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RE: My Top Film Noir - 18/3/2009 5:47:14 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54583
Joined: 1/10/2005
No. 34



The Sniper (1952)
 
Director: Edward Dmytryk
Writer: Harry Brown, from a story by Edna and Edward Anhalt.
 
Spoiler Free Synopsis

A tortured ex-soldier, recently under psychiatric supervision and with a visceral hatred of woman cracks and takes to the rooftops of San Francisco to exact his vengeance while pleading with the authorities to stop him.

For me many films in the classic period fell more solidly into social commentary and melodrama than film noir – Wyler’s Detective Story falls out as a result (although had Hammett actually taken on the script it would have been fascinating to see how far he pushed Douglas’s detective). Noirs dealing with race can be pretty ham-fisted – No Way Out and Dmytryk’s Crossfire are too conscious of the message, with noir only trappings to hang it on. It is particularly a pity with the latter because the race issue aside it contains one of the best examples of the reasons that returning GIs became such key characters in the main flowering of classic film noir in the post-war period.

From the faux neo-realist policiers initiated by Dassin, etc, it was common for noir to champion issues of the day. Psychological theories of crime were gaining in popularity (as was therapy generally). In the 50s this would go full-blown with a large number of psycho-noir entries to the cannon.

Before his short exile as one of the Hollywood 10, Dmytryck made 2 great film noirs in the US. One will obviously be seen much further up the list. The other – The Sniper, still with a social message – is credited with creating the type of alienated character that later works like Taxi Driver came to rely upon (remembering Schrader would certainly have seen this film in his own writing on noir).

The film opens with stats on sex crimes (remembering now, that more or less all crimes against women are counted in these statistics, not just those we would normally call sex crimes now). Panning round a spotlessly clean low rent room, pulling back off the reflection in the mirror, everything seems normal and everyday until the drawer opens – a rifle. Uninterested in a lone man walking down the street the trigger is the careless laughter of a woman walking home with her date.



Arthur Franz makes a compelling tortured lead – disturbed and angered by his impulses he throws away the key of the drawer. But the film gives him plenty to justify his anger towards women – 2 women discussing men dismissively, a mother gazing at a fur coat in a shop window at night as her son pleads to go home, getting a slap for his trouble – a slap he feels too. Signs and symbols are everywhere. Resorting to self-harm the pressure is kept up as instead of a female nurse – who might help diffuse the crisis – he is treated by a man complaining about his other half. We get inklings this isn’t new – he calls the state prison and, curiously, asks for a doctor (convincingly too – have you ever noticed how unconvincing most phone scenes seem to be in terms of interaction with the other end of the line?) – but his last hope is dashed. Dr Gillette isn’t there.



The film goes quite far in trying to make easier to sympathise with a multiple killer in its choice of victim – a woman who works in a nightclub who has had multiple relationships, a women who regularly gets drunk and is infantilised in her home life, playing with dolls in an overly fussy room. The bitch at work. The dotty cat lover at home. But both he and we know he needs help.

In the middle of the film we get an argument on taxes and the funding of public services. You get the oddity of a lecture on the psychological view of crime – considered liberal – that proposes a form of automatic incarceration that tends to the extreme! Richard Kiley and Adolphe Menjou are key to putting over the liberal argument and in the unusual note the film ends on as the tortured Eddie is finally tracked down.



Burnett Guffey does some great work behind the camera. There is one moment of sunlight and hope as Eddie sees ‘happy’ playing kids but he still gets kicked in the teeth. The armed police guarding San Francisco’s rooftops, light and dark angled up and down twisting streets following his victims and making use of the geometric maze of the city as Eddie escapes through a rundown industrial district. And this lovely shot of the reflection of the hotplate as Eddie tries to quieten the impulse for the gun.

The visuals emphasise the uncontrolled anger and his perception of women vs. the image with mirrors and smashing glass. We also get to see a genuine looking perp walk

A low key noir and compelling character piece with a superb central performance that focusses on the damage one self-destructive man can do.

< Message edited by elab49 -- 4/2/2012 10:03:01 PM >


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quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


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Post #: 91
RE: My Top Film Noir - 18/3/2009 11:54:39 PM   
TRM


Posts: 4797
Joined: 20/10/2006
From: Bristol
Yet another film i haven't seen  I have just spent the last 10 minutes reading a bit about the Hollywood 10. Pretty interesting stuff really, which i didn't realise there was a special group of. Im a little surprised you said only 1 other of his noirs are that great, as i thought both murder my sweet and crossfire were highly acclaimed, and i assumed you would have liked both (the idea of a chandler novel for one made it seem a decent bet, with the other seeming to be more highly acclaimed.

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Post #: 92
RE: My Top Film Noir - 19/3/2009 8:35:18 AM   
elab49


Posts: 54583
Joined: 1/10/2005
If you look at the first paragraph I mention Crossfire there. It isn't that I don't like the film, I just think it is a drama in film noir clothing that doesn't quite fit.

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Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


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(in reply to TRM)
Post #: 93
RE: My Top Film Noir - 19/3/2009 11:05:10 AM   
elab49


Posts: 54583
Joined: 1/10/2005
Up next - another member of the Hollywood 10.

And in less than what? 8 months?

_____________________________

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quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


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(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 94
RE: My Top Film Noir - 19/3/2009 11:21:58 AM   
Jasiri


Posts: 2496
Joined: 23/10/2005
Seem to have missed the last few entries,those I've seen since Stranger on the Third Floor,(which 7 months later I still havent got round to putting on ) The Unsuspected,The Reckless Moment and The Sniper I really enjoyed.Particularly Reckless Moment which I thought was brilliant.

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Post #: 95
RE: My Top Film Noir - 19/3/2009 11:28:03 AM   
elab49


Posts: 54583
Joined: 1/10/2005
I would highly recommend the book as well. One of those precious few that go on the good book/good adapation side of the balance.

And I'm not really in a position to tease anyone about tardiness

_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

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Post #: 96
RE: My Top Film Noir - 19/3/2009 11:30:03 AM   
Professor Moriarty

 

Posts: 10381
Joined: 6/10/2005
From: the waters of Casablanca
Even when I think I've watched a few noir films elab never fails to come up with one I've not seen.  Have noted it before and would like to watch it. 

Did you ever see 14 Hours, which sounds a bit similar?

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Post #: 97
RE: My Top Film Noir - 19/3/2009 11:36:51 AM   
elab49


Posts: 54583
Joined: 1/10/2005
I remember us discussing The Sniper before - I think you thought it wouldn't be one I'd go for?

14 Hours isn't quite the same thing - more of a double act and more limited (and Baseheart isn't remotely as good as franz, although I do like Paul Douglas who nearly made it on the list with Clash by Night). Sniper goes for a deep psychological mess of a mind played out mainly in isolation.

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quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

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Post #: 98
RE: My Top Film Noir - 19/3/2009 11:50:05 AM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
How have I managed to miss this thread?!? Only had a quick spin through but there's some great stuff in here, elab. Some excellent and underseen choices for the list. Great reviews as well. Something you mentioned a few pages back has made me a little worried the next choice for my list is going to overlap with yours as well.

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Post #: 99
RE: My Top Film Noir - 19/3/2009 11:58:39 AM   
elab49


Posts: 54583
Joined: 1/10/2005
quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

How have I managed to miss this thread?!?


Possibly it being several pages back because of my extremely tardy reviews?

Thank you.

_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 100
RE: My Top Film Noir - 19/3/2009 12:07:39 PM   
Professor Moriarty

 

Posts: 10381
Joined: 6/10/2005
From: the waters of Casablanca
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Post #: 101
RE: My Top Film Noir - 19/3/2009 12:11:19 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54583
Joined: 1/10/2005


_____________________________

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quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

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Post #: 102
RE: My Top Film Noir - 19/3/2009 4:33:20 PM   
rick_7


Posts: 6151
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: The internet
Agree completely about The Sniper - I think I had that in one my old top 100s on here. Great movie, striking just the right balance between social drama and character study. The use of pics in this thread is great - the reviews equally so. Fine work.  I'm a big fan of The Reckless Moment too. Here's something I wrote about it a couple of years ago (sorry, I'm a bit lazy):
 
quote:

Fascinating, brilliant noiresque melodrama: the second best of Ophüls' three American films, after Letter From an Unknown Woman. Joan Bennett – a staple of Fritz Lang's excursions in the genre – is cast most effectively as a Lake Tahoe housewife, trying to cover up a murder apparently committed by her daughter. Deserted by her husband for Christmas – he's away on a business trip* – she tangles with Irish blackmailer James Mason and his ferocious, softly-spoken accomplice, Mr Nagel.

The film's masterstroke is in placing its generic hallmarks – the sleazy, manipulative older man duping an innocent, the brooding blackmailer and the merciless hand of fate – within (and against) such a well-realised familial set-up, in such a comfortable, ordinary, well-lit community. The bright house, like something from a TV soap, is contrasted superbly with the other-worldly eerieness of the boat house at night. A similar juxtaposition: a nightmare fast unravelling within an ideal, was used in Nicholas Ray's terrific Bigger Than Life. Here, Ophüls also uses visual tricks to telegraph danger and impending catastrophe, as in the lights-on/lights-off sequence that commences the film's first night. The director's trademark tracking shots are also much in evidence: there's a tremendous one to set the scene as Bennett returns from Los Angeles some five minutes in.

The film is powered by Bennett's edgy, protective central performance. She's a nervous tic in human form as her character juggles traditional responsibilities with new ones, like trying to raise £10,000 in two days. The scenes in which she is gradually, casually degraded by uncaring loan companies and pawnbrokers are masterfully done. What other film would bother to show that? Her scene with Mason in a car crossing a lake, is similarly potent: eloquent dialogue forcefully delivered. At times betraying the B-movie woodenness that ultimately prevented Bennett ever being a top drawer star, her housewife nevertheless has a certain something more real, more compelling, more caring, more obsessively, believably maternal than almost any other on-screen parent of the period. Mason gives one of his best performances too, and his final confrontation with Bennett is an absolute gem. There's also fine work by David Bair and Geraldine Brooks, as our would-be murderer.

The Reckless Moment is fast-moving, persuasive entertainment, written and shot with an eye for the unusual. There's also a curious (albeit fatalistic) happy-ish ending. Its themes are as enduring as its poetic imagery, Bennett's emotional and sexual repression (neither relieved by any outlet), the mundane practicalities of domestic '40s life and the soon-to-be-familiar 'generation gap' conflicts within the family unit giving this home front Noir a feel that's all its own.

(3.5 out of 4)

*The original story was set in WWII, hence the absence of the husband. Bennett's scenes on the telephone with her husband (and her conversation about him with his father) bear some resemblance to those in a great American home front picture released five years before: Since You Went Away. Claudette Colbert's surprising tour-de-force at the heart of that film is one of the few screen mothers superior to Bennett's. 'The Reckless Moment' also recalls a 1948 Noir in which a happy post-war bubble is cruelly punctured – that time by Robert Ryan – the twisty-turny Act of Violence.

Got to say I think you're giving Crossfire a raw deal, it's a classic to match It's a Wonderful Life, or Brigadoon.  So what's next? I was thinking Force of Evil, but Polonsky was just blacklisted, he wasn't one of the 10. Something by Dalton Trumbo? Or Laura? This Gun for Hire? I don't know much about Adrian Scott, but he produced a couple of the Dick Powell noirs, Wikipedia tells me. Hoping Moonrise will crop up somewhere, that'd be in my top five, probably with Cry Danger, Out of the Past, Fallen Angel and something else.

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(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 103
RE: My Top Film Noir - 19/3/2009 4:45:12 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54583
Joined: 1/10/2005
quote:

ORIGINAL: rick_7

Got to say I think you're giving Crossfire a raw deal, it's a classic to match It's a Wonderful Life, or Brigadoon.  So what's next? I was thinking Force of Evil, but Polonsky was just blacklisted, he wasn't one of the 10. Something by Dalton Trumbo? Or Laura? This Gun for Hire? I don't know much about Adrian Scott, but he produced a couple of the Dick Powell noirs, Wikipedia tells me. Hoping Moonrise will crop up somewhere, that'd be in my top five, probably with Cry Danger, Out of the Past, Fallen Angel and something else.


Jasiri guessed that one earlier when I mentioned the preponderance of characters with violent fathers. You've got at least a couple there that will be top 10

You've also made a very astute guess in there about what is coming next -while also including a film which I accept many will see as a glaring omission from this list, but which I simply don't like. You can add it to those 2 shining examples of awful films you mention above.

I do, however, like Crossfire. It is one of the Mitchum performances I enjoy most. But I sat down at the start of this and made some decisions about where I'd draw the film noir line (balanced by favourite films) and it fell the other side. I find No Way Out pretty interesting too, and I love the anecdote about Widmark going over to apologise to Poitier after their scenes, before they became fast friends.

The reference to Act of Violence in your review is interesting. I was so disappointed it squandered such an amazing build-up, trying too hard with the scenes of nightmarish wandering.



_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

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Post #: 104
RE: My Top Film Noir - 19/3/2009 4:47:52 PM   
MOTH

 

Posts: 3479
Joined: 3/10/2005
From: Sittin' on the dock of the bay
good stuff elab, my Lovefilm list has just been extended. Hope you don't give too much praise to Laura and champion Where the Sidewalk Ends instead (starring Liverpool's Xabi Alonso!)

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Post #: 105
RE: My Top Film Noir - 19/3/2009 4:50:05 PM   
Jackie Boy

 

Posts: 1135
Joined: 2/1/2006
quote:

ORIGINAL: elab49

No. 34



The Sniper (1952)
 
Director: Edward Dmytryk
Writer: Harry Brown, from a story by Edna and Edward Anhalt.
 
Spoiler Free Synopsis

A tortured ex-soldier, recently under psychiatric supervision and with a visceral hatred of woman cracks and takes to the rooftops of San Francisco to exact his vengeance while pleading with the authorities to stop him.

For me many films in the classic period fell more solidly into social commentary and melodrama than film noir – Wyler's Detective Story falls out as a result (although had Hammett actually taken on the script it would have been fascinating to see how far he pushed Douglas's detective). Noirs dealing with race can be pretty ham-fisted – No Way Out and Dmytryk's Crossfire are too conscious of the message, with noir only trappings to hang it on. It is particularly a pity with the latter because the race issue aside it contains one of the best examples of the reasons that returning GIs became such key characters in the main flowering of classic film noir in the post-war period.

From the faux neo-realist policiers initiated by Dassin, etc, it was common for noir to champion issues of the day. Psychological theories of crime were gaining in popularity (as was therapy generally). In the 50s this would go full-blown with a large number of psycho-noir entries to the cannon.

Before his short exile as one of the Hollywood 10, Dmytryck made 2 great film noirs in the US. One will obviously be seen much further up the list. The other – The Sniper, still with a social message – is credited with creating the type of alienated character that later works like Taxi Driver came to rely upon (remembering Schrader would certainly have seen this film in his own writing on noir).

The film opens with stats on sex crimes (remembering now, that more or less all crimes against women are counted in these statistics, not just those we would normally call sex crimes now). Panning round a spotlessly clean low rent room, pulling back off the reflection in the mirror, everything seems normal and everyday until the drawer opens – a rifle. Uninterested in a lone man walking down the street the trigger is the careless laughter of a woman walking home with her date.



Arthur Franz makes a compelling tortured lead – disturbed and angered by his impulses he throws away the key of the drawer. But the film gives him plenty to justify his anger towards women – 2 women discussing men dismissively, a mother gazing at a fur coat in a shop window at night as her son pleads to go home, getting a slap for his trouble – a slap he feels too. Signs and symbols are everywhere. Resorting to self-harm the pressure is kept up as instead of a female nurse – who might help diffuse the crisis – he is treated by a man complaining about his other half. We get inklings this isn't new – he calls the state prison and, curiously, asks for a doctor (convincingly too – have you ever noticed how unconvincing most phone scenes seem to be in terms of interaction with the other end of the line?) – but his last hope is dashed. Dr Gillette isn't there.



The film goes quite far in trying to make easier to sympathise with a multiple killer in its choice of victim – a woman who works in a nightclub who has had multiple relationships, a women who regularly gets drunk and is infantilised in her home life, playing with dolls in an overly fussy room. The bitch at work. The dotty cat lover at home. But both he and we know he needs help.

On the middle of the film we get an argument on taxes and the funding of public services. You get the oddity of a lecture on the psychological view of crime – considered liberal – that proposes a form of automatic incarceration that tends to the extreme! Richard Kiley and Adolphe Menjou are key to putting over the liberal argument and in the unusual note the film ends on as the tortured Eddie is finally tracked down.



Burnett Guffey does some great work behind the camera. There is one moment of sunlight and hope as Eddie sees 'happy' playing kids but he still gets kicked in the teeth. The armed police guarding San Francisco's rooftops, light and dark angled up and down twisting streets following his victims and making use of the geometric maze of the city as Eddie escapes through a rundown industrial district. And this lovely shot of the reflection of the hotplate as Eddie tries to quieten the impulse for the gun.

The visuals emphasise the uncontrolled anger and his perception of women vs. the image with mirrors and smashing glass. We also get to see a genuine looking perp walk

A low key noir and compelling character piece with a superb central performance that focusses on the damage one self-destructive man can do.


Much of this reminds me of Dirty Harry. I wonder if Don Siegel got some of his inspiration from this back then. 

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Post #: 106
RE: My Top Film Noir - 19/3/2009 4:54:20 PM   
rick_7


Posts: 6151
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: The internet
quote:

ORIGINAL: elab49

Jasiri guessed that one earlier when I mentioned the preponderance of characters with violent fathers. You've got at least a couple there that will be top 10

You've also made a very astute guess in there about what is coming next -while also including a film which I accept many will see as a glaring omission from this list, but which I simply don't like. You can add it to those 2 shining examples of awful films you mention above.

I do, however, like Crossfire. It is one of the Mitchum performances I enjoy most. But I sat down at the start of this and made some decisions about where I'd draw the film noir line (balanced by favourite films) and it fell the other side. I find No Way Out pretty interesting too, and I love the anecdote about Widmark going over to apologise to Poitier after their scenes, before they became fast friends.

The reference to Act of Violence in your review is interesting. I was so disappointed it squandered such an amazing build-up, trying too hard with the scenes of nightmarish wandering.



Sorry, should really have read all the comments, but time's short today, so just looked at your reviews. Yeah, I was disappointed with the second half of Act of Violence too, though Mary Astor's brilliant performance helped. Looking forward to whatever's up next!

_____________________________

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Blog: DJANGO! DUMBO! DESPICABLE ME 2! Plus: other stuff.

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(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 107
RE: My Top Film Noir - 19/3/2009 6:33:11 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54583
Joined: 1/10/2005
quote:

ORIGINAL: MOTH

good stuff elab, my Lovefilm list has just been extended. Hope you don't give too much praise to Laura and champion Where the Sidewalk Ends instead (starring Liverpool's Xabi Alonso!)


I am a fan of Where the Sidewalk Ends.

And Laura.

_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to MOTH)
Post #: 108
RE: My Top Film Noir - 23/3/2009 3:23:15 PM   
Jasiri


Posts: 2496
Joined: 23/10/2005
quote:

ORIGINAL: elab49

quote:

ORIGINAL: rick_7

Got to say I think you're giving Crossfire a raw deal, it's a classic to match It's a Wonderful Life, or Brigadoon.  So what's next? I was thinking Force of Evil, but Polonsky was just blacklisted, he wasn't one of the 10. Something by Dalton Trumbo? Or Laura? This Gun for Hire? I don't know much about Adrian Scott, but he produced a couple of the Dick Powell noirs, Wikipedia tells me. Hoping Moonrise will crop up somewhere, that'd be in my top five, probably with Cry Danger, Out of the Past, Fallen Angel and something else.


Jasiri guessed that one earlier when I mentioned the preponderance of characters with violent fathers. You've got at least a couple there that will be top 10

You've also made a very astute guess in there about what is coming next -while also including a film which I accept many will see as a glaring omission from this list, but which I simply don't like. You can add it to those 2 shining examples of awful films you mention above.



I'm hoping this is Fallen Angel.The plot is just ridiculous,a big disappointment.

(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 109
RE: My Top Film Noir - 23/3/2009 3:25:21 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54583
Joined: 1/10/2005
Nope - I agree with you on the film, though. Not a film I like.

_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to Jasiri)
Post #: 110
RE: My Top Film Noir - 23/3/2009 3:50:27 PM   
Jasiri


Posts: 2496
Joined: 23/10/2005
Oh well least it's not going to be on your list then.I suppose 'glaring omission' suggests something much better known and narrows it down.Doubt it's Force of Evil or even more unlikely Out of the Past so I'm thinking the other Otto Preminger film mentioned.

(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 111
RE: My Top Film Noir - 23/3/2009 3:55:08 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
quote:

ORIGINAL: Jasiri

Oh well least it's not going to be on your list then.I suppose 'glaring omission' suggests something much better known and narrows it down.Doubt it's Force of Evil or even more unlikely Out of the Past so I'm thinking the other Otto Preminger film mentioned.


I think it actually is one of those two. I think Laura is a cert to be in. I'll go with Out of the Past as the one that's missing.

(in reply to Jasiri)
Post #: 112
RE: My Top Film Noir - 23/3/2009 3:59:50 PM   
Professor Moriarty

 

Posts: 10381
Joined: 6/10/2005
From: the waters of Casablanca

quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

quote:

ORIGINAL: Jasiri

Oh well least it's not going to be on your list then.I suppose 'glaring omission' suggests something much better known and narrows it down.Doubt it's Force of Evil or even more unlikely Out of the Past so I'm thinking the other Otto Preminger film mentioned.


I think it actually is one of those two. I think Laura is a cert to be in. I'll go with Out of the Past as the one that's missing.


I don't think she likes it that much.

I'm going for a film that others will argue is not a noir

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 113
RE: My Top Film Noir - 23/3/2009 4:09:08 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
Which one would some people not class as noir?

If this turns into a debate about genre I'm going to weep.

(in reply to Professor Moriarty)
Post #: 114
RE: My Top Film Noir - 23/3/2009 4:11:49 PM   
Jasiri


Posts: 2496
Joined: 23/10/2005
quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

quote:

ORIGINAL: Jasiri

Oh well least it's not going to be on your list then.I suppose 'glaring omission' suggests something much better known and narrows it down.Doubt it's Force of Evil or even more unlikely Out of the Past so I'm thinking the other Otto Preminger film mentioned.


I think it actually is one of those two. I think Laura is a cert to be in. I'll go with Out of the Past as the one that's missing.


That would definitely be a glaring omission,say it isn't so Elab.Although if The Killers is #1,or even there abouts I could forgive anything else being missing.

quote:

ORIGINAL: Professor Moriarty

I'm going for a film that others will argue is not a noir


quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

Which one would some people not class as noir?

If this turns into a debate about genre I'm going to weep.


Laura

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 115
RE: My Top Film Noir - 23/3/2009 4:11:56 PM   
Professor Moriarty

 

Posts: 10381
Joined: 6/10/2005
From: the waters of Casablanca
My money is on *gun shot* ugghhh ahhhhh eeeeek *dies pointing to The Night of the Hunter*

(in reply to rawlinson)
Post #: 116
RE: My Top Film Noir - 23/3/2009 4:16:02 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
quote:

ORIGINAL: Jasiri

quote:

ORIGINAL: Professor Moriarty

I'm going for a film that others will argue is not a noir


quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

Which one would some people not class as noir?

If this turns into a debate about genre I'm going to weep.


Laura



I thought he meant other than the three that were first mentioned.

(in reply to Jasiri)
Post #: 117
RE: My Top Film Noir - 23/3/2009 4:22:47 PM   
elab49


Posts: 54583
Joined: 1/10/2005
quote:

ORIGINAL: Professor Moriarty

My money is on *gun shot* ugghhh ahhhhh eeeeek *dies pointing to The Night of the Hunter*


Interesting. It is certainly in my first run through of greatest films. But do I call it a noir?

This isn't related to the point above - which does include the one I don't include, although, at least, I meet one of Jasiri's forgiveness criteria - but have I mentioned before that I decided not to include  Hitchcock?

_____________________________

Lips Together and Blow - blogtasticness and Glasgow Film Festival GFF13!

quote:

ORIGINAL: Deviation] LIKE AMERICA'S SWEETHEARTS TOO. IT MADE ME LAUGH A LOT AND THOUGHT IT WAS WITTY. ALSO I FEEL SLOWLY DYING INSIDE. I KEEP AGREEING WITH ELAB.


Annual Poll 2013 - All Lists Welcome

(in reply to Professor Moriarty)
Post #: 118
RE: My Top Film Noir - 23/3/2009 4:33:00 PM   
Jasiri


Posts: 2496
Joined: 23/10/2005
Nothing unusual but I'm getting confused. Least I think I can take it The Killers is highly placed.

(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 119
RE: My Top Film Noir - 23/3/2009 4:35:03 PM   
rawlinson

 

Posts: 45002
Joined: 13/6/2008
From: Timbuktu. Chinese or Fictional.
quote:

ORIGINAL: elab49

This isn't related to the point above - which does include the one I don't include,


So it is one of Laura, Out of the Past or Force of Evil? I'm sticking with Out of the Past.

quote:

  but have I mentioned before that I decided not to include  Hitchcock?


Because you could fill up the top 10 with Hitch' alone?

(in reply to elab49)
Post #: 120
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