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The Last Classic I Watched... - 6/6/2008 11:09:33 PM   
m_er


Posts: 3956
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Istanpool
Write a short review, and tell us how the film was for you. All the positve and negative sides as well.

< Message edited by m_er -- 13/7/2013 10:47:57 AM >


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Post #: 1
The kid - 7/6/2008 12:32:00 AM   
TRM


Posts: 4797
Joined: 20/10/2006
From: Bristol
Seems like a decent idea. It should encourage me to seek out classics other people have really liked. Ok so that last 'classic' i watched was : -

The kid (Chaplin, 1921) - The story follows Chaplin (playing his famous role of 'the tramp') who becomes the father of an orphan by complete accident. Without ruining any of the plot (hopefully) the film develops showing the tramp who has trained his son to destory windows, before the tramp then comes by with a new pane of glass to replace the broken window pane (and make some money in the process).

The positives - One of Chaplin's most touching films (possibly only behind City lights) whilst still keeping a good level of slapstick comedy. The acting by Chaplin is up to the standard which i have become accustomed to in his later films and he is joined by a brilliant performance by the young Jackie Coogan.

The negatives - Well i don't think there was much to be criticised to be honest. The ending was possibly a little bit abrupt, but this was afterall Chaplin's first feature length film and this is something which he did get better with in his later films. Another minor point is that there are perhaps not as many memorable moments in this film as some of his other classics (well it has been a couple of days since i watched it and i can only remember a few key set pieces whereas i could still mention quite a few from City lights which i watched a few months ago) but this is of course a very minor thing.

Overall i think this rightly ranks down amongst Chaplin's finest films as well as one of the best films of the silent era. A good solid 9/10 and i would happily recommend it to anyone.

(Is this the kind of review you wanted m_er? If im missing something i don't mind editing my post)

< Message edited by TRM -- 7/6/2008 12:38:04 AM >


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Post #: 2
RE: The kid - 7/6/2008 8:43:57 AM   
m_er


Posts: 3956
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Istanpool
quote:

ORIGINAL: TRM

Seems like a decent idea. It should encourage me to seek out classics other people have really liked. Ok so that last 'classic' i watched was : -

The kid (Chaplin, 1921) - The story follows Chaplin (playing his famous role of 'the tramp') who becomes the father of an orphan by complete accident. Without ruining any of the plot (hopefully) the film develops showing the tramp who has trained his son to destory windows, before the tramp then comes by with a new pane of glass to replace the broken window pane (and make some money in the process).

The positives - One of Chaplin's most touching films (possibly only behind City lights) whilst still keeping a good level of slapstick comedy. The acting by Chaplin is up to the standard which i have become accustomed to in his later films and he is joined by a brilliant performance by the young Jackie Coogan.

The negatives - Well i don't think there was much to be criticised to be honest. The ending was possibly a little bit abrupt, but this was afterall Chaplin's first feature length film and this is something which he did get better with in his later films. Another minor point is that there are perhaps not as many memorable moments in this film as some of his other classics (well it has been a couple of days since i watched it and i can only remember a few key set pieces whereas i could still mention quite a few from City lights which i watched a few months ago) but this is of course a very minor thing.

Overall i think this rightly ranks down amongst Chaplin's finest films as well as one of the best films of the silent era. A good solid 9/10 and i would happily recommend it to anyone.

(Is this the kind of review you wanted m_er? If im missing something i don't mind editing my post)


Perfectly done TRM. Yup, this is what I wanted to accomplish when I opened this subject. The reviews here should encourage film fans to view more classics, plus get an idea how other think about classics and so !! 

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Post #: 3
Review: The Third Man - 7/6/2008 12:02:35 PM   
Dantes Inferno


Posts: 5887
Joined: 27/10/2007
From: Norway
Great idea! I'm going to try to hang more in this forum so I can get some more knowledge on the Golden Oldies, so this thread is just perfect for me. I even got a review:

* * * CONTAINS PLOT SPOILERS * * *

THE THIRD MAN
Year: 1949
Directed by: Carol Reed
Written by: Graham Greene
Starring: Joseph Cotten, Alida Valli, Orson Welles, Trevor Howard



Quite possibly the finest non-auteur film ever made, The Third Man is a product which success lays in the sum of its parts, and not in the hands of a single individual. Carol Reed's offbeat camera shots, Graham Green's pulsating story, an excellent cast (with a show-stealing Orson Welles) and one of the most memorable scores ever produced: all equally important ingredients in the meal that is anything but "just a thriller".

The film revolves around a group of characters, some visible, some hiding in the darkness of Vienna's powerless street lights. Guiding our story is the pulp writer Holly Martins, who have arrived in the war-torn Austrian city on the behalf of his friend Harry Lime. However, as it turns out, Lime was killed in a traffic accident, and Holly's stay changes the minute he walks into his hotel. He finds himself a popular talking partner to many a person, some of them turning out to have known Lime very well. However, as he questions them on his friend's demise, Holly finds out that their stories doesn't quite match up, with the prime evidence being the fact that a porter who saw the accident claims there was "a third man"; someone who helped the lowlife baron Kurtz and the Romanian Popescu, carry Lime's body out of the road and to a statue in the city market. Both of them are suspicious characters, with Popescu seeming to have gained the Superman-like ability to enter and leave Vienna at breckneck speeds. It is interesting to note that all the people Holly meets share the same notion, in the sense that they are all unwilling to let him find out what we all know must be the real truth. It is ironic that their attempts to make Holly forget actually makes him (and us) more curious, leading the way into the labyrinthine plot.

Holly himself is as far from an auteur, and he knows it, frequently referring to himself as a hack writer. He is constantly questioned about his work, but he seems vaguely interested at best. Realizing that the story he finds himself is much more interesting than the ones he writes himself, Holly throws himself head-first into a mess he never should have entered. As pretty much every film buff in the world is aware of, The Third Man is of course Harry Lime, and he is no more than dead than any of the other characters (save for the porter, who was killed in an act which finds the plot propelling its mystery even more).

It is of course a given that Holly is in a world he doesn't belong in. Surrounded by tall buildings with giant-like shadows and people talking a language he can't possibly even begin to understand (clearly underlined in a scene which find him hopelessly trying to recite a stage-play), Holly really should have gone back to America. Then again, if he did, we might not have gotten this film, and then we would have been very sorry indeed.

It is interesting to see that even when Harry Lime is exposed for the hardened criminal he is, our sympathies still remain on his side, much thanks to the charming performance of Orson Welles. In the end, Holly finds himself watching his friend's funeral for the second time, and he has not wisened one bit. He may have served the law, but for what purpose? It is clear that it doesn't give him satisfaction. In that sense, The Third Man may be a film which main theme lays in loyalty, and the price one pays for breaking that loyalty.

VERDICT:
Its characters may not get what they want, but they same cannot be said for the audience of this magnificent film. Endlessly watchable and morally challenging, The Third Man is the best story Holly Martins never wrote. 9/10


< Message edited by Dantes Inferno -- 7/6/2008 1:59:37 PM >


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Post #: 4
Review: The Miracle Worker - 7/6/2008 5:22:20 PM   
El Becks


Posts: 995
Joined: 10/1/2006
From: a land that time forgot
The Miracle Worker [1962]
 
Just finished watching this moving film, which is the true story of Helen Keller and Annie Sullivan.  As a young girl, Helen Keller (Patty Duke) is stricken with scarlet fever. The illness leaves her blind, mute, and deaf.  Helen cannot communicate with anyone, nor anyone with her. Often frustrated and desperate, Helen flies into uncontrollable rages and tantrums that terrify her hopeless family. The gifted teacher Annie Sullivan (Anne Bancroft) comes to help Helen understand the world from which she is isolated.  Both Bancroft and Duke give absolutely fantastic Oscar-winning performances.  I cried buckets.

< Message edited by El Becks -- 7/6/2008 5:24:21 PM >


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RE: Review: The Miracle Worker - 7/6/2008 6:21:46 PM   
TRM


Posts: 4797
Joined: 20/10/2006
From: Bristol
I dont think ive even heard of that film before. Your review makes it sound like it might be worth checking out.

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Post #: 6
RE: Review: The Miracle Worker - 7/6/2008 6:39:22 PM   
El Becks


Posts: 995
Joined: 10/1/2006
From: a land that time forgot
You can get the DVD for £3.99 from play.com.  It is a lovely film; have plenty of kleenex handy.

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Post #: 7
RE: Review: The Third Man - 9/6/2008 12:31:38 PM   
Professor Moriarty

 

Posts: 10126
Joined: 6/10/2005
From: the waters of Casablanca
quote:

ORIGINAL: Dantes Inferno

THE THIRD MAN
Year: 1949
Directed by: Carol Reed
Written by: Graham Greene
Starring: Joseph Cotten, Alida Valli, Orson Welles, Trevor Howard



Quite possibly the finest non-auteur film ever made, The Third Man is a product which success lays in the sum of its parts, and not in the hands of a single individual. Carol Reed's offbeat camera shots, Graham Green's pulsating story, an excellent cast (with a show-stealing Orson Welles) and one of the most memorable scores ever produced: all equally important ingredients in the meal that is anything but "just a thriller".

VERDICT:
Its characters may not get what they want, but they same cannot be said for the audience of this magnificent film. Endlessly watchable and morally challenging, The Third Man is the best story Holly Martins never wrote. 9/10



To me, relatively "disappointing" on the first viewing when I was expecting Harry Lime to be a main character, there from the get go.  Subsequent viewings do the film greater justice each time.  imo its a masterpiece.   I also have a more metaphysical take on Anna and Trevor, being two-sides of Holly's conscience on whether he should betray a friend, no matter how bad that friend's actions or not.  Anyway, that's my rambling and without that its still a well shot, well written, well acted masterpiece 5/5

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Post #: 8
RE: The Last Classic I Watched... - 18/6/2008 4:30:07 PM   
m_er


Posts: 3956
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Istanpool
How Green Was My Valley
Year: 1941
Director : John Ford


“HOW GREEN WAS MY VALLEY”.
As a standard film lover, who doesn’t know much about the actors’ or directors’ backgrounds, and their past films or so, sat there, scratching my chin, hmmmm, not knowing what to see/expect. I sat there, watched it and I must say out loud explicitly that loved it! It is a film for me that I can watch it over and over. This is one of the films that should be seen once in a while for it warms your heart, gives you a rib-cracking hug, makes you feel warm all over. So moving, so gripping, so real. A film about life and death, family and separation, religion and social life.  


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Post #: 9
RE: Review: The Third Man - 18/6/2008 5:54:48 PM   
Dantes Inferno


Posts: 5887
Joined: 27/10/2007
From: Norway

quote:

ORIGINAL: Professor Moriarty

To me, relatively "disappointing" on the first viewing when I was expecting Harry Lime to be a main character, there from the get go. Subsequent viewings do the film greater justice each time.  imo its a masterpiece. I also have a more metaphysical take on Anna and Trevor, being two-sides of Holly's conscience on whether he should betray a friend, no matter how bad that friend's actions or not. Anyway, that's my rambling and without that its still a well shot, well written, well acted masterpiece 5/5


That's a great theory, Moriarty! Didn't think of that at all. I will definitely watch this film again with that in mind.

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Post #: 10
RE: Review: The Third Man - 18/6/2008 5:58:01 PM   
Piles


Posts: 5545
Joined: 6/8/2007
From: Whalley Range
quote:

ORIGINAL: Dantes Inferno

Great idea! I'm going to try to hang more in this forum so I can get some more knowledge on the Golden Oldies, so this thread is just perfect for me. I even got a review:

* * * CONTAINS PLOT SPOILERS * * *

THE THIRD MAN
Year: 1949
Directed by: Carol Reed
Written by: Graham Greene
Starring: Joseph Cotten, Alida Valli, Orson Welles, Trevor Howard



Quite possibly the finest non-auteur film ever made, The Third Man is a product which success lays in the sum of its parts, and not in the hands of a single individual. Carol Reed's offbeat camera shots, Graham Green's pulsating story, an excellent cast (with a show-stealing Orson Welles) and one of the most memorable scores ever produced: all equally important ingredients in the meal that is anything but "just a thriller".

The film revolves around a group of characters, some visible, some hiding in the darkness of Vienna's powerless street lights. Guiding our story is the pulp writer Holly Martins, who have arrived in the war-torn Austrian city on the behalf of his friend Harry Lime. However, as it turns out, Lime was killed in a traffic accident, and Holly's stay changes the minute he walks into his hotel. He finds himself a popular talking partner to many a person, some of them turning out to have known Lime very well. However, as he questions them on his friend's demise, Holly finds out that their stories doesn't quite match up, with the prime evidence being the fact that a porter who saw the accident claims there was "a third man"; someone who helped the lowlife baron Kurtz and the Romanian Popescu, carry Lime's body out of the road and to a statue in the city market. Both of them are suspicious characters, with Popescu seeming to have gained the Superman-like ability to enter and leave Vienna at breckneck speeds. It is interesting to note that all the people Holly meets share the same notion, in the sense that they are all unwilling to let him find out what we all know must be the real truth. It is ironic that their attempts to make Holly forget actually makes him (and us) more curious, leading the way into the labyrinthine plot.

Holly himself is as far from an auteur, and he knows it, frequently referring to himself as a hack writer. He is constantly questioned about his work, but he seems vaguely interested at best. Realizing that the story he finds himself is much more interesting than the ones he writes himself, Holly throws himself head-first into a mess he never should have entered. As pretty much every film buff in the world is aware of, The Third Man is of course Harry Lime, and he is no more than dead than any of the other characters (save for the porter, who was killed in an act which finds the plot propelling its mystery even more).

It is of course a given that Holly is in a world he doesn't belong in. Surrounded by tall buildings with giant-like shadows and people talking a language he can't possibly even begin to understand (clearly underlined in a scene which find him hopelessly trying to recite a stage-play), Holly really should have gone back to America. Then again, if he did, we might not have gotten this film, and then we would have been very sorry indeed.

It is interesting to see that even when Harry Lime is exposed for the hardened criminal he is, our sympathies still remain on his side, much thanks to the charming performance of Orson Welles. In the end, Holly finds himself watching his friend's funeral for the second time, and he has not wisened one bit. He may have served the law, but for what purpose? It is clear that it doesn't give him satisfaction. In that sense, The Third Man may be a film which main theme lays in loyalty, and the price one pays for breaking that loyalty.

VERDICT:
Its characters may not get what they want, but they same cannot be said for the audience of this magnificent film. Endlessly watchable and morally challenging, The Third Man is the best story Holly Martins never wrote. 9/10





I kind of like this film. A little.

Glad to see you do too!

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Post #: 11
RE: Review: The Third Man - 18/6/2008 6:14:43 PM   
Dantes Inferno


Posts: 5887
Joined: 27/10/2007
From: Norway
Has it reached your personal top, Piles?

Okay, new review. Probably my shortest yet.

12 Angry Men
Year: 1957
Directed by: Sidney Lumet
Written by: Reginald Rose
Starring: Henry Fonda, Martin Balsam, John Fiedler, Lee J. Cobb, E.G. Marshall, Jack Klugman, Ed Binns, Jack Warden



In theory, 12 Angry Men should be one of the most un-watchable films ever made. Just picture the face of your ignorant friend as you tell him it's in black and white, has no action, no explosions, is all talking, and to round it up: takes place in one single room. Oh yes, there are more ways than the Hitchcockian way to scare a person.Of all the Oldies I have yet seen lately, 12 Angry Men is unquestionably the most enjoyable. In fact, for anyone wanting to get into the B&W classics, you could do a whole lot worse than this film. Isn't that ironic?


< Message edited by Dantes Inferno -- 18/6/2008 6:15:08 PM >


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Post #: 12
RE: Review: The Third Man - 19/6/2008 2:07:39 PM   
Professor Moriarty

 

Posts: 10126
Joined: 6/10/2005
From: the waters of Casablanca
quote:

ORIGINAL: Dantes Inferno


quote:

ORIGINAL: Professor Moriarty

To me, relatively "disappointing" on the first viewing when I was expecting Harry Lime to be a main character, there from the get go. Subsequent viewings do the film greater justice each time.  imo its a masterpiece. I also have a more metaphysical take on Anna and Trevor, being two-sides of Holly's conscience on whether he should betray a friend, no matter how bad that friend's actions or not. Anyway, that's my rambling and without that its still a well shot, well written, well acted masterpiece 5/5


That's a great theory, Moriarty! Didn't think of that at all. I will definitely watch this film again with that in mind.


Thanks I'd be interested to see if you think it stands up.


The Cabinet of Dr Caligari
 


 
I've been meaning to get round to this film for some time.  Though I used to call it Cagliari, so probably just as well I didn't try to get it earlier else I'd have spent my time looking for a wardrobe somewhere in Italy.    I've only seen a handful of silent films (a couple of Murnau's, Chaplin, Buster Keaton, etc.) so I was interested to see how this would hold up, but I'd been putting it off for three reasons:
- I read the article in Empire a couple of months back, so was waiting till I'd forgotten the spoilers I read there
- the last silent film I watched was Sunrise, a film so captivating and well told that I'd completely forgotten there was no dialogue in it, I wasn't sure how well the next film would hold up in comparison
- I'm not really a fan of the horror genre

Well turn's out the last obstacle wasn't really a problem after all, as in my head I'd misapproriated the film, it might be psychologically intriguing, but its no horror film by any measure.  What it is is quite an interesting tale with something of a twist at the end.  What I liked most about the film was the character of Caligari and the brilliant expressionist sets, which are probably as uniquely identifiable as Welles' interpretation of Kafka's The Trial some 40-odd years later.  What I didn't really like about it was the acting, and I actually thought the film worked better without the twist. 

As I said I've not seen a lot of films from this vintage to be able to compare Caligari well.  I'm glad I saw it, but won't be rushing back for a rewatch any time soon.  3/5


< Message edited by Professor Moriarty -- 19/6/2008 2:16:17 PM >

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Post #: 13
RE: Review: The Third Man - 19/6/2008 8:34:27 PM   
Dantes Inferno


Posts: 5887
Joined: 27/10/2007
From: Norway

quote:

ORIGINAL: Professor Moriarty

quote:

ORIGINAL: Dantes Inferno


quote:

ORIGINAL: Professor Moriarty

To me, relatively "disappointing" on the first viewing when I was expecting Harry Lime to be a main character, there from the get go. Subsequent viewings do the film greater justice each time.  imo its a masterpiece. I also have a more metaphysical take on Anna and Trevor, being two-sides of Holly's conscience on whether he should betray a friend, no matter how bad that friend's actions or not. Anyway, that's my rambling and without that its still a well shot, well written, well acted masterpiece 5/5


That's a great theory, Moriarty! Didn't think of that at all. I will definitely watch this film again with that in mind.


Thanks I'd be interested to see if you think it stands up.


Well, duh.

I'm actually looking forward to re-watching all these films I've been starting to explore. Although I love discovering movies, I am even more appreciative of the act of seeing them again. That way, all the expectetations are gone and I can just sit down and enjoy the movie. And that is when these movies become part of my favorites-list.

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RE: Review: The Third Man - 20/6/2008 8:06:06 AM   
Jasiri


Posts: 2496
Joined: 23/10/2005
There's already a long running thread for this Return of the Golden Oldies.

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Post #: 15
RE: Review: The Third Man - 25/6/2008 11:35:42 AM   
m_er


Posts: 3956
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Istanpool
The 400 Blows (1959, Truffaut)  7/10
The General (1927, Bruckman/ Keaton) 9/10
Kind Hearts And Coronets (1949, Hamer) 8/10
The Seventh Seal (1957, Bergman) 10/10
Sunrise: A Song Of Two Humans (1927, Murnau) 8/10
The Third Man (1949, Reed) 8/10

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Post #: 16
RE: Review: The Third Man - 12/9/2008 12:24:27 AM   
Tank Boy


Posts: 203
Joined: 24/7/2008
From: Dublin, Ireland
Hitchcock's The 39 Steps (because it was free with The Sunday Times and I had never seen it before). Was probably expecting too much, seeing as how it's considered a classic, but it's still great stuff.

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Post #: 17
RE: The Last Classic I Watched... - 15/9/2008 10:28:06 AM   
scarface666brooksy!!


Posts: 3543
Joined: 24/10/2007
From: The Valley of the Wind
Point Blank with Lee Marvin. Not as good as I expected but worth the watch I guess 6/10

< Message edited by scarface666brooksy!! -- 1/10/2008 5:59:53 AM >


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Post #: 18
RE: The Last Classic I Watched... - 17/10/2008 8:19:11 PM   
fairyprincess

 

Posts: 158
Joined: 26/9/2008
saw casablanca for the first time last night.  it's brilleant, obviously. what i really like though was that it's not a film  where the guy get the girl or that the main characters are a polarized moral compass. casablanca is about the chain of events that take one man from a morally gray path. and that, is worth a hill of bean's in this crazy world.


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Post #: 19
RE: The Last Classic I Watched... - 18/10/2008 2:11:08 AM   
Squidward Hark Bugle

 

Posts: 9407
Joined: 17/10/2007
From: Splashed
Fantasia, the greatest film of the 1940s.

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Post #: 20
RE: The Last Classic I Watched... - 20/10/2008 6:38:43 PM   
The Waco Kid

 

Posts: 387
Joined: 30/9/2005


imdb link

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0039842/

At the moment i am currently trying to build a complete John Mills collection ( i have about 35-40 % of his films)
never saw this one but its one of those films that grabs your attention from the word go.


SPOILERS 

The film starts with john mills as an old man walking throught he streets as war has been declared over.
he walks into the local town hall and looks up at a picture of himself as town mayor.
the film then flits back to the begining of him starting his political career.
he helps a woman out getting a job and she in return sets him up so she can marry him.
It later turns out that all she wanted was to get her old house back and money.
she is also responsible for the death of his son.
of course he divorces her and years later they meet up again when she has another son who falls in love with a young lady that his best friend adopted.
the rest of it i won't spoil.
its a great film and well worth viewing if you can find a copy.



< Message edited by The Waco Kid -- 20/10/2008 6:39:58 PM >
Post #: 21
RE: The Last Classic I Watched... - 26/10/2008 7:42:47 PM   
The Scientist


Posts: 46
Joined: 26/10/2008
Mildred Pierce

This film is about a woman's relationship with her daughter.  It has excellent performances, especially from Joan Crawford (rewarded with an Oscar) and an enthralling story.  Superior entertainment that stays in the memory.

< Message edited by The Scientist -- 26/10/2008 7:44:17 PM >


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RE: Review: The Third Man - 28/10/2008 11:12:09 PM   
Rinc


Posts: 12813
Joined: 2/10/2005
From: A park bench, with a newspaper quilt

quote:

ORIGINAL: Dantes Inferno

In theory, 12 Angry Men should be one of the most un-watchable films ever made. Just picture the face of your ignorant friend as you tell him it's in black and white, has no action, no explosions, is all talking, and to round it up: takes place in one single room. Oh yes, there are more ways than the Hitchcockian way to scare a person.Of all the Oldies I have yet seen lately, 12 Angry Men is unquestionably the most enjoyable. In fact, for anyone wanting to get into the B&W classics, you could do a whole lot worse than this film. Isn't that ironic?



That's what i've always said about the film. Imagine trying to pitch it! But despite that it is brilliant and one of the most engrossing and enjoyable films to watch.

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Post #: 23
RE: Review: The Third Man - 29/10/2008 12:43:54 PM   
Deviation


Posts: 27284
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The Virgin Spring by Ingmar Bergman. Fantastic, that's all I have to say. Fantastic performance by Max Von Sydow, disturbingly violent and wonderfully made. A very sad film, at the same time simplistic in plot yet heavy on philosophy. Far lees small than The Seventh Seal, and possibly better and more athmospheric. Posibly the most emotional film Bergman has done. Was he really disappointed by it.

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There are certainly times where calling a person a cunt is not only reasonable, it is a gross understatement.

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I really wish I could go down to see Privates

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RE: Review: The Third Man - 31/10/2008 1:03:17 PM   
FGT


Posts: 246
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Snow White....

Still stunning animation.some of the artwork is a bit off....notably the Prince and Snow White herself. I hate musicals but, perhaps because of the age of them, the songs are ok. Classic is bandied about a lot nowadays but this film is a true classic and is worth watching. A completely enchanting piece of work

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RE: Review: The Third Man - 31/10/2008 1:24:57 PM   
rick_7


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quote:

ORIGINAL: FGT

I hate musicals but, perhaps because of the age of them, the songs are ok.

Which ones? All musicals?

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RE: Review: The Third Man - 4/11/2008 1:05:08 PM   
FGT


Posts: 246
Joined: 10/3/2008
quote:

Which ones? All musicals?


Pretty much....My Fair Lady and The Wizard of Oz are exceptions but as for Carousel, Hello Dolly, The King and I, Moulin Rouge, etc, etc. I would be happy to see them burned on a huge bonfire and all traces of them removed from the collective conciousness.

See what happens when you force a child to watch musicals..decades later the trauma is still there!

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RE: Review: The Third Man - 4/11/2008 1:15:37 PM   
Professor Moriarty

 

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They are fair points, but it misses out another load of films from the 30s musical heyday like:

Top Hat
Gold Diggers of 1935
42nd Street


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The Great Musical Debate - 4/11/2008 1:35:58 PM   
rick_7


Posts: 6151
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: The internet
Yes. FGT, you've succeeded in listing some terrible musicals, to which you might add The Sound of Music and Grease. But the musicals that you dislike seem to be either translated from the stage (usually rubbish) or modern (usually rubbish). As Holmes' brilliant nemesis points out, there are a lot of classic musicals worth your time and attention that were designed solely for the screen and are light, deft and brilliant for just that reason.
 
As well as Top Hat and a Busby Berkeley musical (I'd go for Gold Diggers of 1933 ahead of the Prof's two recommendations, because of the incredible closing production number, 'Remember My Forgotten Man', which chronicles the Great Depression in musical form - boy, is it good), try any of these: Love Me Tonight, The Merry Widow (Lubitsch version), Meet Me in St Louis, Stormy Weather (no plot, amazing numbers, including the legendary Nicholas Bros - stick "Nicholas Brothers Jumpin' Jive" into YouTube to see what Fred Astaire described as the greatest number ever filmed), Singin' in the Rain and The Band Wagon. And Dumbo and Bambi are classic Disney musicals. Of modern musicals, All That Jazz and Dancer in the Dark are pretty special, though they can't touch the films mentioned above.
 
Give some of them a go. Go on, please.

(I've cannily changed the thread title to lure people in.)

< Message edited by rick_7 -- 4/11/2008 1:37:44 PM >


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Recent Classics and The Great Musical Debate spinoff - 5/11/2008 11:11:36 AM   
FGT


Posts: 246
Joined: 10/3/2008
Drat and double drat..curse you both with your knwoledge of the cinema!!!
I forgot about those true classics. Fred and Ginger movies..Busby Berkley etc. Which is the one with Lullaby of Broadway in it? That number actually gives me goosebumps.  I should have said...I don't like most musicals of the 50s and 60s.

Basck to the topic..Watched Arsenic and old lace last night...still great fun

< Message edited by FGT -- 5/11/2008 11:15:52 AM >


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