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RE: Top 100 Films I've Watched This Year: 2009 - 28/2/2009 10:44:02 PM   
jamesbondguy


Posts: 6238
Joined: 6/1/2007
From: The Village Green

Blue Jeans (1958)
Director: Jacques Rozier

So, Rozier has been forgotten , then- in the English-speaking part of the world at least, but it’s still a faith hardly befitting of him. He was one of the original major writers for Cahiers du Cinema, and Truffaut and Godard both wrote enthusiastically of his early work in some of their last pieces before they too became film-makers. I think he’s older than the both of them, but his work seems as dedicated to youthful vigour as early Godard and much of Truffaut. Indeed, Godard gave him quite a salute in his 1994 film JLG/JLG, an melancholy and beautiful attempt at a cinematic self-portrait, where Godard paid homage to more obvious heroes like Nicholas Ray, Roberto Rossellini, Sam Fuller, but also Rozier. Where does this enthusiasm for his work for his cult following come from? It’s hard to decipher, for his work is often verging on the impossible to see (and he only makes around one feature a decade, seemingly)- which is why one should download Blue Jeans now, as it’s recently, seemingly out of nowhere, popped up out of nowhere on several of the bigger sites, complete with serviceable English subtitles.
It was made in 1958, and it’s an early work, although a minor masterpiece of the New Wave short film-making (it’s only 22 minutes in length). It’s flaws are evident- the characters aren’t up to much, it takes a little while to get going, and one can dismiss on the grounds of it’s inconsequentiality, although I think that same quality is a plus. For it’s one of those great beach films, and one of those great French beach films- like Les Vacances de M. Hulot and a couple of Rohmers, which capture the unique feeling of being at a seaside (and more specifically a French one) so accurately that one can almost taste the sea breeze and imagine the seagulls flying overhead- quite an achievement since we can’t see the blue of the sea, or the golden sand, for Hulot and this film are shot in crisp, tender black and white. I would find it easy to believe Tati’s comedy masterpiece was an inspiration, for this short film has the same kind of wistfulness and whimsy. It’s imagery is so sensual, so tender that at times it makes one catch their breath- witness the scene with the two lovers on the beach, or the two friends walk by the sea-side eyeing up girls, or the sequence where four people fit impractically onto one vespa. It’s a hymn to youthful energies and romantic naiveté (it seems that his chosen subject in his work is primarily teenagers), and it captures that feeling that one has all the time in the world (as one character explicitly states). It’s mix of the hazy and the vivid is so close to those days on the beach, and in the beach-side metropolises (here Cannes), which have sprung up around them- and Cannes looks inviting here, especially at night. But it could also be taken as a view of how America has affected French teenagers, and French life in general- all the male teens swagger and hold themselves in a desperate imitation of James Dean, and they hang around outside multiple Esso stations dotting the countryside. These kids have probably seen one too many American rock’n’roll films and live out life as if they were inside one. So it’s more than worth seeing, then. It’s a minor beauty, as crisp, as humorous, as fresh, as dreamy, as youthfully vigorous and energetic as it’s even been, and it’s universal- this could be anywhere. Now I live in the hope of seeing two of his feature-lengths, the acclaimed Adieu Philippine and Du Cote D’Orouet - the French DVD release has no subtitles. Time to learn the language properly, I think.

Histoire(s) Du Cinema (1988-1998, Jean-Luc Godard)
Une Femme est Une Femme (1961, Jean-Luc Godard)
The Singing Detective (1986, Aimel) -
Dans Paris (2005, Honore)
The Roaring Twenties (1939, Walsh)
Chat Perches (2004, Marker)
Detour (1945, Ulmer)
Sweet Sixteen (Loach)
Paris Nous Appartient (1961, Rivette)
Radio On (1979, Petit)  
Gun Crazy (1950, Lewis)
Happy-Go-Lucky (2008, Leigh)
Tickets (Olmi, Kiarostami, Loach)
The Filth and The Fury (2003, Temple)
Joy Division (Gee, 2007)
Love Meetings (Pasolini, 1965)  
Somers Town (2007, Meadows)
This is England (2006, Meadows)

The Girl Who Lept Through Time (2006)

Election (1999, Payne)

High Hopes (Leigh)
Barton Fink (1991, Coen)
Slumdog Millionaire (2008, Boyle)
Carrie (1976, De Palma)
King of Kong (2007)

Burn After Reading (2007, Coen)

Shorts:

Antoine et Colette (1962, Truffaut)

Blue Jeans (Jacques Rozier, 1958)
Meetin' WA (Godard, 1986)
Bread And Ally/Breaktime (1970-72, Kiarostami)


_____________________________

Just like Geoffrey Ingram.

(in reply to Beetlejuice!)
Post #: 991
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 28/2/2009 10:58:23 PM   
Pigeon Army


Posts: 14612
Joined: 29/1/2006
From: Pixar HQ, George Lucas' Office.
quote:

ORIGINAL: TRM

quote:

ORIGINAL: Gimli The Dwarf
I had hoped to top 100 before March and PA a run for his money,


Im still pretty optimistic he will slow down soon since he should be back at uni. I think im still about 10 behind you though anyway


Sadly, this is likely. However, I shall still put up a valiant fight. I'm going down swinging, bitches.


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rinc
She's supposed to be 13! I'd want her to be very attractive though


quote:

ORIGINAL: MonsterCat
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army
Stop being mean to Deviation

No.

(in reply to TRM)
Post #: 992
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 28/2/2009 11:20:40 PM   
Pigeon Army


Posts: 14612
Joined: 29/1/2006
From: Pixar HQ, George Lucas' Office.
Seeing as it's now March here in New Zealand, here's my February stats.

1.       Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004, Gondry) - 5/5
2.       Laura (1944, Preminger) - 5/5

3.       The Usual Suspects (1995, Singer) - 4.5/5*
4.       The Prestige (2006, Nolan) - 4.5/5**

5.       Slumdog Millionaire (2008, Boyle) - 4.5/5
6.       Out of the Past (1947, Tourneur) - 4.5/5
7.       24 Hour Party People (2002, Winterbottom) - 4.5/5

8.      
Thank You For Smoking (2005, Reitman) - 4.5/5*

9.       Little Miss Sunshine (2006, Dayton & Faris) - 4.5/5
10.     Psycho (1960, Hitchcock) - 4.5/5

11.    
Bad Day at Black Rock (1955, Sturges) - 4.5/5

12.    
The Right Stuff (1983, Kaufman) - 4.5/5

13.    
Death at a Funeral (2007, Oz) - 4.5/5

14.     Cloverfield (2008, Reeves) - 4.5/5*

15.    
Heavenly Creatures (1994, Jackson) - 4.5/5

16.     Paprika (2006, Kon) - 4.5/5

17.    
Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan (2006, Charles) - 4/5*

18.     
3-4 x jûgatsu
(Boiling Point) (1990, Kitano) - 4/5
19.     The Simpsons Movie (2007, Silverman) - 4/5

20.    
Scream (1996, Craven) - 4/5


21.
    
Dean Spanley (2008, Fraser) - 4/5
22.     Control Room (2004, Noujaim) - 4/5
23.
     Being Julia (2004, Svabo) - 4/5

24.     Oldboy (2003, Park) - 4/5
25.     Lake Placid (1999, Miner) - 4/5**

26.    
Hellboy II: The Golden Army (2008, Del Toro) - 4/5

27.    
Chinatown (1974, Polanski) - 4/5
28.    
Sono otoko, ky
obo ni tsuki (Violent Cop) (1989, Kitano) - 4/5
29.     The Queen (2006, Frears) - 4/5
30.    
Happy Feet (2006, Miller) - 4/5
 

31.    
No. 2 (2006, Fraser) - 3.5/5
32.     El Mariachi (1992, Rodriguez) - 3.5/5
33.     Vantage Point (2008, Travis) - 3.5/5

34.    
Kill Bill Vol. 1 (2003, Tarantino) - 3.5/5 

35.    
On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969, R. Hunt) - 3.5/5

36.    
Futurama: The Beast with a Billion Backs (2008, Avanzino) - 3.5/5

37.    
Parenthood (1989, Howard) - 3.5/5

38.     Crank (2006, Neveldine & Taylor) - 3.5/5
39.
    
Thunderball (1965, Young) - 3.5/5
40.     You Only Live Twice (1967, Gilbert) - 3.5/5

41.
    
Il deserto rosso (The Red Desert) (1964, Antonioni) - 3/5

42. 
  Corpse Bride (2005, Burton & Johnson) - 2.5/5

43.   
Shark Attack 3: Megalodon (2002, Worth) - 2.5/5

44.   
Blue Thunder (1983, Badham) - 2.5/5

45.   
Elizabethtown (2005, Crowe) - 2/5

46.   
Meet The Spartans (2008, Friedberg & Seltzer) - 0/5


SHORT FILMS
1.     One Man Band (2005, Andrews & Jimenez) - 4.5/5*
2.     Six Shooter (2004, McDonagh) - 4.5/5
3.     Vinni-Pukh (Winnie Pooh) (1969, Khitruk) - 4.5/5
4.     Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog (2008, Whedon) - 4.5/5*

5.     Meme les pigeons vont au paradis (Even Pigeons Go To Heaven) (2007, Tourneux) - 4.5/5
6.     Valg
aften (Election Night) (1998, Thomas Jensen) - 4/5
7.     Jack-Jack Attack (2005, Bird) - 4/5*
8.     Fifty Percent Grey (2001, Robinson) - 4/5

9.     Oktapodi (2007, Various) - 4/5
10.   Vinni-Pukh idyot v gosti (Winnie the Pooh Goes Visiting) (1971, Khitruk) - 4/5

11.  
Ostrov (Island) (1973, Khitruk) - 4/5

12.   Jabberwocky (1971, Svankmajer) - 4/5
13.   9 (2005, Acker) - 4/5
14.   Boundin' (2003, Luckey & Gould) - 3.5/5**

15.   The Speaker (2006, Kahi) - 3.5/5
16.  
The Silent City (2006, Robinson) - 3.5/5**
17.   Ubornaya istoriya - Iyubovnaya istoriya (Lavatory Lovestory) (2007, Bronzit) - 3.5/5

18.   The Key to Reserva (2007, Scorsese) - 3/5
19.   Doodlebug (1997, Nolan) - 3/5
20.   Fierrot le pou (1990, Kassovitz) - 3/5


21.  
Life is Short (2006, Lindhome & Oskowitz) - 3/5
22.   Dysenchanted (2004, Miller) - 2/5

Decade Breakdown
00s - 42
90s - 09 
80s - 04
70s - 04
60s - 06
50s - 01
40s - 02
30s - 00
20s - 00

Top 20 Performances of February 2009
1.    Min-sik Choi as Dae-su Oh (Oldboy, 2003)
2.   
Jack Nicholson as Jake 'J.J.' Gittes (Chinatown, 1974)
3.    Sacha Baron Cohen as Borat Sagdeyev (Borat, 2006)
4.   
Brendan Gleeson as Donnelly (Six Shooter, 2004)
5.   
Anthony Perkins as Norman Bates (Psycho, 1960)

6.   
Aaron Eckhart as Nick Naylor (Thank You For Smoking, 2005)
7.    Kevin Spacey as Verbal Kint (The Usual Suspects, 1995)
8.    Kirk Douglas as Whit Sterling (Out of the Past, 1947)
9.    Jim Carrey as Joel Barish (Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, 2004)

10. 
Annette Bening as Julia Lambert (Being Julia, 2004)

11. 
Sam Neill as Dean Spanley (Dean Spanley, 2008)
12.  Jane Greer as Kathie Moffat (Out of the Past, 1947)

13. 
Dana Edwards as Det. Lt. Mark McPherson (Laura, 1944)

14. 
Peter O'Toole as Horatio Fisk (Dean Spanley, 2008)
15.  Kate Winslet as Clementine Kruczynski (Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, 2004)
16.  Clifton Webb as Waldo Lydecker (Laura, 1944)
17.  Helen Mirren as Queen Elizabeth II (The Queen, 2006)

18. 
Ruby Dee as Nanna Maria (No. 2, 2006)
19.  Steve Carrell as Frank Ginsberg (Little Miss Sunshine, 2006)
20. 
Spencer Tracey as John J. Macreedy (Bad Day at Black Rock, 1955)


< Message edited by Pigeon Army -- 28/2/2009 11:33:11 PM >


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rinc
She's supposed to be 13! I'd want her to be very attractive though


quote:

ORIGINAL: MonsterCat
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army
Stop being mean to Deviation

No.

(in reply to Pigeon Army)
Post #: 993
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 1/3/2009 12:23:55 AM   
Rinc


Posts: 12836
Joined: 2/10/2005
From: A park bench, with a newspaper quilt
Here's my stats for the month. I started off at a rapid pace and was on course to watch 50-60 this month but in the last 10 days i was a bit too busy and didn't manage to watch many.




1. The Bourne Supremacy (Greengrass, 2004) - 9
2. Saving Private Ryan (Spielberg, 1998) - 9
3. The Dark Knight (Nolan, 2008) - 8
4. Rio Bravo (Ford, 1959) - 8
5. Paths Of Glory (Kubrick, 1957) - 8
6. *The Grapes Of Wrath (Ford, 1940) - 8
7. Jurassic Park (Spielberg, 1993) - 8
8. Night Of The Hunter (Laughton, 1955) - 8
9. Evil Dead II (Raimi, 1987) - 8
10. Unbreakable (Shyamalan, 2000) - 8
11. *The Killing (Kubrick, 1956) - 7
12. Gremlins (Dante, 1984) - 7
13. Scarface (De Palma, 1983) - 7
14. Team America: World Police (Parker, 2004) - 7
15. Anchorman (McKay, 2004) - 7
16. North By Northwest (Hitchcock, 1959) - 7
17. *The Escapist (Wyatt, 2008) - 7
18. *Witness For The Prosecution (Wilder, 1957) - 7
19. Miami Vice (Mann, 2006) - 7
20. *Fast Times At Ridgemont High (Heckerling, 1982) - 7
21. Black Narcissus (Powell/Pressburger, 1947) - 7
22. *Shadow Of A Doubt (Hitchcock, 1943) - 6
23. *Scarface (Hawks, 1932) - 6
24. *All Quiet On The Western Front (Milestone, 1930) - 6
25. *Harvey (Koster, 1950) - 6
26. *The Lady Vanishes (Hitchcock, 1938) - 6
27. *Stage Fright (Hitchcock, 1950) - 6
28. *Drugstore Cowboy (Van Sant, 1989) - 6
29. *W (Stone, 2008) - 6
30. *Poltergeist (Hooper, 1982) - 6
31. *The Good, The Bad and The Weird (Kim, 2008) - 6
32. *Hard Candy (Slade, 2005) - 5
33. *It Happened One Night (Capra, 1934) - 5
34. *I Confess (Hitchcock, 1953) - 5
35. *Ashes of Time (Kar-Wai, 1994) - 4

Decades:

20's: 0
30's: 4
40's: 3
50's: 9
60's: 0
70's: 0
80's: 6
90's: 3
00's: 10

New Viewings: 19
Repeat Viewings: 16

< Message edited by Rinc -- 1/3/2009 12:26:25 AM >


_____________________________

No spoilers please:

Invisiotext:
[ color=#F1F1F1 ]text[ /color ]

(in reply to Pigeon Army)
Post #: 994
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 1/3/2009 10:14:21 AM   
Pigeon Army


Posts: 14612
Joined: 29/1/2006
From: Pixar HQ, George Lucas' Office.
48. Kumonosu jô (Throne of Blood) (1957, Kurosawa) - 4/5
Kurosawa's adaptation of one of my favourite Shakespeare plays, Macbeth, is an interesting beast, because it pares the play down to its basics and changes the ending, but doesn't lose much of the generally cynical outlook on human nature that drove Shakespeare's original. At one point, Macbeth-substitute Taketori Washizu (played with an undeniably appealing theatricality by Toshiro Mifune, truly inhabiting the outwardly aggressive yet inwardly paranoid and confused character) is told by his wife (brought to life with a restrained performance from Isuzu Yamada, interesting when juxtaposed against Mifune's performance) that "the first prophecies have been fulfilled without you doing a thing", and yet she eggs him on to actually get involved and kill the Great Lord in order to become Sovereign - at this point, the film makes very clear that greed and powerlust drives Washizu's wife, and confusion and weakness drives Washizu himself. Kurosawa doesn't beat around the bush when it comes to this, and he seems to spend less time painting an ambiguous portrait of Washizu/Macbeth than Shakespeare did, to the film's detriment, but overall, Throne of Blood is a gripping, highly theatrical, thought-provoking film that just isn't on the same level as Shakespeare's original play.

Also, I hate fucking wipe transitions. Why the fuck did Kurosawa use them? They don't enhance the film, and in fact do quite the opposite.

Short Films
9. La vielle dame et les pigeons (The Old Lady and the Pigeons) (1998, Chomet) - 4/5
A delightfully morbid tale of a French guardeme living in outrageous poverty, who decides to exploit an old lady's kindness to the obese pigeons around her house, dress up as a pigeon, and eat her food. The animation is fantastic, and the story is exciting and darkly hilarious, and by the time you get to the big reveal, the film has moved into ridiculously over-the-top - but no less fun - territory.

15. Papiroflexia (2007, Baldwin) - 4/5
An origami expert who can give his creations life gets pissed off with urbanisation and industrialisation, and so folds everything in the world in order to restore nature to its former glory. It's a sweet little animation, with a nice little message that doesn't feel forced, even if you come out of the film feeling slightly unaffected.

22. Sebastian's Voodoo (2008, Baldwin) - 3.5/5
A sentient voodoo doll manages to escape from his hook, and goes about rescuing his equally sentient voodoo doll buddies from their owner. The animation's a bit naff, and it's a bit like 9 in that the whole procedure feels slightly too sluggish and inconsequential, but the voodoo dolls, like 9's ragdolls, garner our sympathy because they are given enough scope and emotional depth in three minutes to make them almost human, and certainly more human than their human owner.

Performance List Additions
46.
Toshiro Mifune as Taketori Washizu (Throne of Blood, 1957)


< Message edited by Pigeon Army -- 1/3/2009 10:16:30 AM >


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rinc
She's supposed to be 13! I'd want her to be very attractive though


quote:

ORIGINAL: MonsterCat
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army
Stop being mean to Deviation

No.

(in reply to Rinc)
Post #: 995
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 1/3/2009 11:26:05 AM   
impqueen


Posts: 7474
Joined: 24/7/2006
February
 
01.        Badlands (Malick, 1973) USA
02.        The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring EE (Jackson, 2001) NZ/USA
03.        The Innocents (Clayton, 1961) UK
04.        Batman Begins (Nolan, 2005) USA   
05.        Hellboy II: The Golden Army (Del Toro, 2008) USA
06.        Frost/Nixon (Howard, 2008) USA
07.        Quick Change (Franklin/Murray, 1990) USA
08.        Mrs Pettigrew Lives for a Day (Nalluri, 2008) UK/USA
09.        The Beat That My Heart Skipped (Audiard, 2005) Fr
10.        The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers EE (Jackson, 2002) NZ/USA
 
11.        Back to the Future Part III (Zemeckis, 1990) USA
12.        Beckett (Glenville, 1964) UK
13.        Back to the Future (Zemeckis, 1985) USA
14.        Ghost Town (Koepp, 2008) USA
15.        The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King EE (Jackson, 2003) NZ/USA
16.        Battle Royale (Fukasaku, 2000) JPN
17.        Beauty and the Beast (Trousdale/Wise, 1991) USA
18.        Basil the Great Mouse Detective (Musker/Clements/Michener/Mattinson, 1986) USA
19.        The Boy Who Could Fly (Castle, 1986) USA  
20.        The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (Adamson, 2005) USA/UK      
 
21.        Bowfinger (Oz, 1999) USA
22.        Back to the Future Part II (Zemeckis, 1989) USA
23.        Bad Education (Almodóvar, 2004) SPN
24.        Bedknobs and Broomsticks (Stevenson, 1971) USA
25.        Push (McGuigan, 2009) USA (First View)
 
26.        The International (Tykwer, 2009) USA/UK/Ger (First View)
27.        Street Fighter (de Souza, 1994) USA
 
Decade:
1960: 02
1970: 02
1980: 04  
1990: 05
2000: 14  

< Message edited by impqueen -- 1/3/2009 11:36:05 AM >


_____________________________

Yes, always.


(in reply to Pigeon Army)
Post #: 996
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 1/3/2009 1:37:45 PM   
Piles


Posts: 5545
Joined: 6/8/2007
From: Whalley Range
JABBERWOCKY (1971, Jan Svankmajer)
 
My introduction to the man Jamesbondguy has heralded as an animation-come-surrealism legend, the Czech Jan Svankmajer, came in the form of “Jabberwocky”. The film is named after Lewis Carroll’s poem, which is – incidentally – read out at the start of the film by a cheeky little girl who slurs her words. The visuals, however, are of toys in a magical room. They are brought to life, seemingly, by a set of clothes owned by a small boy. They are seemingly irrelevant to one and other, but all involve toys of some sort consorting and communicating with each other before being torn apart by a large black cat.
 
Now, I know that with most surrealism films you can’t really find a definitive answer to talk about in your review, and that’s certainly the case with “Jabberwocky”. This film, like the films of every surrealist from Bunuel to Lynch, is open to continuous scrutiny and much argument. However, the thoughts and conclusions drawn up in the next few paragraphs are mine and mine only, and although they are probably wrong, they are what I took from the film. JBG said in another thread that the film is about childlike innocence, a theme I could probably draw to the film if I wanted to write a review that made me look smart for “getting” the film in accordance with what Svankmajer wanted me to get. So, without further delaying, here are my thoughts.
 
In “Jabberwocky”, the source of all of the destruction – arguably – is the big black cat. In between every seemingly nonsensical interlude, we are returned to a very simple puzzle in which a black line attempts to avoid dead ends and gain its freedom. Each time it reaches one of these dead ends, the black cat leaps through the blocks, causing them to crash onto the floor. As I said, the obvious cause of destruction is the cat, but is he the cause of all the destruction? Or the only cause of destruction? No. In fact, almost all of the characters cause some trouble in their own way. The little statuette (is it a statuette? I think so) dances around its table on the top of a knife, causing the table top doily to get ripped and unusable. The dolls eat each other. Even nature, usually heralded as the hero in films, obstructs the room with its overreaching branches and ends up hiding our “protagonist” from shot.
 
So, in each of the scenes, we trouble, strife, and eventually destruction. And not one of the characters is innocent in the whole mess; not even the little set of clothes on their trusty hanger. They are the creator of this whole sorry mess, and each of the problems have stemmed from his almighty hand. It could be an attack on religion (I don’t know if Svankmajer is distinctly religious or not, so this thought hasn’t really fully formed in my mind), or it could be an attack on authority in general. Who knows? But the thing that we presume to be highest in the proverbial food chain is causing as much mess as anything else, if not more. And then, the final shot, of the clothes crumpled in the corner and the black, business-like, imposing clothes replacing it on the hanger, is what throws up the possibility of the theme being of the loss of childhood innocence. But it could also support my destruction theory; even the creator lies in the wayside. Everything hurts everything. There are no gallant heroes or innocent protectors.
 
The short poem that is read out at the start of the film, Lewis Carroll’s “Jabberwocky” that also lead to the worst of Terry Gilliam’s films, also supports my theory. The poem itself, when read without our narrator’s slurry voice and hard-to-understand mannerisms, is of a man who hears about a mythical creature and goes to slay it. However, in the poem itself, this Jabberwocky doesn’t kill anybody. The man hears the legend, strides to find the monster, and kills it. Again, this is senseless destruction, and although stories of the Jabberwocky’s murders are legend amongst the townsfolk, it only breeds more destruction in the hunt for it. I guess, all in all, Svankmajer is trying to point out the pointless cycle of destruction that runs, unhindered, through human life. Or, is he? Who knows. What I do know is that’s what I took from it, and although I’m probably wrong, I thought it to be a thoughtful and clever metaphor that makes me want to discover more Svankmajer and form more silly ideas about what he’s trying to say.
 
Verdict
Meanings, meanings, meanings. At the end of the day, whatever you think the film is trying to say, “Jabberwocky” is still a humorous, beautiful, bizarre and playful film from the best Czech surrealist animator I’ve ever heard of. 9/10

-----

Also seen; Dekalog (9/10), which is a brilliantly thoughtful peice of genius from Keislowski - a man who is quickly becoming one of my favourite directors... and certainly in my top 3 european directors along with Rohmer and Lang. I saw the first couple episodes of this series last year, but the majority of it was viewed in 2009 which means I think I'm allowed to include it in this list. It's difficult to conclude this ten hour film in just a couple of lines, so I'm not really going to try. All I'm going to say is that I loved it, and that I'll write a full review some time this year (I'm sure it will be reviewed in the top 50 directors thread I'm planning, as part of Keislowski's top 5).

The Lives of Others (9/10), which I liked less this time around than I have done in the past, but still really enjoyed. I think it has less substance than I once thought (it's messages on observation and voyeurism are too light and obvious), but it still packs more of an emotional punch than any film I've seen this year. Ulrich Muhe is fantastic as the protaganist, the Stasi investigator Weisler, and delivers a subtle yet heart warming performance as Weisler begins to change. The ending is simply beautiful, perhaps one of thebest epilogues of all time, and debutant Donnersmack rarely puts a foot wrong all film. I almost wish they could have given out two Best Foreign Language Picture awards in 2006.

I did the Bourne trilogy last night with my uni housemates (awesome evening), and I'll put extended thoughts on that up later, but all I'll say now is; 1. Bourne Ultimatum (8/10), 2. Bourne Supremacy (7/10), 3. Bourne Identity (7/10).

Again, I will add these 6 films to my list when I get back to my computer.

_____________________________

Top 100 Moz Songs / Top 100 Films

(in reply to impqueen)
Post #: 997
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 1/3/2009 5:59:15 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54599
Joined: 1/10/2005
The International (Tykwer, 2009)

Thank heavens for trailers – if not for the late start to the actual film I’d have missed it thanks to the usual muppets who apparently don’t know the national speed limit on a single carriageway.

Anyway – a proper grown-up film. Efficient thriller, credible story (with a minor mmm and an intellectual disagreement on the nature of 3rd World debt – but I digress). While the main characters have the required difficultish bosses they at least work genuinely as colleagues, Owen’s office looks as real a working desk as you can get and with no dodgy romance sub-plot and the procedural works very well indeed. Owen and Watts are Interpol and New York DA respectively, part of a cross-border team examining the criminal actions of a bank based in Luxembourg (the ICBB – as opposed to the IBCC!). The writer keeps the story relatively simple avoiding the potential for unnecessary flourishes  – my husband thought it felt more like watching something like State of Play than some of the plots we’ve been subjected to in the cinema recently.

What had us talking on the way home was the visuals. I’ve just read French’s review and he mentions the centrality of the architecture in the film too, although I’m not sure I agree with his theory. We get fantastic views of a Berlin rail station, Interpol – a brilliant shot of the bank building itself with the glass windows towering above the parallel lines below. When new scenes start we aren’t already in the rooms, e.g. we enter Elli’s flat after the camera hovers outside the façade. The Italian political rally and the aerial shots throughout the scene are superb. But the piece de resistance is a brilliant set piece in the Guggenheim in New York (Which oddly, after these other facades, looks rather less impressive than the buildings of big business). It is done to feel real – genuinely panicked bystanders who probably think it is an art installation at first. And either the Guggenheim are damn good sports or that set cost as much as the film itself. Great stuff.

It doesn’t have the pace of a Bourne but, then, it isn’t meant to – fewer cartoonish sideplots meant we could enjoy the film without our intelligence also being slightly insulted. And bankers were the bad guys – could it get more topical? Decent performances all round, particularly Owen, Mueller-Stahl as the ‘fixer’ for the bank and the bank’s chief, the always excellent Ulrich Thomsen (who has almost lost the accent to his English speaking voice, interestingly). But the real star, for me, is director Tykwer – after the difficult Perfume, this gives a far better idea of what he can do behind a camera.


_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to Piles)
Post #: 998
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 1/3/2009 7:32:43 PM   
richCie


Posts: 4028
Joined: 11/11/2006
From: Wells, England

quote:

ORIGINAL: elab49

The International (Tykwer, 2009)

Thank heavens for trailers – if not for the late start to the actual film I’d have missed it thanks to the usual muppets who apparently don’t know the national speed limit on a single carriageway.

Anyway – a proper grown-up film. Efficient thriller, credible story (with a minor mmm and an intellectual disagreement on the nature of 3rd World debt – but I digress). While the main characters have the required difficultish bosses they at least work genuinely as colleagues, Owen’s office looks as real a working desk as you can get and with no dodgy romance sub-plot and the procedural works very well indeed. Owen and Watts are Interpol and New York DA respectively, part of a cross-border team examining the criminal actions of a bank based in Luxembourg (the ICBB – as opposed to the IBCC!). The writer keeps the story relatively simple avoiding the potential for unnecessary flourishes  – my husband thought it felt more like watching something like State of Play than some of the plots we’ve been subjected to in the cinema recently.

What had us talking on the way home was the visuals. I’ve just read French’s review and he mentions the centrality of the architecture in the film too, although I’m not sure I agree with his theory. We get fantastic views of a Berlin rail station, Interpol – a brilliant shot of the bank building itself with the glass windows towering above the parallel lines below. When new scenes start we aren’t already in the rooms, e.g. we enter Elli’s flat after the camera hovers outside the façade. The Italian political rally and the aerial shots throughout the scene are superb. But the piece de resistance is a brilliant set piece in the Guggenheim in New York (Which oddly, after these other facades, looks rather less impressive than the buildings of big business). It is done to feel real – genuinely panicked bystanders who probably think it is an art installation at first. And either the Guggenheim are damn good sports or that set cost as much as the film itself. Great stuff.

It doesn’t have the pace of a Bourne but, then, it isn’t meant to – fewer cartoonish sideplots meant we could enjoy the film without our intelligence also being slightly insulted. And bankers were the bad guys – could it get more topical? Decent performances all round, particularly Owen, Mueller-Stahl as the ‘fixer’ for the bank and the bank’s chief, the always excellent Ulrich Thomsen (who has almost lost the accent to his English speaking voice, interestingly). But the real star, for me, is director Tykwer – after the difficult Perfume, this gives a far better idea of what he can do behind a camera.



all of a sudden thanks to this review and the fact that it got Sight and Sound's film of the month has made me interested in what i had considered likely to be a boring run of the mill hollywood blockbuster...
might give this a shot though

_____________________________

A Blog!! http://richcie.wordpress.com//

#5 member of The Wire fan club. PM Dantes Inferno to join.


(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 999
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 1/3/2009 7:47:23 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54599
Joined: 1/10/2005
I think when I initially saw bits about it I was thinking another dreary rerun of Peacemaker. But I thoroughly enjoyed it, and not at all what I expected.

Also, kudos to cinematographer Griebe - the aerial stuff of NY really doesn't look like NY - or a different take on it. It is excellent stuff.

< Message edited by elab49 -- 1/3/2009 9:12:14 PM >


_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to richCie)
Post #: 1000
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 1/3/2009 9:31:15 PM   
Pigeon Army


Posts: 14612
Joined: 29/1/2006
From: Pixar HQ, George Lucas' Office.
quote:

ORIGINAL: elab49

The International (Tykwer, 2009)

Thank heavens for trailers – if not for the late start to the actual film I'd have missed it thanks to the usual muppets who apparently don't know the national speed limit on a single carriageway.

Anyway – a proper grown-up film. Efficient thriller, credible story (with a minor mmm and an intellectual disagreement on the nature of 3rd World debt – but I digress). While the main characters have the required difficultish bosses they at least work genuinely as colleagues, Owen's office looks as real a working desk as you can get and with no dodgy romance sub-plot and the procedural works very well indeed. Owen and Watts are Interpol and New York DA respectively, part of a cross-border team examining the criminal actions of a bank based in Luxembourg (the ICBB – as opposed to the IBCC!). The writer keeps the story relatively simple avoiding the potential for unnecessary flourishes  – my husband thought it felt more like watching something like State of Play than some of the plots we've been subjected to in the cinema recently.

What had us talking on the way home was the visuals. I've just read French's review and he mentions the centrality of the architecture in the film too, although I'm not sure I agree with his theory. We get fantastic views of a Berlin rail station, Interpol – a brilliant shot of the bank building itself with the glass windows towering above the parallel lines below. When new scenes start we aren't already in the rooms, e.g. we enter Elli's flat after the camera hovers outside the façade. The Italian political rally and the aerial shots throughout the scene are superb. But the piece de resistance is a brilliant set piece in the Guggenheim in New York (Which oddly, after these other facades, looks rather less impressive than the buildings of big business). It is done to feel real – genuinely panicked bystanders who probably think it is an art installation at first. And either the Guggenheim are damn good sports or that set cost as much as the film itself. Great stuff.

It doesn't have the pace of a Bourne but, then, it isn't meant to – fewer cartoonish sideplots meant we could enjoy the film without our intelligence also being slightly insulted. And bankers were the bad guys – could it get more topical? Decent performances all round, particularly Owen, Mueller-Stahl as the 'fixer' for the bank and the bank's chief, the always excellent Ulrich Thomsen (who has almost lost the accent to his English speaking voice, interestingly). But the real star, for me, is director Tykwer – after the difficult Perfume, this gives a far better idea of what he can do behind a camera.



I've been amped for this film for quite a while, really excited because I love Owen, Watts and Thomsen, and Run Lola Run is simply an amazing film, but then all the lukewarm reviews started filing in and I was getting quite worried. Nice to see that it's getting some good reception, though - I'm still checking it out anyway.


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rinc
She's supposed to be 13! I'd want her to be very attractive though


quote:

ORIGINAL: MonsterCat
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army
Stop being mean to Deviation

No.

(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 1001
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 1/3/2009 9:50:03 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54599
Joined: 1/10/2005
The reviews over here seem fine - I've looked up the Sight and Sound one after Richcie's comment and it looks pretty fair to me. Phillip French in the Observer liked it too. I've no idea what Ian Nathan was on - he seemed to have written his review based solely on his own preconceptions and a misleading trailer going in and how they didn't meet them. You don't need a cobbled on romance, and the one thing this very deliberately didn't do was ape Bourne. Glib one-liners aren't needed outside fun action films - although the scene with a doctor in NY is pretty funny, but believably so.

_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to Pigeon Army)
Post #: 1002
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 1/3/2009 9:59:29 PM   
chris_scott01


Posts: 3081
Joined: 5/1/2006
Another month gone a only a few changes to my ongoing top 100 that I started last year, but welcome additions they certainly are.  Kon Ichikawa is fast becoming another favourite director with The Burmese Harp sliding into the top 20 with ease.  The Cloud Capped Star, The Leopard, Death In Venice, Scenes From A Marriage and of course Rocco and His Brothers earn well respected places.

  1. La Strada (1954, Federico Fellini)
  2. Rocco e i suoi Fratelli (1960, Luchino Visconti)
  3. The Wind (1928, Victor Sjöström)
  4. Yama no Oto (1954, Mikio Naruse)
  5. Banshun (1949, Yasujiro Ozu)
  6. Black Narcissus (1947, Michael Powell & Emeric Pressburger)
  7. L’Armée des ombres (1969, Jean-Pierre Melville)
  8. Tôkyô monogatari (1953, Yasujiro Ozu)
  9. Touch of Evil (1958, Orson Welles)
  10. Aguirre, der Zorn Gottes (1972, Werner Herzog)
  11. Jeux Interdits (1952, René Clément)
  12. Tôkyô Boshoku (1957, Yasujiro Ozu)
  13. Biruma no Tategoto (1956, Kon Ichikawa)
  14. Shichinin no Samurai (1954, Akira Kurosawa)
  15. Saikaku Ichidai Onna (1952, Kenji Mizoguchi)
  16. Nagareru (1956, Mikio Naruse)
  17. Smultronstället (1957, Ingmar Bergman)
  18. Chimes at Midnight (1965, Orson Welles)
  19. Les Enfants du Paradis (1945, Marcel Carné)
  20. La Terra Trema (1948, Luchino Visconti)
  21. Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans (1927, F.W. Murnau)
  22. Citizen Kane (1941, Orson Welles)
  23. The Red Shoes (1948, Michael Powell & Emeric Pressburger)
  24. Il Gattopardo (1963, Luchino Visconti)
  25. L’Atalante (1934, Jean Vigo)
  26. Marketa Lazarová (1967, František Vlácil)
  27. Sanshô Dayû (1954, Kenji Mizoguchi)
  28. Bakushû (1951, Yasujiro Ozu)
  29. Körkarlen (1921, Victor Sjöström)
  30. Pather Panchali (1955, Satyajit Ray)
  31. Ugetsu Monogatari (1953, Kenji Mizoguchi)
  32. Meshi (1951, Mikio Naruse)
  33. The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (1943, Michael Powell & Emeric Pressburger)
  34. Fitzcarraldo (1982, Werner Herzog)
  35. Higanbana (1958, Yasujiro Ozu)
  36. His Girl Friday (1940, Howard Hawks)
  37. Le Notti Bianche (1957, Luchino Visconti)
  38. Genroku Chûshingura (1941, Kenji Mizoguchi)
  39. La Notte (1961, Michaelangelo Antonioni)
  40. Charulata (1964, Satyajit Ray)
  41. Le Doulos (1963, Jean-Pierre Melville)
  42. A Matter of Life and Death (1946, Michael Powell & Emeric Pressburger)
  43. Aparajito (1956, Satyajit Ray)
  44. Ansatsu (1964, Masahiro Shinoda)
  45. Night and the City (1950, Jules Dassin)
  46. Sanma no aji (1962, Yasujiro Ozu)
  47. F For Fake (1974, Orson Welles)
  48. Fukushû Suruwa Wareniari (1979, Shohei Imamura)
  49. Det Sjunde Inseglet (1957, Ingmar Bergman)
  50. The Crowd (1928, King Vidor)
  51. Scener ur ett äktenskap (1973, Ingmar Bergman)
  52. Seppuku (1962, Masaki Kobayashi)
  53. Peeping Tom (1960, Michael Powell)
  54. The Tragedy of Othello: The Moor of Venice (1952, Orson Welles)
  55. The Big Sleep (1946, Howard Hawks)
  56. Apur Sansar (1959, Satyajit Ray)
  57. The Magnificent Ambersons (1942, Orson Welles)
  58. Rashômon (1950, Akira Kurosawa)
  59. Nattvardsgästerna (1962, Ingmar Bergman)
  60. A Streetcar Named Desire (1951, Elia Kazan)
  61. A Canterbury Tale (1944, Michael Powell & Emeric Pressburger)
  62. Le Quatre cent coups (1959, Francois Truffaut)
  63. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia (1974, Sam Peckinpah)
  64. Le Deuxième Souffle (1966, Jean-Pierre Melville)
  65. Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid (1973, Sam Peckinpah)
  66. M (1931, Fritz Lang)
  67. Der Himmel über Berlin (1987, Wim Wenders)
  68. Mahanagar (1963, Satyajit Ray)
  69. The Wild Bunch (1969, Sam Peckinpah)
  70. The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (2007, Andrew Dominik)
  71. Häxan (1922, Benjamin Christensen)
  72. There Will be Blood (2007, Paul Thomas Anderson)
  73. Hiroshima Mon Amour (1959, Alain Resnais)
  74. Point Blank (1967, John Boorman)
  75. Andrei Rublyov (1969, Andrei Tarkovsky)
  76. Le Samouraï (1967, Jean-Pierre Melville)
  77. Hadaka no Shima (1960, Kaneto Shindo)
  78. Meghe Dhaka Tara (1960, Ritwik Ghatak)
  79. Nobi (1959, Kon Ichikawa)
  80. Death in Venice (1971, Luchino Visconti)
  81. Persona (1966, Ingmar Bergman)
  82. Le Chagrin et la Pitié (1969, Marcel Ophuls)
  83. Double Indemnity (1944, Billy Wilder)
  84. The Constant Gardener (2005, Fernando Meirelles)
  85. Kapurush (1965, Satyajit Ray)
  86. Nattvardsgästerna (1962, Ingmar Bergman)
  87. Umarete wa mita keredo (1932, Yasujiro Ozu)
  88. Seance on a Wet Afternoon (1964, Bryan Forbes)
  89. The Trial (1962, Orson Welles)
  90. Akasen Chitai (1956, Kenji Mizoguchi)
  91. Le Cercle Rouge (1970, Jean-Pierre Melville)
  92. Seventh Heaven (1927, Frank Borzage)
  93. Vampyr (1932, Carl Theodor Dreyer)
  94. Thieves’ Highway (1949, Jules Dassin)
  95. Ride the High Country (1962, Sam Peckinpah)
  96. No Country for Old Men (2007, Joel Coen & Ethan Coen)
  97. Humanity and Paper Balloons (1937, Sadao Yamanaka)
  98. Broken Lance (1954, Edward Dmytryk)
  99. Sweet Smell of Success (1957, Alexander Mackendrick)
  100. Gion Bayashi (1953, Kenji Mizoguchi)


_____________________________

rapidite! rapidite!

(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 1003
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 2/3/2009 12:07:04 PM   
Pigeon Army


Posts: 14612
Joined: 29/1/2006
From: Pixar HQ, George Lucas' Office.
36. Easy Riders, Raging Bulls: How the Sex, Drugs and Rock 'n' Roll Generation Saved Hollywood (2003, Bowser) - 4/5
And so it was that I inadvertently watched two films involving Jean-Luc Godard today. This, the first, tells the story of the late 1960s-1970s American 'new wave', in which directors like Francis Ford Coppola, William Friedkin, Arthur Penn, Hal Ashby, Roman Polanski, Sam Peckinpah, Martin Scorsese, George Lucas, Peter Bogdanovich, Steven Spielberg and others revolutionised the way films were created in America. The film's incredibly interesting, filled with a lot of insight into the scene that fuelled this cinematic renaissance and the films actually making up this renaissance, and while there are some notable exceptions given short shrift during the doco (Michael Cimino and Woody Allen are two American breakouts in this time I was surprised were shafted), the talking heads are all more than captivating and Bowser's direction is crisp and assured.

93. 2 ou 3 choses que je sais d'elle (2 or 3 Things I Know About Her) (1967, Godard) - 3/5
It has its moments. The film's very intellectually stimulating, even if it refuses to approach communism in an objective light, instead painting it rosy colours and tying it off with a cute pink ribbon, while demonising its ideological opposite, capitalism (in a probable oversight by Godard, there's a wonderful moment where a Nobel Prize winner and a student are discussing communist ethics, and they sound all very nice, then a waiter comes and gives them drinks - and the student's ordered that symbol of American globalisation, a Coca-Cola). The things it has to say on language, on the dehumanising nature of society's constant industrialisation, urbanisation and globalisation, and on the challenges of appearing ethical and human in the face of gross injustices worldwide, are interesting to listen to and contemplate. However, unlike A bout de souffle, which complemented its ideas with a beating heart and scintillating characters, 2 or 3 Things suffers in that the characters are generally bland and lacking in identity, which is odd considering Godard's penchant for close-ups on faces and focusing on singular people rather than groups. They all talk the same - like Godard - they all act fairly blandly, and they're sidelined for the plethora of ideas Godard wants to get out, and the film suffers. Much like, but better than, Richard Linklater's dreary and painful Waking Life, 2 or 3 Things focuses too much on its ideas and too little on the characters representing them. If Godard had given the film some heart, it would be ten times better than it is in its current state. But it just feels somewhat empty, more like a lecture on ideological standpoints on various issues rather than a film.


_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rinc
She's supposed to be 13! I'd want her to be very attractive though


quote:

ORIGINAL: MonsterCat
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army
Stop being mean to Deviation

No.

(in reply to chris_scott01)
Post #: 1004
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 2/3/2009 12:08:30 PM   
Jasiri


Posts: 2496
Joined: 23/10/2005
quote:

ORIGINAL: chris_scott01

Another month gone a only a few changes to my ongoing top 100 that I started last year, but welcome additions they certainly are.  Kon Ichikawa is fast becoming another favourite director with The Burmese Harp sliding into the top 20 with ease. 



Judging by where it is in both lists you obviously liked Fires on the Plain too.I think you may have made a typo though as you've got them the wrong way round.

(in reply to chris_scott01)
Post #: 1005
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 2/3/2009 12:22:58 PM   
MOTH

 

Posts: 3479
Joined: 3/10/2005
From: Sittin' on the dock of the bay
catching up on a few recent films

The Boy in The Striped Pyjamas (Mark Herman, 2008)
An earnest, if slightly implausible, tale benefitting from two natural performances from the young leads. Ultimately, it's too lightweight to be deeply affecting, but it does deserve credit for the ending which, given the subject matter, is both fitting and commendably restrained (6/10)

Doubt (John Patrick Shanley, 2008)
An intelligent, dialogue driven story, but fairly clumsy in its execution, particular the overuse of 'symbolic' weather. As you'd expect, this is an actor's showpiece, but personally I found Adams too irritating and Streep too mannered and scenery-chewing to be truly credible. Luckily, we have the brilliant Hoffman to save the day, whose superbly ambiguous performance keeps the moral boundaries shifting and hence the interes. Unfortunately, this ambiguity is undermined by a crucial scene late on, in which the script flounders a bit and strongly suggests whether or not Fr Flynn is guilty of the accusations against him. Ironically, a film called Doubt could have done with a little more doubt in it to be more effective. (6/10)

The Escapist (Rupert Wyatt, 2008)
An entertaining prison break film given extra weight by Brian Cox in particular. The cross-cutting back and forth between the planning and actual escape effectively ratchets up the tension and makes up for the usual cliches and implausibilities than turn up along the way. And it builds to a thoroughly unexpected ending, which walks the tightrope between gimmicky and clever, but just about pulls it off. (7/10)

< Message edited by MOTH -- 2/3/2009 12:23:25 PM >


_____________________________

I've only gone and set up a blog! This week I've been mostly reviewing The Lego Movie and Wadjda. Click: The Fast Picture Show

(in reply to Jasiri)
Post #: 1006
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 2/3/2009 2:03:30 PM   
ElephantBoy

 

Posts: 8627
Joined: 13/4/2006
High new entries for The 400 Blows (Les Quatre Cents Coups) (Francois Truffaut,1959,101 Min) 8.5/10
His touching debut about loneiness,families,the joys of childhood and the school systerm is a very steady and thought provoking watch.

Rebecca (Alfred Hitchcock,1940,130 Min) 8/10

Twelve Monkeys (Terry Gilliam,1995,129 Min) 8/10

Office Space (Mike Judge,1999,89 Min) 4/10
What a joke this film is

and i'll have you know elab49 I quite like Trust the Man

(in reply to MOTH)
Post #: 1007
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 2/3/2009 2:16:20 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54599
Joined: 1/10/2005
quote:

ORIGINAL: ElephantBoy


Office Space (Mike Judge,1999,89 Min) 4/10
What a joke this film is

and i'll have you know elab49 I quite like Trust the Man


Was that one of Gimli's captured on a drunken hen night films?

Still - I like Office Space.

_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to ElephantBoy)
Post #: 1008
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 2/3/2009 2:30:38 PM   
ElephantBoy

 

Posts: 8627
Joined: 13/4/2006
Yeah, the fact it's got Maggie in just meant i had to see it, i worship the ground that woman walks on

Office Space, lets see?
Pointless plot, written like a sitcom, paper thin characters, no emotional investment in either plot or said characters, some lazy performances and Jennifer Aniston just phoniey it in for vairty, and the worse thing is i feel more sorry for her than anyone else.

(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 1009
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 2/3/2009 2:40:21 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54599
Joined: 1/10/2005
Ah, but I loved it.

Elephantboy - do you work in a soulless office, by any chance? Stephen Root and Gary Cole - oh so recognisable and such great fun. And the photocopier = the cheer that got first time I saw it in company (of fellow office drones ).

Oddly - I still don't like Beavis & Butthead, which is what put me off watching Office Space for ages.

_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to ElephantBoy)
Post #: 1010
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 2/3/2009 2:46:40 PM   
ElephantBoy

 

Posts: 8627
Joined: 13/4/2006
There goes the Nail firmly on the head, because i actually liked Beavis and Butthead.  I guess to answer your point, the fact something might be realistic doesn't make it effective.  The problem is these typical down beat/life afiarming indie flicks seem to use so called realistic moments as a excuse not to drive plot on or create anything dramtic.  For me it's too showy and adds nothing.  I think you can be saying something without actually saying something if you see what i mean.

(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 1011
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 2/3/2009 2:52:24 PM   
Rhubarb


Posts: 24508
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: No Direction Home

quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army
(in a probable oversight by Godard, there's a wonderful moment where a Nobel Prize winner and a student are discussing communist ethics, and they sound all very nice, then a waiter comes and gives them drinks - and the student's ordered that symbol of American globalisation, a Coca-Cola).


Les enfants de Marx et Coca-Cola, as he mentioned in another film.

_____________________________

Team Ginge
WWLD?


quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan

You organisational skills sicken me, Rhubarb.



(in reply to Pigeon Army)
Post #: 1012
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 2/3/2009 2:52:36 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54599
Joined: 1/10/2005
quote:

ORIGINAL: ElephantBoy

I guess to answer your point, the fact something might be realistic doesn't make it effective. 


I neither said nor meant it was. It's partly a fairytale for office workers - absolutely nothing real about it!

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Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to ElephantBoy)
Post #: 1013
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 2/3/2009 3:31:36 PM   
Lex Romero


Posts: 412
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: southampton
I think we're all missing the important point:  It's just not funny. ¬_¬

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My Film list for 2009:

http://www.empireonline.com/forum/tm.asp?m=2164869&mpage=39

(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 1014
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 2/3/2009 3:36:12 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54599
Joined: 1/10/2005
Or it is. Humour can be so marmite

Catching up on a couple from Feb before my list for the month.

Eden (Hofmann, 2006)
 
An odd little film that to my mind successfully captures the sensual delight truly good food can generate. There are some similarities to As Good As It Gets in this tale of a shy overweight man called Gaston, one of the worlds greatest chefs, and a waitress (in a happy enough marriage but with nightmare in-laws). A chance meeting, and a developing obsession with Gaston's cooking, leads to a friendship of sorts, but Eden's emotionally messed-up husband objects and violence ensues. A slight tale, but with a certain charm and nicely performed. But the skill is in capturing that pleasure – the scene in the restaurant, as the diners singly and in pairs, savour their meal is done very well indeed.

_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to Lex Romero)
Post #: 1015
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 2/3/2009 5:39:13 PM   
DCMaximo


Posts: 992
Joined: 5/1/2007
From: Nottingham via Aidy Boothroyd's Palace of Wisdom
My list for February

1. Quiz Show (1994, Redford)
2. The Escapist (2008, Wyatt)
3. The Killers (1946, Siodmak)
4. The Last Picture Show (1971, Bogdanovich)
5. Jason Lives: Friday The 13th Part VI (1986, McLoughlin)
6. Once Upon A Time In The West (1968, Leone)
7. Trading Places (1983, Landis)
8. The World's Fastest Indian (2005, Donaldson)
9. Murderball (2005, Rubin & Shapiro)
10. Friday The 13th Part III (1982, Miner)

11. Friday The 13th Part 2 (1981, Miner)
12. Alligator (1980, Teague)
13. Twins (1988, Reitman)
14. Uncle Buck (1989, Hughes)
15. The Curious Case Of Benjamin Button (2008, Fincher)
16. Friday The 13th: The Final Chapter (1984, Zito)
17. The Bucket List (2008, Reiner)
18. Friday The 13th (2009, Nispel)
19. Australia (2008, Luhrman)
20. Cobra (1986, Cosmatos)
21. Friday The 13th: A New Beginning (1985, Steinmann)
22. Biker Boyz (2003, Bythewood)


Performances Of The Month

1. Brian Cox as Frank Perry (The Escapist)
2. Ben Johnson as Sam The Lion (The Last Picture Show)
3. Ralph Fiennes as Charles Van Doren (Quiz Show)
4. Burt Lancaster as Swede Anderson (The Killers)
5. Jason Robards as Cheyenne (Once Upon A Time In The West)
6. Anthony Hopkins as Burt Munro (The World's Fastest Indian)
7. Timothy Bottoms as Sonny Crawford (The Last Picture Show)
8. Edmond O'Brien as Jim Reardon (The Killers)
9. Rob Morrow as Dick Goodwin (Quiz Show)

[/quote]

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The Spanish Inquisition of the 'Get Carlton Banks a TV Spin-off' Association

"Carlotta was the kind of town where they spell trouble T-R-U-B-I-L, and if you try to correct them, they kill you"

(in reply to DCMaximo)
Post #: 1016
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 2/3/2009 6:24:43 PM   
Epiphany Demon


Posts: 6497
Joined: 14/11/2007
I've added loads of films that I haven't done write ups of, so refer to my list for the newest ones, and some snazzy graphics that I swear I thought of first

38. To Kill A Mockingbird (Mulligan, 1962) - 6.5/10

A good, but overrated, adaptation of Harper Lee's novel. Gregory Peck is very good as Atticus Finch, a lawyer in Maycomb County defending a black man in a rape case. Competent acting all round, solid direction and obviously a good script can't make up for some of the early parts that lack emotion and pace. Watch out for Robert Duvall in an early role.

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THE ALTERNATIVE LOOK AT BOB DYLAN'S DISCOGRAPHY - ONE DAY MAYBE I'LL FINISH IT

(in reply to DCMaximo)
Post #: 1017
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 2/3/2009 7:04:41 PM   
jamesbondguy


Posts: 6238
Joined: 6/1/2007
From: The Village Green
quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army

93. 2 ou 3 choses que je sais d'elle (2 or 3 Things I Know About Her) (1967, Godard) - 3/5
It has its moments. The film's very intellectually stimulating, even if it refuses to approach communism in an objective light, instead painting it rosy colours and tying it off with a cute pink ribbon, while demonising its ideological opposite, capitalism (in a probable oversight by Godard, there's a wonderful moment where a Nobel Prize winner and a student are discussing communist ethics, and they sound all very nice, then a waiter comes and gives them drinks - and the student's ordered that symbol of American globalisation, a Coca-Cola). The things it has to say on language, on the dehumanising nature of society's constant industrialisation, urbanisation and globalisation, and on the challenges of appearing ethical and human in the face of gross injustices worldwide, are interesting to listen to and contemplate. However, unlike A bout de souffle, which complemented its ideas with a beating heart and scintillating characters, 2 or 3 Things suffers in that the characters are generally bland and lacking in identity, which is odd considering Godard's penchant for close-ups on faces and focusing on singular people rather than groups. They all talk the same - like Godard - they all act fairly blandly, and they're sidelined for the plethora of ideas Godard wants to get out, and the film suffers. Much like, but better than, Richard Linklater's dreary and painful Waking Life, 2 or 3 Things focuses too much on its ideas and too little on the characters representing them. If Godard had given the film some heart, it would be ten times better than it is in its current state. But it just feels somewhat empty, more like a lecture on ideological standpoints on various issues rather than a film.



You sure picked an easy film for your second Godard.  La Chinoise, which he made a year later, is probably the best of his late 60's idea films, and features more of the qualities you were looking for- more engaging characters, and a more objective light to it's commentary, as it's more of an affectionate satire of the fashion of Maoism among upper-middle-class Parisian students at the time. Plus, it's even more exciting in terms of it's cinematic approach. And it's got Jean-Pierre Leaud in it, which is always a major plus.

< Message edited by jamesbondguy -- 2/3/2009 7:07:18 PM >


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Just like Geoffrey Ingram.

(in reply to Pigeon Army)
Post #: 1018
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 2/3/2009 8:21:10 PM   
chris_scott01


Posts: 3081
Joined: 5/1/2006
quote:

ORIGINAL: Jasiri

quote:

ORIGINAL: chris_scott01

Another month gone a only a few changes to my ongoing top 100 that I started last year, but welcome additions they certainly are.  Kon Ichikawa is fast becoming another favourite director with The Burmese Harp sliding into the top 20 with ease. 

Judging by where it is in both lists you obviously liked Fires on the Plain too.I think you may have made a typo though as you've got them the wrong way round.



Yeah, I don't know, The Burmese Harp was such a beautiful story of humanity that hit me harder than Fires on the Plain.  Maybe it's just more accessible on first viewing, who knows FotP may be better on repeat viewings.  To be honest my list is all over the place, I haven't looked through it properly and weighed out each new addition with those around it, I generally just stick them in somewhere that seems a fair reflection of my feelings.

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rapidite! rapidite!

(in reply to Jasiri)
Post #: 1019
RE: Top 100 Films I've Wathced This Year: 2009 - 2/3/2009 8:27:43 PM   
paul_ie86


Posts: 11422
Joined: 4/1/2007
From: Chelsea Hotel #2
8. Gone Baby Gone (Affleck, 2007)- 9/10

What a film! Great performances from everyone involved, especially Casey Affleck who nearly equals his performance as Robert Ford. And excellent direction from Ben Affleck.

18. Wanted (Bekmambatov, 2008)- 8/10

An entertaining fun picture with visuals. And Angelina is smoking hot


< Message edited by paul_ie86 -- 2/3/2009 11:02:29 PM >


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(in reply to chris_scott01)
Post #: 1020
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