Kathy Burke as Valerie in Niil By Mouth
43. Matt Dillon as Bob Hughes in Drugstore Cowboy


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Fellow scientists, poindexters, geeks.

Yeah, Mr. White! Yeah, science!

Much more better!

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Post #: 1161
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 13/3/2009 10:46:15 AM   
chris_scott01


Posts: 3081
Joined: 5/1/2006

Five

In 2002 Abbas Kiarostami made 10, which was an interesting experiment to help usher in the age of digital filmmaking. In 2003 Kiarostami made what looks like another experiment and dedicated it to (presumerably his favourite filmmaker?) Yasujiro Ozu, who I kind of like too, though I'm not really a fan of this dedicating films to an personal idol. But this time it falls flat on its face as he submits his audience to 75 minutes of staring at mundane scenes, all on the seashore. It's divided into 5 segments, the first being a peice of driftwood on the beach being washed around by the lapping water, the other four segments are just as boring. I really don't know what he's trying to accomplish by these five long takes. The last one is almost an entirely black screen with just a bit of moonlight and a chorus of frogs making not much of an interesting sound at all. If he's trying to find something profound or just meditative I could do just the same by finding a place to sit just outside my house and admire the small details of nature, and that would be the full effect not on a tv screen. It's such an utterly pointless waste of time that I hope Ozu is rolling in his grave that such a film was dedicated to him. If Kiarostami wants to make a film like this theres nothing stopping him, it mustn't have cost a thing apart from the camera which we can all get, but releasing it to the public is an insult.

3 Women

This shares quite a bit in common with Bergman's Persona. Naive waif Pinky (Sissy Spacek) has just got a job in a rehabilitation spa in southern California and is shown the ropes by Millie (Shelley Duvall). Their friendship developes and they start to share the same apartment. When Pinky suffers an accident there appears to be an exchange of personalities. The third women from the title is the quiet, timid wife of a bar owner, a western style ranch in the middle of nowhere which Millie is a regular at. She too is involved in this personality shift. The first hour is really setting the scene and tone of the film. It has isolated and surreal qualities which are enhanced by the unsettling artwork being done by the bar owner's wife, both at the bar and at the apartments where Millie and Pinky live as they run that complex too. But the main factors in the uneasy feel of the film are some excellent perfomances by Spacek and Duvall, who offer quite normal dialogue in an over excited or almost too perfect way.

Love

An Hungarian film about a dying mother who is being looked after by her daughter in law, her son is a political prisoner but she is fed false letters by the daughter in law which say he's in America making a 'big film'. This is, of course to spare her the heartache of knowing what's happened to her son because the wife believes she won't live to see him return, but she still holds on to a small ray of hope that she will see him again. The film focuses on the phsycological aspects of their struggle, which I must admit do cause the film to drag its heels at times, even if it is quite short, but the ending is touching and the way memories are intercut at significant parts of the films are quite clever. There's some good performances to note from the four main characters too.

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Post #: 1162
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 13/3/2009 12:19:13 PM   
MOTH

 

Posts: 3479
Joined: 3/10/2005
From: Sittin' on the dock of the bay
Man on Wire (James Marsh, 2008)
Utterly absorbing documentary, as gripping as any heist movie, wonderfully assembled and edited. Talking heads are all engaging, none more so than Petit himself, the consummate showman, even when sitting and talking. The others lend perspective and a surprisingly emotional aspect. (9/10)

Godzilla (Ishiro Honda, 1954)
The iconic Big Stompy Monster movie is good fun, with some nice model work and special effects, whilst its influence on monster movies from Jaws to Cloverfield is evident. The spectre of the atomic bombs does hang over it, giving some scenes more gravitas than you would normally expect in such movies (7/10)

Hiroshima Mon Amour (Alain Resnais, 1959)
An arresting hybrid of documentary and drama, with the main interest being the innovative editing and use of image and dialogue to connect time, space and people. In doing so, it works well in an experimental sense, although it doesn't really sustain an emotional resonance throughout. Still a very worthwhile watch and a heartfelt tribute to the victims of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings (8/10)

< Message edited by MOTH -- 13/3/2009 12:23:33 PM >


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Post #: 1163
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 13/3/2009 12:25:24 PM   
Pigeon Army


Posts: 14612
Joined: 29/1/2006
From: Pixar HQ, George Lucas' Office.
quote:

ORIGINAL: chris_scott01

Five

In 2002 Abbas Kiarostami made 10, which was an interesting experiment to help usher in the age of digital filmmaking. In 2003 Kiarostami made what looks like another experiment and dedicated it to (presumerably his favourite filmmaker?) Yasujiro Ozu, who I kind of like too, though I'm not really a fan of this dedicating films to an personal idol. But this time it falls flat on its face as he submits his audience to 75 minutes of staring at mundane scenes, all on the seashore.


Have you seen Wim Wenders' Tokyo-Ga? It's his film dedicated to finding 'Ozu's Tokyo' (yeah, those modern arthouse auteurs really have a thing for Ozu), but it's a documentary, and it is at least mildly interesting, even if Wenders' voiceover betrays that, dispassionate as it is. However, if you're trying to avoid self-indulgence in the name of a personal idol, it'd be best to avoid it.

Anyway...

69. Manhattan (1979, Allen) - 4/5
RichCie made a mention earlier in the thread that he never expected Oldboy to debut in anyone's list at number 50 at this time of the year. Manhattan's another victim of my three-month film binge, which partly explains its low placing. Allen's ode to Manhattan and take on the mid-life crisis all in one, Manhattan's a comedy which isn't regularly funny, a romance that feels a bit too cold and misanthropic to be romantic, a character study with characters who really suck at this developing thing (much like in the much superior Closer). The acting's good, with the standout being Mariel Hemingway as the precocious young Tracey, who seems to know more about life than any of the middle-aged characters surrounding her, the Gershwin score is exceptional, and the dialogue's sharp, if occasionally needlessly precocious (the random name-dropping of W.C. Fields for no reason at one point is indicative of this). It's a very good, interesting character study, but it seems unsure in its tone, fluctuating between seriousness and light-heartedness with nary a regard for what the tone was five seconds ago. Also, the Meryl Streep subplot seems superfluous, particularly given Streep's dull performance.


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ORIGINAL: Rinc
She's supposed to be 13! I'd want her to be very attractive though


quote:

ORIGINAL: MonsterCat
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army
Stop being mean to Deviation

No.

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Post #: 1164
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 13/3/2009 2:44:30 PM   
barkers101


Posts: 2507
Joined: 19/2/2008
Meryl streep's sub plot is important because it shows that the film isn't really about love, but rather about loss.

Though i like Annie Hall more...


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Post #: 1165
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 13/3/2009 3:08:06 PM   
Jasiri


Posts: 2496
Joined: 23/10/2005
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army

quote:

ORIGINAL: chris_scott01

Five

In 2002 Abbas Kiarostami made 10, which was an interesting experiment to help usher in the age of digital filmmaking. In 2003 Kiarostami made what looks like another experiment and dedicated it to (presumerably his favourite filmmaker?) Yasujiro Ozu, who I kind of like too, though I'm not really a fan of this dedicating films to an personal idol. But this time it falls flat on its face as he submits his audience to 75 minutes of staring at mundane scenes, all on the seashore.


Have you seen Wim Wenders' Tokyo-Ga? It's his film dedicated to finding 'Ozu's Tokyo' (yeah, those modern arthouse auteurs really have a thing for Ozu), but it's a documentary, and it is at least mildly interesting, even if Wenders' voiceover betrays that, dispassionate as it is. However, if you're trying to avoid self-indulgence in the name of a personal idol, it'd be best to avoid it.



I used to be interested in seeing Five. Tokyo-Ga is a weird one,hard to know what Wenders is actually trying to achieve but the interviews with Chishu Ryu and Yuuharu Atsuta are golden,the emotion they show and the respect these men clearly still had for Ozu roughly 20 years after his death speaks volumes for the man.When it comes to Ozu documentaries though there's nothing that could better I Lived, But... (Kazuo Inoue) which is included as an extra on Criterion's release of Tokyo Story.On a similar note Chris have you seen Hou Hsiao-hsien's Cafe Lumiere ? Commissioned by Shochiku to mark the centenary of Ozu's birth.

(in reply to Pigeon Army)
Post #: 1166
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 13/3/2009 10:34:42 PM   
Dantes Inferno


Posts: 5887
Joined: 27/10/2007
From: Norway
26. Rosemaryís Baby (1968, Polanski) Ė 8/10
An interesting, but ultimately flawed gem. The concept is intriguing, if not necessarily fulfilled in the way it could have been. I have a few problems with it. First of all, Polanski clearly wanted his actors to play their parts offbeat, which resulted in an odd feel that didnít ring true to me (the old couple arriving at the crime taking the news as if they didnít know the meaning of the word ďdistressedĒ was justÖ no). Mia Farrow is half-part excellent and half-part confused, though luckily more of the first than the second. Dream scenes? Awful and as subtle as a bazooka on a presidential assassination mission ("This isn't a dream, this is real! I am overacting!").

Still, the film is tense without even seeming to try, though I canít help but wonder at some lack of logic with the final scene (spoilers follow): if they donít mind her seeing the baby, why do they drug her to keep her in the dark? And why couldnít the scene been played more seriously? I mean, a photo camera? Give me a break. Now, I didnít hate the film. In fact, I liked it pretty much. But to call it excellent? I donít know, there is a better film in someoneís womb somewhere, although I canít for the life of me figure out which personís womb that is.

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Post #: 1167
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 13/3/2009 11:03:18 PM   
Lex Romero


Posts: 412
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: southampton
Yeah I really loved the film up until the end.  It just felt so...unresolved.  But not in a good way. 

I think the problem comes from the fact that all films/books that deal with this conflict of the uncanny (is she crazy or is it really ghosts/aliens etc?!) fall apart by their conclusion; wondering whether it's true or not is interesting, finding out the answer never is as satisfying as our own wonder.   There's just no way for the film to give a satisfying conclusion  or a conclusion that doesn't leave us feeling the rest of the film had large sections of pointlessness. 

It's like finding out how a magic trick was done.  It's never as satisfying as wondering how it was done.


_____________________________

My Film list for 2009:

http://www.empireonline.com/forum/tm.asp?m=2164869&mpage=39

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Post #: 1168
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 13/3/2009 11:03:31 PM   
Lex Romero


Posts: 412
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: southampton
Keeping this list here to keep updated and keep track of my list:

First Viewing


5/5

01. Taxi Driver

02. Scarlet Street
03. The Wrestler

4.5/5


04. Double Indemnity
05. Touch of Evil
06. Day of the Dead
07. Dawn of the Dead
08. Moon
09. Joint Security Area
10. Spring Summer Autumn Winter...And Spring
11. Let the Right one In
12. Gran Torino

13. Slumdog Millionaire
14. Deliverance
15. Bruno
16. Kung Fu Panda
17. Bonnie and Clyde
18. Ninja: The Final Duel
19. Sherlock Jr.

4/5


20. Watchmen
21.The Chaser
22. Detour
23. Red Cliff
24. Face/Off
25. The 36th Chamber of Shaolin
26. The Exorcist
27. Milk
28. TimeCrimes
29. The Escapist
30. Night of the Living Dead
31.Man on Wire
32. Frost/Nixon
33. Cape Fear (1991)
34. Night of the Hunter
35. The Graduate
36. River's Edge

37. Badlands
38. Public Enemies
39. Rope
40. Chinatown
41. The Dark Knight
42. The Naked Gun 2 1/2: The Smell of Fear

3.5/5

43. Violent Cop
44. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince
45. Mad Max 2
46. Terminator: Salvation
47. Star Trek (2009)
48. Carrie
49. Jason and the Argonauts
50. The Hangover
51. The Importance of being Earnest (1952)

52. Corali
ne
53. Fido
54. Revolutionary Road
55. Land of the Dead
56. Boyz N the Hood
57. As Good as it Gets
58. The Rock
59. Ghost in the Shell
60. The Postman Always Rings Twice
61. Shopgirl
62. Vicky Christina Barcelona
63. Hot Rod
64. Monsters vs Aliens

65. The Girl who leapt through time
66. Nick and Norah's Infinite Playlist
67. The Music Box

3/5


68. The Lost Boys
69. Hudson Hawk
70. Mad Max
71. Enemy of the State
72. Doom
73. The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
74. Zack and Miri Make a Porno
75. Jackass Number 2
76. In Search of a Midnight Kiss

2.5/5

77. Kung Fu Panda: Secrets of the Furious Five
78. The Butterfly Effect 3

2/5

1.5/5

1/5


79. Transformers 2: Revenge of the Fallen
80. Twlight
81. Labyrinth

82. High School Musical 2

0.5/5

83. zoo
84. Skinned Deep


Shorts

1. Kiwi!
2.
tma/svetlo/tma
3. This way up

4. oktapodi
5. La Maison en Petit Cubes
6. flora
7. meat love
8. Evil Demon Golf Ball from Hell!!!


Films Viewed Per Decade - first / repeat viewings

2000s - 47  /  2
1990s - 10  /
1980s - 10 /
1970s - / 1
1960s - 4  /
1950s - 3  /
1940s - 2 / 3
1930s - 1  /
1920s - 1  /
1910s - 0  /
1900s - 0  /

English language films  - 70 / 6
Foreign language films - 16 / 0

< Message edited by Lex Romero -- 4/8/2009 1:31:51 PM >


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My Film list for 2009:

http://www.empireonline.com/forum/tm.asp?m=2164869&mpage=39

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Post #: 1169
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 14/3/2009 10:22:44 AM   
chris_scott01


Posts: 3081
Joined: 5/1/2006
quote:

ORIGINAL: Jasiri

On a similar note Chris have you seen Hou Hsiao-hsien's Cafe Lumiere ? Commissioned by Shochiku to mark the centenary of Ozu's birth.



I haven't seen it, I'd really like to get into some Korean films, I've only seen a couple.  I haven't seen Tokyo-Ga either. Film takes up so much time   I take it Cafe Lumiere is worth a look?

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Post #: 1170
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