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Dante's 50 favorite films - finished!

 
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Dante's 50 favorite films - finished! - 13/8/2008 10:57:42 PM   
Dantes Inferno


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From: Norway
I've been thinking about doing a top 100 for some time now, but I don't have 80 films that I feel are worthy for a list, for several reasons (some needs to be rewatched before they can be called favorites, others... need not be watched). However, I do have a top 50-list, and even though that might seem like an under-achievement after the great list of Piles or the one currently in progress by homer, I still think I can keep up with them by using my extraordinary gifts as a reviewer (no lie detectors in the vicinity).

Besides, considering certain people's tendency to quit halfway or never seem to finish, I might stand out because of the fact that I intend to finish the list.

I'm not sure when I'll start, but it will be soon. I had hoped to do some cool lay-outs, but I don't have Photoshop anymore, and I stink at it anyways. Plus, I'm starting to wonder if it really matters.

I'm not an expert at film, nor though I have a very intimate knowledge of elder films, but instead of waiting for the time where I can safely say I fulfill those criterias, I have decided to release the list now. Maybe in some time I can create another list (perhaps with 100 entries) and look back and see what has changed.

A couple of films didn't make the list because I haven't watched them twice yet, so you won't be seeing those films even though they might have made an entry if I had seen time more than one time. These films include: Citizen Kane, The Third Man, Apocalypse Now, American History X, The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, Das Boot, Psycho and Amadeus, among others. All great films that I don't make the list because I don't know them well enough to write reviews of them like they were favorites, even though rewatches would guarantee an entry for a least some of them.

< Message edited by Dantes Inferno -- 19/10/2008 5:27:19 PM >


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RE: Dante's 50 favorite films - coming soon! - 13/8/2008 11:12:13 PM   
Professor Moriarty

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: Dantes Inferno

I'm not an expert at film, nor though I have a very intimate knowledge of elder films, but instead of waiting for the time where I can safely say I fulfill those criterias, I have decided to release the list now.


You know everyone loves your lists and insights so I'm looking forward to this. 

But here's a tip for the future, don't spoil Amadeus by watching it again.  Seriously it gets weaker on repeat viewings, leave it as it is and don't let Tom Hulce start annoying you.

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RE: Dante's 50 favorite films - coming soon! - 13/8/2008 11:14:14 PM   
Rhubarb


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Good luck Dantes! Looking forward to it.

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You organisational skills sicken me, Rhubarb.



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RE: Dante's 50 favorite films - coming soon! - 13/8/2008 11:33:52 PM   
Kadaj


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Best of luck mate. More than likely we'll be posting simultaneously .

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RE: Dante's 50 favorite films - coming soon! - 14/8/2008 9:58:17 AM   
Dantes Inferno


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Cheers, guys.

This looks like it's going to be a boring day, so I'll be writing a lot of reviews today, methinks. I should probably go out for a jog too... even though it is as tempting as... well just mention something disgusting. Actually, don't.

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RE: Dante's 50 favorite films - coming soon! - 14/8/2008 1:48:11 PM   
Rhubarb


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Stay in and write the reviews! Jogging is for saps who want to be healthy and live long

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quote:

ORIGINAL: FritzlFan

You organisational skills sicken me, Rhubarb.



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RE: Dante's 50 favorite films - coming soon! - 14/8/2008 3:20:12 PM   
Dantes Inferno


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It turns out I didn't go for a jog. It was too rainy I couldn't possibly risk my iPod a second time after I almost broke that when it got water inside it.

I have written 2 1/2 reviews. The rest of the day was spent watching a 3-hour film that will end up in the list, but needed a re-watch before I could write a review of it. On another note: I'm gonna get Photoshop again, so hopefully, there will be some lay-out. In the meantime I'll try to write a lot of reviews, so that when I finally have the lay-out I can just speed ahead.

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RE: Dante's 50 favorite films - coming soon! - 14/8/2008 4:27:37 PM   
Piles


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Great stuff! Really looking forward to this list, Dantes. Should be a good read!

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RE: Dante's 50 favorite films - coming soon! - 14/8/2008 5:18:43 PM   
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Looking forward to it, Dante!

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RE: Dante's 50 favorite films - coming soon! - 14/8/2008 6:38:58 PM   
Dantes Inferno


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Eh, screw the visuals. I'm starting now.

50. ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST (1968)

Director: Sergio Leone
Starring: Charles Bronson, Claudia Cardinale, Henry Fonda, Jason Robbards

"It was a sunny day. He was sitting on the bench, waiting for the 11 AM train. A fly had found it in its best interest to make home at his face. More specificially: his right cheek. Had it not been for the boiling heat, the fly would have been dead as a graveyard now." Okay, I might not be the first choice to write a voice-over for Once Upon a Time in the West, but you have to admit: it wouldn't be very hard. Considering the masterful hand that Sergio Leone uses to paint the images in this opus, one would have to look hard for a person who didn't find this movie to be candy for the eyes. Oh yes, a contemplation of the old west this might be, but no one goes to the cinema for ideas, and Leone knows that. Therefore, you would be hard-pressed to find a more cinematic film than this. You might find it slow-moving, boring, talentless, even plain bad, but if you think this film is not good-looking, you should seriously consider looking up "good-looking" in the dictionary. If that doesn't convince you, well, then my friend, you are without hope.



I mean, this film has it all: an entrance to the rival the one of Harry Lime, the most bad-ass shoot-out this side of Heat and a score that ranks with the best of them. Add to that the fact that it was a critical and commercial failure (shouldn't every favorites-list have one of these?), and you have found yourself a film that should at very least be in your shelf. Because the film could tell its simple plot at a maximum 45 minutes, Leone is free to indulge himself with some of the most powerful imagery ever committed to celluloid. By writing that I also am reminded that, according to scriptwriting books, a film should introduce its principal characters during the first 10 minutes. That book surely isn't in Leone's library, because West takes its good first third setting up the main characters, which is quite an achievement considering there's only four of them. But what characters! And what introductions! Even after quadruple re-watches I still get chills as Harmonica (Charles Bronson) appears behind the train. I still find the dolly shoot revealing the town that Jill (Claudia Cardinale) has arrived in to be as moving as it was on the first time I saw it. It is a popular rule among critics that substance should always be superior to style, but this is the film that proves to be the exception that defines the rule.

Even though the plot is not very complex, it is still best to discover it for yourself, and I shall therefore not describe too much of it in this review. Instead, I will focus on some of the small, but fine details that is found at every corner in this film. Take a look at the arrival of Cheyenne (Jason Robbards), for example. Notice how his chained arms are put below frame until the moment when he raises to drink the water. And let's not forget the panning shot that reveals Frank (Henry Fonda) after butchering an entire family with cold blood. Sure, the film might be a "farewell to the west" (in terms of history and for Leone's career), but that is not what you talk about with your friends after seeing it. No, you talk about the slow but suspenseful fate, the shocking flash-back, the gorgeous visuals. You talk about one great film. You talk about Once Upon a Time in the West
...

< Message edited by Dantes Inferno -- 14/8/2008 6:39:23 PM >


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RE: OUATITW - 14/8/2008 7:00:26 PM   
Piles


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Great film, and a great review! You managed to say more in three paragraphs than I did in about twelve! I agree whole heartadly about the introductions; second to none because of the abundance of great ones.

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Entry #49 - 14/8/2008 7:30:26 PM   
Dantes Inferno


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49. THIS IS SPINAL TAP (1984)

Director: Rob Reiner
Starring: Michael McKean, Christopher Guest, Harry Shearer



I still remember it as vividly as if it happened yesterday. Me and a friend were watching a TV show, only to find it being interrupted by a series of commercials. Among the many ads for shampoo and various cleaning products, there was one commercial that stood out. It was an ad for a CD-collection of Black Sabbath-songs, and I can still hear the announcer's voice as he declared it a "must-have for any self-appointed rock fan". Even more important was the fact that he said that we should "turn it up to 11". Me and my friend were of course very confused by that comment. My friend told me that turning it up to 11 would not work on his system, as he might as well have turned on the mute button, seeing as 11 was not the highest of volumes on that brand of stereo. At that time we had obviously not watched This is Spinal Tap yet. Unless you are having a slow day, you have already figured out that I'm talking about the film's most well-known quote: "this one goes to 11". That is just one of many ways that this film has entered the public consciousness. Another good example comes in the form of the Swedish heavy metal band Opeth, who were playing a concert just recently when the stage curtain suddenly fell down. When the video was put up on their website, it was labeled with the catchy title "two days ago, the band had a Spinal Tap-moment".

Now, let me ask you a question. Do you know any jokes that are funnier the second time you tell them? Of course not. It is interesting to note how hard comedy films are to make, seeing as many of them lose their power after repeated viewings. Spinal Tap is the exception that proves the rule. At first viewing I didn't really get the film, and even at a short 85 minutes I still found it to be too long. Oh, how foolish I was in my younger days. Luckily, I found myself getting an urge to watch it again one day, and as you might understand considering its place on this list, it was love on second sight. The film is a clever and unique mockumentary about the fictional band Spinal Tap, whom we are introduced to as they prepare their tour for their supposed comeback album, "Smell the Glove". Of course, the band has passed their prime a long time ago, and are now trying to claim to whatever glory they once possessed. As we follow them on the tour, they run into many hilarious situations (hilarious for us, not them), such as when they get lost backstage or when none of their fans turn up at a signing. But while the band may be stupid, they are also sympathetic, and as friction increases within their ranks, we start to feel for them. Yeah, they're idiots, but they're lovable idiots.

Another part that is surprisingly not given much mention is the music. While the songs are so cheesy that they basically parody themselves, I don't think I'll be the first to admit that a lot of them are actually quite catchy. I often find myself rocking along to "Big Bottoms", "Stonehenge" and "Sex Farm". I also have the exquisite privilege of being in a band myself, and while we have never had any our songs played on radio, there is still plenty for us to recognize in this film. The quarrels, the fight for leadership, and the joy of everything just working are just some of many things that every musician should feel a sense of familiarity towards in this masterpiece. Another great sign of this film's genius is that none of the people involved in this film have ever been able to let it go. They famously appeared on an episode of The Simpsons and have had several re-unions, including an hilarious one during Live 8 last year, when they played "Big Bottoms". The number of bassists on the stage in that moment has got to be a record.

This is Spinal Tap is the definitive proof that a film can be as funny as it is inventive and original. Every scene here hits the mark, and there is not a single out-of-key note in any of the film's 85 minutes. If you are a fan of laughing, and haven't watched this film yet, I'd suggest you watch it right away. But you have to turn it up to 11.


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RE: Entry #49 - 14/8/2008 7:44:39 PM   
doncopey1


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A couple of nice opening films. You summed them up nicely with your reviews. I like Once Upon a Time in the West despite it not being a favourite i always felt Leone is a great case of style over substance not in all of his films Once Upon a Time in America is his most coherant. Here the plot is wafer thin, and at time is needlessly long with elongated scenes which are overly stylised and i dont find Bronson remotely cool. I like Fonda though despite his critics for this movie.

This is Spinal Tap is a great choice a wonderful, unqiue and original movie. Well written, superbly acted and hilarious. Its well approached from Reiner but i just love how it takes the piss out of rock, brilliant.


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RE: Entry #49 - 14/8/2008 8:59:35 PM   
BobM70


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A couple of nice opening films. You summed them up nicely with your reviews. I like Once Upon a Time in the West despite it not being a favourite i always felt Leone is a great case of style over substance not in all of his films Once Upon a Time in America is his most coherant. Here the plot is wafer thin, and at time is needlessly long with elongated scenes which are overly stylised and i dont find Bronson remotely cool. I like Fonda though despite his critics for this movie.

I actually think America was a lot less coherent. Also a great film by the way.
West is a brilliant operatic piece of cinema. It is deliberatly slow, the story is classic in the sense it deals with almost Shakespearian themes of deceat, loss, love and revenge.
It also has the most beautiful filmscore in the hystory of cinema.

Bob

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RE: Dante's 50 favorite films - coming soon! - 14/8/2008 9:47:30 PM   
Professor Moriarty

 

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I'm being presumptuous, but if you've not seen The Wild Bunch please watch it so we can bump OUATITW off your top 50   You'll find everything there that you like about this film (maybe with the exception of Morricone's score) but much more. 

Spinal Tap has only a couple of scenes that don't really work, but even those raise a smile.  The ones that really work are roll on the floor funny.  However many times I see the mini Stonehenge it doesn't get less funny.  If you don't have the DVD consider purchasing it as the film may only be short, but there's practically a second film in the outtakes.  This is one of my favourite bits in the film:



I agree with 50% of your choices so far  

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RE: Dante's 50 favorite films - coming soon! - 14/8/2008 10:08:08 PM   
Dantes Inferno


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don: I agree that it is the mocking of the rock genre that makes it funny, but it also has respect for it, which to me, is just as important. Will we perhaps be seeing another list of yours someday? I always enjoy reading your lists, even though you could work on your grammar.

Moriarty: I do have the DVD. The Wild Bunch will be watched as soon as I get a chance too.


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Entry #48 - 14/8/2008 10:13:05 PM   
Dantes Inferno


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48. RESERVOIR DOGS (1992)

Director: Quentin Tarantino
Starring: Harvey Keitel, Michael Madsen, Tim Roth, Quentin Tarantino, Lawrence Tierney, Chris Penn, Steve Buscemi

Even though it was turned into a spoof in the TV series Coupling (which was actually pretty funny), there are still few moments as cool as the cast of Reservoir Dogs walking down the street in slow-motion with "Little Green Bag" playing in the background. It might not have the same impact on an audience now as it did in '92, but that doesn't mean the power of the film has faded one bit. I still remember it so vividly. I would look at the VHS in the store, but I knew it was pointless to buy it, because I knew the 18-rating would never slip by my by parents. Obviously, by the time I finally turned 18, I had already seen it many times and already become an avid fan. It might not be Tarantino's best film, but it is a strong indication of where his career would go later, and I don't feel like I'm lying when I call it one of the most idiosyncratic debuts ever made.



The plot is as simple as they come, but as with all of Tarantino's films, it's not the premise, but the execution that tip this over from B- to A-level. By refusing to show the heist that the entire plot is based upon, Tarantino manages to turn the film completely on its head, making the audience aware that familiar corners might turn out to be leading to unpredictable places. The fact that most of the film is centered around a single location (the robber's rendevouz in a ware-house), recalls the films of John Carpenter, most particularly Assault on Precinct 13 and The Thing. Yet, I have more belief in the theory that Tarantino based his one-location story on Rio Bravo, one of his favorite movies. By focusing on a limited location, he not only manages to avoid a spending a large budget (this is independent cinema, after all), but even more importantly, it gives him an opportunity to focus on the paranoia of the robbers as they slowly start to believe that one of them might be a rat. Here, the reference to The Thing rings more true, as it now becomes a whodunit, and everyone is a likely suspect as the next guy.

But the film is so much more than that. Centered around a bunch of color-coded criminals (Mr. Blonde, Mr. Pink, Mr. White, etc), the film is often funny without ever being a comedy and thrilling while never feeling like a routine action film. It is not a combination of those parts, either, but rather something else completely. Vented through the cineast-like brain of Tarantino, Reservoir Dogs is a film that has been ejected by a man who has spent his life doing nothing but watching movies, yet still directs the film like a seasoned pro. But, masterful direction aside, it is in the script and the actor's interpretation of it that Reservoir Dogs harvests most of its masterful elements. Most important to mention is Tarantino's dialogue, which even I, a devoted fanboy, has to admit is not as good now as it used to be then. But I will not spend this review talking about the dialogue, but rather concentrate on the film's non-linear narrative. Sure, Pulp Fiction might be a better exercise in 'how to construct a fractured story', but old Quentin still knew what he was doing during Reservoir Dogs too.

Let's stop and think for a moment. Imagine if this film had been assembled in a linear fashion. How would it begin? Well, it would open with the various character introductions, which in the non-linear version are located in all sorts of unpredictable places. Had Tarantino decided to scramble the un-chronological approach, the film would have lost much of its paranoia, as the identity of the rat would have been revealed very early. It would also move the film into a more conventional territory. Can you think of an undercover film that doesn't reveal the undercover cop in the beginning? Another important result of the non-linear narrative is a more simple one: it's just more fun that way. Is it a gimmick? Maybe, but it is an enjoyable gimmick that prevented the film from being just another heist thriller. Instead, it turned the film into an indie hit and launched Tarantino into Hollywood. And the rest, as quite a lot of people say these days, is history.


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RE: Dante's 50 favorite films - coming soon! - 14/8/2008 10:14:51 PM   
Kadaj


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Dantes Inferno

don: I agree that it is the mocking of the rock genre that makes it funny, but it also has respect for it, which to me, is just as important. Will we perhaps be seeing another list of yours someday? I always enjoy reading your lists, even though you could work on your grammar.

Moriarty: I do have the DVD. The Wild Bunch will be watched as soon as I get a chance too.



Then when you watch it you'll be able to see how much better Once Upon A Time In the West is.......

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RE: Dante's 50 favorite films - coming soon! - 14/8/2008 10:35:34 PM   
richCie


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Great 3 films to start off with, with OUATITW possibly too low, but we shall see as things go on.
I'm a firm fan of OUATITA over OUATIA but thats not the most popular of opinions on here...
Could be a very good list this...

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RE: Dante's 50 favorite films - coming soon! - 14/8/2008 10:40:09 PM   
Dantes Inferno


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quote:

ORIGINAL: richCie

Great 3 films to start off with, with OUATITW possibly too low, but we shall see as things go on.
I'm a firm fan of OUATITA over OUATIA but thats not the most popular of opinions on here...
Could be a very good list this...


Huh?

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RE: Dante's 50 favorite films - coming soon! - 14/8/2008 10:54:35 PM   
Professor Moriarty

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: Dantes Inferno

Moriarty: I do have the DVD. The Wild Bunch will be watched as soon as I get a chance too.



Cool, let me know how you get on.  Also what is the DVD release now?  I have an old one, which is a flipper (this and Goodfellas I think).  And this might be one case where I'd double dip, if its one disc and has extras.  I guess I could look this up on Amazon, but what they hey

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RE: Dante's 50 favorite films - coming soon! - 14/8/2008 11:00:17 PM   
Dantes Inferno


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Wow, you are lazy. Look it up yourself!

I have a 2-disc version with a featurette and some outtakes on the second disc, I think.

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RE: Entry #48 - 14/8/2008 11:07:34 PM   
Professor Moriarty

 

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That's a very good Dogs review.

When you look at the one set films I always think of Hitchcock.  His best example of this is '45s Lifeboat where the survivors of a bombed boat in WW2 assemble in the small boat.  If you like that kind of scene then I can recommend the movie.  Its not Hitch's best, but shows what can be done with very limited resources.  I think most recently The Cube managed to pull this trick too.

Anyway, back to Dogs.  I realised when I read your review that it was just too long since I'd seen this, which is very remiss of me.  I think its a great film and what I'd like to propose makes it great is Keitel's turn.  I think its really Oscar worthy and is the standout of the movie.  As I said though its been too long since I saw this so maybe someone would like to disagree. 

I know he was the big name coming to the film, but I have a sneaking suspicion that without his powerhouse performance this film would not be remembered as much as it is now.  Shame that Lawrence Tierney didn't get a bigger outing (though he's not lost in the movie) but he's on great form too. 

In all honest I think some of the rawness of the director shows through in the way the film is shot, but its still a sound calling card and you've found a good position for it on the list.

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RE: Entry #48 - 14/8/2008 11:32:24 PM   
homersimpson_esq


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Great first three choices there. I think #50 and #49 are too low and #48 is too high, but still, sterling choices. Looks like I'll have to check out The Wild Bunch too, although Morricone's score is so ingrained in OUATITW that it'd be hard to compare them - I mean, I absolutely adore Morricone's scores, and it's a big part of why I love OUATITW. Still, another Western to watch is a good thing to continue changing my opinion!

Keep up the good work Dante!


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RE: Entry #48 - 14/8/2008 11:45:49 PM   
Kadaj


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quote:

ORIGINAL: homersimpson_esq

Looks like I'll have to check out The Wild Bunch too, although Morricone's score is so ingrained in OUATITW that it'd be hard to compare them



Actually I watched this for the first time recently and thoroughly enjoyed it. In my opinion it's a totally different type of Western to OUATITW (love this code that's going on btw), sort of in the way Rio Bravo is to, say The Assassination of Jesse James.... I love Sam Seckinpah's style, really individual, but you can idneitfy where other subsequent director's have adapted their technique from.Definetely recommended, but I like The Searchers .

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RE: Entry #48 - 14/8/2008 11:52:33 PM   
Professor Moriarty

 

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quote:

ORIGINAL: Kadaj

quote:

ORIGINAL: homersimpson_esq

Looks like I'll have to check out The Wild Bunch too, although Morricone's score is so ingrained in OUATITW that it'd be hard to compare them



Actually I watched this for the first time recently and thoroughly enjoyed it. In my opinion it's a totally different type of Western to OUATITW (love this code that's going on btw), sort of in the way Rio Bravo is to, say The Assassination of Jesse James.... I love Sam Seckinpah's style, really individual, but you can idneitfy where other subsequent director's have adapted their technique from.Definetely recommended, but I like The Searchers .



Yes they are different westerns, but they are both eulogies for the end of the west.  If you add The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance and Unforgiven to this you have four fine films trying to tie up the end of the genre.  My own ranking would be Liberty Valance > The Wild Bunch > Unforgiven > OUATITW, but I know others disagree with that.  There are probably some others I should add to that list, but its late for me

I didn't get what you meant by "you can idneitfy where other subsequent director's have adapted their technique from".  Can you expand?  Looks like it could be interesting.

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RE: Entry #48 - 15/8/2008 12:12:44 AM   
Kadaj


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Professor Moriarty

quote:

ORIGINAL: Kadaj

quote:

ORIGINAL: homersimpson_esq

Looks like I'll have to check out The Wild Bunch too, although Morricone's score is so ingrained in OUATITW that it'd be hard to compare them



Actually I watched this for the first time recently and thoroughly enjoyed it. In my opinion it's a totally different type of Western to OUATITW (love this code that's going on btw), sort of in the way Rio Bravo is to, say The Assassination of Jesse James.... I love Sam Seckinpah's style, really individual, but you can idneitfy where other subsequent director's have adapted their technique from.Definetely recommended, but I like The Searchers .



Yes they are different westerns, but they are both eulogies for the end of the west.  If you add The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance and Unforgiven to this you have four fine films trying to tie up the end of the genre.  My own ranking would be Liberty Valance > The Wild Bunch > Unforgiven > OUATITW, but I know others disagree with that.  There are probably some others I should add to that list, but its late for me

I didn't get what you meant by "you can idneitfy where other subsequent director's have adapted their technique from".  Can you expand?  Looks like it could be interesting.


I meant the dynamic style of the 'shoot-out' sequences, the kinetic editing and frantic shot/ reverse-shot accompinied by each ringing gunshot. Really energetic. I thought I can identify directors, such as Edgar Wright, adopting this sort of style to similar scenes in their respective films . Hope that answers your response to my opinion, I'm trying to think of other directors I was thinking of before but it's late and I'm a mook.

(in reply to Professor Moriarty)
Post #: 27
RE: Entry #48 - 15/8/2008 11:08:06 AM   
Dantes Inferno


Posts: 5887
Joined: 27/10/2007
From: Norway

quote:

ORIGINAL: Professor Moriarty

In all honest I think some of the rawness of the director shows through in the way the film is shot, but its still a sound calling card and you've found a good position for it on the list.


Oh shit, I was gonna mention the editing too. Godamnit. It's actually a very well shot film. The opening scene, for instance, has that De Palma-spinning-around-the-table-thing going on, but what's interesting is that scene starts out from the back of the persons and then slowly works it out in front of them. There are some great long takes too, most noticeable being Michael Madsen stepping outside to get the gasoline.

Christ, now I remember so much more that I could have written!

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(in reply to Professor Moriarty)
Post #: 28
RE: Entry #48 - 15/8/2008 11:12:11 AM   
Professor Moriarty

 

Posts: 10426
Joined: 6/10/2005
From: the waters of Casablanca
Actually I was thinking more of in the warehouse, when I think there were a few too many longshots and I'd have liked a few more close-ups.  I expect Tarantino was going for a camera as a voyeur look.  Or just trying to keep the number of setups and costs down.  Because I think that even though the funding went up when Keitel came on board (quite litterally making the movie from his performance and money) it was still a cheap gig.

(in reply to Dantes Inferno)
Post #: 29
RE: Entry #48 - 15/8/2008 11:15:42 AM   
Dantes Inferno


Posts: 5887
Joined: 27/10/2007
From: Norway
More close-ups? Maybe. There is one zoom-in on Keitel when he and Buscemi is discussing the rat in the beginning, and I thought it worked really well, because that's the moment things start to become clear to him.

Of course the film was cheap. The fact that he got Keitel was very lucky, not only because he is a terrific actor, but because he was in a period where he was willing to experiment, often choosing more risky projects, another good example being Bad Lieutenant.

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(in reply to Professor Moriarty)
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